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827 Electronic - General Resources

Misc. - Numbers

2D Layered Hybrid Perovskite Material Enhances Effectiveness for LEDs and Solar Cells
In the perpetual hunt for next generation high-efficiency LEDs and solar cells, researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory and their partners are developing ground-breaking 2D layered hybrid perovskites that allow higher level of freedom in designing and fabricating efficient optoelectronic devices.
March 10, 2017
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2D material's traits could send electronics research spinning in new directions
An international team of researchers, working at the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) and UC Berkeley, fabricated an atomically thin material and measured its exotic and durable properties that make it a promising candidate for a budding branch of electronics known as "spintronics."
June 26, 2017
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2D van der Waals heterostructures with tunable optical-electronic-magnetic coupling
Ever since the first demonstration of graphene in 2004, the scientific community has pursued the possibility of building man-made materials by artificial stacking of different ultrathin materials one on top of the other. These materials are called van der Waals heterostructures.
August 23, 2017
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3D solutions to energy savings in silicon power transistors
In electronics, lower power consumption leads to operation cost savings, environmental benefits and the convenience advantages from longer running devices. While progress in energy efficiencies has been reported with alternative materials such as SiC and GaN, energy-savings in the standard inexpensive and widely used silicon devices are still keenly sought.
December 6, 2016
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3D-printed decal electronics for the Internet-of-Everything
Printed electronics -- the application of printing technologies for the fabrication of electronic circuits and devices, increasingly on flexible plastic or paper substrates -- have been around for a while
October 17, 2016
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10 basic iOS tricks every iPhone owner should know
Brush up on the iOS basics, from snapping screenshots to typing letters with accent marks.
June 9, 2017
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30 billion transistors have been squeezed into a fingernail-sized chip using nano tech
The Research Alliance, a group based at the SUNY Nanocomplex in New York and led by IBM, have managed to develop 5nm transistors.
June 5, 2017
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1000 km range thanks to a new battery concept
You cannot get far today with electric cars. One reason is that the batteries require a lot of space. Fraunhofer scientists are stacking large cells on top of one another. This provides vehicles with more power. Initial tests in the laboratory have been positive. In the medium term, the project partners are striving to achieve a range of 1000 kilometers for electric vehicles.
May 17, 2017
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1000 times more efficient nano-LED opens door to faster microchips
The electronic data connections within and between microchips are increasingly becoming a bottleneck in the exponential growth of data traffic worldwide. Optical connections are the obvious successors but optical data transmission requires an adequate nanoscale light source, and this has been lacking.
February 2, 2017
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Misc. - A

A battery-inspired strategy for carbon fixation
Scientists working toward the elusive lithium-air battery discovered an unexpected approach to capturing and storing carbon dioxide away from the atmosphere. Using a design intended for a lithium-CO2 battery, researchers in Japan and China have developed a way to isolate solid carbon dust from gaseous carbon dioxide, with the potential to also separate out oxygen gas through the same method.
August 9, 2017
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A better battery: One-time pollutant may become valued product to aid wind, solar energy
Chemists at Oregon State University have discovered that one or more organic compounds in a family that traditionally has been known as pollutants could offer an important advance to make cheap, reliable batteries.
October 18, 2016
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A brand-new way to synthesize sodium-embedded carbon nanowalls for electrodes
A little sodium goes a long way. at least that's the case in carbon-based energy technology. Specifically, embedding sodium in carbon materials can tremendously improve electrodes.
December 20, 2016
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A breakthrough in 'dead layer' of antiferromagnet
Since the early 1930s when Louis Néel found the anomaly that some materials containing magnetic elements and showing zero remanence at all temperatures did not follow the paramagnetic Curie law, the constant low-temperature susceptibility behind this phenomenon which is called antiferromagnet (AFM) has drew tremendous attentions and found numerous applications, especially in the area of improved computer memory units.
July 18, 2017
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A complete waste of energy
Engineers develop process for electronic devices that stops wasteful power leakage
October 25, 2016
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A device that turns currents into electricity could make tidal energy a reality
There's no doubt that tidal power is severely lagging behind other forms of renewable energy like wind and solar power. However, as two-thirds of the Earth's surface is covered by water, we'd be crazy not to try and harness energy from water that's continuously in motion.
October 12, 2017
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A fast, non-destructive test for two-dimensional materials
By now it is well understood that thinning a material down to a single atom thickness can dramatically change that material's physical properties. Graphene, the best known 2D material, has unparalleled strength and electrical conductivity, unlike its bulk form as graphite.
April 28, 2017
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A flexible new platform for high-performance electronics
A team of University of Wisconsin--Madison engineers has created the most functional flexible transistor in the world -- and with it, a fast, simple and inexpensive fabrication process that's easily scalable to the commercial level.
September 28, 2017
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A flexible, stretchable, self-healing ionic conductor
Scientists, including several from the University of California, Riverside, have developed a transparent, self-healing, highly stretchable conductive material that can be electrically activated to power artificial muscles and could be used to improve batteries, electronic devices, and robots.
December 27, 2016
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A levitated nanosphere as an ultra-sensitive sensor
A tiny sphere and a laser beam inside of which it hovers as if by magic -- with these simple ingredients Martin Frimmer and co-workers at the Photonics Laboratory of ETH Zurich have developed a highly sensitive sensor. In the future this device is expected to measure, amongst other things, extremely weak forces or electric fields very precisely.
June 28, 2017
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A more fundamental approach to correlation
By efficiently modeling the fundamental quantum-physical interactions among electrons, RIKEN researchers have opened the door to a new field of computational physics for a technologically important class of materials.
April 21, 2017
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A multi-channel nano-optical device dramatically increases the parallel processing speed
Microprocessors play a pivotal role in computers and have steadily increased the speed of information processing over the past several decades. However, due to technical limitations such as heat generation due to integration, the processing speed of semiconductors has remained at several gigahertz (GHz) for the past decade.
March 17, 2017
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A multistable, shape-reconfigurable design for aluminum-air batteries
Researchers propose a new, multistable, shape-reconfigurable design combined with a battery packing concept -- which they term shape-reconfigurable batteries (SRBs) -- that leads to 2D and 3D polymorphed states, while preserving the electrochemical functionality.
August 14, 2017
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A nanotechnology approach to generating electricity from water evaporation
Water evaporation is a fundamental force of nature that biological systems use to convert energy generated from the evaporation of water confined within nanoscale compartments into muscle-like mechanical work in response to changes in environmental humidity.
February 21, 2017
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A new platform to study graphene's electronic properties
Graphene's unusual electronic structure enables this extraordinary material to break many records of strength, electricity and heat conduction. Physicists at the Center for Theoretical Physics of Complex Systems (PCS), in collaboration with the Research Institute for Standards and Science (KRISS), used a model to explain the electronic structure of graphene measured by a new spectroscopic platform.
February 13, 2017
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A new technique to measure the electronic structures of stacks of 2D materials
Gadgets are set to become flexible, highly efficient and much smaller, following a breakthrough in measuring two-dimensional materials by the University of Warwick.
February 16, 2017
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A non-toxic, high-quality surface treatment for organic field-effect transistors
In a development beneficial for both industry and environment, UC Santa Barbara researchers have created a high-quality coating for organic electronics that promises to decrease processing time as well as energy requirements.
October 18, 2016
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A novel method for the fabrication of active-matrix 3-D pressure sensors
A recent study, affiliated with UNIST has created a three-dimensional, tactile sensor that could detect wide pressure ranges from human body weight to a finger touch. this new sensor with transparent features is capable of generating an electrical signal based on the sensed touch actions, also, consumes far less electricity than conventional pressure sensors.
April 5, 2017
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A novel method for the synthesis of hexagonal boron nitride
A team of researchers from the Air Force Research Laboratory, Colorado School of Mines, and the Argonne National Laboratory in Illinois have developed a novel method for the synthesis of a composite material that has the potential of vastly improving the electronics used by the Air Force.
May 12, 2017
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A novel molybdenum-coated catalyst for efficient hydrogen production
A novel molybdenum-coated catalyst that can efficiently split water in acidic electrolytes is developed by researchers at KAUST and could help with efficient production of hydrogen.
June 6, 2017
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A novel semiconductor nanocomposite material that moves in response to light
A research team at Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) has developed a revolutionary, light-activated semiconductor nanocomposite material that can be used in a variety of applications, including microscopic actuators and grippers for surgical robots, light-powered micro-mirrors for optical telecommunications systems, and more efficient solar cells and photodetectors.
October 17, 2016
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A novel semiconductor nanofiber with superb charge conductivity
The Department of Mechanical Engineering of the Hong Kong Polytechnic University (PolyU) has developed a novel technology of embedding highly conductive nanostructure into semi-conductor nanofiber. the novel composite so produced has superb charge conductivity, and can therefore be widely applied, especially in environmental arena.
April 13, 2017
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A record photovoltaic effect observed in antiferroelectrics
The photovoltaic effect is the main physical and chemical principle behind every photovoltaic device, more popular known as a Solar Cell. It is characterized by the conversion of photons (from any artificial or natural light source like sunlight) into usable electrical energy. Modern photovoltaic devices have been intensively researched since the early days of the semiconductor transistor revolution (1940s) and nowadays they provide around 13% of the global renewable electric energy, a figure that will steadily increase to meet the COP21 directives.
October 3, 2016
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A reversible method for altering the electronic properties of a nanomaterial
A team of physicists has demonstrated a reversible method for altering the electronic properties of a nanoscopic material, pointing the way toward merging several hallmark functions of modern electronics into a single component (Physical Review Letters,"Writing Programmable Schottky Diodes in MoS2 Transistors via Nanoscale Ferroelectric Control").
June 7, 2017
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A revolution in lithium-ion batteries is becoming more realistic
The modern world relies on portable electronic devices such as smartphones, tablets, laptops, cameras or camcorders. Many of these devices are powered by lithium-ion batteries, which could be smaller, lighter, safer and more efficient if the liquid electrolytes they contain were replaced by solids. A promising candidate for a solid-state electrolyte is a new class of materials based on lithium compounds, presented by physicists from Switzerland and Poland.
September 5, 2017
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A seaweed derivative could be just what lithium-sulfur batteries need
Lithium-sulfur batteries have great potential as a low-cost, high-energy, energy source for both vehicle and grid applications. However, they suffer from significant capacity fading. Now scientists from the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) have made a surprising discovery that could fix this problem.
June 13, 2017
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A semiconductor that can beat the heat
A newly discovered collective rattling effect in a type of crystalline semiconductor blocks most heat transfer while preserving high electrical conductivity -- a rare pairing that scientists say could reduce heat buildup in electronic devices and turbine engines, among other possible applications.
July 31, 2017
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A skyrmion square dance
Tiny whirling magnetic patterns called skyrmions are attracting attention as potential data carriers in next-generation memory devices. RIKEN researchers have now discovered that a magnetic field can be used to switch a group of skyrmions between two different lattice arrangements, demonstrating the kind of control needed to develop such devices (Science Advances, "Skyrmion lattice structural transition in MnSi").
June 16, 2017
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A superior near-infrared organic light emitting diode
A breakthrough has been achieved at the London Centre for Nanotechnology, where researchers from the Marie Curie initial training network Organic Semiconductors for NIR Optoelectronics, alongside collaborators from Advent Technologies in Greece and from the University of Wuppertal have shown record external quantum efficiencies for diodes based on organic red/NIR oligomers free from heavy/toxic metals and combining electron-withdrawing moieties together with electron-donating ones, in a previously poorly studied "A-D-A" motif.
May 16, 2017
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A true random number generator based on solution-processed semiconducting carbon nanotubes
The generation of random numbers -- the generation of a sequence of numbers or symbols that cannot be reasonably predicted better than by a random chance -- usually is done through a random-number generator.
July 12, 2017
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A window into battery life for next-gen lithium cells
Dendrites, whiskers of lithium that grow inside batteries and can cause fires like those in the Samsung Galaxy Note 7, are the bane of next-generation lithium batteries.
October 19, 2016
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A zero-index waveguide
In 2015, researchers at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) developed the first on-chip metamaterial with a refractive index of zero, meaning that the phase of light could be stretched infinitely long. The metamaterial represented a new method to manipulate light and was an important step forward for integrated photonic circuits, which use light rather than electrons to perform a wide variety of functions.
October 9, 2017
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Acoustically actuated ultra-compact NEMS magnetoelectric antennas
Good things come in small packages. This is especially true in the world of portable wireless communications systems. Cell phones, wearables, and implantable electronics have shrunk over time, which has made them more useful in many cases. But a critical component of these devices--the antenna--hasn't followed suit. Researchers haven't been able to get them much smaller, until now.
August 29, 2017
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Active implants: How gold binds to silicone rubber
Ultra-thin and compliant electrodes are essential for flexible electronic parts. When it comes to medical implants, the challenge lays in the selection of the materials, which have to be biocompatible. Silicones were particularly promising for application in the human body because they resemble the surrounding human tissue in elasticity and resilience. Gold also poses an excellent electrical conductivity but does only weakly bind to silicone, which results in unstable structures.
June 13, 2017
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Adding hydrogen to graphene improves applicability in the semiconductor industry
Adding hydrogen to graphene could improve its future applicability in the semiconductor industry, when silicon leaves off. Researchers at the Center for Multidimensional Carbon Materials (CMCM), within the Institute for Basic Science (IBS) have recently gained further insight into this chemical reaction.
November 3, 2016
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Adding stress boosts performance, stability for fuel cells
A team from the Center for Functional Nanomaterials and universities in China and California designed a new fuel cell catalyst.
October 4, 2017
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Addition of Nanoparticles to Metals Could Result in Efficient and Reliable Manufacturing Processes
In an advance that could lead to improved manufacturing, a new study by UCLA researchers shows that adding nanoparticles to metals during the melting process allows for better control during melting.
January 19, 2017
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Additive manufacturing: a new twist for stretchable electronics?
Electronic components that can be elongated or twisted -- known as "stretchable" electronics -- could soon be used to power electronic gadgets, the onboard systems of vehicles, medical devices and other products. and a 3-D printing-like approach to manufacturing may help make stretchable electronics more prevalent, say researchers at Missouri University of Science and Technology.
January 3, 2017
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Advance in intense pulsed light sintering opens door to improved electronics manufacturing
Faster production of advanced, flexible electronics is among the potential benefits of a discovery by researchers at Oregon State University's College of Engineering.
December 22, 2016
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Advances in nanotechnology will give next-generation paper a whole new lease of digital life
The University of Surrey's Professor David Frohlich has won £1.17m funding from the Digital Economy programme, to research and develop paper materials that would allow readers to "interact' with printed materials like Harry Potter portraits.
May 19, 2017
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Advancing GaN-on-Silicon for scalable high electron mobility transistors
A team of researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign has advanced gallium nitride (GaN)-on-silicon transistor technology by optimizing the composition of the semiconductor layers that make up the device. Working with industry partners Veeco and IBM, the team created the high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) structure on a 200 mm silicon substrate with a process that will scale to larger industry-standard wafer sizes.
January 9, 2017
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Advancing molecular ferroelectric thin-film technologies
Recent progress in molecular ferroelectrics (MOFEs) has been overshadowed by the lack of high quality thin-films for device integration.
August 31, 2017
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Advancing the Field of Wearable Devices by Means of Flexible Batteries
The use of graphene in printed electronic devices has been the reason for rapid advancement in the field of wearable technology.
August 14, 2017
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All-Carbon, Spintronic Design Proposal Could Pave Way for Smaller, Better Performing Electronic Structures
A novel computing system made exclusively from carbon was designed by a Researcher with the Erik Jonsson School of Engineering and Computer Science at UT Dallas. This system might one day replace the silicon transistors that power existing electronic devices.
June 6, 2017
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An invisible electrode
Transparent conductors are one of the key elements of today's electronic and optoelectronic devices such as displays, light emitting diodes, photovoltaic cells, smart phones, etc. Most of the current technology is based on the use of the semiconductor Indium Tin Oxide (ITO) as a transparent conducting material.
December 20, 2016
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An ordered route to improved solar cell performance
Silicon is the dominant material in the production of solar cells. However, perovskites are catching up: they are cheap, flexible and have a promising light-to-electricity conversion efficiency. KAUST researchers are investigating the formation of these perovskites to better understand their properties and gain insight into the design of more efficient devices.
January 10, 2017
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An oxide semiconductor just single atom thick
A new study, affiliated with UNIST has introduced a novel method for fabrication of world™ thinnest oxide semiconductor that is just one atom thick. this may open up new possibilities for thin, transparent, and flexible electronic devices, such as ultra-small sensors.
February 8, 2017
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An ultrathin, transparent oxide thin-film transistors for wearable display
With the advent of the Internet of Things (IoT) era, strong demand has grown for wearable and transparent displays that can be applied to various fields such as augmented reality (AR) and skin-like thin flexible devices.
July 29, 2016
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Anomalously large charge transfer in an atomic layer cake of transition metal oxides
Along with the critically important goal of making the next generations of electronics devices ever smaller, designers and developers also strive for multi-functionality. Traditional semiconductor-based microelectronic devices exploit interfacial charge transfer between different materials to create and manipulate electronic and magnetic states.
December 6, 2016
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Art of paper-cutting inspires self-charging paper device
Despite the many advances in portable electronic devices, one thing remains constant: the need to plug them into a wall socket to recharge. now researchers, reporting in the journal ACS Nano ("Ultralight Cut-Paper-Based Self-Charging Power Unit for Self-Powered Portable Electronic and Medical Systems"), have developed a light-weight, paper-based device inspired by the Chinese and Japanese arts of paper-cutting that can harvest and store energy from body movements.
April 12, 2017
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Artificial leaf as mini-factory for drugs
To produce drugs sustainably and cheaply, anywhere you want. Whether in the middle of the jungle or even on Mars. a 'mini-factory' whereby sunlight can be captured to make chemical products. Inspired by the art of nature where leaves are able to collect enough sunlight to produce food, chemical engineers at Eindhoven University of Technology (TU/e) have presented such a scenario.
December 21, 2016
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Artificial photosynthesis steps into the light
Rice University scientists have created an efficient, simple-to-manufacture oxygen-evolution catalyst that pairs well with semiconductors for solar water splitting, the conversion of solar energy to chemical energy in the form of hydrogen and oxygen.
March 23, 2017
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Asphalt helps lithium batteries charge faster
A touch of asphalt may be the secret to high-capacity lithium metal batteries that charge 10 to 20 times faster than commercial lithium-ion batteries, according to Rice University scientists.
October 2, 2017
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Asphalt-Nanoribbon Anode is Efficient and Resistant to Dendrites
A touch of asphalt could be the secret to high-capacity lithium metal batteries that are capable of charging 10 to 20 times faster than commercial lithium-ion batteries, according to Rice University Scientists.
October 3, 2017
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Atomic discovery opens door to greener, faster, smaller electronic circuitry
A key step in unlocking the potential for greener, faster, smaller electronic circuitry was taken recently by a group of researchers led by UAlberta physicist Robert Wolkow.
July 26, 2017
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'Atomic sandwiches' could make computers 100X greener
Researchers have engineered a material that could lead to a new generation of computing devices, packing in more computing power while consuming a fraction of the energy that today's electronics require.
October 4, 2016
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Atomic-level sensors enable measurements of the electric field within a working semiconductor device
Semiconductors lie at the heart of many of the electronic devices that govern our daily lives. the proper functioning of semiconductor devices relies on their internally generated electric fields. Being able to measure these fields on the nanoscale is crucial for the development of next-generation electronics, but present techniques have been restricted to measurements of the electric field at a semiconductor's surface.
February 2, 2017
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Atomically thin layers bring spintronics closer to applications
University of Groningen scientists led by physics professor Bart van Wees have created a graphene-based device, in which electron spins can be injected and detected with unprecedented efficiency. The result is a hundredfold increase of the spin signal, big enough to be used in real life applications, such as new spin transistors and spin-based logic.
August 15, 2017
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Atomically thin layers of water hold promise for the energy storage of the future
Researchers at North Carolina State University have found that a material which incorporates atomically thin layers of water is able to store and deliver energy much more quickly than the same material that doesn't include the water layers.
April 28, 2017
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Avoiding printed 'coffee rings' with cellulose nanofibers
Drying is an important part of printing words and electronics. Particles suspended in liquid are applied to a surface and the liquid evaporates leaving the particles behind. Many times, the particles dry unevenly because of the so-called 'coffee ring effect'.
May 10, 2017
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Misc. - B

Back to the roots: Germanium outperforms silicon in energy efficient transistors with n- und p- conduction
A team of scientists from the Nanoelectronic Materials Laboratory (NaMLab gGmbH) and the Cluster of Excellence Center for Advancing Electronics Dresden (cfaed) at the Dresden University of Technology have demonstrated the world-wide first transistor based on germanium that can be programmed between electron- (n) and hole- (p) conduction.
February 3, 2017
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Batteries from scrap metal
Chinese scientists have made good use of waste while finding an innovative solution to a technical problem by transforming rusty stainless steel mesh into electrodes with outstanding electrochemical properties that make them ideal for potassium-ion batteries.
June 9, 2017
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Better cathode materials for lithium-sulphur-batteries
At present, lithium batteries are one of the best solutions for storing electrical power in a small space. Lithium ions in these batteries migrate from the anode to the opposite electrical pole, the cathode, during the discharge cycle. The anode and cathode generally consist of heavy-metal compounds that are expensive and toxic.
May 17, 2017
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Better living through pressure: Functional nanomaterials made easy
Using pressure instead of chemicals, nanoparticles have been fabricated into nanowire arrays similar to those that underlie touch-screens for phones, computers, TVs, and sensors. the pressure process takes nanoseconds instead of the hours required by industry's current chemical means, say investigators.
April 18, 2017
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Beyond graphene: Advances make reduced graphene oxide electronics feasible
Researchers at North Carolina State University have developed a technique for converting positively charged (p-type) reduced graphene oxide (rGO) into negatively charged (n-type) rGO, creating a layered material that can be used to develop rGO-based transistors for use in electronic devices.
March 30, 2017
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Beyond lithium-ion: Researchers reveal a safer, longer-lasting, solid-state battery alternative
Researchers have patented the solid-state batteries. the next step is finding battery makers to manufacture them.
March 3, 2017
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Bio-inspired graphene-based energy storage
Inspired by an American fern, researchers have developed a groundbreaking prototype that could be the answer to the storage challenge still holding solar back as a total energy solution
March 31, 2017
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Bioinspired memristor chips that see patterns over pixels
Inspired by how mammals see, a new "memristor" computer circuit prototype at the University of Michigan has the potential to process complex data, such as images and video orders of magnitude, faster and with much less power than today's most advanced systems.
May 22, 2017
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Biomimetic graphene aerogel could lead to flexible electronics
Versatile, light-weight materials that are both strong and resilient are crucial for the development of flexible electronics, such as bendable tablets and wearable sensors. Aerogels are good candidates for such applications, but until now, it's been difficult to make them with both properties.
June 21, 2017
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Body energy as a power source
Smartphones, MP3 players, sports electronics devices such as pulse meters or trackers, medical equipment such as tonometers, pacemakers of the heart, or insulin pumps: An increasing number of electronic companions make daily life easier for us. But as useful these smart helpers may be: Their constant hunger for electricity is a problem. The solution: power supply by means of energy produced by body movements.
October 2, 2017
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Body energy as a power source
Smartphones, MP3 players, sports electronics devices such as pulse meters or trackers, medical equipment such as tonometers, pacemakers of the heart, or insulin pumps: An increasing number of electronic companions make daily life easier for us. But as useful these smart helpers may be: Their constant hunger for electricity is a problem.
October 2, 2017
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Brain circuit enables split-second decisions when cues conflict
New findings shed light on how we quickly assess risks and rewards before acting
April 24, 2017
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Breaking the rules to make electricity from waste heat
In cage-structured compounds, the atoms surround a large open space that can be filled with other atoms or molecules, making these materials very useful in nature and for technologies. In nature, the atoms in these compounds (called clathrates) are always bonded to four other atoms. The bonds define the open volume in the cage.
June 27, 2017
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Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms in understanding heat transport
The precise control of electron transport in microelectronics makes complex logic circuits possible that are in daily use in smartphones and laptops.
February 17, 2017
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Bright future for self-charging batteries
New tech could one day make battery chargers obsolete
April 24, 2017
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Bright future for self-charging batteries
Who hasn't lived through the frustrating experience of being without a phone after forgetting to recharge it? this could one day be a thing of the past thanks to technology being developed by Hydro-Quebec and McGill University.
April 24, 2017
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Brighter Shine for LEDS with Picosun ALD
Picosun Oy, the leading provider of high quality Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) technology, enters into collaboration with Osram Opto Semiconductors and other partners to create a new generation of advanced LED lighting solutions.
February 13, 2017
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Bringing signals into phase
How we use and generate electricity has changed dramatically over the past century yet the basic components that control its flow remain remarkably similar. Researchers at KAUST have now developed a novel type of component that could improve the performance of electrical circuits.
September 26, 2017
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Bringing superconducting single-photon detectors in from the cold
A new form of compact cooling technology developed for space astronomy could pave the way for use of advanced superconducting detectors for better cancer treatments, driverless cars and practical quantum communications.
October 4, 2017
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Broadband light sources with liquid core
Researchers pumped a hybrid waveguide with an ultrafast, intense laser pulse and produced a very broad light spectrum in the near and mid-infrared range (1.1 \u00B5 to 2.7 \u00B5m) not visible to the human eye. Due to the unique characteristics of the liquid fiber core, the light pulse is broken up into solitons -- a multitude of light waves with different wavelengths.
July 28, 2017
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Bubble-Recoil Facilitates Cooling of Microchips Even in Space
The bubbles forming on a heated surface tend to create a tiny recoil when they leave it, similar to the kick from a gun shooting blanks.
March 7, 2017
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Building a better microbial fuel cell, using paper
Significant progress in developing microbial fuel cells has been made by scientists, which rely on bacteria to generate an electrical current, that are cheaper and more efficient.
February 6, 2017
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Built from the bottom up, nanoribbons pave the way to 'on-off' states for graphene
A new way to grow narrow ribbons of graphene, a lightweight and strong structure of single-atom-thick carbon atoms linked into hexagons, may address a shortcoming that has prevented the material from achieving its full potential in electronic applications. Graphene nanoribbons, mere billionths of a meter wide, exhibit different electronic properties than two-dimensional sheets of the material.
March 30, 2017
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Bumpy surfaces, graphene beat the heat in devices
Bumpy surfaces with graphene between would help dissipate heat in next-generation microelectronic devices, according to Rice University scientists.
November 29, 2016
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Bundles of Microtubes Developed by Peptides Convert Thermal Energy into Electrical Energy
Several proteins and peptides can naturally assemble themselves into slender, long fibers known as fibrils and other shapes. Researchers have now discovered a method to harness this feature in order to develop tubular structures of diphenylalanine that are capable of converting thermal energy into electrical energy, also known as a pyroelectric effect.
October 5, 2016
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Misc. - C

Carbon nanotube and graphene nano-chimneys can cool circuits
A few nanoscale adjustments may be all that is required to make graphene-nanotube junctions excel at transferring heat, according to Rice University scientists.
January 4, 2017
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Carbon nanotube electronic skins for motion detection
Researchers in China have developed piezoresistive electronic skins (E-skins) based on a composite of polymer and arrays of aligned few-walled carbon nanotubes (AFWCNTs, with diameter of 3-5 nm) that, enabled by the aligned carbon nanotubes, exhibited multiple advantages, such as simple device structure, high precision, fast response, excellent stability, and low power consumption.
June 7, 2017
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Carbon nanotubes couple light and matter
With their research on nanomaterials for optoelectronics, scientists from Heidelberg University and the University of St Andrews (Scotland) have succeeded for the first time to demonstrate a strong interaction of light and matter in semiconducting carbon nanotubes. Such strong light-matter coupling is an important step towards realising new light sources, such as electrically pumped lasers based on organic semiconductors.
November 15, 2016
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Carbon nanotubes self-assemble into tiny transistors
Carbon nanotubes can be used to make very small electronic devices, but they are difficult to handle. University of Groningen scientists, together with colleagues from the University of Wuppertal and IBM Zurich, have developed a method to select semiconducting nanotubes from a solution and make them self-assemble on a circuit of gold electrodes.
April 5, 2017
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Capture of Real-Time, Dynamic Visualizations of Atoms Helps Build Better Batteries
An unimaginably small reaction was captured by researchers in the Dionne lab, which is 18 feet below the Engineering Quad of Stanford University with one of the most enhanced microscopes in the world.
January 17, 2017
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Cells snack on nanowires
Phagocytosis draws in silicon strands, opening possible route to bioelectronics
December 16, 2016
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Characterizing Graphene's Properties Without Applying Disruptive Electrical Contacts
A new method for characterizing graphene's properties without the need for applying disruptive electrical contacts has been developed by Scientists. This new method allows Scientists to analyze both the quantum capacitance and resistance of graphene and other two-dimensional materials.
May 31, 2017
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Characterization of magnetic nanovortices simplified
Magnetic nanovortices, so-called "skyrmions", count among the most promising candidates for the future of information technology. Processors and storage media making use of these tiny structures could one day lead to the further miniaturization of IT devices and improve their energy efficiency significantly.
December 20, 2016
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Chemical route towards electronic devices in graphene
Essential electronic components, such as diodes and tunnel barriers, can be incorporated in single graphene wires (nanoribbons) with atomic precision. The goal is to create graphene-based electronic devices with extremely fast operational speeds. The discovery was made in a collaboration between Aalto University and their colleagues at Utrecht University and TU Delft in the Netherlands.
July 25, 2017
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Chemists teach computer program to model forces between atoms accurately
A team of researchers from MIPT, Skoltech, and Dukhov Research Institute of Automatics, led by Artem Oganov, used a machine learning technique to model the behavior of aluminum and uranium in the liquid and crystalline phases at various temperatures and pressures. Such simulations of chemical systems can predict their properties under a range of conditions before experiments are performed, enabling further work with only the most promising materials.
October 2, 2017
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Chip-sized, high-speed terahertz modulator raises possibility of faster data transmission
Tufts University engineers have invented a chip-sized, high-speed modulator that operates at terahertz (THz) frequencies and at room temperature at low voltages without consuming DC power. the discovery could help fill the "THz gap" that is limiting development of new and more powerful wireless devices that could transmit data at significantly higher speeds than currently possible.
January 19, 2017
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Chips Made of Layers Just Three Atoms Thick Could be the Future of Electronics
For more than 50 years, silicon chipmakers have developed innovative methods to switch electricity off and on, by producing the digital zeroes and ones to encode pictures, words, movies and other forms of data.
November 30, 2016
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Chiral metamaterial produces record optical shift under incremental power modulation
Georgia Institute of Technology researchers have demonstrated an optical metamaterial whose chiroptical properties in the nonlinear regime produce a significant spectral shift with power levels in the milliwatt range.
March 1, 2017
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Chiral quantum optics: a new research field with bright perspectives
Surprising direction-dependent effects emerge when light is guided in microscopic structures. this discovery shows promise for both classical and quantum information processing.
January 27, 2017
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Chong Liu one-ups plant photosynthesis
New system generates clean energy on the small scale
October 4, 2017
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Clarifying how lithium ions ferry around in rechargeable batteries
Although most of our electronic devices, like mobile phones, laptops and electric vehicles use lithium rechargeable batteries, what is going on inside them is not fully understood. Researchers from the Center for Molecular Spectroscopy and Dynamics, within the Institute for Basic Science (IBS) succeeded in observing in realtime the ultrafast dynamics of lithium ions with femtosecond time resolution (1/1,000,000,000,000,000 of a second).
March 28, 2017
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CNTs' Large Surface Area and Flexible Structure Produce Ultra-High Capacity Lithium-Air Batteries
Lithium-air batteries with extremely high electric storage capacity have been developed by a NIMS Research Team headed by Yoshimi Kubo and Akihiro Nomura, Team Leader and Researcher, respectively, Lithium Air Battery Specially Promoted Research Team, C4GR-GREEN.
May 18, 2017
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Coffee-ring effect leads to crystallization control
A chance observation of crystals forming a mark that resembled the stain of a coffee cup left on a table has led to the growth of customized polycrystals with implications for faster and more versatile semiconductors.
March 3, 2017
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Collaboration heats up exotic topological insulators
Fashion is changing in the avant-garde world of next-generation computer component materials. Traditional semiconductors like silicon are releasing their last new lines. Exotic materials called topological insulators (TIs) are on their way in. and when it comes to cool, nitrogen is the new helium.
November 1, 2016
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Combining catalytic and electrical contact edge-effects to engineer the transport properties of nanocontacts to nanowires
With the emergence of one-dimensional (1-D) and two-dimensional (2-D) nanostructures as the future of electronic materials there is a pressing need to develop new electrical contact preparation techniques that can refine the traditional processes for nanotechnological devices. the future of semiconductor devices brings significant challenges as the dimensions of the device components have been reduced from three-dimensional (3-D) to 2-D, and now to 1-D.
January 5, 2017
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Combining scanning probe technologies with microbeads for low-cost, high-resolution optical lithography systems
Conventional optical lithography is the standard and most common technique in the semiconductor industry and in the microfabrication research field. Although several approaches have recently been developed to increase the resolution of optical lithography, most of the ultrahigh-resolution techniques are quite expensive.
October 4, 2017
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Coming together, falling apart, and starting over, battery style
Whether inside your laptop computer or storing energy outside wind farms, we need high-capacity, long-lasting, and safe batteries. In batteries, as in any electrochemical device, critical processes happen where the electrolyte and active material meet at the solid electrode.
March 19, 2017
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Conductance of an anti-aromatic molecule measured for the first time
Molecular electronics aims to use small organic molecules as the active component in an electrical circuit in order to tailor functionality and achieve new levels of miniaturization with increased functionality via chemical design. Anti-aromatic molecules had been predicted decades ago to have excellent conducting properties.
August 16, 2017
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Conductive graphene ink wins science photography competition's top prize
An image of spectacular swirling graphene ink in alcohol, which can be used to print electrical circuits onto paper, has won the overall prize in a national science photography competition, organised by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).
April 3, 2017
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Conductive ink improves mechanical durability of printed e-textiles
Researchers in Japan have developed a textile-permeable conductive ink to improve mechanical durability of printed e-textiles.
June 2, 2017
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Connecting two electrodes by liquid crystal-guided carbon nanotube wires
Carbon nanotubes being highly electrically conductive along the tube axis, have gained great research interests in recent years for connecting two conducting electrodes at the nanoscale -- where the CNTs can be integrated into a micro- or nanoelectronic system.
November 1, 2016
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Consistent-chirality carbon nanotube tangles with high on-current in transistors
Carbon nanotubes are expected to replace silicon as the next generation semiconductor materials owing to their perfect structure and excellent properties.
December 28, 2016
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Consumer safety agency wants better standards for batteries
CPSC praised Samsung's recall program in the U.S.
January 25, 2017
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Consumer Technology Association
The Consumer Technology Association (CTA), formerly the Consumer Electronics Association (CEA), unites 2,200 companies within the consumer technology industry. Members tap into valuable and innovative members-only resources: unparalleled market research, networking opportunities with business advocates and leaders, up-to-date educational programs and technical training, exposure in extensive promotional programs, and representation from the voice of the industry.
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Contact lens technology leads to supercapacity breakthrough
Ground-breaking research from the University of Surrey and Augmented Optics Ltd., in collaboration with the University of Bristol, has developed potentially transformational technology which could revolutionise the capabilities of appliances that have previously relied on battery power to work.
December 6, 2016
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Controlled creation of large-scale quantum emitter arrays
Transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) are layered semiconductors that can be exfoliated into layers only a few atoms thick. Recent research has shown that some TMDs can contain quantum light sources that can emit single photons of light. Until now, the occurrence of these quantum light emitters has been random.
May 22, 2017
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Controlling chain conformations to enhance electronic devices
Controlling the way fluorinated polymer chains twist and turn may enable fast and flexible electrical circuits, according to collaborative research conducted at Penn State. the findings may offer substantial impact on the development of new polymer-type materials used in flexible electronic applications.
December 1, 2016
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Controlling the properties of matter in two-dimensional crystals
By creating atomic chains in a two-dimensional crystal, researchers at Penn State believe they have found a way to control the direction of materials properties in two and three dimensional crystals with implications in sensing, optoelectronics and next-generation electronics applications.
November 3, 2016
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Controlling traffic on the graphene electron highway
On an otherwise normal day in the lab, Eva Andrei didn't expect to make a major discovery. Andrei, a physics professor at Rutgers University, was using graphite -- the material in pencils -- to calibrate a scanning tunneling microscope. As part of the process, she turned on a very powerful magnetic field. When she looked up to see the material's electronic spectrum, she was astonished. "We saw huge, beautiful peaks up there, just incredible.
August 31, 2017
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Continuous-flow, electrically triggered, single cell-level electroporation
Graduate students Mingde 'Jack' Zheng and Joseph Sherba have developed a novel, microfluidic platform for monitoring electroporation and molecular delivery at the single cell-level as part of a collaborative research team led by Professors Jeffrey Zahn and David Shreiber in the Department of Biomedical Engineering and Professors Hao Lin and Jerry Shan in the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at Rutgers, the State University of new Jersey, in Piscataway, NJ.
March 3, 2017
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Cotton candy capillaries lead to circuit boards that dissolve when cooled
Building transient electronics is usually about doing something to make them stop working: blast them with light, soak them with acid, dunk them in water.
June 27, 2017
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Could triboelectric nanogenerators charge your smartwatch just by checking it?
Triboelectric nanogenerators (TENGs) are small devices that convert movement into electricity, and might just be what bring us into an era of energy-harvesting clothes and implants. But could TENGs, even theoretically, give us wearable electronics powered solely by the wearer's day-to-day body motion?
May 10, 2017
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Creating computers that use 10,000 times less energy
Imagine patterning and visualizing silicon at the atomic level, something which, if done successfully, will revolutionize the quantum and classical computing industry.
February 13, 2017
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Creative use of noise brings bio-inspired electronic improvement
In conventional electronics, a great deal of effort is devoted to eliminating stochastic resonance (SR) -- the annoying hiss that generally hinders the detection of weak signals and degrades overall device performance. But, what if there were a way to exploit this effect to enhance signal transmission for a new generation of devices, such as bio-inspired sensors and computing processors whose design is based on the neural networks of the brain?
September 25, 2017
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Current state of fabricating molecular electronics
Since the genesis of the research field of molecular electronics, which is generally considered to have begun in 1974 with Aviram's and Ratner's early theoretical research ("Molecular rectifiers"), tremendous progress has been achieved both theoretically and experimentally by scientists and engineers who were fascinated by intriguing physical, chemical phenomena, and potential device applications of molecular junctions.
June 14, 2017
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Curved kick on the nanoscale: Investigations of the skyrmion Hall effect reveal surprising results
Researchers at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) have made another important breakthrough in the field of future magnetic storage devices. Already in March 2016, the international team investigated structures, which could serve as magnetic shift register or racetrack memory devices. this type of storage promises low access times, high information density, and low energy consumption.
December 27, 2016
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Misc. - D

'DarkLight' enables visible light communication in the dark
Demonstrates for first-time, how visible light can transmit data in the dark
October 17, 2016
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Dawn of organic single crystal electronics
Researchers at the Institute for Molecular Science, National Institutes of Natural Sciences have developed a method for high performance doping of organic single crystal. Furthermore, they succeeded in the Hall effect measurement of the crystal -- the world's first case.
April 28, 2017
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Decoding and controlling signalling circuits in living cells with light flashes
Researchers at Turku Centre for Biotechnology have invented new tools for decoding and controlling signalling circuits in living cells with flashes of light. In principle, any cellular circuit can now be targeted with the new method. By using this approach, the researchers discovered that major biological signalling circuits can be made to resonate when driven at their resonant frequency.
May 17, 2017
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Degradable electronic components created from corn starch
As consumers upgrade their gadgets at an increasing pace, the amount of electronic waste we generate continues to mount. to help combat this environmental problem, researchers have modified a degradable bioplastic derived from corn starch or other natural sources for use in more eco-friendly electronic components.
April 19, 2017
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Design and fabrication of 3D-printed stretchable tactile sensors
Researchers at the University of Minnesota, led by Professor Michael C. McAlpine, have developed a series of novel inks, which can be cured at room temperature with tunable printability, high flexibility, electrical conductivity, and sensitivity.
June 5, 2017
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Designer materials create miniature computer circuits
Scientists at the University of Manchester have discovered a new method of creating optoelectronic circuits using graphene and other 2D materials that are much smaller than their current counterparts.
November 22, 2016
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Developing a Better, Safer Lithium-ion Battery
The lithium-ion batteries we rely on to power our smartphones and electric cars use a liquid as the electrolyte to separate two electrodes. If Researchers were to develop a solid electrode, it could mean greater storage capacity and a safer battery.
July 14, 2017
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Developing a catalytic conveyor belt
Capitalizing on previous studies in self-powered chemo-mechanical movement, researchers at the University of Pittsburgh's Swanson School of Engineering and Penn State University's Department of Chemistry have developed a novel method of transporting particles that utilizes chemical reactions to drive fluid flow within microfluidic devices.
February 17, 2017
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Device designed to exploit scattering of light by mechanical vibrations
Researchers at the University of Campinas's Gleb Wataghin Physics Institute (IFGW-UNICAMP) in São Paulo State, Brazil, have theoretically developed a silicon photonic device that would enable optical and mechanical waves vibrating at tens of gigahertz (GHz) to interact.
June 7, 2017
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Device for detecting subatomic-scale motion may aid robotics, security
Scientists at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have developed a new device that measures the motion of super-tiny particles traversing distances almost unimaginably small--shorter than the diameter of a hydrogen atom, or less than one-millionth the width of a human hair. not only can the handheld device sense the atomic-scale motion of its tiny parts with unprecedented precision, but the researchers have devised a method to mass produce the highly sensitive measuring tool.
December 19, 2016
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Diamond quantum sensor reveals current flows in graphene
Researchers at the University of Melbourne are the first in the world to image how electrons move in two-dimensional graphene, a boost to the development of next-generation electronics.
April 26, 2017
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Diamonds - the ultimate semiconductors
"While we think of diamonds as very expensive jewelry, they can actually be made using methane and hydrogen. Diamonds are really just carbon, a light and simple element. Their simple yet unique characteristics create significant potential for use in a wide range of purposes, including generation of environmental energy and biological applications," says Professor Mutsuko Hatano.
November 29, 2016
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Direct observation of graphene decoupling on Cu(111)
Graphene films that are grown on copper (Cu) substrates must be detached clean without leaving residue behind, as residual metallic impurities can significantly alter electronic and electrochemical properties of graphene.
December 13, 2016
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Discovering the ultimate limit of heat transport: Measurements across a single-atom junction
When electricity flows through circuits, heat is invariably generated and leads to detrimental increases in temperature. The ability to move heat away from circuits is one of the major challenges of modern electronics, especially as circuitry gets smaller and smaller.
June 13, 2017
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Discovery of a source of fast magnetic reconnection
The source of the acceleration of a common type of magnetic reconnection has now been described by scientists. Magnetic reconnection is a universal process that triggers solar flares and northern lights and can disrupt cell phone service and fusion experiments.
March 31, 2017
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Discovery of nanosheets with the highest ever hydroxyl ion conductivity
A NIMS research group led by associate principal investigator Renzhi Ma and director Takayoshi Sasaki of the International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics discovered that layered double hydroxide nanosheets have exceptionally high hydroxyl ion conductivity.
July 4, 2017
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Discovery of new crystal structure holds promise for optoelectronic devices
A Florida State University research team has discovered a new crystal structure of organic-inorganic hybrid materials that could open the door to new applications for optoelectronic devices like light-emitting diodes and lasers.
January 4, 2017
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Discovery of new transparent thin film material could improve electronics and solar cells
A team of researchers, led by the University of Minnesota, have discovered a new nano-scale thin film material with the highest-ever conductivity in its class. the new material could lead to smaller, faster, and more powerful electronics, as well as more efficient solar cells.
May 5, 2017
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Draper's DragonflEye cyber-bug takes flight
Back in January we heard about Draper's efforts to outfit a living dragonfly with a sort of solar-powered mind control backpack. This project, known as DragonflEye, is cruising right along, and the R&D firm just released a video of the modified insect taking flight.
June 1, 2017
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Misc. - E

Eco-friendly fabrication of silicon nanowires
Scientists from the Faculty of Physics, the Lomonosov Moscow State University have worked out a new and more eco-friendly method of silicon nanowires obtaining, which allows to replace hydrofluoric acid by ammonium fluoride (NH4F).
October 19, 2016
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Electricity production: when enzymes rival platinum
This biocell could, in the long run, offer an alternative to fuel cells that require rare and costly metals, such as platinum.
August 30, 2017
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Electrifying magnetism by assembling alternating atomic layers of two oxide materials
As computers and cell phones become smarter and faster, they use more electricity. More electricity means more heat. Dispelling that heat uses more energy. New materials that couple electric and magnetic states of a material could break this cycle.
June 14, 2017
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Electrocatalyst nanostructures key to improved fuel cells, electrolyzers
Purdue University scientists' simulations have unraveled the mystery of a new electrocatalyst that may solve a significant problem associated with fuel cells and electrolyzers.
June 5, 2017
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Electrochemical energy storage with porous one-dimensional (1D) nanomaterials
The development of porous one-dimensional (1D) nanomaterials (check our nanotechnology FAQ to learn more about number of dimensions of a nanomaterial) with designed properties and architectures has led to significant advances in electrochemical energy storage.
May 24, 2017
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Electrochemical performance of lithium-ion capacitors
Internal short-circuit method (ISC) is also called direct contact (DC) method. the pre-lithiated can achieved through direct physical contact between negative electrode and lithium metal with electrolyte in pressure.
April 21, 2017
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Electrocrystallization: Breakthrough in gold nanoparticle research
A research team led by Professor Flavio Maran of the University of Padova (Italy) and Academy Professor Kari Rissanen of the University of Jyväskylä (Finland) has published in the Journal of the American Chemical Society ("Electrocrystallization of Monolayer-Protected Gold Clusters: Opening the Door to Quality, Quantity, and new Structures") a research study that demonstrates how it is possible to obtain very high quality crystals formed of gold nanoparticles.
March 21, 2017
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Electrolytes made from liquefied gas enable batteries to run at ultra-low temperatures
Engineers at the University of California San Diego have developed a breakthrough in electrolyte chemistry that enables lithium batteries to run at temperatures as low as -60 degrees Celsius with excellent performance -- in comparison, today's lithium-ion batteries stop working at -20 degrees Celsius. The new electrolytes also enable electrochemical capacitors to run as low as -80 degrees Celsius -- their current low temperature limit is -40 degrees Celsius.
June 15, 2017
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Electromagnetic shielding with graphene-based sandwich structures
Researchers have demonstrated a series of graphene-based sandwich structures that were fabricated by assembling graphene films and various spacers.
October 5, 2017
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Electron Pulses Used to Manipulate Nanomagnets and Store Information
Magnets and magnetic occurrences underpin the huge majority of advanced data storage, and the measurement scales for research dedicated on magnetic behaviors continue to shrink with the rest of digital technology.
July 24, 2017
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Electrons 'puddle' under high magnetic fields, study reveals
Olympic figure skaters and electrons have a lot in common. In figure skating competitions, the "free skate" segment gives the skater the flexibility to travel in whichever pattern he or she chooses around the rink. Similarly, in metals, electrons in outer orbitals can wander fairly freely.
January 5, 2017
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Electronic 'cyclones' at the nanoscale
It has long been thought that spiral electronic structures called "polar vortices' would not be produced in electrically ordered materials. the idea persisted although scientists observed a similar phenomenon on the surface of some magnetic materials. However, through highly controlled multilayer thin film synthesis, scientists controlled various competing atomic forces to allow these regions to form.
April 20, 2017
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Electronic 'hairy skin'could give robots a more human sense of touch
Electronic-skin prototypes are stretchy, thin films that can sense temperature, pressure and even monitor blood oxygen or alcohol levels. But most of these devices are missing a key feature of real skin that allows us to feel a wider range of conditions: hair.
December 14, 2016
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Electronic synapses that can learn: towards an artificial brain?
Researchers from the CNRS, Thales, and the Universities of Bordeaux, Paris-Sud, and Evry have created an artificial synapse capable of learning autonomously. they were also able to model the device, which is essential for developing more complex circuits.
April 3, 2017
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Electrical currents can be now be switched on and off at the atomic scale
Robert Wolkow is no stranger to mastering the ultra-small and the ultra-fast. a pioneer in atomic-scale science with a Guinness World Record to boot (for a needle with a single atom at the point), Wolkow's team, together with collaborators at the Max Plank Institute in Hamburg, have just released findings that detail how to create atomic switches for electricity, many times smaller than what is currently used.
October 28, 2016
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Electrically tunable surface could bring drastically higher resolution to smartphone and TV
Researchers at the University of Central Florida have developed a new color changing surface tunable through electrical voltage -- a breakthrough that could lead to three times the resolution for televisions, smartphones and other devices.
May 25, 2017
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Energy decay in graphene resonators
Energy dissipation is a key ingredient in understanding many physical phenomena in thermodynamics, photonics, chemical reactions, nuclear fission, photon emissions, or even electronic circuits, among others.
May 16, 2017
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Energy transition: Smart, interconnected, sustainable
Many elements are required for making the energy system more sustainable. Among them are smart solar storage systems, smartly interconnected energy grids, and electricity-based synthetic fuels (e-fuels).
May 18, 2017
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Engaging diamond for next-era transistors
Materials scientists in Japan have developed a new diamond transistor fabrication process that promises to advance the development of more robust and energy-efficient electronics
May 16, 2017
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Engaging diamond for next-era transistors
As consumers around the world have become increasingly dependent on electronics, the transistor, a semiconductor component central to the operation of these devices, has become a critical subject of scientific research.
May 16, 2017
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Engineers achieve significant breakthrough in spin wave based information processing technology
Conventional electronic devices make use of semiconductor circuits and they transmit information by electric charges. However, such devices are being pushed to their physical limit and the technology is facing immense challenges to meet the increasing demand for speed and further miniaturisation. Spin wave based devices, which utilise collective excitations of electronic spins in magnetic materials as a carrier of information, have huge potential as memory devices that are more energy efficient, faster, and higher in capacity.
July 24, 2017
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Engineers create prototype chip just three atoms thick
For more than 50 years, silicon chipmakers have devised inventive ways to switch electricity on and off, generating the digital ones and zeroes that encode words, pictures, movies and other forms of data.
November 29, 2016
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Engineers invent method to control light propagation in waveguides
A team of Columbia Engineering researchers, led by Applied Physics Assistant Professor Nanfang Yu, has invented a method to control light propagating in confined pathways, or waveguides, with high efficiency by using nano-antennas. to demonstrate this technique, they built photonic integrated devices that not only had record-small footprints but were also able to maintain optimal performance over an unprecedented broad wavelength range.
April 17, 2017
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Engineers invent the first bio-compatible, ion current battery
Engineers at the University of Maryland have invented an entirely new kind of battery. It is bio-compatible, because it produces the same kind of electrical energy that the body uses.
July 24, 2017
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Engineers pioneer platinum shell formation process - and achieve first-ever observation
UCI researchers have devised a new method of dynamically forming a platinum shell on a metallic alloy nanoparticle core, a development that may lead to better materials for oxygen reduction reactions in fuel cells that power some cars and electronic devices.
August 9, 2017
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Engineers overcome a hurdle in growing a revolutionary optical metamaterial
When John Crocker, a professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering in the University of Pennsylvania's School of Engineering and Applied Science was a graduate student, his advisor gathered together everyone in his lab to "throw down the gauntlet" on a new challenge in the field.
February 21, 2017
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Engineers shrink atomic force microscope to dime-sized device
Researchers at the University of Texas at Dallas have created an atomic force microscope on a chip, dramatically shrinking the size -- and, hopefully, the price tag -- of a high-tech device commonly used to characterize material properties.
February 15, 2017
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Engineers transform food waste into green energy
In a classic tale of turning trash into treasure, two different processes soon may be the favored dynamic duo to turn food waste into green energy, according to a new Cornell-led study in the journal Bioresource Technology.
June 13, 2017
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Engineer unveils new spin on future of transistors with novel design
An engineer with the Erik Jonsson School of Engineering and Computer Science at The University of Texas at Dallas has designed a novel computing system made solely from carbon that might one day replace the silicon transistors that power today's electronic devices.
June 5, 2017
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Enhanced fuel cell performance using one atom thick 2D material
(Nanowerk Spotlight) Methanol fuel cells are widely considered as a potential source of future energy due to the usage of methanol as a liquid fuel; simplicity in operation; higher energy density of methanol fuel; high power density obtained etc. However their commercialization is greatly hindered by methanol crossover taking place in the membrane area of fuel cells, leading to short circuits and greatly affecting overall performance.
December 6, 2016
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Entropy landscape sheds light on quantum mystery
By precisely measuring the entropy of a cerium copper gold alloy with baffling electronic properties cooled to nearly absolute zero, physicists in Germany and the United States have gleaned new evidence about the possible causes of high-temperature superconductivity and similar phenomena.
May 15, 2017
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EV Group Unveils Breakthrough Low-Temperature Laser Debonding Solution For Fan-Out Wafer-Level Packaging
Designed as a module for integration in the company's benchmark EVG®850 DB automated debonding system, the new laser debonding solution incorporates a solid-state laser and proprietary beam-shaping optics to enable optimized, force-free debonding. Featuring both low-temperature debonding and high-temperature-processing stability, EVG's new laser debonding solution is ideal not only for fan-out wafer-level packaging (FoWLP), but also for processing compound semiconductors and power devices. System orders have already been placed for the new solution.
July 6, 2017
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Evidence of topological excitations in a quantum magnet
Condensed matter physics is the study of the multitude of ways that matter can organise itself. In each phase as conventionally understood, be it a magnet, metal, superconductor or something else, it is possible to characterise the phase by looking at the system locally in space.
May 16, 2017
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Environmentally-friendly graphene textiles could enable wearable electronics
Wearable, textiles-based electronics present new possibilities for flexible circuits, healthcare and environment monitoring, energy conversion, and many others.
November 24, 2016
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European nanotechnology project to design less toxic photovoltaic materials
The University Institute for Advanced Materials Research at the Universitat Jaume I has participated in the European Project Sunflower, whose objective has been the development of organic photovoltaic materials less toxic and viable for industrial production.
January 27, 2017
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Exotic quantum technology realized using normal silicon
A device created by RIKEN researchers demonstrates that it is possible to realize the building block of quantum computers in ordinary, 'garden-variety' silicon used in the modern electronics industry.
December 16, 2016
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Exceptionally Compressible and Stretchable Polyelectrolyte for Supercapacitors
Wearable and flexible electronics mandate equivalently wearable and flexible power sources.
July 4, 2017
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Exploring defects in nanoscale devices for possible quantum computing applications
Researchers at Tokyo Institute of Technology in collaboration with the University of Cambridge have studied the interaction between microwave fields and electronic defect states inside the oxide layer of field-effect transistors at cryogenic temperatures. It has been found that the physics of such defect states are consistent with driven two-level systems possessing long coherence times, and that their induced dynamics can be coherently and independently controlled.
October 19, 2016
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Misc. - F

Fabricating CMOS devices for 5-nm node with nanowire technology
Leti, an institute of CEA Tech, presented two papers at IEDM 2016 today that demonstrate its ability to provide industry with all the elements required for building a competitive 5-nm node with nanowire architectures.
December 6, 2016
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Fast track control accelerates switching of quantum bits
From laptops to cellphones, today's technology advances through the ever-increasing speed at which electric charges are directed through circuits. Similar advances can happen in the emerging field of quantum technology by speeding up control over quantum states in atomic and nanoscale systems.
January 12, 2017
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FAU Physicists Use Single Laser Pulse to Control Electronic Current in Graphene
It is essential to control electronic current in modern electronics because streams of electrons that transfer signals and data are controlled at high speed. With advances in technology, the need for transmission speeds is also growing.
September 26, 2017
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Feast your eyes on this 600-DPI e-paper screen
I have to say, I really like e-paper. And it's come a long way since the crude early Kindles -- nowadays you have e-readers that are as high-resolution as the best phones and iPads. And they're set to get even better if E Ink's latest screens make it into a few products, as I hope they do.
May 25, 2017
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Feather-light metal cathodes for stable lithium-oxygen batteries
Lithium-oxygen systems could someday outperform today's lithium-ion batteries because of their potential for high energy density. However, a number of important issues, such as their poor electrochemical stability must be addressed before these systems can successfully compete with current rechargeable batteries.
May 24, 2017
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Fermented foams: Graphene composite foams using beer yeasts
The use of graphene as an additive can give mechanical and electrical benefits to composite materials, making them multifunctional. In a novel fermentation method, Graphene Flagship researchers have developed graphene-containing rubber foams with unusual mechanical and electrical behaviours: when stretched, the composite foams expand and become more conductive. These unexpected properties could be promising for use in smart filters and medical devices.
June 1, 2017
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Ferroelectric phenomenon proven viable for oxide electrodes, disproving predictions
Flux-closure domain (FCD) structures are microscopic topological phenomena found in ferroelectric thin films that feature distinct electric polarization properties. These closed-loop domains have garnered attention among researchers studying new ferroelectric devices, ranging from data storage components and spintronic tunnel junctions to ultra-thin capacitors.
August 1, 2017
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Finding 2D materials to make batteries cheaper, better
The University of Illinois at Chicago has received a $1.44 million National Science Foundation grant to discover new 2D materials that can be used to manufacture better and cheaper batteries.
September 27, 2017
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First demonstration of a metal-free metamaterial that can absorb electromagnetic energy
Electrical engineers at Duke University have created the world's first electromagnetic metamaterial made without any metal. the device's ability to absorb electromagnetic energy without heating up has direct applications in imaging, sensing and lighting.
January 27, 2017
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First step towards photonic quantum network
Advanced photonic nanostructures are well on their way to revolutionising quantum technology for quantum networks based on light. Researchers from the Niels Bohr Institute have now developed the first building blocks needed to construct complex quantum photonic circuits for quantum networks. this rapid development in quantum networks is highlighted in an article in the prestigious scientific journal, Nature.
January 25, 2017
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Flexible batteries power the future of wearable technology
The rapid development of wearable technology has received another boost from a new development using graphene for printed electronic devices.
August 11, 2017
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Flexible ferroelectrics bring two material worlds together
Until recently, "flexible ferroelectrics" could have been thought of as the same type of oxymoronic phrase. However, thanks to a new discovery by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory in collaboration with researchers at Northwestern University, scientists have pioneered a new class of materials with advanced functionalities that moves the idea from the realm of irony into reality (Nature Communications, "Flexible ferroelectric organic crystals").
January 16, 2017
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Flexible thermoelectric nanogenerator on paper
Temperature differentials (heat) are ubiquitously present in our environment, making thermoelectric energy harvesting a highly attractive research field. the thermoelectric effect is the direct conversion of temperature difference to electric voltage -- a phenomenon described by the Seebeck effect and measured by a Seebeck coefficient (volts per difference in temperature).
November 30, 2016
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Flexible, organic and biodegradable - a new wave of electronics
As electronics become increasingly pervasive in our lives - from smart phones to wearable sensors - so too does the ever rising amount of electronic waste they create. a United Nations Environment Program report found that almost 50 million tons of electronic waste were thrown out in 2017--more than 20 percent higher than waste in 2015.
May 3, 2017
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Flexible, organic and biodegradable: Researchers develop new wave of electronics
A new semiconductor is as flexible as skin and easily degradable, report scientists. It could have diverse medical and environmental applications, without adding to the mounting pile of global electronic waste.
May 2, 2017
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Fluorine grants white graphene new powers
A little fluorine turns an insulating ceramic known as white graphene into a wide-bandgap semiconductor with magnetic properties. Rice University scientists said that could make the unique material suitable for electronics in extreme environments.
July 14, 2017
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Food waste mixed with carbon nanotubes could store solar and wind energy
Saving up excess solar and wind energy for times when the sun is down or the air is still requires a storage device. Batteries get the most attention as a promising solution although pumped hydroelectric storage is currently used most often. now researchers reporting in ACS' Journal of Physical Chemistry C are advancing another potential approach using sugar alcohols – an abundant waste product of the food industry – mixed with carbon nanotubes.
October 27, 2016
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For platinum catalysts, nanosize squeeze gives big boost in performance
A nanosize squeeze can significantly boost the performance of platinum catalysts that help generate energy in fuel cells, according to a new study by Stanford scientists.
November 24, 2016
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For this metal, electricity flows, but not the heat
There's a known rule-breaker among materials, and a new discovery by an international team of scientists adds more evidence to back up the metal's nonconformist reputation. According to a new study led by scientists at the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) and at the University of California, Berkeley, electrons in vanadium dioxide can conduct electricity without conducting heat.
January 26, 2017
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For wearable electronic devices, plastic holes are golden
In science, sometimes the best discoveries come when you're exploring something else entirely. That's the case with recent findings from the National Institute of Standards and Technology, where a research team has come up with a way to build safe, nontoxic gold wires onto flexible, thin plastic film.
November 23, 2016
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Formamidinium perovskite nanocrystals: Bright, cheap and stable
The research group of Prof. Christoph J. Brabec at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg has made progress on perovskite nanocrystal synthesis and published their results in Nano Letters.
May 2, 2017
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Freezing lithium batteries may make them safer and bendable
Yuan Yang, assistant professor of materials science and engineering at Columbia Engineering, has developed a new method that could lead to lithium batteries that are safer, have longer battery life, and are bendable, providing new possibilities such as flexible smartphones. His new technique uses ice-templating to control the structure of the solid electrolyte for lithium batteries that are used in portable electronics, electric vehicles, and grid-level energy storage.
April 24, 2017
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Freezing lithium batteries may make them safer, bendable
A new method that could lead to lithium batteries that are safer, have longer battery life, and are bendable has now been developed, providing new possibilities such as flexible smartphones. His new technique uses ice-templating to control the structure of the solid electrolyte for lithium batteries that are used in portable electronics, electric vehicles, and grid-level energy storage.
April 24, 2017
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Frequency modulation accelerates the research of quantum technologies
Many modern technological advances and devices are based on understanding quantum mechanics. Compared to semiconductors, hard disk drives or lasers, quantum devices are different in the sense that they directly harness quantum states in the operation of the device. A big goal of the field is to develop a working quantum computer envisaged to outperform traditional computers in certain difficult computational tasks.
May 30, 2017
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From space to the streets: new battery model also makes electric cars more reliable
Nano satellites weighing just a few kilograms orbit the Earth. Pivotal point of these miniature computers are their solar-powered batteries. Computer scientists at Saarland University have now developed a procedure that allows for better planning of solar battery operations. they are able to predict how much the on-board battery will in fact be utilized in the course of the satellite's mission. the efficiency achieved here is about five times greater than with conventional systems. and electric cars on Earth are already benefiting from the procedure as well.
March 15, 2017
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From space to the streets: new battery model also makes electric cars more reliable
Nano satellites weighing just a few kilograms orbit the Earth. Pivotal point of these miniature computers are their solar-powered batteries. Computer scientists have now developed a procedure that allows for better planning of solar battery operations.
March 16, 2017
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Fundamental solid state phenomenon unravelled
Whether water freezes to ice, iron is demagnetized or a material becomes superconducting -- for physicists there is always a phase transition behind it. they endeavour to understand these different phenomena by searching for universal properties. Researchers at Goethe University Frankfurt and Technische Universitat Dresden have now made a pioneering discovery during their study of a phase transition from an electrical conductor to an insulator.
December 16, 2016
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Misc. - G

German institute successfully tests underwater energy storage sphere
The Fraunhofer Institute is working on a seabed-based pumped-storage structure.
March 6, 2017
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Germanium's semiconducting and optical properties probed under pressure
Germanium may not be a household name like silicon, its group-mate on the periodic table, but it has great potential for use in next-generation electronics and energy technology.
January 3, 2017
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Getting from greenhouse gas to microbial biomass
Greenhouse gases such as CO2 and CH4 are emitted into our atmosphere as waste products of current energy production activities. But imagine turning this waste carbon into biomass - a reliable, economical, and safe source of feedstocks for biofuels and other bioproducts.
February 3, 2017
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Getting rid of the cleanroom - 3D printing for more efficient chemical research
With the help of some designing, a few grams of plastic filament and a 3D printer, researchers in the University of Helsinki made a unique device for studying chemical reactions, and improved their experimental processes.
April 13, 2017
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GGI International; manufacturers of membrane switches & graphic overlays
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Giant charge reversal observed for the first time
Charged surfaces submerged in an electrolyte solution can sometimes become oppositely charged. This nonintuitive phenomenon, known as charge inversion, happens when excess counter ions adsorb, or adhere, to the surface. It can occur in a number of chemical and biological settings. In certain situations, theory predicts that a highly charged surface not only changes sign, but can become more highly charged than the original surface. This is known as giant charge reversal, but remains controversial and has never been observed experimentally until now.
July 12, 2017
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Giving robots a sense of touch
Eight years ago, Ted Adelson's research group at MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) unveiled a new sensor technology, called GelSight, that uses physical contact with an object to provide a remarkably detailed 3-D map of its surface.
June 5, 2017
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Global Merchant Imports
Select responsible products that draw upon an unlimited energy source -- the sun. You'd be surprised at the variety of products available: lights, watches, radios and more.
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Glow-in-the-dark dye could fuel liquid-based batteries
Could a glow-in-the-dark dye be the next advancement in energy storage technology?
November 17, 2016
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Going carbon free boosts battery life
Zinc-air batteries are one of the most promising solutions for the large-scale storage of intermittently-generated renewable electricity from solar, wind or tidal: they are non-flammable, inexpensive and with a very high energy density.
February 8, 2017
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Gold electrons can tunnel a nanoscale gap
Rice University researchers recently discovered that excited electrons are capable of tunneling across a nanoscale insulator gap -- going from one metallic conductor to another.
May 11, 2017
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Gold shines through properties of nanobio sensors
With their remarkable electrical and optical properties, along with biocompatibility, photostability and chemical stability, gold nanoclusters are gaining a foothold in a number of research areas, particularly in biosensing and biolabeling.
August 16, 2017
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Grafoid unveils GPURE Graphene Polymer Membrane for Next-Generation Li-Ion Battery Applications
Grafoid Inc., a Canadian graphene R&D, investment and technology licensing company announced today the development of its GPURE Graphene Polymer nano-porous membrane intended for next generation Li-Ion battery applications.
March 15, 2017
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Grant focuses on 'hydrogen sponge' for use in fuel-cell vehicles
Finding practical hydrogen storage technologies for vehicles powered by fuel cells is the focus of a $682,000 grant from the U.S. Department of Energy, awarded to Mike Chung, professor of materials science and engineering, Penn State.
June 15, 2017
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Graphene and terahertz waves could lead the way to future communication
By utilizing terahertz waves in electronics, future data traffic can get a big boost forward. So far, the terahertz (THz) frequency has not been optimally applied to data transmission, but by using graphene, researchers at Chalmers University of Technology have come.
June 27, 2017
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Graphene electrodes offer new functionalities in molecular electronic nanodevices
An international team of researchers led by the University of Bern and the National Physical Laboratory (NPL) has revealed a new way to tune the functionality of next-generation molecular electronic devices using graphene.
June 9, 2017
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Graphene enables fully flexible near-field communication antennas
Graphene is currently one of the most extensively studied materials in the world, both on scientific and industrial level. the world's first two-dimensional material, this single layer of carbon atoms arranged in a hexagonal lattice has a series of unique and outstanding properties. as well as being the thinnest, strongest and lightest known material, graphene is flexible, impermeable and extremely electrically and thermally conductive. all properties well suited for next generation NFC antennas.
November 29, 2016
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Graphene on silicon carbide can store energy
By introducing defects into the perfect surface of graphene on silicon carbide, researchers at Linköping University in Sweden have increased the capacity of the material to store electrical charge. This result, which has been published in the scientific journal Electrochimica Acta ("Monitoring of epitaxial graphene anodization"), increases our knowledge of how this ultrathin material can be used.
May 22, 2017
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Graphene 'phototransistor' promising for optical technologies
Researchers have solved a problem hindering development of highly sensitive optical devices made of a material called graphene, an advance that could bring applications from imaging and displays to sensors and high-speed communications.
April 12, 2017
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Graphene touch sensor for wearable electronics
Researchers in Korea have developed a wearable and stretchable mutual capacitance touch sensor based on graphene electrodes that is capable of multitouch sensing as well as 3D sensing in a highly deformed state.
July 26, 2017
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Graphene transistor could mean computers that are 1,000 times faster
A University of Central Florida professor is part of a research team that developed a graphene-based transistor that could someday lead to computers that are a thousand times faster and use a hundredth of the power.
June 13, 2017
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Graphene-Based Conductive Ink Wins Overall Prize in National Science Photography Competition
An image of spectacular swirling graphene ink in alcohol, which can be used to print electrical circuits onto paper, has won the overall prize in a national science photography competition, organised by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC).
April 4, 2017
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Graphene-nanotube hybrid boosts lithium metal batteries
Rice University scientists have created a rechargeable lithium metal battery with three times the capacity of commercial lithium-ion batteries by resolving something that has long stumped researchers: the dendrite problem.
May 18, 2017
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Graphene-Perovskite Solar Cells Exceed 18% Efficiency
Scientists have created hybrid perovskite-graphene solar cells that show good stability upon exposure to sunlight, while still maintaining efficiency over 18% - the highest reported efficiency of graphene perovskite hybrid solar cells to date.
October 5, 2016
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Graphene's sleeping superconductivity awakens
Researchers have found a way to trigger the innate, but previously hidden, ability of graphene to act as a superconductor - meaning that it can be made to carry an electrical current with zero resistance.
January 19, 2017
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Gray tin exhibits novel topological electronic properties in 3-D
In a surprising new discovery, alpha-tin, commonly called gray tin, exhibits a novel electronic phase when its crystal structure is strained, putting it in a rare new class of 3D materials called topological Dirac semimetals (TDSs). Only two other TDS materials are known to exist, discovered as recently as 2013. Alpha-tin now joins this class as its only simple-element member.
April 4, 2017
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Green Diamond - the future of power electronics
GreenDiamond, with its 14 partners, is a €4 million European Horizon 2020 project launched in June 2015 to develop breakthrough 10 kV diamond transistor technology for sustainable high power electronics.
March 16, 2017
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Green IT: new switching process in non-volatile spintronics devices
To construct magnetic memories, elements with two stable magnetization states are needed. Promising candidate for such magnetic elements are tiny rings, typically of the order of few micrometers, with clockwise or counterclockwise magnetization as the two states. Unfortunately, switching between those two states directly requires a circular magnetic field which is not easy to achieve.
April 13, 2017
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Green light for ultra-fine display colors
Chih-Jen Shih is very satisfied with his breakthrough: "To date, no one has succeeded in producing green light as pure as we have," says the Professor of Chemical Engineering in his laboratory at ETH Zurich. He points at an ultra-slim, bendable light-emitting diode (LED), which displays the three letters "ETH" in a fine hue of bright green.
September 6, 2017
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Ground-Breaking Light-Activated Semiconductor Nanocomposite Material Moves in Response to Light
A team of researchers from Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) have presented a paper describing a novel light-activated phenomenon that has the potential to become the foundation for applications as diverse as microscopic robotic grippers, optical telecommunications systems, and more efficient solar cells.
October 18, 2016
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Ground-breaking method to use graphene to generate complex and controllable sound signals
A pioneering new technique that encourages the wonder material graphene to "talk" could revolutionise the global audio and telecommunications industries.
May 4, 2017
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Group works toward devising topological superconductor
The experimental realization of ultrathin graphene - which earned two scientists from Cambridge the Nobel Prize in physics in 2010 - has ushered in a new age in materials research.
April 11, 2017
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Guiding light with geometric phase
The simplest way to trap light, or in general electromagnetic waves, in a finite region is to realize a region surrounded by mirrors so that light is not able to escape.
March 14, 2017
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Misc. - H

Harnessing energy from glass walls
Semi-transparent perovskite solar cells have been developed that could be great candidates for solar windows, say researchers.
May 29, 2017
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Harnessing geometric frustration to tune batteries for greater power
A new generation of higher-powered batteries for phones and cameras could result from ground-breaking research.
May 10, 2017
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Harnessing heat to power computers
One of the biggest problems with computers, dating to the invention of the first one, has been finding ways to keep them cool so that they don't overheat or shut down.
April 18, 2017
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Harnessing hopping hydrogens for high-efficiency OLEDs
Renewed investigation of a molecule that was originally synthesized with the goal of creating a unique light-absorbing pigment has led to the establishment of a novel design strategy for efficient light-emitting molecules with applications in next-generation displays and lighting.
July 10, 2017
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Hands off approach to looking into silicon chips
The possibility of looking inside silicon chips to see their tiny working parts, without damaging the chips, is a step closer thanks to an international team led by scientists at the LCN.
July 3, 2017
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Harvesting water energy with a wearable, all-fabric triboelectric generator
Wearable energy harvesters are greatly attractive and receive intensive research efforts in recent years, aiming at powering various emerging flexible and wearable electronics to meet the requirements of smart fabrics, motion tracking and health monitoring.
August 7, 2017
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Hexagonal boron nitride enables the fabrication of 2-dimensional electronic memories
The use of two dimensional (2D) layered materials to improve the capabilities of electronic devices is a promising strategy that has recently gained much interest in both academia and industry. However, while the research in 2D metallic and semiconducting materials is well established, detailed knowledge and applications of 2D insulators are still scarce.
March 7, 2017
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High temperature step-by-step process makes graphene from ethene
An international team of scientists has developed a new way to produce single-layer graphene from a simple precursor: ethene - also known as ethylene - the smallest alkene molecule, which contains just two atoms of carbon.
May 4, 2017
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High-precision control of printed electronics
Printed electronic transistor circuits and displays, in which the colour of individual pixels can be changed, are two of many applications of ground-breaking research at the Laboratory of Organic Electronics, Linkping University.
July 4, 2017
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High-resolution imaging reveals new understanding of battery cathode particles
Using advanced imaging techniques, scientists at the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have been able to observe what exactly happens inside a cathode particle as lithium-ion batteries are charged and discharged.
February 1, 2017
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High-speed switching for ultrafast electromechanical switches and sensors
Unlike the slow ferroelastic domain switching expected for ceramics, high-speed sub-microsecond ferroelastic domain switching and simultaneous lattice deformation are directly observed for the thin films. This exciting finding paves the way for high-frequency ultrafast electromechanical switches and sensors.
August 29, 2017
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High-tech electronics made from autumn leaves
Northern China's roadsides are peppered with deciduous phoenix trees, producing an abundance of fallen leaves in autumn. These leaves are generally burned in the colder season, exacerbating the country's air pollution problem.
August 29, 2017
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Highest Plasmon Energy Observed in Graphene Plasmons
The unique properties of graphene can be both a blessing and a curse to researchers, particularly to those at the junction of electronic and optical application. the flexible profiles of these atom-thick sheets have highly mobile electrons, which make them efficient conductors, but generally graphene sheets do not interact efficiently with light.
November 16, 2016
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Highly conductive and pure FEBID gold nanostructures
Recently, researchers from Vienna University of Technology (TU Wien) have discovered a novel way to fabricate pure gold nanostructures by the additive direct-write lithography called FEBID. this work will open a new door for applications of 3D gold devices
October 18, 2016
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Holes in the electrode
Rechargeable lithium batteries with cathodes comprising nickel, manganese, and cobalt, are viewed as the most potent today. But they, too, have a limited lifespan.
February 22, 2017
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'Hot' electrons don't mind the gap
Scientists find nanogaps in plasmonic gold wires enhance voltage when excited
May 8, 2017
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How a researcher disassembles molecules
Taking a fresh look at an old substance
June 7, 2017
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How protons move through a fuel cell
Hydrogen is regarded as the energy source of the future: It is produced with solar power and can be used to generate heat and electricity in fuel cells. Empa researchers have now succeeded in decoding the movement of hydrogen ions in crystals -- a key step towards more efficient energy conversion in the hydrogen industry of tomorrow.
June 21, 2017
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How some battery materials expand without cracking
When you charge a battery, or when you use it, it's not just electricity but also matter that moves around inside. Ions, which are atoms or molecules that have an electric charge, travel from one of the battery's electrodes to the other, making the electrodes shrink and swell. In fact, it's been a longstanding mystery why fairly brittle electrode materials don't crack under the strain of these expansion and contraction cycles.
April 12, 2017
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How to charge your devices the right way
Give those batteries long, healthy lives.
August 23, 2017
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Hybrid heterostructures with programmable potentials
Stacking thin layers of graphene and related materials (GRMs) leads to heterostructure devices with a variety of different electronic and optical properties, which can be tailored by careful design of the stack. Now, researchers from the Graphene Flagship have added a new option for tailoring the electronic properties, using molecular monolayers to create controllable periodic potentials on the surface of graphene.
April 26, 2017
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Hydrogen in your pocket? new plastic for carrying and storing hydrogen
A Waseda University (Tokyo) research group has developed a polymer which can store hydrogen in a light, compact and flexible sheet, and is safe to touch even when filled with hydrogen gas (Nature Communications, "A ketone/alcohol polymer for cycle of electrolytic hydrogen-fixing with water and releasing under mild conditions").
November 28, 2016
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Hydrogen on demand
Technion-Israel Institute of Technology researchers have developed a new approach to the production of hydrogen from water using solar energy. In findings published today in Nature Materials, the researchers explain that this approach will make it possible to produce hydrogen in a centralized manner at the point of sale located far from the solar farm. the new technology is expected to significantly reduce the cost of producing the hydrogen and shipping it to the customer.
March 13, 2017
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Misc. - I

IBS Scientists develop new Optical Circuit Components to Control Light
The computers of the future could work nearly at the speed of light. Nanophotonics, the study of the behavior of light at the nanometer scale, could bring the speed of the current technology into a totally different level.
November 29, 2016
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ICFO Develops First Ever Graphene-Quantum Dot Based CMOS Integrated Camera
Thanks to silicon and complementary metal-oxide semiconductors (CMOS) technology, microelectronics has progressed greatly in the last four decades, thereby making possible computing, compact and economical digital cameras, smartphones, as well as a majority of the electronic gadgets people depend on at present.
May 30, 2017
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If atoms are mostly empty space, why do objects look and feel solid?
Chemist John Dalton proposed the theory that all matter and objects are made up of particles called atoms, and this is still accepted by the scientific community, almost two centuries later. Each of these atoms is each made up of an incredibly small nucleus and even smaller electrons, which move around at quite a distance from the centre
February 16, 2017
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Imaging quasiparticles that could lead to faster circuits, higher bandwidths
Zhe Fei pointed to the bright and dark vertical lines running across his computer screen. This nano-image, he explained, shows the waves associated with a half-light, half-matter quasiparticle moving inside a semiconductor.
June 7, 2017
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Imec and Besi Demonstrate Long-Term Reliability of Ni-Cu-Ag Plated Solar Modules
Drunen (The Netherlands) and Leuven (Belgium)–January 3, 2017–Today, the world-leading research and innovation hub in nano-electronics, energy and digital technology imec (partner in EnergyVille) and BE Semiconductor Industries N.V. (Besi), a leading manufacturer of assembly equipment for the semiconductor industry, announced that they have demonstrated long-term reliability in five full size 60-cells Nickel/Copper/Silver (Ni/Cu/Ag) plated solar cell modules, confirming the industrial value of this metallization technology.
January 5, 2017
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Improved polymer and new assembly method for ultra-conformable 'electronic tattoo' devices
A group of researchers at Waseda University has developed processes and materials for ultrathin stick-on electronic devices using elastomeric "nanosheet" film, achieving ease of production while also preserving high elasticity and flexibility fifty times better than previously reported polymer nanosheets.
February 22, 2017
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Improving Li-ion batteries with nanostructured conductive polymer gels
The electrode in lithium-ion (Li-ion) batteries is an integrated system in which both active materials and binder systems play critical roles in determining its final properties. In order to improve battery performance, a lot of research is focussing on the development of high-capacity active materials.
March 28, 2017
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Improving microscale energy storage unit with porous materials
Microscale energy storage units for wearable and miniaturized electronic devices are improved using porous materials.
November 21, 2016
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Improving silver nanowires for FTCEs with flash light interactions
Flexible transparent conducting electrodes (FTCEs) are an essential element of flexible optoelectronics for next-generation wearable displays, augmented reality (AR), and the Internet of Things (IoTs). Silver nanowires (Ag NWs) have received a great deal of attention as future FTCEs due to their great flexibility, material stability, and large-scale productivity. Despite these advantages, Ag NWs have drawbacks such as high wire-to-wire contact resistance and poor adhesion to substrates, resulting in severe power consumption and the delamination of FTCEs.
April 4, 2017
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In the fast lane - conductive electrodes are key to fast-charging batteries
Can you imagine fully charging your cell phone in just a few seconds? Researchers in Drexel University's College of Engineering can, and they took a big step toward making it a reality with their recent work unveiling of a new battery electrode design in the journal Nature Energy.
July 10, 2017
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Inexpensive organic material gives safe batteries a longer life
Modern batteries power everything from cars to cell phones, but they are far from perfect - they catch fire, they perform poorly in cold weather and they have relatively short lifecycles, among other issues. Now researchers from the University of Houston have described a new class of material that addresses many of those concerns in Nature Materials.
June 19, 2017
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Inexpensive organic material gives safe batteries a longer life
Discovery could benefit renewable energy, transportation, personal electronics
June 19, 2017
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Ink-jet printable and biocompatible layered electronics
Printed electronics can lead to both low-cost and flexible devices. Flexible electronics is of particular interest for wearable systems, such as health and fitness trackers, while the relative low-costs of printing are attractive for functional packaging for consumer products.
March 28, 2017
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Inkjet-printed batteries bring us closer to smart objects
The race is on to develop everyday objects that have network connectivity and can send and receive data: the so-called 'Internet of Things'. But this requires flexible, lightweight and thin rechargeable power sources. Currently available batteries are packaged into fixed shapes and sizes, making them unsuitable for many future needs.
May 2, 2017
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Innovations offer peek into the future of electronic devices
Purdue University researchers - during the international IEDM 2016 conference the week of Dec. 5 - showcased a range of concepts and technologies that foreshadow the future of the semiconductor industry.
December 14, 2016
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Innovative Approaches Could Enable Use of 2D Nanomaterials in Lithium-Ion Batteries
Low self-discharge, high specific energy density and low memory effect make lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) appealing as chief energy storage devices. Of the different components of a battery, electrode materials have an important part in improving electrochemical characteristics.
July 27, 2017
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Innovative Superconducting Thin Nanomaterial Gets Magnets Levitating
A thin nanomaterial that has superconducting properties has been developed by a team of experimental physicists headed by Professor Uwe Hartmann from Saarland University. the innovative material has the ability to levitate magnets, conduct electricity without loss, and screen magnetic fields below the temperature of about -200 °C.
April 7, 2017
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Innovative Technique for Using Layered Materials to Print TFTs
Printed transistors fabricated completely from layered materials--this is the innovative study by Graphene Flagship research team from AMBER at Trinity College Dublin. the outcomes of the study were published in the April 7th 2017 issue of the journal Science and look promising enough to inexpensively print a wide array of electronic devices from LEDs to solar cells that find applications in interactive smart food and drug labels, next-generation bank note security and e-passports.
April 10, 2017
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Insights into Opto-Electrical Properties of Two-Dimensional Semiconductor Nanocrystals
Nanocrystals synthesized through wet-chemical process have already been used in applications such as background lighting in new-generation flat panel displays. Their futuristic application would be as active elements for producing better color brilliance. They are even applied for medical diagnosis and treatment.
June 9, 2017
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Intense Pulsed Light Could Sinter Nanoparticles for Enhanced Electronics Manufacturing
Faster production of advanced, flexible electronics is among the potential benefits of a discovery by researchers at Oregon State University's College of Engineering.
December 23, 2016
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Interface between insulators enables information transport by spin
Modern computer technology is based on the transport of electric charge in semiconductors. But this technology's potential will be reaching its limits in the near future, since the components deployed cannot be miniaturized further. But, there is another option: using an electron's spin, instead of its charge, to transmit information.
February 15, 2017
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Interfering with graphene
The quality of graphene can be assessed from patterns produced in electron microscopy images, three RIKEN researchers have found (Advanced Materials Interfaces, "A new analytical method for extracting precise structural parameters of epitaxial graphene from moire patterns"). this new way of evaluating these carbon sheets, which are just one atom thick, could help to improve the manufacturing process of this prized material.
April 28, 2017
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International team of scientists unveils fundamental properties of spin Seebeck effect
Thermoelectric effects are a fundamental building block for the conception and development of new processes for information processing. they enable to re-use waste heat obtained in different processes for the operation of respective devices and thus contribute to the establishment of more energy-efficient, ecofriendly processes.
July 29, 2016
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Ionotronic Devices Open new Avenues for Creating Electrically Switchable Memories
Ionotronic devices rely on charge effects based on ions, instead of electrons or in addition to electrons. These devices open new opportunities for creating electrically switchable memories. However, there are still many technical challenges to overcome before this new kind of memories can be produced.
February 24, 2017
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Is a stretchable smart tablet in our future?
Engineering researchers at Michigan State University have developed the first stretchable integrated circuit that is made entirely using an inkjet printer, raising the possibility of inexpensive mass production of smart fabric (ACS Nano, "Fully Printed Stretchable Thin-Film Transistors and Integrated Logic Circuits").
February 15, 2017
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Misc. - J

Jagged platinum nanowires double the record for reaction critical to fuel cell performance
Fuel cells make electricity through chemical reactions. A key reaction is combining oxygen with hydrogen to make water while releasing energy in the form of electrons. The rate of this conversion is typically slow. It requires the presence of a catalyst such as platinum.
June 13, 2017
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Japanese Researchers Develop a Photocatalyst that Increases Hydrogen Production Tenfold
Hydrogen is an alternative source of energy that can be developed from renewable sources of water and sunlight. A photocatalyst capable of increasing hydrogen production tenfold has been developed by a group of Japanese Researchers.
May 19, 2017
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Jumping droplets whisk away hotspots in electronics
Engineers have developed a technology to cool hotspots in high-performance electronics using the same physical phenomenon that cleans the wings of cicadas.
April 3, 2017
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Misc. - K

Korea to establish an OLED light therapy R&D center
Korea's Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST) and the country's Engineering Research Center (ERC) are joingly setup a new OLED light therapy engineering center.
August 14, 2017
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Misc. - L

Lanthanide-Doped Upconversion Nanocrystals Improve Polarized Emission and Bioimaging
Recently, lanthanide-doped upconversion nanocrystals (UCNCs) have discovered immense potential in the applications of nonlinear optoelectronic and near-infrared bioimaging devices because of their exceptional photostability and tunable spectral characteristics.
May 22, 2017
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Large Currents can be Transported at Nanoscale Using Graphene
Graphene has established itself as a wonder material once again. An international research team headed by Professor Fritz Aumayr from the Institute of Applied Physics at TU Wien has demonstrated that the electrons in graphene are very mobile and react very rapidly.
December 22, 2016
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Large portfolio of 2D semiconductor materials benefits next-generation flexible electronics
Inspired by the unique optical and electronic property of graphene, two-dimensional (2D) layered materials -- as well as their hybrids -- have been intensively investigated in recent years, driven by their potential applications for nanoelectronics.
May 23, 2017
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Large-yield synthesis of 2D antimonene nanocrystals
Density functional theory computations have shown that monolayered arsenene and antimonene -- which are indirect wide-band-gap semiconductors -- under strain become direct band-gap semiconductors. Such dramatic transitions of electronic properties could open a new door for nanoscale transistors with high on/off ratio, blue/UV optoelectronic devices, and nanomechanical sensors based on new ultrathin semiconductors.
December 5, 2016
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Laser pulses reveal the superconductors of the future
Another step forward towards superconductivity at room temperature: an experiment at the cutting edge of condensed matter physics and materials science has revealed that the dream of more efficient energy usage can turn into reality.
May 9, 2017
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Lasertec lasercut smt stencils
Fantastic quality smt stencils, wave solder pallets and tooling along with solder paste and adhesive.
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Laying the foundations for hybrid silicon lasers
Producing semiconductor lasers on a silicon wafer is a long-held goal for the electronics industry, but their fabrication has proved challenging. Now, researchers at A*STAR have developed an innovative way to manufacture them that is cheap, simple and scalable.
June 14, 2017
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Learning how to fine-tune nanofabrication
Daniel Packwood, Junior Associate Professor at Kyoto University's Institute for Integrated Cell-Material Sciences (iCeMS), is improving methods for constructing tiny "nanomaterials" using a "bottom-up" approach called "molecular self-assembly". Using this method, molecules are chosen according to their ability to spontaneously interact and combine to form shapes with specific functions. In the future, this method may be used to produce tiny wires with diameters 1/100,000th that of a piece of hair, or tiny electrical circuits that can fit on the tip of a needle.
February 14, 2017
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Lego like silicon electronics fabricated with hybrid etching masks
(Nanowerk Spotlight) Bulk micromachining techniques are commonly used for making high aspect ratio structures used in complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology, microelectromechanical systems (MEMS), dynamic random access memory (DRAM) capacitors, and 3D integrated circuits. These techniques generally utilize a hard mask -- for example metal -- material to withstand abrasive deep reactive ion etching (DRIE) that is used in bulk micromachining.
February 6, 2017
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Light can switch on atomically thin topological materials
Theoretical physicists at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory used computer simulations to show how special light pulses could create robust channels where electricity flows without resistance in an atomically thin semiconductor.
January 4, 2017
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Light has new capacity for electronics
Characters in some of the more futuristic science fiction films, like "Minority Report" and "Iron Man," control computer displays with slick and deliberate hand motions. In "Minority Report," the protagonist, played by Tom Cruise, uses gloves that glow at the fingertips and give him the power of virtual manipulation. the light seems to allow him to control the screen as if it were a touchscreen, but he's touching nothing but air.
April 27, 2017
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Liquid electrolyte contacts for advanced characterization of resistive switching memories
Memristors are nanosized electronic devices that can be used to fabricate next generation memories, and to build up electronic synapses for neuromorphic computing.
July 26, 2017
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Liquid fuel for future computers
Researchers at ETH Zurich and IBM Research Zurich have built a tiny redox flow battery. this means that future computer chip stacks -- in which individual chips are stacked like pancakes to save space and energy -- could be supplied with electrical power and cooled at the same time by such integrated flow batteries (Energy & Environmental Science, "3D-printed fluidic networks for high-power-density heat-managing miniaturized redox flow batteries").
March 15, 2017
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Liquid metal nano printing set to revolutionize electronics
A new technique using liquid metals to create integrated circuits that are just atoms thick could lead to the next big advance for electronics.
February 17, 2017
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Lithium Metal Batteries Improved by Using Hybrid Graphene Nanotubes as Anode
Researchers from the Rice University have developed a rechargeable lithium metal battery with a capacity that is three times that of commercial lithium-ion batteries. They achieved this by overcoming a problem that has challenged Researchers for a long time, namely, the dendrite problem.
May 19, 2017
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Lithium-ion batteries will get more efficiency due to silicon, germanium, carbon nanowalls
Members of the D. V. Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics together with their colleagues from the Faculty of Chemistry of the Lomonosov Moscow State University have developed a new silicon- and germanium-based material that could significantly increase specific characteristics of lithium-ion batteries.
August 30, 2017
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Living computers: RNA circuits transform cells into nanodevices
The interdisciplinary nexus of biology and engineering, known as synthetic biology, is growing at a rapid pace, opening new vistas that could scarcely be imagined a short time ago.
July 27, 2017
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Logic circuits with diamond-based transistors
Scientists have succeeded in developing logic circuits equipped with diamond-based MOSFETs (metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect-transistors) at two different operation modes. This achievement is a first step toward the development of diamond integrated circuits operational under extreme environments.
August 2, 2017
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Long-lasting flow battery could run for more than a decade with minimum upkeep
Researchers from the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) have developed a new flow battery that stores energy in organic molecules dissolved in neutral pH water. this new chemistry allows for a non-toxic, non-corrosive battery with an exceptionally long lifetime and offers the potential to significantly decrease the costs of production.
February 9, 2017
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Looking at complex light wave forms
For the first time an international research team under the direction of Prof. Dr. Giuseppe Sansone at the Institute of Physics at the University of Freiburg has been able to completely characterize the complex evolution of weak electric fields.
May 31, 2017
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Looking at light to explore superconductivity in boron-diamond films
More than a decade ago, researchers discovered that when they added boron to the carbon structure of diamond, the combination was superconductive. Since then, growing interest has been generated in understanding these superconducting properties.
May 9, 2017
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Looking for the next leap in rechargeable batteries
Researchers may have just found a solution for one of the biggest stumbling blocks to the next wave of rechargeable batteries -- small enough for cellphones and powerful enough for cars.
February 17, 2017
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Looking for the quantum frontier
A team of researchers from Australia and the UK have developed a new theoretical framework to identify computations that occupy the 'quantum frontier' -- the boundary at which problems become impossible for today's computers and can only be solved by a quantum computer. Importantly, they demonstrate that these computations can be performed with near-term, intermediate, quantum computers (Quantum, "Achieving quantum supremacy with sparse and noisy commuting quantum computations").
April 27, 2017
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'Lossless' metamaterial could boost efficiency of lasers and other light-based devices
Engineers at the University of California San Diego have developed a material that could reduce signal losses in photonic devices. the advance has the potential to boost the efficiency of various light-based technologies including fiber optic communication systems, lasers and photovoltaics.
February 16, 2017
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Low haze structures for transparent flexible electrodes by electrospinning processes
For flexible electrodes, INM - Leibniz Institute for new Materials is working with the process of electrospinning, a technique that produces ultra-fine fibers that are up to 100 times thinner than a human hair. These fibers are collected on glass or on foils in an unstructured, wide mesh net. When conductive materials are spun, flexible conductive transparent electrodes could be produced.
April 13, 2017
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Lust for power: Engineers develop non-toxic material that generates electricity through hot and cold
Thanks to the discovery of a new material, a cooking pan could generate enough electricity to charge a cellphone in just a few hours. the team found that a combination of the chemical elements calcium, cobalt and terbium can create an efficient, inexpensive and bio-friendly material that can generate electricity through a thermoelectric process involving heat and cold air.
March 19, 2017
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Misc. - M

Magnetic discovery could be tip of the 'ice'berg
A new material, called "rewritable magnetic charge ice," has an unprecedented degree of control over local magnetic fields. the artificial, magnetically charged structure is formed by manipulating local magnetic charges that set the state of the magnetic "bits."
January 10, 2017
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Magnetic fields at the crossroads
From compasses used in ancient overseas navigation to electrical motors, sensors, and actuators in cars, magnetic materials have been a mainstay throughout human history. In addition, almost all information that exists in contemporary society is recorded in magnetic media, like hard drive disks.
March 7, 2017
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Major Progress in Smart Printed Electronics by AMBER
A team of researchers in AMBER, the Science Foundation Ireland-funded materials science research center hosted in Trinity College Dublin, have fabricated printed transistors entirely made up of two-dimensional (2D) nanomaterials for the first time.
April 7, 2017
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Making flexible electronics with nanowire networks
A smartphone touchscreen is an impressive piece of technology. It displays information and responds to a user's touch. But as many people know, it's easy to break key elements of the transparent, electrically conductive layers that make up even the sturdiest rigid touchscreen. If flexible smartphones, e-paper and a new generation of smart watches are to succeed, they can't use existing touchscreen technology.
June 5, 2017
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Making graphene using laser-induced phase separation
Researchers clarify how laser annealing technology can lead to production of ultrathin nanomaterials
December 1, 2016
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Making hydrogen fuel from humid air
One of the biggest hurdles to the widespread use of hydrogen fuel is making hydrogen efficiently and cleanly. Now researchers report in the journal ACS Nano a new way to do just that.
June 14, 2017
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Making sodium-ion batteries that last
Lithium-ion batteries have become essential in everyday technology. But these power sources can explode under certain circumstances and are not ideal for grid-scale energy storage.
February 15, 2017
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Making the most of nanoscale catalytic effects for nanotechnology
Research by scientists at Swansea University is helping to meet the challenge of incorporating nanoscale structures into future semiconductor devices that will create new technologies and impact on all aspects of everyday life.
January 19, 2017
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Making wires of polymers chains
Consumer demand continually pushes the electronics industry to design smaller devices. Now researchers at A*STAR have used a theoretical model to assess the potential of electric wires made from polymer chains that could help with miniaturization.
June 14, 2017
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Managing stress helps transistor performance
Tensile mechanical stress can have a useful effect for some transistors, where the resulting atomic strain allows its current-carrying electron-hole pairs better mobility. However, when that stress is applied to the whole device, as is a popular approach via use of what's called contact etching stop layers (CESLs), the drift region adjacent to the stretched channel is compressed and results in reduced performance.
May 16, 2017
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Mass Spectrometry Performance Improved by Triboelectric Nanogenerators
Mechanical energy harvested from the environment is converted into electricity by triboelectric nanogenerators (TENG). this electricity is used to recharge consumer electronics or powering small devices such as sensors.
February 28, 2017
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Materials that emit rainbows
Mechanochromic luminescent (MCL) materials change their color in response to a change in their environment, like pressure and temperature. to date, most MCL materials only change between two colors, limiting their applications. a international research team has developed tricolor-changing MLC materials. not only that, the developed materials exhibited efficient thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF) and allowed high performance organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) devices.
February 27, 2017
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Measuring how perovskite solar films efficiently convert light to power
Measurement shows potential for building better solar cells by imaging fundamental properties of the material
January 11, 2017
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Mechanism behind the electric charges generated by photosynthesis
Photosynthesis requires a mechanism to produce large amounts of chemical energy without losing the oxidative power needed to break down water. a Japanese research team has clarified part of this mechanism, marking another step towards the potential development of artificial photosynthesis
April 17, 2017
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Meeting the challenges of nanotechnology: Nanoscale catalytic effects for nanotechnology
Scientists show nanoscale modifications to the edge region of nanocontacts to nanowires can be used to engineer the electrical function of the interfaces.
January 19, 2017
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Melbourne Centre for Nanofabrication Adds Cutting Edge Nanolithography Capability
Nanotechnology is widely considered to be the way of the future for electronics, medicine and many other scientific endeavours.
August 1, 2016
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Memristors promise more precise and affordable neuroprosthetics
In a new paper, researchers from the University of Southampton, UK, and members of the EU-funded RAMP project, have demonstrated how memristors could help aid the development of more precise and affordable neuroprosthetics and bioelectric medicines.
October 5, 2016
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Metal instability achieves energy-efficient nanotechnology
Researchers show their nanowire resonators can be used to miniaturize energy-efficient electronics.
July 31, 2017
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Metal instability achieves energy-efficient nanotechnology
Computers that fit in our pockets, television screens no thicker than a door, and cars only slightly bigger than their passengers, technology is constantly getting smaller. A major reason for this miniaturization is the development of nano-size resonators, which convert small levels of electrical power into mechanical oscillations at high frequencies.
July 31, 2017
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Microbial fuel cell converts methane to electricity
Transporting methane from gas wellheads to market provides multiple opportunities for this greenhouse gas to leak into the atmosphere. Now, an international team of researchers has taken the first step in converting methane directly to electricity using bacteria, in a way that could be done near the drilling sites.
May 17, 2017
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Microbiologists make big leap in developing 'green' electronics
Microbiologists at the University of Massachusetts Amherst report that they have discovered a new type of natural wire produced by bacteria that could greatly accelerate the researchers' goal of developing sustainable "green" conducting materials for the electronics industry. the study by Derek Lovley and colleagues appears this week in mBio ("Expressing the Geobacter metallireducens PilA in Geobacter sulfurreducens Yields Pili with Exceptional Conductivity"), the American Society of Microbiology's premier journal.
January 17, 2017
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Miniaturizing the brain of a drone
In recent years, engineers have worked to shrink drone technology, building flying prototypes that are the size of a bumblebee and loaded with even tinier sensors and cameras. Thus far, they have managed to miniaturize almost every part of a drone, except for the brains of the entire operation -- the computer chip.
July 13, 2017
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Miniscule amounts of impurities in vacuum greatly affecting OLED lifetime
Reproducibility is a necessity for science but has often eluded researchers studying the lifetime of organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). Recent research from Japan sheds new light on why: impurities present in the vacuum chamber during fabrication but in amounts so small that they are easily overlooked.
December 28, 2016
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MIPT Researchers Demonstrate Development of Compact Sources of Coherent Plasmons
The possibility to develop compact sources of coherent plasmons has been theoretically demonstrated by researchers from MIPT's Laboratory of 2D Materials' Optoelectronics, Institute of Radioengineering and Electronics, and Tohoku University (Japan).
October 17, 2016
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MIT Researchers develop Method to Produce Highly Conductive, Wrinkle-Free, Single-Domain Graphene at Wafer Scale
Just like in a hair-raising thrill ride, electrons can move through graphene. Scientists have been aware for years that electrons can blitz through graphene close to the speed of light, much faster than they can move through silicon and other semiconducting materials.
April 4, 2017
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Moisture enhances ammonia sensitivity of carbon nanotubes
In spite of the numerous research efforts regarding the development of miniaturized, low-cost, and highly sensitive sensors based on different organic and semiconducting materials, carbon nanotubes still remain the most promising ones.
June 19, 2017
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Molecular Lego for nanoelectronics
The ability to assemble electronic building blocks consisting of individual molecules is an important objective in nanotechnology. An interdisciplinary research group is now significantly closer to achieving this goal. The team of researchers has successfully assembled and tested conductors and networks made up of individual, newly developed building block molecules.
May 18, 2017
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Molecular Lego for nanoelectronics
The ability to assemble electronic building blocks consisting of individual molecules is an important objective in nanotechnology. An interdisciplinary research group at Friedrich-Alexander Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) is now significantly closer to achieving this goal.
May 18, 2017
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More stable qubits in perfectly normal silicon
The power of future quantum computers stems from the use of qubits, or quantum bits, which do not have to be either 0 or 1, but can also be 0 and 1 at the same time. It is not yet clear on which technology these qubits in quantum computers will be based, but qubits based on electron spins are looking more and more promising
October 4, 2016
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Monitoring oxygen reaction dynamics with an individual nanosheet-based electronic circuit
Water electrolysis has been regarded as an environmentally friendly route to hydrogen gas production. However, efficiency of water catalysis is severely limited by poor kinetics of the oxygen evolution reaction (OER). In-depth understanding towards this reaction is expected to be a fundamental guideline for achieving a high-efficiency catalysis system design.
September 29, 2017
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Movable microplatform floats on a sea of droplets
Microelectromechanical systems, or MEMS, are tiny machines fabricated using equipment and processes developed for the production of electronic chips and devices. They've found a wide variety of applications in today's consumer electronics, but their moving parts can wear out over time as a result of friction.
December 16, 2016
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MRI-powered mini-robots could offer targeted treatment
Invasive surgical techniques - cutting through the breastbone for open heart surgery or making a large incision to inspect an abdominal tumor - allow physicians to effectively treat disease but can lead to sometimes serious complications and dramatically slow healing for the patient.
March 7, 2017
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MSI unveils Their new Pre-Built Gaming Systems
MSI, the world's leading manufacturer of true gaming hardware, has fitted its Aegis gaming desktop line with the recently introduced Intel® Kaby Lake chipset. Besides the new chipset, MSI has revamped its high-end Aegis Series desktops in terms of design, convenience and performance.
January 5, 2017
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MSU Researcher Wins Major Award to Build Tools for Examining Nanomaterials
Erik Grumstrup studies a world where electrons act like bumper cars with atoms and change happens in less than a millionth of a billionth of a second.
June 5, 2017
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Multi-parameter microscopy aids design of improved optoelectronic devices
The National Physical Laboratory has developed a novel measurement method, providing simultaneous topographical, electrical, chemical and optical microscopy at the nanoscale for the first time.
March 24, 2017
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Multilayer Hexagonal Boron Nitride Enhances Capabilities of Electronic Devices
A promising strategy that has recently gained an increased amount of interest in both industry and academia is the use of two dimensional (2D) layered materials to enhance the capabilities of electronic devices.
March 8, 2017
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Misc. - N

Nano One Materials announces Issuance of Taiwanese Patent for Battery Applications
Nano One Materials Corp. is pleased to announce the issuance of Taiwanese Patent No. 201207152 related to batteries utilizing the proprietary lithium mixed metal oxides developed by Nano One. the method for making the proprietary oxides is discussed in previously issued U.S. Patent Nos. 9,136,534 and 9,159,999.
March 18, 2016
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Nano One's Patented Technology set to Redefine Battery Grade Lithium
The advantages of Nano One's patented technology were described by Dan Blondal, CEO of Nano One Materials today. Blondal explained how Nano One's patented technology could facilitate long range electric vehicle batteries to use lithium carbonate as a substitute to expensive and supply-constrained lithium hydroxide.
April 28, 2017
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Nano-hologram paves way for integration of 3-D holography into everyday electronics
An Australian-Chinese research team has created the world's thinnest hologram, paving the way towards the integration of 3D holography into everyday electronics like smart phones, computers and TVs.
May 18, 2017
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Nano-imprinting technology improves transistor-based biosensors
Korean researchers are improving the fabrication of transistor-based biosensors by using silicon nanowires on their surface.
March 1, 2017
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Nano-level lubricant tuning improves material for electronic devices and surface coatings
Molybdenum disulfide, which is ubiquitously used as a solid lubricant, has recently been shown to have a two-dimensional (2D) form that is similar to graphene. But, when thinned down to less than a nanometer thick, MoS2 demonstrates properties with great promise as a functional material for electronic devices and surface coatings.
February 10, 2017
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Nano-Level Lubricant Tuning Enhances Material for Surface Coatings and Electronic Devices
Widely used as a solid lubricant, molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) has now been discovered to have a two-dimensional (2D) form that is similar to graphene. When MoS2 is thinned down to below a nanometer in thickness, it exhibits characteristics with great potential as a functional material for surface coatings and electronic devices.
February 13, 2017
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Nano-polycrystalline film leads to stronger magnetism compared to single-crystal films
To realize the next generation of devices for information processing based on new phenomena such as spintronics, multiferroics, magnetooptics, and magnonics, their constituent materials need to be developed. Recent rapid progress in nanotechnology allows us to fabricate nanostructures that are impossible to obtain in nature.
March 17, 2017
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Nano-SPEARs gently measure electrical signals in small animals
Microscopic probes developed at Rice University have simplified the process of measuring electrical activity in individual cells of small living animals. the technique allows a single animal like a worm to be tested again and again and could revolutionize data-gathering for disease characterization and drug interactions.
April 17, 2017
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Nanoalloys ten times as effective as pure platinum in fuel cells
A new type of nanocatalyst can result in the long-awaited commercial breakthrough for fuel cell cars. Research results from Chalmers University of Technology and Technical University of Denmark show that it is possible to significantly reduce the need for platinum, a precious and rare metal, by creating a nanoalloy using a new production technique. The technology is also well suited for mass production.
May 24, 2017
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Nanocellulose dramatically improves the 3D-printability of carbon nanotubes for wearable electronics
Researchers have focused on nanocellulose as a novel biomaterial with industrial and scientific applications, which range from the creation of new kinds of commercially useful materials and uses in medical technology all the way to the food and pharmaceutical industries.
September 25, 2017
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Nanocrystalline LEDs: Red, green, yellow, blue...
The color of the light emitted by an LED can be tuned by altering the size of their semiconductor crystals. Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet in Munich researchers have now found a clever and economical way of doing just that, which lends itself to industrial-scale production.
August 7, 2017
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Nanodiamonds Curtail Electrochemical Deposition that Leads to Short-Circuiting of Lithium Ion Batteries
Lithium-ion batteries have been behind a number of recent fires and meltdowns due to short-circuiting in mobile devices despite being extensively used in mobile devices from laptops to cell phones and are also considered to have one of the longest lifespans of commercial batteries today.
August 28, 2017
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Nanoelectronic thread probes form reliable, scar-free integration with the brain
Engineering researchers at the University of Texas at Austin have designed ultra-flexible, nanoelectronic thread (NET) brain probes that can achieve more reliable long-term neural recording than existing probes and don't elicit scar formation when implanted.
February 15, 2017
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Nanoelectronics scientists shatter 'impossible' record
An international research team that includes University of Central Florida Professor Enrique del Barco, Damien Thompson of the University of Limerick and Christian A. Nijhuis of the National University of Singapore has cracked an important limitation that for nearly 20 years has prevented the practical use of molecular diodes.
July 3, 2017
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Nanogenerator-powered electrospinning system
Researchers have developed a system that can execute the electrospinning process without any external power source.
September 26, 2017
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Nanoparticles could spur better LEDs, invisibility cloaks
In an advance that could boost the efficiency of LED lighting by 50 percent and even pave the way for invisibility cloaking devices, a team of University of Michigan researchers has developed a new technique that peppers metallic nanoparticles into semiconductors.
July 19, 2017
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Nanophotonic AFM probe provides ultrafast and ultralow noise detection
Photothermal induced resonance (PTIR) has found application in the characterization of materials in fields spanning from photovoltaics, plasmonic, polymer science, biology and geology to name a few. PTIR combines the spatial resolution of atomic force microscopy (AFM) with the specificity of absorption spectroscopy, enabling mapping of composition and electronic bandgap, material identification and biomolecule conformational analysis with nanoscale spatial resolution.b
September 1, 2017
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Nanophotonics team creates low-voltage, multicolor, electrochromic glass
Rice University's latest nanophotonics research could expand the color palette for companies in the fast-growing market for glass windows that change color at the flick of an electric switch.
March 8, 2017
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Nanophysics: Saving energy with a spot of silver
Tomorrow's computers will run on light, and gold nanoparticle chains show much promise as light conductors. Now Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet in Munich scientists have demonstrated how tiny spots of silver could markedly reduce energy consumption in light-based computation.
May 18, 2017
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Nanoporous material could lead to greater energy efficiency in electronics
Researchers from Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (UAB), in collaboration with the ICN2, have developed a nanoporous material based on a copper and nickel alloy, with a structure similar to that of a sponge with pores measuring the size of nanometers, which allows handling and storing information using very little energy.
July 13, 2017
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Nanoscale energy harvesters show large-scale impact
The production of nano-scale devices has drastically increased with the rise in technological applications, yet a major drawback to the functionality of nano-sized systems is the need for an equally small energy resource.
September 28, 2017
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Nanoscale view of energy storage
In a lab 18 feet below the Engineering Quad of Stanford University, researchers in the Dionne lab camped out with one of the most advanced microscopes in the world to capture an unimaginably small reaction.
January 16, 2017
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Nanosheets may produce more durable and longer lasting lithium-ion batteries
Lithium-ion batteries are used to power many things from mobile phones, laptops, tablets to electric cars. But they have some drawbacks, including limited energy storage, low durability and long charging time.
June 22, 2017
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Nanostructured cathode leads to breakthrough in magnesium batteries
Magnesium batteries offer promise for safely powering modern life -- unlike traditional lithium ion batteries, they are not flammable or subject to exploding -- but their ability to store energy has been limited.
August 23, 2017
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Nanostructures taste the rainbow
Engineers at Caltech have for the first time developed a light detector that combines two disparate technologies -- nanophotonics, which manipulates light at the nanoscale, and thermoelectrics, which translates temperature differences directly into electron voltage -- to distinguish different wavelengths (colors) of light, including both visible and infrared wavelengths, at high resolution.
June 28, 2017
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Nanotechnologists can now make orientation of magnetism adjustable in new materials
Nanotechnologists at the UT research institute MESA+ are now able to create materials in which they can influence and precisely control the orientation of the magnetism at will. An interlayer just 0.4 nanometres thick is the key to this success. the materials present a range of interesting possibilities, such as a new way of creating computer memory as well as spintronics applications -- a new form of electronics that works on the basis of magnetism instead of electricity.
March 8, 2016
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Nanotechnology and 3D printing, a mighty alliance to detect toxic liquids
Carbon nanotubes have made headlines in scientific journals for a long time, as has 3D printing. But when both combine with the right polymer, in this case a thermoplastic, something special occurs: electrical conductivity increases and makes it possible to monitor liquids in real time.
January 10, 2017
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Nanotechnology engineers design an infinitesimal computing device
In 1959 renowned physicist Richard Feynman, in his talk "Plenty of Room at the Bottom," spoke of a future in which tiny machines could perform huge feats. Like many forward-looking concepts, his molecule and atom-sized world remained for years in the realm of science fiction.
October 27, 2016
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Nanotechnology for energy materials: Electrodes like leaf veins
Scientists have recently demonstrated for these applications that networks of metallic mesh possessing fractal-like nano-features surpass other metallic networks in utility.
October 4, 2016
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Nanotechnology: Lighting up ultrathin films
Based on a study of the optical properties of novel ultrathin semiconductors, researchers have developed a method for rapid and efficient characterization of these materials.
January 17, 2017
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Nanotechnology: Lighting up ultrathin films
Based on a study of the optical properties of novel ultrathin semiconductors, researchers of Ludwig-Maximilians-Universit㲠M (LMU) in Munich have developed a method for rapid and efficient characterization of these materials.
January 17, 2017
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Nanowires, the future of electronics
The current demand for small-sized electronic devices is calling for fresh approaches in their design, report scientists.
June 7, 2017
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New 2D Materials Prove to be Fast in Conducting Electricity
New two-dimensional materials, with breakthrough magnetic and electrical attributes capable of making them building blocks of future quantum computers and several other improved electronics, have been fabricated by physicists at the University of California, Irvine.
April 27, 2017
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New 3D Chip Incorporates Data Storage and Computing
As embedded intelligence is gradually moving into more and more areas of day-to-day life, fields spanning from personalized medicine to autonomous driving are producing massive quantities of data. But just as the overflow of data is touching huge proportions, the ability of computer chips to process it into valuable information is stalling.
July 6, 2017
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New anode material set to boost lithium-ion battery capacity
A new approach developed by a team of researchers, led by Prof. Jaephil Cho (School of Energy and Chemical Engineering) could hold the key to greatly improving the performance of commercial lithium-ion batteries.
December 13, 2016
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New approach captures the energy of slow motion
A new concept in energy harvesting could capture energy currently wasted due to its characteristic low frequency and use it to power next-generation electronic devices, according to a team of Penn State materials scientists and electrical engineers.
December 21, 2016
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New approach may accelerate design of high-power batteries
Research led by a Stanford scientist promises to increase the performance of high-power electrical storage devices, such as car batteries.
April 21, 2017
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New battery coating could improve smart phones and electric vehicles
High performing lithium-ion batteries are a key component of laptops, smart phones, and electric vehicles. Currently, the anodes, or negative charged side of lithium ion batteries, are generally made with graphite or other carbon-based materials.
April 18, 2017
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New battery is activated by your spit
Researchers at Binghamton University, State University of New York have developed the next step in microbial fuel cells (MFCs): a battery activated by spit that can be used in extreme conditions where normal batteries don't function.
August 8, 2017
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New bilayer material could lead to more efficient and versatile light emission, such as bendy LED screens
A cover story appearing in the peer-reviewed journal Nanoscale Horizons reports a new bilayer material, with each layer measuring less than one nanometer in thickness, that someday could lead to more efficient and versatile light emission.
February 15, 2017
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New biofuel cell with energy storage
Researchers have developed a hybrid of a fuel cell and capacitor on a biocatalytic basis. with the aid of enzymatic processes, what's known as a biosupercapacitor efficiently generates and stores energy. the trick: the enzymes are embedded in a stable polymer gel, which can store a large amount of energy.
November 15, 2016
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New breakthrough in battery charging technology
A team of researchers, affiliated with UNIST has developed a single-unit, photo-rechargeable portable power source based on high-efficiency silicon solar cells and lithium-ion batteries (LIBs).
April 24, 2017
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New class of 'soft' semiconductors could transform HD displays
A new type of semiconductor may be coming to a high-definition display near you. Scientists at the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) have shown that a class of semiconductor called halide perovskites is capable of emitting multiple, bright colors from a single nanowire at resolutions as small as 500 nanometers.
June 26, 2017
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New classes of printable electrically conducting polymer materials for flexible electronics
Semiconductors, which are the very basic components of electronic devices, have improved our lives in many ways. they can be found in lighting, displays, solar modules and microprocessors that are installed in almost all modern day devices, from mobile phones, washing machines, and cars, to the emerging Internet of Things. to innovate devices with better functionality and energy efficiency, researchers are constantly looking for better ways to make them, in particular from earth-abundant materials using eco-friendly processes.
January 13, 2017
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New diode features optically controlled capacitance
A team of researchers at the Israel Institute of Technology has developed a new capacitor with a metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) diode structure that is tunable by illumination. The capacitor, which features embedded metal nanoparticles, is similar to a metal-insulator-metal (MIM) diode, except that the capacitance of the new device depends on illumination and exhibits a strong frequency dispersion, allowing for a high degree of tunability.
June 6, 2017
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New design improves performance of flexible wearable electronics
In a proof-of-concept study, North Carolina State University engineers have designed a flexible thermoelectric energy harvester that has the potential to rival the effectiveness of existing power wearable electronic devices using body heat as the only source of energy.
June 22, 2017
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New design strategy for longer lasting batteries
It's always exciting to bring home a new smartphone that seems to do anything, but it can be all downhill from there. with every charge and discharge cycle, the device's battery capacity lowers a little bit more – eventually rendering the device completely useless.
January 23, 2017
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New device could turn heat energy into a viable fuel source
A new device being developed by Washington State University physicist Yi Gu could one day turn the heat generated by a wide array of electronics into a usable fuel source.
August 31, 2017
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New Device Would Enable Optical and Mechanical Waves Vibrating at Tens of Gigahertz to Interact
A silicon photonic device capable of enabling the interaction of mechanical and optical waves vibrating at tens of gigahertz (GHz) has been theoretically developed by researchers at the University of Campinas's Gleb Wataghin Physics Institute (IFGW-UNICAMP) in São Paulo State, Brazil.
June 7, 2017
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New Dual-Surface Graphene Electrode Helps Split Water into Hydrogen and Oxygen
A catalyst based on laser-induced grapheme, which splits water into hydrogen on one side and oxygen on the other side, has been produced by Rice University Chemists. According to the Chemists, the cost-effective material may be a practical component in producing the hydrogen for use in future fuel cells.
August 7, 2017
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New energies in gas sensing
Gas detectors capable of sensing minute quantities of pollutants could help better monitor air quality. KAUST researchers have discovered a two-dimensional electronic material that exhibits high sensitivity to gas molecules, such as carbon dioxide (CO2), nitrogen oxides (NOx) and ammonia (NH3).
April 14, 2017
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New Flexible Supercapacitors Show Promise for Energy Storage Applications
Scientists at the NanoScience Technology Center of University of Central Florida (UCF) have developed a novel method for producing flexible supercapacitors that can store more amount of energy and can be recharged over 30,000 times without any sign of degradation. this new process could transform technology such as electric vehicles and mobile phones in the future.
November 22, 2016
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New 'gold standard' for flexible electronics
What if solar panels were both more efficient and more rugged? A new economical process makes optically transparent, flexible, and conductive gold films that could answer that question. The process deposits a single crystal gold film.
June 27, 2017
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New graphene-based system could help us 'see' electrical signaling in heart and nerve cells
Scientists have enlisted the exotic properties of graphene, a one-atom-thick layer of carbon, to function like the film of an incredibly sensitive camera system in visually mapping tiny electric fields in a liquid. Researchers hope the new method will allow more extensive and precise imaging of the electrical signaling networks in our hearts and brains.
December 16, 2016
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New Graphene-Based Technique for Allowing Control of Terahertz Waves
The terahertz waves span frequency ranges between the infrared spectrum (used, for instance, for night vision) and gigahertz waves (which are used, among others applications, in Wi-Fi connections). Terahertz waves help to detect materials that are undetectable at other frequencies. However, the application of these waves is severely restricted due to the absence of appropriate materials and devices to control them.
March 8, 2017
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New Graphene-Based Transistor Could Help Produce Faster Computers in the Future
Professor Ryan M. Gelfand from the University of Central Florida is part of a research team that produced a graphene-based transistor capable of developing computers, in the future, that use a hundredth of the power besides being a thousand times faster.
June 14, 2017
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New hydrocarbon fuel cells with high efficiency and low cost
The commercialization of the 'natural gas fuel cell' has finally come to the fore, thanks to the recent development of electrode materials that maintain long-term stability in hydrocarbon fuels. Advantage of using this material includes that it uses internal transition metal as a further catalyst in a fuel cell operating condition.
July 18, 2017
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New hydronium-ion battery presents opportunity for more sustainable energy storage
A new type of battery developed by scientists at Oregon State University shows promise for sustainable, high-power energy storage.
February 20, 2017
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New insights into the electrical properties of liquid crystals doped with nanoparticles
Many of the electronic devices we use in our daily life -- laptops, smartphones, smart watches, tablets, car navigation, etc. -- rely on liquid crystal display (LCD) technologies.
June 30, 2017
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New Layered Material Could Help develop Reduced Graphene Oxide-Based Transistors
A research team at North Carolina State University (NC State) has developed a new method for changing positively charged (p-type) reduced graphene oxide (rGO) into negatively charged (n-type) rGO. the resultant layered material can be employed to develop rGO-based transistors, which can be used in electronic devices.
March 31, 2017
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New low-cost technique converts bulk alloys to oxide nanowires
A simple technique for producing oxide nanowires directly from bulk materials could dramatically lower the cost of producing the one-dimensional (1D) nanostructures. that could open the door for a broad range of uses in lightweight structural composites, advanced sensors, electronic devices - and thermally-stable and strong battery membranes able to withstand temperatures of more than 1,000 degrees Celsius.
January 19, 2017
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New magnet has nearly massless charge carriers
Advances in modern electronics has demanded the requisite hardware, transistors, to be smaller in each new iteration. Recent progress in nanotechnology has reduced the size of silicon transistors down to the order of 10 nanometers. However, for such small transistors, other physical effects set in, which limit their functionality.
July 28, 2017
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New magnetic topological semimetal could advance electronics
A recent discovery by a team of researchers led by Tulane University advances fundamental knowledge that could one day lead to more energy-efficient computers, televisions, cell phones and other electronics.
July 24, 2017
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New material could lead to erasable and rewriteable optical chips
A military drone flying on a reconnaissance mission is captured behind enemy lines, setting into motion a team of engineers who need to remotely delete sensitive information carried on the drone's chips. Because the chips are optical and not electronic, the engineers can now simply flash a beam of UV light onto the chip to instantly erase all content. Disaster averted.
December 6, 2016
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New material for the electron injection layer and transport layer of organic electroluminescence displays
As part of the Strategic Basic Research Programs of Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), research group led by Professor Hideo Hosono at Institute of Innovative Research, Tokyo Institute of Technology has developed two new oxide semiconductors which are suitable for organic electronics (PNAS, "Transparent amorphous oxide semiconductors for organic electronics: Application to inverted OLEDs").
February 17, 2017
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New material inspired by a sea worm changes according to the environment
The gelatinous jaw of a sea worm, which becomes hard or flexible depending on the environment around it, has inspired researchers to develop a new material that can be applied to soft robotics. Despite having the texture of a gel, this compound is endowed with great mechanical resistance and consistency, and is able to adapt to changing environments.
April 28, 2017
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New method allows to study individual defects in transistors
Scientists from the University of Twente's MESA+ research institute have developed a method for studying individual defects in transistors. all computer chips, which are each made up of huge numbers of transistors, contain millions of minor 'flaws'.
December 6, 2016
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New method developed for analyzing photonic crystal structure
A new technique developed by MIT researchers reveals the inner details of photonic crystals, synthetic materials whose exotic optical properties are the subject of widespread research.
November 24, 2016
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New method for making green LEDs enhances their efficiency and brightness
Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign have developed a new method for making brighter and more efficient green light-emitting diodes (LEDs). Using an industry-standard semiconductor growth technique, they have created gallium nitride (GaN) cubic crystals grown on a silicon substrate that are capable of producing powerful green light for advanced solid-state lighting (Applied Physics Letters, ""Maximizing Cubic Phase Gallium Nitride Surface Coverage on Nano-patterned Silicon (100)").
July 29, 2016
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New method promises easier nanoscale manufacturing
Scientists at the University of Chicago and Argonne National Laboratory have discovered a new way to precisely pattern nanomaterials that could open a new path to the next generation of everyday electronic devices.
July 28, 2017
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New Method Using Nano-Antennas Helps Control Light Propagation in Waveguides
A method to control the propagation of light in confined pathways, or waveguides, has been developed by a team of Columbia Engineering researchers headed by Applied Physics Assistant Professor Nanfang Yu.
April 18, 2017
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New Model Accurately Predicts Electronic Properties of a Combination of 2D Semiconductors
Bandgap is the so-called defining property of a semiconductor, and it is considered to be a barrier that prevents electrons within a particular energy range from passing through a material.
February 7, 2017
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New nanocoating for space tech applications
Experimental physicists in the research group led by Professor Uwe Hartmann at Saarland University have developed a thin nanomaterial with superconducting properties. Below about -200 °C these materials conduct electricity without loss, levitate magnets and can screen magnetic fields.
April 6, 2017
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New nanofiber marks important step in next generation battery development
One of the keys to building electric cars that can travel longer distances and to powering more homes with renewable energy is developing efficient and highly capable energy storage systems.
March 10, 2017
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New Nanoscale Memory Cell for Minimizing the Size of Superconducting Computers
From the 1950s, considerable research and development initiatives have aimed to design a superconducting computer with the ability to perform high-speed computations without heat dissipation.
June 14, 2017
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New organic lasers one step closer to reality
New research could make lasers emitting a wide range of colors more accessible and open new applications from communications and sensing to displays.
April 28, 2017
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New organic-inorganic hybrid material may be the future for more efficient technologies
An organic-inorganic hybrid material may be the future for more efficient technologies that can generate electricity from either light or heat or devices that emit light from electricity.
February 13, 2017
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New Oxygen-Free Alloys Could Increase Performance of Biosensors, Semiconductors
A team of researchers at the University of Connecticut have discovered that decreasing oxygen in certain nanocrystalline materials may enhance their durability and strength at high temperatures, a potential enhancement that could result in faster jet engines, better biosensors, and greater capacity semiconductors.
July 18, 2017
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New photoacoustic technique detects gases at parts-per-quadrillion level
A team of researchers has found a way to detect trace gases down to concentrations at the parts-per-quadrillion level using a new variation on the photoacoustic effect, a technique that measures the sound generated when light interacts with molecules.
June 27, 2017
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New platinum-based catalysts boost activity for key chemical reaction in fuel cells
Fuel cells are a promising technology for clean and efficient electrical power generation, but their cost, activity, and durability are key challenges to commercialization. Today's fuel cells use expensive platinum (Pt)-based nanoparticles as catalysts to accelerate the reactions involved in converting the chemical energy from renewable fuels--such as hydrogen, methanol, and ethanol--into electrical energy.
December 19, 2016
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New quantum liquid crystals may play role in future of computers
Physicists at the Institute for Quantum Information and Matter at Caltech have discovered the first three-dimensional quantum liquid crystal -- a new state of matter that may have applications in ultrafast quantum computers of the future.
April 20, 2017
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New quantum states for better quantum memories
Conventional memories used in today's computers only differentiate between the bit values 0 and 1. In quantum physics, however, arbitrary superpositions of these two states are possible. Most of the ideas for new quantum technology devices rely on this "Superposition Principle".
November 23, 2016
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New research facilitates tuning of thermal conductivity of 2D materials
A research team has discovered a surprising way to direct the thermal conductivity of 2D materials, which will assist electronics designers to dissapate heat in electronic gadgets that utilize these materials.
October 22, 2016
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New research reveals rich potential of holey graphene for battery systems
A recent research reveals that in a battery system, electrodes containing porous graphene scaffolding deliver a considerable improvement in both the retention and transport of energy. Typically, methods to increase the density of stored charge conflict with those that aim to enhance the speed at which ions can travel through a material.
May 12, 2017
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New 'Star-Spangled' Nanomaterial May Open Door to Advanced Electronics
A research team from the University of Texas at Dallas has been involved in analyzing a variety of materials for several years hoping to find one with electrical properties that may be suitable for small, energy-efficient transistors to power future electronic devices.
March 19, 2017
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New study suggests 2-D boron may be best for flexible electronics
Though they're touted as ideal for electronics, two-dimensional materials like graphene may be too flat and hard to stretch to serve in flexible, wearable devices. "Wavy" borophene might be better, according to Rice University scientists.
October 4, 2016
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New system for exploring superconductivity
The discovery in 1986 that a copper-based compound conducts electricity without resistance at much higher temperatures than conventional superconductors rocked the world of physics as it seemed like the holy grail of superconduction at room temperature was within reach. However, while cuprates that conduct at even higher temperatures have since been found, room-temperature superconduction still feels like a distant goal. Furthermore, despite three decades of feverish effort, scientists do not fully understand how cuprates superconduct.
January 20, 2017
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New tabletop technique probes outermost electrons of atoms deep inside solids
It may be unwise to judge a book by its cover, but you can tell a lot about a material from the outermost electrons in its atoms.
November 23, 2016
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New technique for Producing Increasingly Efficient Intermetallic Nanoparticles for Fuel Cell Applications
A method for producing more efficient, smaller intermetallic nanoparticles, for fuel cell applications, has been discovered by scientists at Ames Laboratory. this new method also uses less of the expensive precious metal platinum.
May 10, 2017
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New Technique to Bond Chips Uses Ink with Silver Nanoparticles
Today in electronics there are two main approaches to building circuits: the rigid one (silicon circuits) and the new, more appealing, flexible one based on paper and polymeric substrates that can be combined with 3-D printing. to date, chips are used to reach the reliable and high electrical performance needed for sophisticated specialized functions.
March 15, 2017
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New Technique to Create Semiconducting Nanocrystals for LED Displays
LMU Researchers have made it possible to tweak the color of light emitted by an LED by modifying the size of their semiconductor crystals. They recently discovered a clever and cost-effective way of accomplishing this, which lends itself to mass-scale production.
August 8, 2017
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New Technique Yields new Nanomaterial for Potential Use in Bendable, Wearable Electronics
An international team of nanomaterials researchers from the University of Illinois at Chicago and Korea University have devised a low-cost and simple technique to develop a new, ultrathin film that is both highly conductive to electric current and transparent.
November 23, 2016
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New Theory by Rice Scientists Enhance Heat Sinks in Future Microelectronics
Rice University scientists suggest that bumpy surfaces with graphene between would help to dissipate heat in next-generation microelectronic devices.
November 30, 2016
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New tri-layer structure increases energy density in lithium batteries
Yuan Yang, assistant professor of materials science and engineering at Columbia Engineering, has developed a new method to increase the energy density of lithium (Li-ion) batteries.
October 22, 2016
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New ultra-thin semiconductor could extend life of Moore's Law
Following a decade of intensive research into graphene and two-dimensional materials a new semiconductor material shows potential for the future of super-fast electronics.
November 21, 2016
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New Ultrafast Flexible and Transparent Memory Devices May be Precursor to new Age of Electronics
Engineering experts from the University of Exeter have come up with a breakthrough way to create the smallest, quickest, highest-capacity memories for transparent and flexible applications that could lead to a future golden age of electronics.
April 3, 2017
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New ultrathin semiconductor materials exceed some of silicon's 'secret' powers
The next generation of feature-filled and energy-efficient electronics will require computer chips just a few atoms thick. For all its positive attributes, trusty silicon can't take us to these ultrathin extremes.
August 11, 2017
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New X-ray laser technique reveals magnetic skyrmion fluctuations
A new way of operating the powerful X-ray laser at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory has enabled researchers to detect and measure fluctuations in magnetic structures being considered for new data storage and computing technologies.
August 31, 2017
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Newly Developed Microsupercapacitors may Enable new Generation of "Smart" Products
Of late, energy storage units that can be incorporated into wearable and flexible electronic systems are gaining in importance. a research team from KAUST has recently developed a microsupercapacitor that exploits 3D porous electrodes. There is anticipation that these micropower units will enable a new generation of "smart"products, such as self-powered sensors for wearables, structural health monitoring, security, and internet of things applications.
December 6, 2016
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Newly-discovered semiconductor dynamics may help improve energy efficiency
Researchers examining the flow of electricity through semiconductors have uncovered another reason these materials seem to lose their ability to carry a charge as they become more densely "doped." Their results, which may help engineers design faster semiconductors in the future, are published online in the journal ACS Nano.
September 5, 2017
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Next Generation Silicon Photonic Optical Network
FLIR Systems X6540sc thermal imaging camera is being used by the Photonics Packaging Group at the Tyndall National Institute (Cork, Ireland) as part of a thermal microscope system to image the silicon photonic optical network unit (ONU) for next generation passive optical networks (NG-PONs) developed in the European FP7-Project "FABULOUS".
November 29, 2016
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Next-gen solvents capture carbon with half the energy
U.S. energy production could increase with the help of an improved carbon capture technology that use about half the energy of today's standard technologies. Emissions captured at fossil fuel power plants could in turn be used to harvest more crude by injecting it into underground oil fields.
June 19, 2017
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Next-generation smartphone battery inspired by the gut
A new prototype of a lithium-sulphur battery -- which could have five times the energy density of a typical lithium-ion battery -- overcomes one of the key hurdles preventing their commercial development by mimicking the structure of the cells which allow us to absorb nutrients.
October 26, 2016
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Nitrides in transition
The average, everyday person might not be familiar with gallium nitride, also known as GaN, but there is a good chance they've heard of silicon, a semiconductor that's been used for decades and found in every computer and most electronics.
June 8, 2017
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Nonlinear optics
The Semiconductor Industry Association has estimated that at current rates of increase, computers' energy requirements will exceed the world's total power output by 2040.
February 21, 2017
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Nothing boring about the thinnest boron ever
To revolutionize devices such as solar cells and supercomputers, scientists want mechanically and chemically robust, strong materials that also conduct. A team pushed the envelope on such materials by creating a single layer of boron atoms. Thin, flat layers of materials are typically grown on a surface, or substrate, to support the structure during the growth process.
June 12, 2017
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Novel nanotube structure strengthens thin films for flexible electronics
Reflecting the structure of composites found in nature and the ancient world, researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have synthesized thin carbon nanotube (CNT) textiles that exhibit both high electrical conductivity and a level of toughness that is about fifty times higher than copper films, currently used in electronics.
April 21, 2017
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Novel silicon etching technique crafts 3-D gradient refractive index micro-optics
A multi-institutional research collaboration has created a novel approach for fabricating three-dimensional micro-optics through the shape-defined formation of porous silicon (PSi), with broad impacts in integrated optoelectronics, imaging, and photovoltaics.
November 29, 2016
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Novel suite of nanowires opens up new horizons in nanoelectronics
The current demand for small-sized electronic devices is calling for fresh approaches in their design.
June 7, 2017
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Misc. - O

OLED Electrodes Made from Graphene
There have been a number of miracle materials throughout history and one of the latest examples is graphene, an atom-thick sheet of carbon. It earned this title because it is exceptionally strong and hard while still being flexible, transparent, and highly conductive. These are desirable properties for a number of applications and for the first time, researchers at Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft and the GLADIATOR project have successfully made functional OLED electrodes from the material.
January 4, 2017
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One step closer to practical fast-charging batteries
Electrodes are critical parts of every battery architecture -- charge too fast, and you can decrease the charge-discharge cycle life or damage the battery so it won't charge anymore.
June 14, 2017
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One-dimensional crystals for low-temperature thermoelectric cooling
Thermoelectric cooling is a solid-state refrigeration process where the heat in an electrically conductive material is transferred using the material's own conduction electrons without any need for the gaseous coolants, such as chlorofluorocarbons, that are used in conventional refrigeration.
May 24, 2017
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Optical communication using solitons on a photonic chip
Optical solitons are special wave packages that propagate without changing their shape. They are ubiquitous in nature, and occur in Plasma Physics, water waves to biological systems. While solitons also exist in optical fiber, discovered at Bell labs in the 1980'ies, there technological use so far has been limited. While researchers studied their use for optical communication, eventually the approach was abandoned.
June 8, 2017
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Optoelectronic inline measurement - accurate to the nanometer
Germany counts high-precision manufacturing processes among its advantages as a location. It's not just the aerospace and automotive industries that require almost waste-free, high-precision manufacturing to provide an efficient way of testing the shape and orientation tolerances of products.
June 13, 2017
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Organ chips get smart and go electric
Organs-on-Chips (Organ Chips) are emerging as powerful tools that allow researchers to study the physiology of human organs and tissues in ways not possible before. By mimicking normal blood flow, the mechanical microenvironment, and how different tissues physically interface with one another in living organs, they offer a more systematic approach to testing drugs than other in vitro methods that ultimately could help to replace animal testing.
June 14, 2017
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Organic electronics can use power from socket
Printed electronics and organic light-emitting devices now perform at levels sufficient for a number of eco-friendly, energy-efficient applications. Previously the idea has been to drive the organic electronics using solar cells, batteries or wireless transformers, which works well in many cases.
March 21, 2017
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Organic electronics: Semiconductors as decal stickers
No more error-prone evaporation deposition, drop casting or printing: Scientists at Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich and FSU Jena have developed organic semiconductor nanosheets, which can easily be removed from a growth substrate and placed on other substrates.
May 8, 2017
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Organic-inorganic heterostructures with programmable electronic properties
Researchers from the University of Strasbourg & CNRS (France), in collaboration with the University of Mons (Belgium), the Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research (Germany) and the Technische Universität Dresden (Germany), have devised a novel supramolecular strategy to introduce tunable 1D periodic potentials upon self-assembly of ad hoc organic building blocks on graphene, opening the way to the realization of hybrid organic--inorganic multilayer materials with unique electronic and optical properties.
March 29, 2017
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Organic-inorganic hybrid perovskites could be a game changer for future spintronic devices
A University of Utah-led team has discovered that organic-inorganic hybrid perovskites could be a game changer for future spintronic devices.
May 29, 2017
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Origami optoelectronics
In a new paper in ACS Nano, researchers present strategies to demonstrate the degree to which highly deformable properties, including stretching, bending, and twisting can be achieved in conjunction with high-performance photodetection through the integration of Miura origami, array design, and paper printing processes, even while using intrinsically brittle but high-performing inorganic electronic/optical materials.
September 28, 2017
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Origin Omni review: the first true enthusiast all-in-one PC
This wide-screen, curved all-in-one has what it takes for gaming.
October 3, 2016
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Overview of synthesizing hybrid nanomaterials with microfluidics
Hybrid nanomaterials (nanohybrids) are composed of two or more components -- at least one of which is nanoscale -- exhibiting many distinct physicochemical properties and hold great promise for applications in optics, electronics, magnetics, new energy, environment protection, and biomedical engineering.
May 9, 2017
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Oxford Nanoimaging Reports on the use of their Super-Resolution Nanoimager in the BioMAN Laboratory, Arizona State University in Tempe for the Biophysics Study of Protein Machines.
Oxford Nanoimaging reports on the use of their super-resolution Nanoimager in the BioMAN Laboratory, Arizona State University in Tempe for the biophysics study of protein machines. Oxford Nanoimaging Limited manufacture and sell custom microscopes offering super-resolution and single-molecule capabilities to research users.
May 9, 2017
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Misc. - P

Particles from outer space are wreaking low-grade havoc on personal electronics
You may not realize it but alien subatomic particles raining down from outer space are wreaking low-grade havoc on your smartphones, computers and other personal electronic devices.
February 17, 2017
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Patterns that push the limits
What about putting your logo on LED lamp to project the picture on the wall? Or do you want your money to shine in different nano-colours depending on the value? with a new method from Chalmers and the University of Gothenburg this is possible.
November 18, 2016
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Peeling off the silicene layers for new electronics
Much like an overcooked dinner, the next so-called wonder material for next-generation electronics has been 'stuck to the pan' until researchers at the UOW's Institute for Superconducting and Electronic Materials (ISEM) came up with a breakthrough solution.
August 1, 2016
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Perovskite solar cells - a true alternative to silicon?
The growing need for 'green' energy sources combined with silicon solar cells' stagnating power conversion efficiencies have lead to a keen search for an alternative to silicon that would bring about a major change. Perovskite solar cell technology, boasting potential for high efficiency, low-cost scalable photovoltaic solar cells, may just be a suitable contender in this race.
December 1, 2016
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Perovskite-based flexible image sensor array
Perovskite materials have attracted great attention in the fields of optoelectronics due to their significant optoelectronic properties. So far, the applications of perovskite thin-films have been limited to solar cells because the required high-definition patterning for optoelectronic devices hadn't been achieved yet.
September 5, 2017
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'Persistent photoconductivity' offers new tool for bioelectronics
Researchers at North Carolina State University have developed a new approach for manipulating the behavior of cells on semiconductor materials, using light to alter the conductivity of the material itself.
May 3, 2017
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Personalized energy
Being cut off from electricity doesn't just affect whether we can make a phone call or heat dinner; it affects a doctor's ability to perform surgery, a police officer's ability to respond to a 911 call, and a city's ability to provide basic services to its citizens.
March 8, 2016
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Phenomen project to lay the foundations for a new age of information processing
The Polytechnic University of Valencia (UPV) is taking part in the European project PHENOMEN which kicked off last September. Funded through the highly-competitive H2020 Future and Emerging Technologies (FET-Open) programme, it aims to lay the foundations of a new information technology. PHENOMEN is a ground-breaking project that will combine advances in photonics, mechanics and electronics to develop the first optically-driven phonon sources and detectors, all at the nanoscale.
December 9, 2016
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Phosphorene reveals its superconductivity
A new atomically thin material similar to graphene has been proven to be a promising new superconductive material.
April 12, 2017
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Photonic crystal and nanowire combo advances 'photonic integration'
While bigger nanowires can improve light confinement and performance, it increases both energy consumption and device footprint -- both of which are considered 'fatal' when it comes to integration. Addressing this problem, researchers came up with an approach that involves combining a sub-wavelength nanowire with a photonic crystal platform.
April 3, 2017
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Photonic crystal and nanowire combo advances 'photonic integration'
Contrary to the tremendous success story of electronic integration, photonic integration is still in its infancy. One the most serious obstacles it faces is the need to use a variety of materials to achieve different functions -- unlike electronic integration. to complicate matters further, many of the materials required for photonic integration aren't compatible with silicon integration technology.
April 3, 2017
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Photopower for microlabs
Miniaturized devices such as microsensors often require an independent, equally miniaturized power supply. Searching for suitable systems, Japanese scientists have now developed a fully integrated microfluidic device that produces hydrogen fuel and converts it into electrical energy based on photocatalysis.
June 14, 2017
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Photovoltaics and batteries: an expensive combination
Solar power can cover up to 40% of the electricity needs of a typical Belgian household. Going beyond that level becomes really expensive: using batteries coupled with solar panels would be twice as expensive as using the power grid.
May 15, 2017
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Physicists achieve rapid magnetic switching with lasers
Making a magnet from a piece of iron and a coil or wire, or another magnet, is a simple experiment. An external electric or magnetic field can align groups of atoms in the iron over time so that they take on their own permanent magnetic field.
September 26, 2017
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Physicists decipher electronic properties of materials in work that may change transistors
University of Texas at Dallas physicists have published new findings examining the electrical properties of materials that could be harnessed for next-generation transistors and electronics.
December 2, 2016
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Physicists demonstrate topological superconductivity on palladium dibismuthides
The hunting of the Majorana fermions - particles that are their own antiparticles - in topological superconductors is one of paramount research targets in condensed matter physics today. Recently, a research team led by Professor Qi-Kun Xue of Tsinghua University in China has succeeded to reveal experimental evidence of topological superconductivity near the surface of epitaxial β-Bi2Pd films, and possible Majorana zero modes at magnetic vortices.
July 3, 2017
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Physicists design 2-D materials that conduct electricity at almost the speed of light
Physicists at the University of California, Irvine and elsewhere have fabricated new two-dimensional quantum materials with breakthrough electrical and magnetic attributes that could make them building blocks of future quantum computers and other advanced electronics.
April 26, 2017
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Physicists develop ultrathin superconducting film
New nano-coating for space tech applications
April 6, 2017
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Physicists discover how electricity is conducted in a type of two-dimensional material
The discovery has the potential to revolutionise the development of the tiny electronic devices that control everything from smart phones to transport and from banking to medical technology.
December 16, 2016
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Physicists find strange state of matter in superconducting crystal
New research published this week shows a rare state of matter in which electrons in a superconducting crystal organize collectively. The findings lay the groundwork for answering one of the most compelling questions in physics: How do correlated electron systems work, and are they related to one another?
August 22, 2017
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Physicists master unexplored electron property
While the charge and spin properties of electrons are widely utilized in modern day technologies such as transistors and memories, another aspect of the subatomic particle has long remained uncharted. This is the "valley" property which has potential for realizing a new class of technology termed "valleytronics" -- similar to electronics (charge) and spintronics (spin).
July 25, 2017
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Physicists resolve long-standing mystery of structure-less transition
We normally associate conduction of electricity with metals. However, some of the high measured conductivities are found in certain organic molecular crystals. Metallic, semiconducting and even superconducting properties can be achieved in these materials, which have interested scientists for decades.
August 22, 2017
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Physicists solve decades-old scientific mystery of negative differential resistance
With a storied history that includes more than a half-century of research, a Nobel Prize, and multiple attempts at practical applications, the story of negative differential resistance--or NDR--reads like a scientific mystery, a mystery that University of Alberta physicists have at last succeeded in unraveling.
January 5, 2017
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Physicists Tap Properties of Plasmons to Expand the Color Range of Color-Changing Glass
A recent nanophotonics study carried out at Rice University can broaden the color palette available for companies in the rapidly growing market for glass windows with the ability to change color by just the click of an electric switch.
March 9, 2017
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Physicists turn a crystal into an electrical circuit
Washington State University physicists have found a way to write an electrical circuit into a crystal, opening up the possibility of transparent, three-dimensional electronics that, like an Etch A Sketch, can be erased and reconfigured.
July 27, 2017
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Piezo Systems for Microscopy, the Semiconductor Industry, and Photonics Ready for Use Even Faster
PI (Physik Instrumente) offers shorter lead times for selected piezo-based positioning systems and nanopositioning controllers. this enables even faster prototype set-up and faster integration of products into the application environment for customers of PI.
December 12, 2016
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Piezoelectric nanogenerators for self-powered flexible sensors
Researchers in China have demonstrated a high performance flexible piezoelectric nanogenerator based on a piezoelectrically enhanced nanocomposite micropillar array of BaTiO3 nanoparticles embedded into a highly crystalline polymer for efficient energy harvesting and highly sensitive self-powered sensing.
June 16, 2017
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PillarHall test structures accelerate the development of microelectronics in three dimensions
VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland has developed the unique PillarHall test structures to accelerate the market entry of three-dimensional, small, efficient and low-power but high-performance electronic components. This will benefit developers of challenging thin film and related manufacturing processes, and thereby the entire electronics industry value network.
June 14, 2017
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Plant inspiration could lead to flexible electronics
Versatile, light-weight materials that are both strong and resilient are crucial for the development of flexible electronics, such as bendable tablets and wearable sensors. Aerogels are good candidates for such applications, but until now, it's been difficult to make them with both properties. Now, researchers report that mimicking the structure of the 'powdery alligator-flag' plant has enabled them to make a graphene-based aerogel that meets these needs.
June 21, 2017
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Plant Inspiration Helps Researchers Create Graphene-Based Aerogel for Use in Flexible Electronics
Versatile, light-weight materials with a combination of strength and resilience are vital for the development of flexible electronics, such as wearable sensors and bendable tablets. Aerogels are promising candidates for such applications, but so far, it has been hard to create them with both properties.
June 22, 2017
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Plasmon-powered upconversion nanocrystals for enhanced bioimaging and polarized emission
Lanthanide-doped upconversion nanocrystals (UCNCs) have recently found great potential in the applications of near-infrared bioimaging and nonlinear optoelectronic devices due to their tunable spectral characteristics and excellent photostability.
May 19, 2017
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Platinum clusters with precise numbers of atoms for preparative-scale catalysis
Subnanometer noble-metal clusters have been studied previously for these possibilities in catalytic applications. For example, it is known that platinum is used as a catalyst for a fuel cell, which is conductive and exhibits magnetism. Platinum is indispensable as a material for the next-generation energy grid, but it is "rare metal" whose reserves are limited. In order to make effective use of resources, it is essential to improve the atomic level accuracy of subnanometer metal clusters and increase the amount of synthesis.
September 25, 2017
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Playing Elite: Dangerous on HTC Vive vs Oculus Rift
Upgrade your Elite: Dangerous experience with VR.
February 14, 2017
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Printable solar cells just got a little closer
A University of Toronto Engineering innovation could make printing solar cells as easy and inexpensive as printing a newspaper. Dr. Hairen Tan and his team have cleared a critical manufacturing hurdle in the development of a relatively new class of solar devices called perovskite solar cells. this alternative solar technology could lead to low-cost, printable solar panels capable of turning nearly any surface into a power generator.
February 16, 2017
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Printable solar cells just got a little closer
Research removes a key barrier to large-scale manufacture of low-cost, printable perovskite solar cells
February 16, 2017
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Printed nanosensors monitor tire wear in real time
Electrical engineers at Duke University have invented an inexpensive printed sensor that can monitor the tread of car tires in real time, warning drivers when the rubber meeting the road has grown dangerously thin.
June 14, 2017
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Printed transistors consisting entirely of 2-D nanomaterials
Researchers in AMBER, the Science Foundation Ireland-funded materials science research centre hosted in Trinity College Dublin, have fabricated printed transistors consisting entirely of 2-dimensional nanomaterials for the first time. These 2D materials combine exciting electronic properties with the potential for low-cost production.
April 6, 2017
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Printed, flexible and rechargeable battery can power wearable sensors
Nanoengineers at the University of California San Diego have developed the first printed battery that is flexible, stretchable and rechargeable. The zinc batteries could be used to power everything from wearable sensors to solar cells and other kinds of electronics.
May 24, 2017
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Printing at the Nanoscale on the tip of an Optical Fibre
Science and art have come together to create a new fabrication method to print a nanoscale imaging probe onto the tip of a glass fibre as thin as a human hair.
May 11, 2017
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Producing a room temperature field-effect transistor using graphene's electron spin
Graphene Flagship researchers based at Chalmers University of Technology in Gothenburg, Sweden have published in Nature Communications a research paper showing a graphene-based spin field-effect transistor operating at room temperature.
July 4, 2017
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Programmable plasmons by strain engineering
Metal nanoparticles can concentrate light near their surface through the excitation of surface plasmons, which are collective oscillations of electrons. Depending on the size and shape of the metal particles, surface plasmons can show a range of different optical responses and colors.
November 29, 2016
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Prototype device for measuring graphene-based electromagnetic radiation created
Bolometer is a device for measuring electromagnetic radiation energy flow based on measurement of variations of physical parameters of thermosensitive element as a result of heating by absorption of radiation energy.
October 27, 2016
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Portable energy harvester for self-powered devices
Researchers worldwide have begun developing triboelectric nanogenerators for harvesting ambient environmental energy -- for instance human walking and ocean waves -- and large-scale TENG devices don't seem to be far off.
July 6, 2017
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Powerful new photodetector can enable optoelectronics advances
In today's increasingly powerful electronics, tiny materials are a must as manufacturers seek to increase performance without adding bulk.
July 7, 2017
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Powering the future with low-cost, high-performance all-solid-state batteries
Ever since batteries were invented over 200 years ago, there has been a drive to improve quality and performance at reduced costs. Compared to common lithium-ion batteries that contain lithium ion conducting liquids, all-solid-state batteries of the future promise a suite of advantages: improved safety and reliability, higher energy storage and longer life cycles.
July 19, 2017
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Putting a block on dot-to-dot
The quantum processes that determine the operation of single-electron devices have been uncovered by RIKEN scientists. this knowledge will help optimize these components as building blocks for future quantum computers.
April 14, 2017
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Putting a spin on logic gates
Computer electronics are shrinking to small enough sizes that the very electrical currents underlying their functions can no longer be used for logic computations in the ways of their larger-scale ancestors. a traditional semiconductor-based logic gate called a majority gate, for instance, outputs current to match either the "0" or "1" state that comprise at least two of its three input currents (or equivalently, three voltages). But how do you build a logic gate for devices too small for classical physics?
April 10, 2017
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Pyroelectric peptide microtubes turn heat to electric currents
Many peptides and proteins have an innate ability to assemble into long, slender fibers called fibrils and other shapes. Now, researchers have found a way to harness this property to create tubular structures of diphenylalanine that have the ability to convert thermal energy into electrical energy, also called a pyroelectric effect.
October 4, 2016
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Misc. - Q

Quantum communications bend to our needs
The potential for photon entanglement in quantum computing and communications has been known for decades. One of the issues impeding its immediate application is the fact that many photon entanglement platforms do not operate within the range used by most forms of telecommunication.
September 26, 2017
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Quantum dot transistor simulates functions of neurons
A transistor that simulates some of the functions of neurons has been invented based on experiments and models developed by researchers at the Federal University of São Carlos (UFSCar) in São Paulo State, Brazil, Würzburg University in Germany, and the University of South Carolina in the United States.
June 15, 2017
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Quantum movement of electrons in atomic layers shows potential of materials for electronics and photonics
Common sense might dictate that for an object to move from one point to another, it must go through all the points on the path.
March 15, 2017
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Quantum nanoscope
Researchers have studied how light can be used to "see" the quantum nature of an electronic material. They managed to do that by capturing light in a net of carbon atoms and slowing down light it down so that it moves almost as slow as the electrons in the graphene. Then something special happens: electrons and light start to move in concert, unveiling their quantum nature at such large scale that it could observed with a special type of microscope.
June 8, 2017
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Quantum obstacle course changes material from superconductor to insulator
Researchers from Brown University have demonstrated an unusual method of putting the brakes on superconductivity, the ability of a material to conduct an electrical current with zero resistance.
November 30, 2016
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Quantum simulation technique yields topological soliton state in SSH model
Topological insulators, an exciting, relatively new class of materials, are capable of carrying electricity along the edge of the surface, while the bulk of the material acts as an electrical insulator. Practical applications for these materials are still mostly a matter of theory, as scientists probe their microscopic properties to better understand the fundamental physics that govern their peculiar behavior.
January 3, 2017
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Quantum theory for manipulating nanomagnets
Researchers at the Department of Physics, University of Jyväskylä, Finland, have created a theory that predicts the properties of nanomagnets manipulated with electric currents. This theory is useful for future quantum technologies.
June 12, 2017
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Quantum transport goes ballistic
IBM scientists have shot an electron through an III-V semiconductor nanowire integrated on silicon for the first time. this achievement will form the basis for sophisticated quantum wire devices for future integrated circuits used in advanced powerful computational systems.
April 5, 2017
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Misc. - R

Radio Shack
Personal radios, wireless telephones, batteries, gadgets, adapters, wires and plugs sit alongside computer equipment and stereo components on their shelves. Convenient online ordering also available.
Provides Products
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Rapid and mass production of graphene, using a microwave oven
Graphene, a material that could usher in the next generation of electronic and energy devices, could be closer than ever to mass production, thanks to microwaves.
December 13, 2016
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Reactions in nanocontainers - towards the world's smallest coaxial cable
As electronic devices continue to shrink to meet the demand for pocket sized and wearable technology, scientists are working to develop the minute components that make them work and a team at the University of Nottingham have developed a new approach for the preparation of a coaxial cable around 50,000 times narrower than the width of a human hair.
August 15, 2017
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Ready to wear electronics
Scientists at a research facility in Berlin dream of clothing that produces energy as we walk. They have combined very different nanomaterials into so-called energy harvesters (Matflexend).
May 22, 2017
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Reality check for topological insulators
Topological insulators, a class of materials which has been investigated for just over a decade, have been heralded as a new 'wonder material', as has graphene. But so far, topological insulators have not quite lived up to the expectations fueled by theoretical studies.
July 27, 2017
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Recipe for safer batteries - just add nanodiamonds
While lithium-ion batteries, widely used in mobile devices from cell phones to laptops, have one of the longest lifespans of commercial batteries today, they also have been behind a number of recent meltdowns and fires due to short-circuiting in mobile devices. In hopes of preventing more of these hazardous malfunctions researchers at Drexel University have developed a recipe that can turn electrolyte solution -- a key component of most batteries -- into a safeguard against the chemical process that leads to battery-related disasters.
August 25, 2017
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Reduced oxygen nanocrystalline materials show improved performance
Researchers at the University of Connecticut have found that reducing oxygen in some nanocrystalline materials may improve their strength and durability at elevated temperatures, a promising enhancement that could lead to better biosensors, faster jet engines, and greater capacity semiconductors.
July 17, 2017
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Reducing conducting thin film surface roughness for electronics
Surface roughness reduction is a really big deal when it comes to fundamental surface physics and while fabricating electronic and optical devices. as transistor dimensions within integrated circuits continue to shrink, smooth metallic lines are required to interconnect these devices. If the surfaces of these tiny metal lines aren't smooth enough, it substantially reduces their ability to conduct electrical and thermal energy -- decreasing functionality.
March 7, 2017
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Reliable molecular toggle switch developed
Nanotechnology constantly allows for new records in miniaturization. Reduction of the dimension of electronic components, however, has physical limits that will be reached soon. Novel materials and components are required. this is where molecular electronics comes in.
March 28, 2017
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Repeat Sales of P-300BV Vacuum Batch Production Tools Boost Picosun's Position in the 200 Mm Semiconductor Market
Picosun Oy, leading supplier of high-quality Atomic Layer Deposition solutions for industrial production, reports of repeat sales of automated P-300BV vacuum batch production systems to major Asian discrete device manufacturers.
August 31, 2017
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Remote destruction capability of high performance silicon electronics
You surely remember one of the hallmarks of the Mission: Impossible series that shows a secret agent receiving his instructions on a tape or other device that then self-destructs and goes up in a cloud of smoke.
March 29, 2017
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Removing air pollution with nanogenerator-enhanced air filters
A triboelectric nanogenerator (TENG) is a device that converts mechanical energy into electricity using the coupling effects between triboelectrification and electrostatic induction through the contact separation or relative sliding between two materials that have opposite tribo-polarity.
May 26, 2017
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Research on Transition Metal Dichalcogenides as an Alternative to Graphene
Physicists from the University of Texas at Dallas (UT Dallas) have reported a new discovery related to the electrical properties of materials that could be utilized for the fabrication of next-generation transistors and electronics.
December 1, 2016
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Research Team Develops Ultrathin, Transparent Oxide TFT for Active-Matrix Backplane of Flexible Display
With the advent of the Internet of Things (IoT) era, strong demand has grown for wearable and transparent displays that can be applied to various fields such as augmented reality (AR) and skin-like thin flexible devices.
August 1, 2016
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Research team flips the switch on ferroelectrics
Nagoya University-led international collaboration develops new approach to advanced sensor and energy harvesting devices based on controlling domain alignment in nanostructured ferroelectric materials.
August 28, 2017
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Research to Study Motion of Vortex Domain Walls in Ferromagnetic Nanowires
From compasses used in ancient overseas navigation to electrical motors, sensors, and actuators in cars, magnetic materials have been a mainstay throughout human history. In addition, almost all information that exists in contemporary society is recorded in magnetic media, like hard drive disks.
March 8, 2017
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Researcher Presents Study on Electrochemical Performance of Lithium-Ion Capacitors
A paper titled "A fast and efficient pre-doping approach to high energy density lithium-ion hybrid capacitors" has been published by researcher Minho Kim.
April 24, 2017
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Researchers achieve major breakthrough in flexible electronics
Semiconductors, which are the very basic components of electronic devices, have improved our lives in many ways. they can be found in lighting, displays, solar modules and microprocessors that are installed in almost all modern day devices, from mobile phones, washing machines, and cars, to the emerging Internet of Things. to innovate devices with better functionality and energy efficiency, researchers are constantly looking for better ways to make them, in particular from earth-abundant materials using eco-friendly processes.
January 13, 2017
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Researchers Aim to Create Graphene-Based Electronic Devices
Important electronic components, such as tunnel barriers and diodes, can be integrated into single graphene wires (nanoribbons) with atomic precision. The aim is to make graphene-based electronic devices with very fast operational speeds.
July 26, 2017
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Researchers are upgrading an element by stretching it
Next to silicon, germanium is the most widely used semiconductor material in the world. But while it's great at conducting electricity, its inefficiency at turning light into electricity (or electricity into light) restricts the other applications for which it can be used.
October 22, 2016
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Researchers Attach Single Ruthenium Atoms to Graphene to Produce High-Performance Fuel Cells
A durable catalyst for high-performance fuel cells has been fabricated by Rice University Scientists by attaching single ruthenium atoms to graphene.
June 29, 2017
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Researchers challenge status quo of battery commercialization
While more efficient, effective, and economical batteries are critical to the world's clean energy future, the path to bringing such technologies to market over the last 25 years is overwhelmingly littered with failure.
September 6, 2017
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Researchers change the color of assembled nanoparticles with an electrical stimulant
Like a chameleon changing colors to blend into the environment, Lawrence Livermore researchers have created a technique to change the color of assembled nanoparticles with an electrical stimulant.
April 25, 2017
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Researchers control soft robots using magnetic fields
A team of engineering researchers has made a fundamental advance in controlling so-called soft robots, using magnetic fields to remotely manipulate microparticle chains embedded in soft robotic devices. the researchers have already created several devices that make use of the new technique.
March 29, 2017
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Researchers Convert Common Insulator into Magnetic Semiconductor
Rice University Researchers discovered that a little fluorine converts an insulating ceramic known as white graphene into a wide-bandgap semiconductor possessing magnetic properties. This could make the unique material ideal for electronics in challenging environments.
July 18, 2017
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Researchers create electronic rose complete with wires and supercapacitors
Taking advantage of natural plant physiology to grow electronics.
March 1, 2017
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Researchers create living bio-hybrid system
One of the biggest challenges in cognitive or rehabilitation neurosciences is the ability to design a functional hybrid system that can connect and exchange information between biological systems, like neurons in the brain, and human-made electronic devices.
November 15, 2016
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Researchers create practical and versatile microscopic optomechanical device
Researchers have developed a new type of optomechanical device that uses a microscopic silicon disk to confine optical and mechanical waves. the new device is highly customizable and compatible with commercial manufacturing processes, making it a practical solution for improving sensors that detect force and movement.
January 9, 2017
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Researchers Create Self-Assembled Organic-Inorganic Heterostructures with Programmable Electronic Properties
"van der Waals heterostructures" refer to vertical stacks of different two-dimensional (2D) crystals, such as boron nitride, graphene, etc. that are held together by weak van der Waals forces. These advanced multilayer structures can serve as a versatile platform for studying a range of phenomena at the nanoscale. Particularly, mechanical superimposition of the 2D crystals creates 2D periodic potentials, which impart unusual chemical and physical properties to the system.
March 30, 2017
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Researchers Demonstrate Production of Functional OLED Electrodes from Graphene
The possibility of producing functional OLED electrodes from graphene has been proven for the very first time. Fraunhofer researchers have developed the process by collaborating with partners from research and industry. for instance, the OLEDs can be integrated into touch displays, and graphene, considered to be a miracle material, promises several other applications for the future.
January 4, 2017
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Researchers develop dynamic templates critical to printable electronics technology
When it comes to efficiency, sometimes it helps to look to Mother Nature for advice - even in technology as advanced as printable, flexible electronics.
July 13, 2017
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Researchers develop fast, cheap method to make supercapacitor electrodes for electric cars, high-powered lasers
Supercapacitors are an aptly named type of device that can store and deliver energy faster than conventional batteries. They are in high demand for applications including electric cars, wireless telecommunications and high-powered lasers.
July 17, 2017
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Researchers Develop Innovative Technique for Synthesizing MoS2
Oxford Instruments has succeeded in commercializing wafer-scale fabrication technology for 2D material MoS2 by employing the world's first non-destructive quality control method from the National Physical Laboratory (NPL).
July 12, 2017
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Researchers develop multi color switchable MCL materials to enable efficient TADF emitters
Researchers from Osaka University managed to create multi-color Mechanochromic Luminescent (MCL) materials. the materials were found to exhibit efficient TADF emission, and the researchers developed an efficient OLED device based on these new materials.
March 1, 2017
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Researchers develop Nanocomposite Material with Exceptional Optoelectronic Properties
Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are less stable. now researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have, for the first time ever, produced a composite material combining silicon nanosheets and a polymer that is both UV-resistant and easy to process. this brings the scientists a significant step closer to industrial applications like flexible displays and photosensors.
March 9, 2017
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Researchers develop new Spray-On Digital Memory Device
It is an established fact that USB flash drives are commonly used in college campuses and offices. Nevertheless, such digital storage devices like these might soon be seen in all places, such as in pill bottles, groceries and even clothing. all this can be possible due to the increase in printable electronics.
April 4, 2017
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Researchers develop new transistor concept
Transistors, as used in billions on every computer chip, are nowadays based on semiconductor-type materials, usually silicon. As the demands for computer chips in laptops, tablets and smartphones continue to rise, new possibilities are being sought out to fabricate them inexpensively, energy-saving and flexibly.
July 14, 2017
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Researchers develop technique to control and measure electron spin voltage
Information technologies of the future will likely use electron spin -- rather than electron charge -- to carry information. But first, scientists need to better understand how to control spin and learn to build the spin equivalent of electronic components, from spin transistors, to spin gates and circuits.
July 13, 2017
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Researchers develop wearable solar thermoelectric generator
A recent study, led by Professor Kyoung Jin Choi in the School of Materials Science and Engineering at UNIST has introduced a new advanced energy harvesting system, capable of generating electricity by simply being attached to clothes, windows, and outer walls of a building (Nano Energy, "Wearable solar thermoelectric generator driven by unprecedentedly high temperature difference").
September 26, 2017
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Researchers directly measure how perovskite solar films efficiently convert light to power
Solar cells made with films mimicking the structure of the mineral perovskite are the focus of worldwide research. But only now have researchers at Case Western Reserve University directly shown the films bear a key property allowing them to efficiently convert sunlight into electricity.
January 11, 2017
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Researchers Discover Important First Step Towards Developing Electrically Pumped Nano-Lasers
When an individual searches Google or uses Facebook, the information processing takes place in a large data center. the performance of these data centers can be improved with short distance optical interconnects.
January 24, 2017
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Researchers engineer dream diodes with a graphene interlayer
A team of researchers, affiliated with UNIST has created a new technique that greatly enhances the performance of Schottky Diodes (metal-semiconductor junction) used in electronic devices. Their research findings have attracted considerable attention within the scientific community by solving the contact resistance problem of metal-semiconductor, which had remained unsolved for almost 50 years.
February 8, 2017
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Researchers explore new 2D materials that could make devices faster, smaller, and efficient
A new study by an international team of researchers led by the University of Minnesota highlights how manipulation of 2D materials could make our modern day devices faster, smaller, and better.
November 28, 2016
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Researchers find new way to control light with electric fields
Researchers from North Carolina State University have discovered a technique for controlling light with electric fields (Nano Letters, "Giant Gating Tunability of Optical Refractive Index in Transition Metal Dichalcogenide Monolayers").
May 25, 2017
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Researchers flip the script on magnetocapacitance
Capacitors, electronic components that store and quickly release a charge, play an important role in many types of electrical circuits. They'll play an equally important role in next-generation spintronic devices, which take advantage of not only electron charge but also spin -- the tiny magnetic moment of each electron.
June 1, 2017
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Researchers Invent Nanoscale Suspended Electrode Arrays for Testing Nematodes
The measurement of electrical activity in individual cells of smaller living animals has been simplified by microscopic probes designed at Rice University.
April 18, 2017
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Researchers investigate the potential of metal grids for electronic components
Nanometer-scale magnetic perforated grids could create new possibilities for Computing. Together with international colleagues, scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf have shown how a cobalt grid can be reliably programmed at room temperature. In addition they discovered that for every hole three magnetic states can be configured. the results have been published in the journal Scientific Reports.
February 2, 2017
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Researchers 'iron out' graphene's wrinkles
From an electron's point of view, graphene must be a hair-raising thrill ride. for years, scientists have observed that electrons can blitz through graphene at velocities approaching the speed of light, far faster than they can travel through silicon and other semiconducting materials.
April 3, 2017
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Researchers manage to print a stretchable OLED cirtuit
Researchers from Michigan State University (MSU) developed a stretchable circuit that includes an OLED display, produced entirely using an ink-jet printer.
February 17, 2017
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Researchers present a new method of 3D-plasmon tomography
Light as a carrier of information is indispensable to modern communication technology. The controlled manipulation of light quanta, so-called photons, form the basis for wireless transmission or data transfer in optical glass fibres.
June 26, 2017
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Researchers Produce Silver Nanowire Inks for Low-Cost Printing of Circuits
Duke University scientists have been brewing up conductive ink-jet printer "inks" to print customizable, low-cost circuit patterns on any surface. to do this, they suspended tiny metal nanoparticles in liquids.
January 4, 2017
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Researchers report new way to make dissolving electronics
Researchers from the University of Houston and China have reported a new type of electronic device that can be triggered to dissolve through exposure to water molecules in the atmosphere.
September 6, 2017
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Researchers Reveal Atomic Positions and Local Electronic Properties of 2D MXene
Scientists have long been searching for electrically conductive materials for cost-effective energy-storage devices. Two-dimensional (2D) ceramics known as MXenes are candidates. MXenes, unlike most 2D ceramics, have inherently excellent conductivity, because they are molecular sheets fabricated from the nitrides and carbides of transition metals like titanium.
March 15, 2017
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Researchers Show how Different Atomic Arrangements can be Combined into Nanowires as they Grow
In an article published in Nature today, researchers at Lund University in Sweden show how different arrangements of atoms can be combined into nanowires as they grow. Researchers learning to control the properties of materials this way can lead the way to more efficient electronic devices.
March 18, 2016
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Researchers succeed in producing OLED electrodes from graphene
The Fraunhofer Institute for Organic Electronics, Electron Beam and Plasma Technology FEP from Dresden, together with partners, has succeeded for the first time in producing OLED electrodes from graphene. the electrodes have an area of 2 ՠ1 square centimeters.
January 3, 2017
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Researchers take the piss with pee-powered liquid energy project
Bill Gates' cistern system uses your personal recharger
June 21, 2017
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Researchers Use Flash Light Interactions to Improve Silver Nanowires for Flexible Transparent Conducting Electrodes
Flexible transparent conducting electrodes (FTCEs) are an essential element of flexible optoelectronics for next-generation wearable displays, augmented reality (AR), and the Internet of Things (IoTs). Silver nanowires (Ag NWs) have received a great deal of attention as future FTCEs due to their great flexibility, material stability, and large-scale productivity. Despite these advantages, Ag NWs have drawbacks such as high wire-to-wire contact resistance and poor adhesion to substrates, resulting in severe power consumption and the delamination of FTCEs.
April 5, 2017
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Researchers use world's smallest diamonds to make wires 3 atoms wide
Scientists at Stanford University and the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory have discovered a way to use diamondoids - the smallest possible bits of diamond - to assemble atoms into the thinnest possible electrical wires, just three atoms wide.
December 27, 2016
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Researchers validate UV light's use in improving semiconductors
A discovery by two scientists at the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) could aid the development of next-generation semiconductor devices.
August 29, 2017
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Revealing polymeric fluids behavior at the microscopic scale
An important concept in future healthcare is the development of devices called ॥uro;'lab on a chip॥uro;'. These ॥uro;'chips॥uro;', not related to the electronic ones found in computers, are small devices in which biological fluids ॥uro;"" blood or urine for example ॥uro;"" are injected to fill specifically designed microscopic channels.
April 24, 2017
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Review: Graphene could revolutionize photonic and opto-electronic devices
The importance of graphene can hardly be overstated. Graphene is the thinnest material comprised of atoms. It is only one atomic layer thick and hence an almost ideal representation of a two-dimensional material in our three-dimensional world. It has unique physical properties, including extreme mechanical strength and large electrical and thermal conductivity.
December 28, 2016
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Revised Schottky diode equation for the graphene/semiconductor Schottky junction
The Energy, Electron, Plasma and Plasmonic (EEPP) Group led by Prof. Ricky Ang at Singapore University of Technology and Design (SUTD) says that it has uncovered the underlying equation governing the carrier's transport across the graphene/semiconductor Schottky junction, which is one of the building blocks in electronic and optoelectronic devices.
December 20, 2016
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Revolutionary method reveals impact of short circuits on battery safety
How lithium-ion (Li-ion) batteries behave under short-circuit conditions can now be examined using a new approach developed by a UCL-led team to help improve reliability and safety.
April 25, 2017
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Rotating molecules create a brighter future
Scientists have discovered a group of materials which could pave the way for a new generation of high-efficiency lighting, solving a quandary which has inhibited the performance of display technology for decades. the development of energy saving concepts in display and lighting applications is a major focus of research, since a fifth of the world's electricity is used for generating light.
March 30, 2017
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Rutgers Scientists Discover how Graphene Could be Used to Cool Electronics Chips
A powerful technique that will help to cool tiny chips has been discovered by Rutgers researchers using graphene. These tiny chips are vital components of electronic devices with billions of transistors apiece.
March 28, 2017
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Ruthenium atoms on graphene to match platinum standard for fuel cells
Rice University scientists have fabricated a durable catalyst for high-performance fuel cells by attaching single ruthenium atoms to graphene.
June 28, 2017
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Misc. - S

Saint Jean Carbon announces Phase One Results of Graphene Battery Project
Saint Jean Carbon Inc. a carbon science company deals in the design and making of green energy creation, green energy storage, and green re-creation through the application of carbon materials.
April 21, 2017
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Salty batteries
Smartphones, laptops, electric cars–whatever the device, an efficient battery is high on any user's wish list. the search for the next-generation battery has recently focused on sodium-- oxygen batteries. Theoretically, these should provide previously unattainable efficiency but their practical implementation has proven to be a stumbling block
November 7, 2016
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Sandia Researchers develop 3D Metasurfaces Possessing Optical Possibilities
Metamaterials are not found in nature, but they do have the potential for a world of applications with their ability to bend light to keep satellites cooler, make ultra-efficient cell phone antennas and ultra-thin lenses, and allow photovoltaics to absorb more energy.
March 10, 2017
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Sandwiched between superconductors, graphene adopts exotic electronic states
In normal conductive materials such as silver and copper, electric current flows with varying degrees of resistance, in the form of individual electrons that ping-pong off defects, dissipating energy as they go. Superconductors, by contrast, are so named for their remarkable ability to conduct electricity without resistance, by means of electrons that pair up and move through a material as one, generating no friction.
May 5, 2017
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Scalable 100% yield production of conductive graphene inks
Conductive inks are useful for a range of applications, including printed and flexible electronics such as radio frequency identification (RFID) antennas, transistors or photovoltaic cells.
February 21, 2017
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Science corrected: Why findings of a popular thermoelectricity study couldn't be replicated
A team of physicists in Clemson University's College of Science and Academia Sinica in Taiwan has determined why other scientists have been unable to replicate a highly influential thermoelectricity study published in a prestigious, peer-reviewed journal.
November 17, 2016
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Science friction
Graphene, a two-dimensional form of carbon in sheets just one atom in thick, has been the subject of widespread research, in large part because of its unique combination of strength, electrical conductivity, and chemical stability.
November 23, 2016
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Scientists create electric circuits inside plants
Plants power life on Earth. they are the original food source supplying energy to almost all living organisms and the basis of the fossil fuels that feed the power demands of the modern world. But burning the remnants of long-dead forests is changing the world in dangerous ways. can we better harness the power of living plants today?
February 27, 2017
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Scientists demonstrate ballistic nanowire connections, a potential key component for quantum computing
IBM scientists have achieved an important milestone toward creating sophisticated quantum devices that could become a key component of quantum computers. As detailed in the peer-review journal Nano Letters, the scientists have shot an electron through a III-V semiconductor nanowire integrated on silicon for the first time.
May 19, 2017
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Scientists Demonstrate Efficient Performance of Germanium in Energy Efficient Transistors
The first transistor based on germanium capable of being programmed between electron- (n) and hole- (p) conduction was demonstrated by scientists from the Nanoelectronic Materials Laboratory (NaMLab gGmbH) and the Cluster of Excellence Center for Advancing Electronics Dresden (cfaed) at the Dresden University of Technology.
February 6, 2017
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Scientists Demonstrate Light-Matter Coupling in Semiconducting Carbon Nanotubes
Researchers from the University of St Andrews (Scotland) and the Heidelberg University worked toward developing nanomaterials for optoelectronics, and have been successful in demonstrating, for the first time, a strong interaction exists between light and matter in semiconducting carbon nanotubes.
November 16, 2016
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Scientists discover new 'boat' form of promising semiconductor GeSe
Princeton researchers have discovered a new form of the simple compound GeSe that has surprisingly escaped detection until now. this so-called beta-GeSe compound has a ring type structure like graphene and its monolayer form could have similarly valuable properties for electronic applications, according to the study published in the Journal of the American Chemical Society.
March 21, 2017
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Scientists discover new magnet with nearly massless charge carriers
Advances in modern electronics has demanded the requisite hardware, transistors, to be smaller in each new iteration. Recent progress in nanotechnology has reduced the size of silicon transistors down to the order of 10 nanometers. However, for such small transistors, other physical effects set in, which limit their functionality.
July 28, 2017
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Scientists design new heat-guiding device that is thinner than a hair
Researchers at Singapore University of Technology and Design (SUTD), University of Bath and University of Cambridge have designed for the first time a heat-guiding structure on the size of nanometers that can steer heat away from, or even towards critical regions of current silicon (or advanced chalcogenide) chips through computer simulations.
December 27, 2016
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Scientists develop real-time technique for studying ionic liquids at electrode interfaces
Ionic liquids--salts made by combining positively charged molecules (cations) and negatively charged molecules (anions) that are liquid at relatively low temperatures, often below room temperature--are increasingly being investigated for uses in batteries, supercapacitors, and transistors
May 16, 2017
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Scientists Explore Ways to Address the Challenge of Incorporating Nanostructures into Future Semiconductor Devices
Swansea University researchers are exploring the possibilities of addressing the challenge of integrating nanoscale structures into next-generation semiconductor devices. Such advancements not only lead to the development of new technologies, but also influence all aspects of day-to-day life.
January 20, 2017
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Scientists find technique to improve carbon superlattices for quantum electronic devices
Researchers at the Nanoscale Transport Physics Laboratory from the School of Physics at the University of the Witwatersrand have found a technique to improve carbon superlattices for quantum electronic device applications.
October 19, 2016
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Scientists get first direct look at how electrons 'dance' with vibrating atoms
Scientists at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and Stanford University have made the first direct measurements, and by far the most precise ones, of how electrons move in sync with atomic vibrations rippling through an exotic material, as if they were dancing to the same beat.
July 6, 2017
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Scientists make vanadium into a useful catalyst for hydrogenation
Just as Cinderella turned from a poor teenager into a magnificent princess with the aid of a little magic, scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory have transformed a common metal into a useful catalyst for a wide class of reactions, a role formerly reserved for expensive precious metals.
May 26, 2017
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Scientists move graphene closer to transistor applications
Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory were able to successfully manipulate the electronic structure of graphene, which may enable the fabrication of graphene transistors-- faster and more reliable than existing silicon-based transistors
August 29, 2017
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Scientists Perform Novel Measurements of Graphene's Electrical Response to Synthetic Air
An international team of scientists led by the National Physical Laboratory (NPL) has performed novel measurements of graphene's electrical response to synthetic air, exposing a distinct knowledge gap that needs to be bridged before the commercialisation of graphene-based gas sensors.
March 18, 2016
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Scientists Prove the Possibility of Stenciling with Atoms in High-Quality 2D Materials
Unlimited possibilities are almost available for the new field of two-dimensional, one-atomic-layer-thick materials, including but not limited to graphene. Penn State material scientists, in their new research, report two discoveries that will offer an effective and simple way to "stencil" superior quality 2D materials in precise locations and also to overcome a hurdle that prevents their usage in next-generation electronics.
May 2, 2017
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Scientists set record resolution for drawing at the one-nanometer length scale
The ability to pattern materials at ever-smaller sizes -- using electron-beam lithography (EBL), in which an electron-sensitive material is exposed to a focused beam of electrons, as a primary method -- is driving advances in nanotechnology. When the feature size of materials is reduced from the macroscale to the nanoscale, individual atoms and molecules can be manipulated to dramatically alter material properties, such as color, chemical reactivity, electrical conductivity, and light interactions.
April 28, 2017
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Scientists sort through bilayer graphene
The development of microelectronics is closely associated with a search for new technology and materials for use in transistors. a promising material, graphene gripped the attention of scientists and engineers alike thanks to its unusual mechanical, electrical, and optical properties.
January 12, 2017
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Scientists Succeed in Manipulating Graphene's Electronic Band Structure with Metal Atoms
Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory succeeded in manipulating the electronic structure of graphene, which could in the fabrication of graphene transistors that are more reliable and faster than the currently available silicon-based transistors.
August 30, 2017
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Scientists take the first step toward creating efficient electrolyte-free batteries
Scientists of Peter the Great Saint-Petersburg Polytechnic University (SPbPU) in collaboration with the French, Swiss and Polish researchers have found unique atomic-scale processes in crystal lattice of antiferroelectric lead zirconate during synchrotron x-ray scattering experiment. the discovery is the first step toward creating efficient electrolyte-free accumulators of electric energy.
January 31, 2017
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Scientists turn memory chips into processors to speed up computing tasks
A team of international scientists have found a way to make memory chips perform computing tasks, which is traditionally done by computer processors like those made by Intel and Qualcomm.
January 4, 2017
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Scientists Use Graphene to Make Heat Energy Convertor More Efficient
Satellite-powering technology that was abandoned decades ago has been reinvented to potentially work with traditional power stations to help them convert heat to electricity more efficiently, meaning we would need less fossil fuel to burn for power. a new study in Nano Energypresents a prototype energy converter, which uses graphene instead of metal, making it almost seven times more efficient.
March 7, 2017
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Searching for New 2D Materials to Make Batteries Better and Cheaper
The National Science Foundation has given the University of Illinois at Chicago a $1.44 million grant to discover new two-dimensional (2D) materials that can be used to manufacture greatly improved and cheaper batteries.
September 28, 2017
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Seaweed: from superfood to superconductor
Seaweed, the edible algae with a long history in some Asian cuisines, and which has also become part of the Western foodie culture, could turn out to be an essential ingredient in another trend: the development of more sustainable ways to power our devices. Researchers have made a seaweed-derived material to help boost the performance of superconductors, lithium-ion batteries and fuel cells.
April 5, 2017
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Seeing the invisible with a graphene-CMOS integrated device
Silicon based CMOS (Complementary metal-oxide semiconductors) technology has truly shaped our world. It enables most of the electronics that we rely on today including computers, smartphones and digital cameras. However, to continue the path of progress in the electronics industry new technology must be developed and a key feature of this is the ability to integrate CMOS with other semiconductors.
June 5, 2017
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Seeing the quantum future
What if big data could help you see the future and prevent your mobile phone from breaking before it happened?
January 16, 2017
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Seeking out new functions for superconducting nanoelectronics
A team of researchers at the University of Tokyo and their collaborators discovered that a two-dimensional semiconductor with a broken inversion symmetry demonstrates rectification, or the property of a diode, under a magnetic field applied in a certain direction.
June 15, 2017
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Self-assembled quantum dot drives a plasmonic nanocircuit
Plasmonic nanocircuits have the potential to miniaturize integrated photonic circuits and bridge integrated electronics and photonics.
June 29, 2017
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Self-assembling particles brighten future of LED lighting
Just when lighting aficionados were in a dark place, LEDs came to the rescue. Over the past decade, LED technologies -- short for light-emitting diode -- have swept the lighting industry by offering features such as durability, efficiency and long life.
January 16, 2017
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Self-assembling polymers provide thin nanowire template
For the chips in our computers and smartphones to get faster and faster, their components -- the circuits and wires through which signals flow -- have to get smaller and smaller. the miniaturization of these wires has taken scientists on a journey almost to the atomic level. Recently, scientists have begun to address -- and now to surmount -- certain barriers in physics that have prevented them from making even smaller wires.
April 12, 2017
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Self-assembling solid crystals a path to safer, solid batteries
Researchers have identified new solid materials that could lead to the manufacture of non-toxic lithium-ion batteries, according to a study recently published in the journal Science and Technology of Advanced Materials.
September 4, 2017
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Self-Forming Silver Nanoparticles Retain High Conductivity in Printable Elastic Conductor
Japanese scientists have developed a new printable elastic conductor that retains high conductivity even when stretched to five times its original length.
May 16, 2017
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Self-healing tech charges up performance for silicon-containing battery anodes
Researchers at the University of Illinois have found a way to apply self-healing technology to lithium-ion batteries to make them more reliable and last longer.
May 15, 2017
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Self-sustaining bacteria-fueled power cell created
Researchers have developed the next step in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) with the first micro-scale self-sustaining cell, which generated power for 13 straight days through symbiotic interactions of two types of bacteria.
March 22, 2017
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Sensing atoms caught in ripples of light
Optical fibers are ubiquitous, carrying light wherever it is needed. These glass tunnels are the high-speed railway of information transit, moving data at incredible speeds over tremendous distances. Fibers are also thin and flexible, so they can be immersed in many different environments, including the human body, where they are employed for illumination and imaging.
September 27, 2017
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Shape matters when light meets atom
Have you ever wondered how you see the world? Vision is about photons of light, which are packets of energy, interacting with the atoms or molecules in what you're looking at. some photons reflect off, reaching your eyes. Others get absorbed. the main decider of which happens is the photon's energy -- its colour.
December 2, 2016
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Shape memory composites for 3D-printed photoresponsive devices
Researchers in Singapore have fabricated 3D printed photoresponsive shape memory devices through combining fused deposition modeling (FDM) printing technology and photoresponsive shape memory composites based on polyurethane and carbon black (PUCB).
July 3, 2017
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Shedding light on the absorption of light by titanium dioxide
Titanium dioxide (TiO2) is one of the most promising materials for photovoltaics and photocatalysis nowadays. this material appears in different crystalline forms, but the most attractive one for applications is called "anatase". Despite decades of studies on the conversion of the absorbed light into electrical charges in anatase TiO2, the very nature of its fundamental electronic and optical properties was still unknown.
April 13, 2017
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Shedding light on the secrets of nano-sized processors
When light couples to electrons on a surface, their concerted motion can travel as a wave guided by the surface geometry itself. Known as 'surface plasmons', these waves could impact the development of telecommunications and computing as in the future data will likely be processed using light instead of electricity.
October 20, 2016
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Shining light on low-energy electrons
The scientific community has known about the existence of electrons for over a hundred years, but there are important facets of their interaction with matter that remain shrouded in mystery. One particular area of interest is low-energy electrons or electrons that have kinetic energy levels of about 10 electronvolts (eV) or less. These electrons affect the functioning of insulators in electronic systems and are responsible for radiation damage in human and other biological tissue.
June 13, 2017
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Signal transmission in a photonic computer without losses
Scientists from the Institute for Theoretical and Applied Electromagnetics of the RAS, the All-Russia Research Institute of Automatics and MIPT have calculated a model of an optical system in which large losses in waveguides are compensated by a small gain.
November 22, 2016
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Signature analysis of single molecules using their noise signals
Noise is low-frequency random fluctuation that occurs in many systems, including electronics, environments, and organisms. Noise can obscure signals, so it is often removed from electronics and radio transmissions.
July 12, 2017
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Silicon solves problems for next-generation battery technology
Silicon - the second most abundant element in the earth's crust - shows great promise in Li-ion batteries, according to new research from the University of Eastern Finland. By replacing graphite anodes with silicon, it is possible to quadruple anode capacity.
August 30, 2017
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Silver circuits on foil allow curved touchscreens
INM will be presenting the so called photochemical metallization on this year's Hannover Messe at the Stand B46 in hall 2 from 24 April to 28 April.
April 11, 2017
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Silver nanowire inks enable paper-based printable electronics
By suspending tiny metal nanoparticles in liquids, Duke University scientists are brewing up conductive ink-jet printer "inks" to print inexpensive, customizable circuit patterns on just about any surface.
January 4, 2017
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Simulating splash at the microscopic level
Spray cooling is one of the most promising methods for cooling high heat flow electronics. Two-phase spray cooling, in particular, has been shown to cool heat fluxes that are orders of magnitude higher than traditional cooling methods like fans and heat sinks. The complex physics of two-phase spray cooling, in which droplets are atomized with a secondary pressurized gas phase, demands deeper understanding.
July 11, 2017
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Single molecules can work as reproducible transistors - at room temperature
A major goal in the field of molecular electronics, which aims to use single molecules as electronic components, is to make a device where a quantized, controllable flow of charge can be achieved at room temperature. A first step in this field is for researchers to demonstrate that single molecules can function as reproducible circuit elements such as transistors or diodes that can easily operate at room temperature.
August 14, 2017
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Single molecule switch
The theoretical physicists Junior Professor Fabian Pauly and his postdoc Dr. Safa G. Bahoosh now succeeded in a team of experimental physicists and chemists in demonstrating a reliable and reproducible single molecule switch. the basis for this switch is a specifically synthesized molecule with special properties. this is an important step towards realising fundamental ideas of molecular electronics.
March 10, 2017
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Single photon excites two atoms at once
Our understanding of quantum optics has received a boost by the discovery, by RIKEN researchers, of a way to excite two atoms with only one light particle, or photon.
November 24, 2016
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Single-molecule graphene switches bring minute electronic devices a step closer
Graphene is a material made of a single sheet of carbon atoms in a honeycomb arrangement. Because of its unique electrical conductivity, graphene has the potential to be a base for electronic devices that are only nanometres (billionths of a metre) in size.
November 24, 2016
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Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Device can Detect Below-Threshold Signals Via Noise
In conventional electronics, a significant amount of effort is put into removing stochastic resonance (SR) - the frustrating hiss that by and large obstructs the detection of weak signals and degrades total device performance.
September 26, 2017
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SiP Alignment Engine is Lightwave Innovation Reviews Award Winner
When alignment speed is critical and accuracy needs to be at the nanoscale, for projects from planar testing to packaging, PI has the award-winning solution. the FMPA Fast Multichannel Photonics Alignment system received a 2017 Lightwave Innovation Review Award, which acknowledges the most original and innovative products in optical technology.
March 7, 2017
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Sketching out magnetism with electricity
In a proof-of-concept study published in Nature Physics, researchers drew magnetic squares in a nonmagnetic material with an electrified pen and then "read" this magnetic doodle with X-rays.
January 12, 2017
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Sketching sensors with conducting polymer pen
Two Northwestern Engineering graduate students are drawing circles around the competition. Daniel Hickox-Young and Luke Prestowitz developed a novel "smart ink" pen, which propelled them to the KAUST DIY Electronics Innovation Challenge, an international contest to encourage creative and inexpensive electronics.
February 16, 2017
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'Smart clothing' could someday power cell phones with the sun's rays
Batteries in smart phones and other portable electronics often die at inopportune times. Carrying a spare battery is one solution. as an alternative, researchers have tried to create fibers to incorporate in clothing that would power these devices. However, many of these fibers can't withstand clothing manufacturing, especially weaving and cutting.
October 5, 2016
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Small, Precision, Affordable: Linear Motor Stage with Magnetic Direct Drive
Motion and nanopositioning industry leader PI expands its PIMag® series of high dynamics linear motor stages with a new compact positioner for automation tasks. The new V-408 stage is equipped with an incremental linear encoder for direct position measurement and a high-force 3-phase linear motor drive.
August 31, 2017
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Smallest narrowband laser on chip brings numerous photonic applications closer
Working in collaboration with the Lionix company, researchers from the University of Twente's MESA+ research institute have developed the world's most narrowband diode laser on a chip.
July 3, 2017
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Smart graphene contact lenses bring wearable electronics to the eye
Several research projects are working on reinventing the contact lens as a smart electronic device that, for instance, works as a self-powered biosensor for various point-of-care monitoring and wireless biomedical sensing, which may detect in real time the pathogen, bacteria, glucose, and infectious keratitis present in tear fluid. One example is a recently developed sensor for diabetic and glaucoma diagnosis.
May 22, 2017
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Smart multi-layered magnetic material acts as an electric switch
The nanometric-size islands of magnetic metal sporadically spread between vacuum gaps display unique conductive properties under a magnetic field.
February 27, 2017
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Smooth surfaces may improve rechargeable lithium batteries
Most of today's lithium-ion batteries, which power everything from cars to phones, use a liquid as the electrolyte between two electrodes. Using a solid electrolyte instead could offer major advantages for both safety and energy storage capacity, but attempts to do this have faced unexpected challenges.
July 13, 2017
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Sodium and magnesium to replace lithium in batteries
The research project Novel Ionic Conductors aims to find new materials which can be used in rechargeable batteries and eventually provide alternatives to the current lithium batteries. Lithium-based batteries have several drawbacks, such as the limited availability of the raw material itself as well as the numerous safety issues, which are primarily associated with the use of a flammable liquid compound. this problem has been exemplified by the recurrence of exploding mobile phones.
May 2, 2017
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Sodium-ion batteries become fully stretchable
There is a growing demand for stretchable electronic devices, especially energy storage systems, which, in order to meet the requirements of day-to-day consumer use, need to maintain acceptable levels of electrochemical performance and mechanical properties simultaneously.
April 20, 2017
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Soft and stretchy fabric-based sensors for wearable robots
Wearable technologies -- from heart rate monitors to virtual reality headsets -- are exploding in popularity in both the consumer and research spaces, but most of the electronic sensors that detect and transmit data from wearables are made of hard, inflexible materials that can restrict both the wearer's natural movements and the accuracy of the data collected.
July 12, 2017
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Solar hydrogen production by artificial leaves - Special treatment improves cheap metal oxide photoelectrodes
The fossil fuel age is bound to end, for several strong reasons. As an alternative to fossil fuels, hydrogen seems very attractive. The gas has a huge energy density, it can be stored or processed further, e. g. to methane, or directly provide clean electricity via a fuel cell. If it is produced using sunlight alone, hydrogen is completely renewable with zero carbon emissions.
August 28, 2017
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Solar-light-driven fully integrated microfluidic device could serve as autonomous fuel-cell-based power source for microsensors or lab-on-a-chip applications
Miniaturized devices such as microsensors often require an independent, equally miniaturized power supply. Searching for suitable systems, scientists have now developed a fully integrated microfluidic device that produces hydrogen fuel and converts it into electrical energy based on photocatalysis. It works fully autonomously and delivers enough hydrogen energy to power a microsensor for daily data transmission.
June 13, 2017
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Solid-state physics - Metal bucks the trend
An A*STAR researcher has, together with an international team, uncovered an exception to the longstanding rule that effective heat-conducting metals are also good conduits for electricity1. This anomaly could eventually be harnessed in thermoelectric devices that convert waste heat from appliances and engines into useful electric power.
July 12, 2017
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Something deep within: Nanocrystals grown in nanowires
Scientists have tailored extremely small wires that carry light and electrons. These new structures could open up a potential path to smaller, lighter, or more efficient devices, they say.
July 29, 2016
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Sound over silicon: Computing's wave of the future
As computer parts grow tinier -- billions of transistors are now packed onto silicon chips the size of a fingernail -- silicon's performance shrinks too, and the material can overheat.
May 10, 2017
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Speaking the language of microstructures
Designing materials for use in the large variety of gadgets and structures that support our everyday lives involves understanding them at their atomic, electronic and macroscopic scales.
August 1, 2016
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Spin liquids - back to the roots
Since 1973, Anderson's resonating valence bond model remains a paradigm for microscopic description of quantum spin liquids in frustrated magnets. It is of fundamental interest as a building unit for more complex quantum-mechanically entangled states that can be used in quantum computing.
June 22, 2017
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Spin-resolved oscilloscope for charge and spin signals
Researchers at the Tokyo Institute of Technology and Nippon Telegraph and Telephone Corporation have developed a "spin-resolved oscilloscope." this device is a basic measuring instrument for plasmonics and spintronics, which are key technologies for future electronics applications.
March 13, 2017
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Spinning electrons open the door to future hybrid electronics
A discovery of how to control and transfer spinning electrons paves the way for novel hybrid devices that could outperform existing semiconductor electronics. In a study published in Nature Communications ("Spin injection and helicity control of surface spin photocurrent in a three dimensional topological insulator"), researchers at Linköping University in Sweden demonstrate how to combine a commonly used semiconductor with a topological insulator, a recently discovered state of matter with unique electrical properties.
June 29, 2017
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Spintronic technology advances with newly designed magnetic tunnel junctions
For the last two decades, magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) have played a central role in spintronic devices such as read heads of hard disk drives and nonvolatile magnetoresistive random access memories (MRAMs), and researchers are constantly working to improve their performance.
March 21, 2017
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Spintronics: Nanotechnologists make orientation of magnetism adjustable in new materials
Nanotechnologists are now able to create materials in which they can influence and precisely control the orientation of the magnetism at will. An interlayer just 0.4 nanometers thick is the key to this success. the materials present a range of interesting possibilities, such as a new way of creating computer memory as well as spintronics applications -- a new form of electronics that works on the basis of magnetism instead of electricity.
March 8, 2016
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Splitting carbon dioxide using low-cost catalyst materials
A promising avenue for the future of clean energy is to store it in the form of carbon-based fuels produced from renewable sources, effectively enabling the clean use of liquid fuels such as gasoline. A first step is the electrolysis of carbon dioxide into oxygen and carbon monoxide. But current CO-forming catalysts are either not selective enough or too expensive to be industrially viable. Now scientists have developed an Earth-abundant catalyst based on copper-oxide nanowires modified with tin oxide.
June 5, 2017
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Stabilizing molecule could pave way for lithium-air fuel cell
Lithium-oxygen fuel cells boast energy density levels comparable to fossil fuels and are thus seen as a promising candidate for future transportation-related energy needs.
April 25, 2017
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Stabilizing molecule could pave way for lithium-air fuel cell
Lithium-oxygen fuel cells boast energy density levels comparable to fossil fuels and are thus seen as a promising candidate for future transportation-related energy needs.
April 26, 2017
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Stamping technique creates nanoscale circuits with electronic ink
The next time you place your coffee order, imagine slapping onto your to-go cup a sticker that acts as an electronic decal, letting you know the precise temperature of your triple-venti no-foam latte.
December 6, 2016
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Stanene's thermal surprise
Heat travels through atom-thin sheets of tin in a very unusual way, A*STAR researchers have found (Physical Review B, "Quantum thermal transport in stanene"). the discovery could help develop applications for the material, including thermoelectric refrigeration or power generation.
February 8, 2017
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Stanford Research Findings on Platinum Catalysts Could Lead to Better Fuel Cells
According to a new study conducted by a Stanford research team, a nanosize squeeze is sufficient to drastically boost the performance of platinum catalysts that help produce energy in fuel cells.
November 24, 2016
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Star-spangled find may lead to advanced electronics
For several years, a team of researchers at the University of Texas at Dallas has investigated various materials in search of those whose electrical properties might make them suitable for small, energy-efficient transistors to power next-generation electronic devices.
March 19, 2017
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Startup works on safer carbon-ion batteries
Safety seen as trade-off for long battery life in lithium-ion cells
March 15, 2017
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Stretchable metallic nanoclusters for wearable electronics
Researchers have fabricated highly deformable and stretchable conductors utilizing a Coil Flash Thermal Evaporation (CFTE) of gold nanoclusters that form robust thin metallic layers and maintain conductivity up to 200% on PDMS and 150% on textured rubber.
August 23, 2017
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Spray-on electric rainbows: Making safer electrochromic inks
Anyone who has a rear-view mirror that automatically dims blue in reaction to annoying high-beam headlights glaring from behind has seen an electrochromic film in action.
August 16, 2017
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Spray-printed crystals to move forward organic electronic applications
Has the time come to replace traditionally used silicon with printable organic semiconductor inks? University of Surrey scientists believe so, especially for future electronics that need to be flexible, lightweight, wearable and low-cost.
November 22, 2016
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Squeezing light into new miniature devices
Do you think your computer is fast enough? Think again. the computers of the future could work almost at the speed of light! Nanophotonics, the study of light at the nanometer scale, could indeed bring the speed of our technology to a completely different level.
November 28, 2016
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Squid-inspired Proteins can Function as Programmable Assemblers of 2D Materials
Squid-inspired proteins can be used as programmable assemblers of 2D materials, like graphene oxide, to develop hybrid materials with minute spacing between layers appropriate for high-efficiency devices including mechanical actuators, energy storage systems and flexible electronics, according to an interdisciplinary group of Penn State Researchers.
July 6, 2017
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Squishy supercapacitors bathed in green tea could power wearable electronics
Wearable electronics are here – the most prominent versions are sold in the form of watches or sports bands. But soon, more comfortable products could become available in softer materials made in part with an unexpected ingredient: green tea.
February 15, 2017
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Stenciling with atoms in 2-dimensional materials possible
The possibilities for the new field of two-dimensional, one-atomic-layer-thick materials, including but not limited to graphene, appear almost limitless. In new research, Penn State material scientists report two discoveries that will provide a simple and effective way to "stencil" high-quality 2D materials in precise locations and overcome a barrier to their use in next-generation electronics.
May 2, 2017
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Stretching a metal into an insulator
To create materials for new energy applications, scientists use heat and strain to remove oxygen atoms. However, stretching a well-ordered, thin film of strontium cobaltite lets the oxygen atoms move more freely through channels. the motion increases the escape of oxygen, and thus increases the number of vacancies.
March 13, 2017
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Stretchy OLED technology could pave way for new smart fabrics, wearables, even tablets
It's cool research, but still research.
February 16, 2017
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Student's award-winning graphene battery could slash electric-car charging times
A student engineer from the University of Sussex has won a national car industry award for designing a new battery that could revolutionise electric vehicles.
December 2, 2016
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Students print their way to new, powerful supercapacitors
Sustainable chemistry students have tripled the specific capacitance of nitrogen-doped carbons: new materials with potential applications in fast energy storage (e.g. for regenerative breaking or fast charging of cellphones). Their experiments required new pieces of equipment which were designed and produced in the lab using 3D printing.
June 13, 2017
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Study on 2D Materials May Lead to Flexible Electronic Gadgets
Dr Neil Wilson in the Department of Physics at the University of Warwick has developed a new method to measure the electronic structures of stacks of two-dimensional (2D) materials — flat, atomically thin, extremely strong, and highly conductive materials — for the first time.
February 17, 2017
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Study optimizes graphene growth - faster, more precise, more stable
Graphene breaks all records. It is the thinnest and most stable material in the world, ultralight, tear-proof, electrically conductive, and highly resilient. Since it was discovered in 2004, the two-dimensional structures composed of carbon atoms have fueled the imagination and inventive spirit. Science fiction authors consider the material suitable for building cables to drive space elevators.
August 25, 2017
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Study picks up large spontaneous spin splitting in the energy band structure
A research group at the University of Tokyo succeeded in observing ferromagnetism (the magnetic property found in substances like iron magnets) and large spontaneous spin splitting (energy difference between two different spin states) in the energy band containing conduction electrons, known as the conduction band, of an (In,Fe)As alloy semiconductor, which they created by doping iron (Fe) atoms into indium arsenide (InAs), a III-V semiconductor often used in high-speed electronic devices.
January 4, 2017
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Sturdy skyrmions stack up
Tiny swirling magnetic patterns called skyrmions (Fig. 1, left) can pack together to form neat lattices inside certain magnetic materials. These lattices are promising for spintronics–a new form of computing that exploits the magnetic characteristics of atoms to manage data. But their usefulness is limited because they typically exist only within a narrow window of temperatures and magnetic fields.
January 6, 2017
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Super P carbon black for reversible lithium and sodium ion storage
Nowadays lithium ion batteries play a dominant role in the rechargeable battery market. Sodium ion batteries have recently attracted increasing interest as an alternative to lithium ion batteries due to the high natural abundance of sodium compared to lithium.
May 3, 2017
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Supercomputing, experiment combine for first look at magnetism of real nanoparticle
Barely wider than a strand of human DNA, magnetic nanoparticles -- such as those made from iron and platinum atoms -- are promising materials for next-generation recording and storage devices like hard drives. Building these devices from nanoparticles should increase storage capacity and density, but understanding how magnetism works at the level of individual atoms is critical to getting the best performance.
February 2, 2017
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Superconducting nanowire memory cell
Developing a superconducting computer that would perform computations at high speed without heat dissipation has been the goal of several research and development initiatives since the 1950s. Such a computer would require a fraction of the energy current supercomputers consume, and would be many times faster and more powerful. Despite promising advances in this direction over the last 65 years, substantial obstacles remain, including in developing miniaturized low-dissipation memory.
June 13, 2017
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Supersonic Solitary Waves in Nano-Electronics Crystals Show Potentials for Matter Transport, Energy Storage
Supersonic solitary waves in nano-electronics crystals show potentials for electric charge or matter transport and energy storage with extremely low heat dissipation
October 27, 2016
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Supersonic spray yields new nanomaterial for bendable, wearable electronics
A new, ultrathin film that is both transparent and highly conductive to electric current has been produced by a cheap and simple method devised by an international team of nanomaterials researchers from the University of Illinois at Chicago and Korea University.
November 22, 2016
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Supersonic Waves Improve Nano-Electronics
Amazing localized excitations such as freak waves happen in nature at all scales. the present theory and models of these waves can be applied to various fields such as physics, acoustics, cosmological relativity, neuro-dynamics, nonlinear lasers and optics, plasmas and oceanography, but they can also play an important role in nano-electronics at the quantum scale.
October 26, 2016
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Superstretchable, supercompressible supercapacitors
Flexible, wearable electronics require equally flexible, wearable power sources. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, Chinese scientists have introduced an extraordinarily stretchable and compressible polyelectrolyte which, in combination with carbon nanotube composite paper electrodes, forms a supercapacitor that can be stretched to 1000 percent in length and compressed to 50 percent in thickness with even gaining, not losing capacity.
July 3, 2017
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Surprising spin behavior at room temperature
The field of spintronics focuses on spin transport behavior in magnetic metals, and the major findings in this area have important implications for the field of electronics. this is because conventional electronics primarily considers the electron charge, whereas spintronics allows the electron spin to be exploited.
February 8, 2017
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Survival of the fittest - Biology's role in sustainable power generation
Scientists from the University of Geneva are using the rules of genetics to better understand how to incorporate wind and solar power into the current electrical grid to produce a renewable power system. The researchers published their study in IEEE/CAA Journal of Automatica Sinica, a joint publication of the IEEE and the Chinese Association of Automation.
June 7, 2017
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Sustainable, high energy density battery created
Researchers announce the development of a novel low cost, rechargeable, high energy density battery that makes the widespread use of solar and wind power possible in the future. It is based on manganese dioxide (MnO2), an abundant, safe and non-toxic material.
March 3, 2017
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Swedish Researchers Increase the Capacity of Graphene to Store Electrical Charge
Researchers at Linköping University in Sweden introduced defects into the perfect surface of graphene on silicon carbide in order to increase the material's capacity to store electrical charge. A report on this has been featured in the scientific journal Electrochimica Acta. This report increases the understanding of how this ultrathin material can be used.
May 23, 2017
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Switched-on DNA sparks nanoelectronics applications
DNA, the stuff of life, may very well also pack quite the jolt for engineers trying to advance the development of tiny, low-cost electronic devices.
February 20, 2017
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Switched-on skyrmions
Miniature magnetic whirlpools could be used to store and process data in a new generation of ultralow-power 'spintronics' computing devices. RIKEN researchers have used an electric field to switch these spin-swirling objects, which are known as skyrmions, between two states–an important step in understanding and controlling their behavior.
November 18, 2016
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Synthesis of 2D metal oxides and hydroxides - high-yield, efficient, fast and low-cost
As two-dimensional (2D) materials gain more and more importance -- thanks to their exotic electronic properties and abundant active sites -- the development of high-yield, efficient, fast and low-cost synthesis methods to advance these materials from the laboratory to industry has become an urgent issue.
June 23, 2017
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Misc. - T

Teaching perovskites to swim
Harvesting sunlight and using it to power our homes and devices is a reality today. Generally, most commercial solar cells are made of silicon. However, as highlighted previously, a type of material called perovskite halides are a potential competitor of silicon. Unfortunately, most perovskite halides are sensitive to moisture and high temperatures such that exposure to either will quickly degrade these materials -- rendering them useless.
May 2, 2017
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Team brings quantum computing closer to reality with new materials
For 60 years computers have become smaller, faster and cheaper. But engineers are approaching the limits of how small they can make silicon transistors and how quickly they can push electricity through devices to create digital ones and zeros. Illustration of light interacting with electrons
May 9, 2017
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The Army's looking into putting bacteria into its electronics
Army Research Lab scientists are collaborating with biologists.
December 1, 2016
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The comeback kid - black phosphorus and its new potential
When it was discovered over a century ago, black phosphorus was considered relatively useless. Over the past five years, however, the engineers and chemists have become intrigued by the material for its potential as an ultra-thin semiconductor, possibly ushering in a new age of flexible and smaller electronics.
July 4, 2017
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The DoE publishes a CALiPER report with photometric testing of four OLED luminaries
The US DoE published a new CALiPER report made by the PNNL laboratory, with photometric testing, laboratory teardowns and accelerated lifetime testing of OLED luminaires. as you can see in the photo below, the four luminaries (from top-left, clockwise) are the OTI Aerelight, Acuity Brands Chalina and Acuity Brands Nomi (single panel and dual panel).
October 28, 2016
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The extraordinary properties of strontium niobate demystified
Researchers from the National University of Singapore (NUS) recently uncovered novel properties of strontium niobate, which is a unique semiconductor material that displays both metallic type conduction and photocatalytic activity. the two studies, which were conducted in collaboration with researchers from the University of California, Berkeley, and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, herald exciting opportunities for the creation of novel devices with unprecedented functionalities as well as unique applications of a new family of photocatalytic materials.
May 15, 2017
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The first low-cost system for splitting carbon dioxide
A promising avenue for the future of clean energy is to store it in the form of carbon-based fuels produced from renewable sources, effectively enabling the clean use of liquid fuels such as gasoline. A first step is the electrolysis of carbon dioxide into oxygen and carbon monoxide, which can be subsequently be transformed into liquid fuels. But current CO-forming catalysts are either not selective enough or too expensive to be industrially viable.
June 5, 2017
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The formation of stable solid electrolyte interphases on lithium metal anode
The successful commercialization of Li-ion batteries has promoted the fast development of electronics industry since 1990s. However, the current energy density cannot cater the demand of electric vehicles, wearable devices and smart grid.
January 30, 2017
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The future of electronics is light
For the past four decades, the electronics industry has been driven by what is called "Moore's Law," which is not a law but more an axiom or observation. Effectively, it suggests that the electronic devices double in speed and capability about every two years. and indeed, every year tech companies come up with new, faster, smarter and better gadgets.
November 29, 2016
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The origin of ultrahigh piezoelectric response
All ferroelectric materials possess a property known as piezoelectricity in which an applied mechanical force can generate an electrical current and an applied electrical field can elicit a mechanical response. Ferroelectric materials are used in a wide variety of industrial applications, from ultrasound and sonar to capacitors, transducers, vibration sensors and ultrasensitive infrared cameras. Now, an international team of scientists led by Penn State may have solved the 30-year-old riddle of why certain ferroelectric crystals exhibit extremely strong piezoelectric responses.
January 9, 2017
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The Presence of Defects Improves the Performance of MnO2 Nanosheets as Supercapacitor Electrode Materials
Supercapacitors are used to store energy in applications that require many rapid change/discharge cycles including personal electronics, hybrid cars, and energy harvesting systems. Supercapacitors using pseudocapacitor electrodes store energy using reversible redox reactions. Candidates for pseudocapacitor electrodes are often metal oxides due to their redox properties, combined with the high specific capacitance at low resistance.
February 24, 2017
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The road to green hydrogen runs through mazes in algal proteins
Hydrogen fuel cells produce electricity, we are increasingly thinking about hydrogen as the successor of crude oil. But where will the hydrogen come from? Its ecologically cleanest source could be industrial - or even domestic! - bioreactors with green algae.
October 19, 2016
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The secrets of vibration-enhanced conductivity in graphene
Graphene, the one-atom-thick material made of carbon atoms, still holds some unexplained qualities, which are important in connection with electronic applications where high-conductivity matters, ranging from smart materials that collectively respond to external stimuli in a coherent, tunable fashion, to light-induced, all-optical networks.
March 8, 2017
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The ultimate tuning of optoelectric properties with nanoplatelets
An international research team has demonstrated an easy approach to synthesize ultrasmall near infrared 2D nanoplatelets (NIR NPLs) via template-assisted cation exchange.
May 15, 2017
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The world's first heat-driven transistor
"We are the first in the world to present a logic circuit, in this case a transistor, that is controlled by a heat signal instead of an electrical signal," states Professor Xavier Crispin of the Laboratory of Organic Electronics, Linkg University.
January 31, 2017
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Theoretical speed limit for intra-chip communications in microprocessors
Researchers at the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology have developed a theory that gives the possibility to precisely predict the level of noise caused by the amplification of photonic and plasmonic signals in nanoscale optoelectronic circuits.
January 19, 2017
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Theorists propose new class of topological metals with exotic electronic properties
Researchers at Princeton, Yale, and the University of Zurich have proposed a theory-based approach to characterize a class of metals that possess exotic electronic properties that could help scientists find other, similarly-endowed materials.
January 19, 2017
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Thermo Fisher Scientific Expands Semiconductor Portfolio with Three New Products
Thermo Fisher Scientific launches three new additions to its portfolio of semiconductor failure analysis workflows, providing semiconductor Manufacturers with what they are looking for -- speed and high-quality physical and electrical failure analysis.
June 30, 2017
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Thermodynamic disorder in GaN-based nanowires
While GaN-based nanowires have the potential for realizing integrated optoelectronic systems because of their high quantum efficiencies, they are also expected to pave the way for new photodetector device architectures and improve photosensitivity.
May 3, 2017
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Thin-film ferroelectrics go extreme
Scientists have created the first-ever polarization gradient in thin-film ferroelectrics, greatly expanding the range of functional temperatures for a key material used in a variety of everyday applications. the discovery could pave the way for developing devices capable of supporting wireless communications in extreme environments.
May 10, 2017
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Thin, Diamond-Like Photonic Nanostructure Reflects Many Colors of Light from all Angles
Through improved calculations, physicists and mathematicians at the University of Twente have recently discovered that a thin, diamond-like photonic nanostructure is capable of reflecting an unexpected broad range of colors of light, from all angles. this causes the material to have immense potential as a back reflector in order to improve the efficiency of tiny on-chip light sources or solar cells.
May 2, 2017
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Thinking thin brings new layering and thermal abilities to the semiconductor industry
What would a simple technique to remove thin layers from otherwise thick, rigid semiconductor crystals mean for the semiconductor industry? This concept has been actively explored for years, as integrated circuits made on thin layers hold promise for developments including improved thermal characteristics, lightweight stackability and a high degree of flexibility compared to conventionally thick substrates.
July 11, 2017
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Thinner Wires for Chips Developed Using Self-Assembling Block Copolymers
In order to enable faster working of the chips in computers and smartphones, the size of the wires and circuits through which signals are transmitted has to be reduced considerably. While miniaturizing these wires, researchers had to undergo an expedition to nearly the atomic level. at present, researchers have started to deal with as well as overcome specific barriers in physics that hinder the making of very small wires.
April 13, 2017
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This battery is powered by bacteria
Researchers at Binghamton University in New York have created a "bacteria-powered battery on a single sheet of paper." the project is aimed at creating batteries for disposable microelectronics that can run for weeks using a little bacteria-rich liquid.
December 23, 2016
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This paper battery is powered by bacteria in your spit
Sometimes a Duracell just won't do.
August 11, 2017
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Three-layer nanoparticle catalysts improve zinc-air batteries
Nanoparticles containing three different layers of material can help to boost the performance of a zinc-air battery, A*STAR researchers have found (Small, "Co@Co3O4@PPD core@bishell nanoparticle-based composite as an efficient electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction").
January 4, 2017
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Tiny Skyrmions Could be the Prospective Information Carriers in Future
An innovative ultra-thin multilayer film has been developed by a research team. the team is headed by Associate Professor Yang Hyunsoo at the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering of the Faculty of Engineering at the National University of Singapore (NUS). the novel film has the ability to tap the characteristics of tiny magnetic whirls (i.e. skyrmions) as information carriers to store and process data on magnetic media.
April 11, 2017
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To connect biology with electronics, be rigid, yet flexible
Researchers uncover design principles to make polymers that can transport both ions and electrons.
June 19, 2017
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Topological defects make metal-free nanocarbon promising for zinc-air batteries
The oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is the core process -- but also the bottleneck -- for the cathode reaction of energy-conversion devices like certain types of fuel cells and metal-air batteries.
January 12, 2017
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Topological insulator research accelerates quest for quicker, longer-lasting electronics
In the world of electronics, where the quest is always for smaller and faster units with infinite battery life, topological insulators (TI) have tantalizing potential.
June 23, 2017
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Topological photonic crystal made of silicon
International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics(WPI-MANA) researchers derive topological photonic states purely based on silicon, which can lead to the development of new functions and devices through integration with semiconductor electronics.
January 19, 2017
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Tortoise electrons trying to catch up with hare photons give graphene its conductivity
How electrons interact with other electrons at quantum scale in graphene affects how quickly they travel in the material, leading to its high conductivity.
December 14, 2016
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Toward all-solid lithium batteries
Most batteries are composed of two solid, electrochemically active layers called electrodes, separated by a polymer membrane infused with a liquid or gel electrolyte. But recent research has explored the possibility of all-solid-state batteries, in which the liquid (and potentially flammable) electrolyte would be replaced by a solid electrolyte, which could enhance the batteries' energy density and safety.
February 2, 2017
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Toward 'invisible' wearable sensors with gold nanowires
To build conformal contact of sensors with human skin/muscle with curvilinear surfaces, stretchable and bendable features are required -- a capability impossible to achieve with existing rigid circuit board technologies.
July 6, 2017
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Toward optical quantum computing
Ordinarily, light particles -- photons -- don't interact. If two photons collide in a vacuum, they simply pass through each other.
June 19, 2017
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Toward printable, sensor-laden 'skin' for robots
In this age of smartphones and tablet computers, touch-sensitive surfaces are everywhere. They're also brittle, as people with cracked phone screens everywhere can attest.
March 23, 2017
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Towards new IT devices with stable and transformable solitons
Unavoidably, each digital information we send around the globe is prone to be lost. Travelling long ways in wires, the initial signal decays and scatters by colliding with impurities and neighboring electromagnetic fields. Therefore, beyond each bit of your desired message, it is necessary to send other hidden bits of information that check for mistakes and take action in case of losses; while devices become smaller and smaller, this issue becomes more significant.
February 6, 2017
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Toyota in "production engineering" for a solid state battery, WSJ says
Solid electrolyte could make electric cars lighter, battery smaller.
July 25, 2017
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Trace metal recombination centers kill LED efficiency
Using cutting-edge first-principles calculations, researchers at the University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB) have demonstrated the mechanism by which transition metal impurities - iron in particular - can act as nonradiative recombination centers in nitride semiconductors.
November 3, 2016
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Transistors that can switch between two stable energy states
Engineers are unveiling an upgrade to the transistor laser that could be used to boost computer processor speeds - the formation of two stable energy states and the ability to switch between them quickly.
May 9, 2017
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Transparent Semiconductor Thin Film with Record Conductivity Discovered
You might not realize it, but a lot of the devices you rely on everyday probably include some amount of the material indium. this is because indium tin oxide (ITO) is a transparent conductor, making it ideal for use in flat-panel displays and solar cells, but indium is also rather rare, which is why so many have been looking for a viable replacement. Researchers at the University of Minnesota have recently discovered a transparent semiconductor that has the highest-ever conductivity of a thin film oxide semiconductor.
May 8, 2017
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Transparent silver: Tarnish-proof films for flexible displays, touch screens, metamaterial
The thinnest, smoothest layer of silver that can survive air exposure has been laid down at the University of Michigan, and it could change the way touchscreens and flat or flexible displays are made.
March 21, 2017
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Triboelectric nanogenerators boost mass spectrometry performance
Triboelectric nanogenerators (TENG) convert mechanical energy harvested from the environment to electricity for powering small devices such as sensors or for recharging consumer electronics
February 27, 2017
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Trickling electrons
What would happen if an electric current no longer flowed, but trickled instead? this was the question investigated by researchers working with Christian Ast at the Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research (Nature Communications, "Sensing the quantum limit in scanning tunnelling spectroscopy").
November 7, 2016
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Tricking molecules into creating new nano-shapes
Making small structures, at the nanometer length scale, is extremely difficult. However, these structures are vital for faster, denser more energy-efficient computing devices.
May 30, 2017
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Tuning crystallinity to realize high energy density in supercapacitors
Supercapacitors, a rapidly emerging type of energy storage device, hold great potential due to their interesting characteristics: high power density, fast charge and discharge rates, and long-term cycling life.
May 15, 2017
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Tweaking electrolyte makes better lithium-metal batteries
Scientists have found adding a pinch of something new to a battery's electrolyte gives the energy storage devices more juice per charge than today's commonly used rechargeable batteries.
March 1, 2017
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Tweaking thermoelectric voltage across atomic-scale gold junction by mechanical force
A voltage difference is created across a junction of two wires held at different temperatures. This phenomenon, called thermoelectric effect, has been widely studied and used in various applications such as thermoelectric power generators, thermoelectric refrigerators, and temperature measurement.
August 25, 2017
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'Twist and shine': Development of a new photoluminescent sensor material
Stress sensors are important tools when it comes to evaluating the robustness of a material facing strong mechanical forces. OIST researchers have just published in Advanced Materials an article ("Dynamic Phosphorescent Probe for Facile and Reversible Stress Sensing") reporting a new kind of sensor molecules that brightens up when the material they are incorporated into comes under heavy mechanical stress.
April 17, 2017
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Twisted semiconductors for future moving holograms
A smartphone display that can produce moving, holographic 3D images will need to be able to twist the light it emits.
March 31, 2017
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Two-dimensional anodes for advanced sodium ion batteries
The mechanism of sodium ion storage in an important two-dimensional material could be a simpler and less toxic route to cheaper batteries, a team of KAUST researchers discovered
October 26, 2016
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Two-Dimensional Hybrid 'Sandwich' offers Unique Properties for Optoelectronics
Researchers from Rice University have demonstrated a nanoscale sandwich, which they hope will become a molecular deli for materials scientists.
February 28, 2017
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Two-Dimensional Materials Create Miniature Optoelectronic Circuits
A team of researchers at the University of Manchester have formulated a new technique of developing optoelectronic circuits using graphene and other 2D materials that are comparatively smaller than their existing counterparts.
November 23, 2016
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Two-dimensional MXene materials get their close-up
Researchers have long sought electrically conductive materials for economical energy-storage devices. Two-dimensional (2D) ceramics called MXenes are contenders. Unlike most 2D ceramics, MXenes have inherently good conductivity because they are molecular sheets made from the carbides and nitrides of transition metals like titanium.
March 14, 2017
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Two-dimensional oxides juice up sodium ion batteries
(Nanowerk Spotlight) Sodium ion batteries are promising alternative to lithium ion batteries, particularly for home based and grid level storage solutions. Despite its lower energy density, sodium is more abundant and geographical more evenly distributed than lithium " and it is cheaper. In some countries, such as Saudi Arabia, it is abundant as a natural product of the water desalination process.
February 9, 2017
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Misc. - U

UC Physicists Control Luminescence of Semiconductor Nanowires Using Gold Coating
In electronics, the race for smaller is huge.
March 17, 2017
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Ultra-compact phase modulators based on graphene plasmons
Modulating the amplitude and phase of light is a key ingredient for many of applications such as wavefront shaping, transformation optics, phased arrays, modulators and sensors. Performing this task with high efficiency and small footprint is a major challenge for the development of optoelectronic devices.
June 26, 2017
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Ultra-fast, ultra-sensitive platinum selenide gas sensors
Researchers from the Graphene Flagship, working at the AMBER centre in Trinity College Dublin, Ireland in collaboration with researchers from University of Siegen, Germany, and University of Vienna, Austria, have demonstrated ultrafast and highly sensitive gas sensors using platinum selenide (PtSe2). this material -- a transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) -- has promising potential in different areas of nanoelectronics, including optoelectonics as well as sensing.
January 12, 2017
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Ultra-Thin Indium Selenide Shows Potential for Super-Fast Electronic Devices
After a decade of research on graphene and 2D materials, a new semiconductor material, known as Indium Selenide (InSe), was found to exhibit the potential for prospective super-fast electronics.
November 22, 2016
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Ultra-thin solution to primary obstacle in solid-state battery development
A team of researchers at the University of Maryland Energy Research Center and A. James Clark School of Engineering have announced a transformative development in the race to produce batteries that are at once safe, powerful, and affordable.
December 19, 2016
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Ultracold atoms point toward an intriguing magnetic behavior
Using atoms cooled to just billionths of a degree above absolute zero, a team led by researchers at Princeton University has discovered an intriguing magnetic behavior that could help explain how high-temperature superconductivity works.
September 29, 2017
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Ultrafast imaging reveals existence of 'polarons'
Many people picture electrical conductivity as the flow of charged particles (mainly electrons) without really thinking about the atomic structure of the material through which those charges are moving. But scientists who study "strongly correlated electron" materials such as high-temperature superconductors and those with strong responses to magnetism know that picture is far too simplistic.
November 29, 2016
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Ultrafast tunable semiconductor metamaterial created
An international team of researchers from Moscow State University (Russia), Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque (USA), and Friedrich-Schiller University in Jena (Germany) have devised an ultrafast tunable metamaterial based on gallium arsenide nanoparticles, as published by Nature Communications ("Ultrafast all-optical tuning of direct-gap semiconductor metasurfaces"). The new optical metamaterial paves the way to ultrafast information transfer on the nanoscale.
May 17, 2017
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Ultralow power transistors could function for years without a battery
A newly-developed form of transistor opens up a range of new electronic applications including wearable or implantable devices by drastically reducing the amount of power used. Devices based on this type of ultralow power transistor, developed by engineers at the University of Cambridge, could function for months or even years without a battery by 'scavenging' energy from their environment.
October 20, 2016
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Ultrasmall Nanoclusters Have Potential to Address Big Issues in Lithium-Ion Batteries
Batteries that are smaller, faster, and more stable are in great demand as devices become smaller and more powerful. Chemists at the University of Illinois have created a superionic solid that could be the starting point of next-generation lithium-ion batteries.
February 22, 2017
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Understanding heat transport in a chain of gold atoms
The precise control of electron transport in microelectronics makes complex logic circuits possible that are in daily use in smartphones and laptops. Heat transport is of similar fundamental importance and its control is for instance necessary to efficiently cool the ever smaller chips.
February 17, 2017
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Unexpected damage found rippling through promising exotic nanomaterials
Some of the most promising and puzzling phenomena in physics play out on the nanoscale, where a billionth-of-a-meter shift can make or break perfect electrical conductivity.
April 27, 2017
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Unexpected, star-spangled find may lead to advanced electronics
Researchers have described a material that, when heated to about 450 degrees Celsius, transforms from an atomically thin, two-dimensional sheet into an array of one-dimensional nanowires, each just a few atoms wide. An image caught in mid-transformation looks like a tiny United States flag, and with false colors added, is arguably the world's smallest image of Old Glory, researchers said.
March 19, 2017
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Unique Carbon Nanotube Structure Strengthens Thin Films for Use in Flexible Electronics
A team of researchers from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have synthesized thin carbon nanotube (CNT) textiles that display both high electrical conductivity and a level of toughness that is approximately fifty times higher than copper films, presently employed in electronics. they drew inspiration from the structure of composites found in the ancient world and nature.
April 24, 2017
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Unique Properties of Graphene Could Revolutionize Photonic and Opto-Electronic Devices
The importance of graphene can hardly be overstated. Graphene is the thinnest material comprised of atoms. It is only one atomic layer thick and hence an almost ideal representation of a two-dimensional material in our three-dimensional world. It has unique physical properties, including extreme mechanical strength and large electrical and thermal conductivity.
December 29, 2016
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We buy and sell electronic test and measurement equipment, coaxial and waveguide components, laboratory standards and calibration equipment, oscilloscopes, power supplies and manuals.
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Using graphene as transparent electrodes and alignment layers for liquid crystal devices
Liquid crystals (LC) are technologically important for their wide applications in optical displays--known as liquid crystal displays (LCD). In conventional LCDs, the LC material is contained in conventional LC cells, where the polyimide layers are used to align the LC homogeneously in the cell, and the transmissive indium tin oxide (ITO) electrodes are used to apply the electric field to reorient the LC along the field.
July 11, 2017
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Using Graphene to Enhance the Working of Next-Gen Molecular Electronic Devices
An innovative technique for enhancing the functionality of next-generation molecular electronic devices by making use of graphene has been developed by an international research team headed by the University of Bern and the National Physical Laboratory (NPL).
June 12, 2017
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Misc. - V

Valleytronics advancement could help extend Moore's Law
In the world of semiconductor physics, the goal is to devise more efficient and microscopic ways to control and keep track of 0 and 1, the binary codes that all information storage and logic functions in computers are based on.
May 1, 2017
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Video captures bubble-blowing nanobattery in action
With about three times the energy capacity by weight of today's lithium-ion batteries, lithium-air batteries could one day enable electric cars to drive farther on a single charge.
April 26, 2017
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'Virtual batteries' could lead to cheaper, cleaner power
In the power grid, supply and demand need to match exactly. If consumers demand more power than producers can supply, or if producers provide more power than consumers need, the result can be rolling blackouts.
March 24, 2017
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Vortex-antivortex pairs found in magnetic trilayers
A international team of researchers has discovered magnetic vortex-antivortex pairs arising from correlated electron spins in a newly engineered trilayer material. The discovery could advance memory cells and points to the potential development of 3-D magnetic logic circuits.
June 28, 2017
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Misc. - W

Warning of shortage of essential minerals for laptops, cell phones, wiring
Researchers say global resource governance and sharing of geoscience data is needed to address challenges facing future mineral supply. Specifically of concern are a range of technology minerals, which are an essential ingredient in everything from laptops and cell phones to hybrid or electric cars to solar panels and copper wiring for homes.
March 19, 2017
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Waste silicon sawdust recycled into anode for lithium-ion battery
Researchers have created a high performance anode material for lithium-ion batteries using waste silicon sawdust.
February 21, 2017
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Water-based and biocompatible 2D inks for printed electronics
Researchers at the University of Manchester have developed a method of producing water-based and inkjet printable 2D material inks, which could bring 2D crystal heterostructures from the lab into real-world products.
January 30, 2017
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What ultimately limits the scaling of graphene nanogap electrodes
The ability to create nanometer-sized gaps in spm2-bonded carbon materials offers a means of contacting nanoscale objects, for example, nanocrystals and single molecules, that cannot be achieved with conventional metallic electrodes.
May 12, 2017
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White paper highlights federal vision for nanotechnology-inspired Grand Challenge for future computing
Today, Federal agencies participating in the National Nanotechnology Initiative (NNI) released a white paper (pdf) describing the collective Federal vision for the emerging and innovative solutions needed to realize the Nanotechnology-Inspired Grand Challenge for Future Computing.
July 29, 2016
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Why does rubbing a balloon on your hair make it stick?
For centuries, scientists have tried to understand triboelectric charging, commonly known as static electricity.
August 29, 2017
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Wires and supercapacitors constructed inside living plants
A special structure for storing energy known as a supercapacitor has been constructed in a plant for the first time. the plant, a rose, can be charged and discharged hundreds of times.
February 27, 2017
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Wood is made into an electrical conductor by turning its surface into graphene
Rice University scientists have made wood into an electrical conductor by turning its surface into graphene.
July 31, 2017
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World's first vertically stacked gate-all-around Si nanowire CMOS transistors
At this week's IEEE IEDM conference, world-leading research and innovation hub for nano-electronics and digital technology, imec, reported for the first time the CMOS integration of vertically stacked gate-all-around (GAA) silicon nanowire MOSFETs.
December 6, 2016
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World's smallest radio receiver has building blocks the size of 2 atoms
Researchers from the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences have made the world's smallest radio receiver - built out of an assembly of atomic-scale defects in pink diamonds.
December 19, 2016
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Writing with the electron beam: Now in silver
When it comes to extremely fine, precise features, a scanning electron microscope (SEM) is unrivaled. A focused electron beam can directly deposit complex features onto a substrate in a single step (Electron-Beam-Induced Deposition, EBID). While this is an established technique for gold, platinum, copper and further metals, direct electron beam writing of silver remained elusive. Yet, the noble metal silver promises especially interesting potential applications in nano-optics in information technology.
July 24, 2017
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Misc. - X

X-ray spectroscopy reveals details of capacity fading in Li-ion batteries
The improvement of batteries is one of the key factors in increasing the performance of electric vehicles. to this end Dr Moniek Tromp of the University of Amsterdam's research priority area Sustainable Chemistry is employing advanced X-ray spectroscopy of battery electrodes under operating conditions.
December 5, 2016
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X-ray study reveals way to control molecular vibrations that transmit heat
Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Brookhaven National Laboratory have developed a new way to track dynamic molecular features in soft materials, including the high-frequency molecular vibrations that transmit waves of heat, sound, and other forms of energy. Controlling these vibrational waves in soft materials such as polymers or liquid crystal compounds could lead to a range of energy-inspired innovations--from thermal and acoustic insulators, to ways to convert waste heat into electricity, or light into mechanical motion.
June 7, 2017
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Misc. - Y

Yeolight opens an OLED lighting exhibition center
China's Yeolight has opened an OLED lighting exhibition center, located in GU'an city Hebei province, China. Yeolight says that at 431 sqm, this is the largest OLED lighting gallery in China. Most of the OLED panels on display are produced by Yeolight, but some are made by LG Display.
January 24, 2017
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Your body is a big battery and scientists want to power gadgets with it
All along the power was inside you
July 5, 2017
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Misc. - Z

Zenith
Sure, you can browse through every kind of television imaginable, but check out the new cool products like Z-Trak, DVD and HDTV. Job and company information also available.
Provides Products
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Zenyatta ventures announces successful testing of graphene oxide material by U.S. based advanced materials company
Recently, Zenyatta Ventures reported the successful testing of their graphene oxide material by a top U.S. based advanced materials company manufacturing silicon-graphene anodes for the next generation of lithium-ion batteries.
May 17, 2017
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Zinc oxide: it's not just for sunscreen and diaper cream
For many, zinc oxide conjures images of bright stripes down lifeguards' noses. But for researchers in Concordia's Faculty of Arts and Science, ZnO is an exciting compound with important optical and electrical properties.
May 9, 2017
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