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120 Health - AIDS and Virus Resources

Misc. - A

A Tiny Usb Stick can Tell you how Much HIV is In your Blood
Just don't Try to Put Photos on It
November 11, 2016
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A USB stick that can test HIV levels in under 30 minutes
Scientists at Imperial College of London have teamed with UK biotech company DNA Electronics to develop a USB stick-based HIV test capable of sophisticated detection in a fraction of the time of a standard test.
November 10, 2016
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Added benefit of combination drug for HIV-infected patients not proven
The drug combination emtricitabine/tenofovir alafenamide is approved in combination with other antiviral agents for the treatment of adults and adolescents infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1).
August 19, 2016
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Anti-HIV medications provide durable protection against heterosexual transmission, study finds
Anti-HIV medications suppress the viral load of people living with HIV and provide durable protection against heterosexual transmission a study led by the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill found. Researchers found a 93 percent reduction of HIV transmission when the HIV-infected person started antiretroviral therapy or ART at a higher CD4 cell count.
July 19, 2016
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ART could help reduce opportunistic infections and save lives of HIV-infected children
Reducing opportunistic infections such as TB in children with HIV could save both lives and money
July 20, 2016
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Autologous stem cell transplant safe, effective for HIV-associated lymphoma patients
New research published online today in Blood Journal of the American Society of Hematology (ASH), challenges the generally held belief that individuals with HIV and aggressive lymphoma are not candidates for standard treatment.
June 14, 2016
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Misc. - B

Broadly neutralizing HIV antibodies open new avenues for development of effective vaccine
A small number of people infected with HIV produce antibodies with an amazing effect: not only are the antibodies directed against the own virus strain, but also against different sub-types of HIV that circulate worldwide. Researchers from the University of Zurich and University Hospital Zurich now reveal which factors are responsible for the human body forming such broadly neutralizing HIV antibodies, thereby opening new avenues for the development of an HIV vaccine.
September 23, 2016
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BUSM scientists map active human apoptosome to provide better understanding of cell death
Programmed cell death, or apoptosis, plays a central role in the maintenance of human health by providing a line of defense against unrestricted cell growth that occurs in many cancers and AIDS as well as in neurodegenerative diseases and stroke.
October 4, 2016
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Misc. - C

CCN article outlines unique treatment options for cardiovascular patients with HIV
Cardiovascular disease has become the leading cause of death for those living with HIV, as the infection has moved from a terminal disease to a chronic illness.
October 3, 2016
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Cell particles may help spread HIV infection, NIH study suggests
HIV appears to enlist the aid of nano-sized structures released by infected cells to infect new cells, according to a study by researchers at the National Institutes of Health. Known as extracellular vesicles (EVs), these bubble-like structures are made by many kinds of cells and, under most circumstances, are thought to ferry molecules from one cell to another, providing a means of communication. NIH scientists discovered that cells infected with HIV appear to produce EVs that manipulate prospective host cells to pass infection to other cells. the study appears in Scientific Reports.
May 10, 2017
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Cheap Ultrasensitive HIV Sensor to Help Screen Virus in Poorer Places
At the Instituto de Microelectrónica de Madrid, researchers have developed a tiny, cheap, portable sensor potentially capable of detecting HIV in people within a week of infection. These days nucleic acid amplification is the clinical standard, but it's too expensive for many places around the world. Besides preventing early detection, not being able to screen blood for HIV hampers blood donation efforts.
February 21, 2017
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Certain immune reactions to viruses cause learning problems
Researchers have discovered a mechanism by which the body's immune reaction to viruses like influenza and HIV may cause learning and memory problems.
May 15, 2017
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Certain Kinds of Vaginal Bacteria can Actually Boost Hiv Risk
The Balance of Microbes can Change your Susceptibility
January 10, 2017
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Chemists develop an ultra-sensitive test for cancers, HIV
Catching a disease in its earliest stages can lead to more effective therapies. Chemists have increased the likelihood of detecting these diseases via a test that is thousands of times more sensitive than current diagnostics.
March 18, 2016
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Combination of broadly neutralizing antibodies can suppress virus in HIV-infected mice, study shows
Without antiretroviral drug treatment, the majority of people infected with HIV ultimately develop AIDS, as the virus changes and evolves beyond the body's ability to control it. But a small group of infected individuals--called elite controllers--possess immune systems capable of defeating the virus. they accomplish this by manufacturing broadly neutralizing antibodies, which can take down multiple forms of HIV.
January 25, 2017
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Combining ART with immune-enhancing treatment may destabilize HIV reservoirs
Although antiretroviral therapy (ART) can reduce the amount of HIV in the blood to an undetectable level in most chronically infected people, it cannot eliminate reservoirs of HIV that persist in latently infected immune cells. Findings presented at the 21st International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2016) in Durban, South Africa, suggest that combining ART with an immune-enhancing treatment may destabilize viral reservoirs in macaques infected with simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), the monkey equivalent of HIV. the work was funded by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, part of the National Institutes of Health, and led by Rama Amara, Ph.D., of Emory University.
July 21, 2016
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Community-level ART coverage, male circumcision linked to decline in new male HIV infections in Uganda
Increasing the number of men who undergo circumcision and increasing the rates at which women with HIV are given antiretroviral therapy (ART) were associated with significant declines in the number of new male HIV infections in rural Ugandan communities, new Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Health research suggests.
July 13, 2016
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Misc. - D

Defective HIV proviruses hinder immune system response and cure
Mutant forms of HIV complicate disease monitoring and distract the immune system from the functional virus
April 19, 2017
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Discovery of additional viral reservoir reveals new target for HIV cure research
HIV cure research to date has focused on clearing the virus from T cells, a type of white blood cell that is an essential part of the immune system. Yet investigators in the Division of Infectious Diseases at the University of North Carolina School of Medicine have found the virus persists in HIV-infected macrophages. Macrophages are large white blood cells found in tissues throughout the body including the liver, lung, bone marrow and brain.
April 17, 2017
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Docs Seeing More Multidrug Resistant HIV Patients
People resistant to older medication also have problems with newer drug, study finds
December 1, 2016
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Dual therapy effective as second-line treatment for patients infected by HIV with multiple mutations
ANRS 12286 MOBIDIP, a clinical trial running in parallel in three countries in sub-Saharan Africa (Cameroon, Burkina Faso, and Senegal), shows that dual therapy with lamivudine and a boosted protease inhibitor is effective as second-line treatment in patients infected by HIV with multiple mutations. Such treatment de-escalation will reduce costs, side effects, and the need for virological monitoring of patients.
May 29, 2017
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Misc. - E

Effects of HIV: what happens to the body?
When a person first contracts HIV, the virus will affect their body in several stages. If left untreated, HIV is likely to lead to AIDS.
March 15, 2017
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Experimental Drug Might Help Drug-Resistant HIV
'This is potentially a lifesaving therapy,' researcher says
October 28, 2016
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Experimental vaccine/immune stimulant combination may lead to viral remission in HIV patients
A study led by researchers at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC), in collaboration with scientists at Walter Reed Army Institute of Research (WRAIR), Janssen Vaccines & Prevention B.V., one of the Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson & Johnson and Gilead Sciences, Inc., has demonstrated that combining an experimental vaccine with an innate immune stimulant may help lead to viral remission in people living with HIV.
November 9, 2016
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Experts receive NIH grant to study why some HIV-infected individuals resist TB
Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine experts and colleagues in the United States and Africa have received an $11 million, five-year NIH grant to understand why some people living with HIV in Africa avoid becoming infected with the bacterium that causes tuberculosis (TB) despite exposure to high-TB-risk circumstances.
June 29, 2016
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Misc. - F

First large-scale clinical study of long-acting injectable HIV drug begins
The first large-scale clinical trial of a long-acting injectable drug for HIV prevention began today. the study, sponsored by the National Institutes of Health, will examine whether a long-acting form of the investigational anti-HIV drug cabotegravir injected once every 8 weeks can safely protect men and transgender women from HIV infection at least as well as the anti-HIV medication Truvada taken daily as an oral tablet.
December 21, 2016
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First new HIV vaccine efficacy study in seven years has begun
South Africa hosts historic NIH-supported clinical trial.
November 28, 2016
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Misc. - G

Gene editing strategy eliminates HIV-1 infection in live animals
A permanent cure for HIV infection remains elusive due to the virus's ability to hide away in latent reservoirs. But now, scientists show that they can excise HIV DNA from the genomes of living animals to eliminate further infection.
May 1, 2017
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Grindr app could be effective way to distribute HIV self-testing kits to high-risk men who have sex with men
A study led by researchers from UCLA found that the gay social and sexual networking app Grindr is an effective means through which to distribute HIV self-testing kits among men who have sex with men who have a high risk for contracting the virus. the study found that advertising placed on the app has a high potential to reach untested high-risk populations and reduce the spread of HIV.
July 13, 2016
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Misc. - H

Health Risks Grow as Kids Born with HIV Age
About 10,000 Americans were infected at birth, and many are now young adults with medical issues, study finds
March 31, 2017
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HIV breakthrough: Scientists remove virus in animals using gene editing
Worldwide, tens of millions of people are living with HIV. While scientists and medical professionals do not yet have a permanent cure for the virus, researchers have just made a breakthrough: they managed to eliminate the HIV-1 infection in mice.
May 4, 2017
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HIV came to NYC at least a decade before virus ID'd
DNA analysis of early viral strains tracks U.S. debut to early '70s
October 26, 2016
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HIV 'fingerprint' tool could greatly assist vaccine development
Scientists hope that their new method of "fingerprinting" the shields of sugar molecules that HIV surrounds itself with in order to evade the immune system will improve, and therefore speed up the development of effective vaccines.
March 28, 2017
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HIV lesions: Pictures and treatments
Lesions are abnormal growths on the skin. Skin lesions are common in people who have HIV.
March 22, 2017
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HIV May Double Odds of Heart Attack
Study suggests that tools used to predict risk need tweaking for those with AIDS-causing virus
December 21, 2016
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HIV patients have nearly twice the heart attack risk
Risk for heart attack, stroke is vastly underestimated in HIV patients
December 21, 2016
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HIV status may affect the progression of HPV infection to cervical pre-cancer
HIV-positive women were more likely to have human papillomavirus infection progress to pre-cancerous cervical lesions
June 1, 2017
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HIV swollen lymph nodes: Symptoms, causes, and treatment
Alymph node is a small, bean-shaped mass of tissue that helps to defend the body against infections. Lymph nodes are sometimes incorrectly referred to as glands; however, glands make or secrete substances, whereas lymph nodes only act as filters.
March 13, 2017
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HIV therapy for breastfeeding mothers can virtually eliminate transmission to babies
For HIV-infected mothers whose immune system is in good health, taking a three-drug antiretroviral regimen during breastfeeding essentially eliminates HIV transmission by breast milk to their infants, according to results from a large clinical trial conducted in sub-Saharan Africa and India.
July 18, 2016
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HIV: A therapeutic advance for resource-limited settings
A clinical trial running in parallel in three countries in sub-Saharan Africa, shows that dual therapy with lamivudine and a boosted protease inhibitor is effective as second-line treatment in patients infected by HIV with multiple mutations. Such treatment deescalation will reduce costs, side effects, and the need for virological monitoring of patients.
May 29, 2017
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HIV: new math model may help to predict strains for vaccine development
A major challenge in the development of an HIV vaccine is the fact that the virus is continually evolving, and it is very difficult to predict which direction it will take. Now, a new study shows how ideas from two disparate fields - stock price prediction and particle diffusion in liquids - can help. Inspired by the financial model, the researchers develop a diffusion-based tool that accurately predicted how an HIV surface protein evolved in a patient population over 30 years.
April 7, 2017
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HIV-infected adults with MDD more likely to experience heart attack, study shows
Among more than 26,000 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected adults, those with major depressive disorder (MDD) were more likely to experience a heart attack than those without MDD, according to a study published online by JAMA Cardiology.
August 24, 2016
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HIV/AIDS and Mental Health Issues?
David Fawcett survived the shock of learning he was HIV-positive in 1988. It wasn't until 4 years later that the full reality of his situation set in.
August 16, 2016
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Home HIV test kits: Uses, what to expect, and benefits
The face of HIV has changed enormously in recent years. People living with HIV who are receiving appropriate medical care can live almost as long as people who do not have HIV.
March 13, 2017
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HOPE study seeks to understand safety of vaginal ring in protecting women against HIV
Women who took part in ASPIRE, a trial that found a vaginal ring containing an antiretroviral (ARV) drug called dapivirine was safe and helped protect against HIV, will soon be offered the opportunity to use the ring as part of a new study called HOPE.
July 19, 2016
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Misc. - I

Improving efficiency of health facilities could extend ART to many people living with HIV
Health facilities in Kenya, Uganda, and Zambia could extend life-sustaining antiretroviral therapy to hundreds of thousands of people living with HIV if facilities improved the efficiency of service delivery. this is one of the main findings from a paper published today in BMC Medicine, co-authored by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation and collaborators from Action Africa Help-International in Kenya, the Infectious Diseases Research Collaboration in Uganda, and the University of Zambia in Zambia.
July 21, 2016
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Increasing rates of new HIV infections threaten 74 countries
AIDS deaths are falling in most countries worldwide, but the rate of new infections increased in several countries over the past decade, threatening to undermine efforts to end the AIDS epidemic by 2030, a new scientific paper shows.
July 20, 2016
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Is an HIV Cure Possible?
Researchers remain hopeful that they're heading in the right direction to finding a cure for HIV, the virus that causes AIDS. Right now, it's still out of reach. But the unusual cases of three people may hold clues.
November 10, 2016
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Is the AIDS Epidemic Winding Down in the U.S.?
Infection rate could be as low as 12,000 people a year by 2025, researchers report
May 17, 2017
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Misc. - J

JAIDS presents important information to prevent HIV epidemic among transgender individuals
Programs to reduce the high risk of HIV infection among transgender people are urgently needed–but efforts are hindered by a lack of accurate information on HIV prevalence, HIV incidence, and specific risk factors facing this key population. a special supplement to JAIDS: Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes presents essential information to meet the challenges of HIV prevention in the transgender population. the journal is published by Wolters Kluwer.
July 20, 2016
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Misc. - L

Large increases in HIV suppression needed to reduce new infections in critical population
NIH-funded study aims to identify and treat HIV-infected men who have sex with men.
October 19, 2016
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Link found between HIV treatment, neuronal degeneration
Certain protease inhibitors, among the most effective HIV drugs, lead to the production of the peptide beta amyloid, often associated with Alzheimer's disease, and may be the cause of cognitive problems, report researchers.
December 16, 2016
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Living Longer and Aging with HIV
Although HIV makes aging more complicated, plenty of people have had the disease for years, even decades, and are doing well.
December 27, 2016
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Misc. - M

Many gay and bisexual men unaware that PrEP medication may reduce HIV risk
Only four in 10 gay and bisexual men in Baltimore without HIV are aware that pre-exposure prophylaxis medication (PrEP) may significantly reduce their risk of contracting the virus, even those who had recently visited a doctor or been tested for a sexually transmitted disease, new Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health research suggests.
October 5, 2016
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Mass incarceration of drug users leads to high levels of HIV, tuberculosis and hepatitis among prisoners
The War on Drugs, mass incarceration of drug users, and the failure to provide proven harm reduction and treatment strategies has led to high levels of HIV, tuberculosis, and hepatitis B and C infection among prisoners–far higher than in the general population.
July 19, 2016
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Maternal antiretroviral treatment eliminates HIV transmission to infants during breastfeeding
For HIV-infected mothers whose immune system is in good health, taking a three-drug antiretroviral regimen during breastfeeding essentially eliminates HIV transmission by breast milk to their infants, according to results from a large clinical trial conducted in sub-Saharan Africa and India.
July 19, 2016
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Meds Prevent HIV Transmission with Unprotected Sex
Study suggests transmission risk is low if infected person adheres to treatment
July 12, 2016
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More than two million people co-infected with HIV, hepatitis C
An estimated 2.3 million people living with HIV are co-infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) globally, a new study has found. Very little was known about the extent of HIV/HCV coinfection prior to this study, which was the first global study of its kind.
March 8, 2016
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MU researcher awarded $3 million NIH grant to develop new drugs for treating HBV
Hepatitis B is a viral infection that increases the likelihood of developing liver cancer or liver failure. According to the World Health Organization, an estimated 2 billion people currently are infected with HBV, which is more than 10 times the number of people who have human immunodeficiency virus.
September 23, 2016
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Misc. - N

Nanoparticle biosensor able to detect HIV only one week after infection
In addition, the total test time is 4 hours, 45 minutes, meaning clinical results could be obtained on the same day. the research is published today in the journal PLOS ONE.
February 15, 2017
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Nanotechnology approach could cut dose of leading HIV treatment in half
Successful results of a University of Liverpool-led trial that utilised nanotechnology to improve drug therapies for HIV patients has been presented at the Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI) in Seattle, a leading annual conference of HIV research, clinical practice and progress.
February 21, 2017
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Nanotechnology based gene editing to eradicate HIV brain reservoir in drug abusers
Opiate abuse is a significant risk factor for HIV infection, and in combination they can have a devastating effect on the brain. Scientists at FIU Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine are studying new therapies that can short-circuit HIV infection and mitigate the damaging effects that opiate addiction has on the central nervous system.
February 15, 2017
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Nearly 3% of U.S. Adults Have Weakened Immunity
Advances in treating HIV and autoimmune diseases are keeping more patients alive
October 28, 2016
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Nearly half of newly-infected HIV patients experience neurologic issues
A team led by researchers from UCSF and Yale has found that half of people newly infected with HIV experience neurologic issues. These neurologic findings are generally not severe and usually resolve after participants started anti-retroviral therapy.
June 14, 2016
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Neutrons key to discovering new HIV drugs? An interview with Dr Matthew Blakeley
What is neutron crystallography and how does it differ from X-ray crystallography?
July 21, 2016
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New HIV infections stagnating globally at 2.5 million per year, study reveals
A major new analysis from the Global Burden of Disease 2015 (GBD 2015) study, published today in the Lancet HIV journal, reveals that although deaths from HIV/AIDS have been steadily declining from a peak in 2005, 2.5 million people worldwide became newly infected with HIV in 2015, a number that hasn't changed substantially in the past 10 years.
July 20, 2016
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New method estimates patient adherence to antiretroviral drugs
Researchers at the Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences at CU Anschutz have developed a technique that estimates an HIVnegative patient's adherence to drugs prescribed to prevent HIV transmission during sex.
August 24, 2016
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New nano approach could cut dose of leading HIV treatment in half
Successful results have utilized nanotechnology to improve drug therapies for HIV patients.
February 24, 2017
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New Research to Improve HIV Treatments Using Nanotechnology
A new University of Liverpool-led study aims to enhance the administration and availability of drug therapies to HIV patients using nanotechnology.
October 22, 2016
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New study clears "Patient Zero" of responsibility for HIV in US
A new genetic analysis has shown that the French-Canadian flight attendant Gaetan Dugas who was posthumously blamed for spreading HIV across North America, was not the "Patient Zero" of the epidemic.
October 28, 2016
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New test detects latent HIV more accurately, moves closer to cure
Researchers are moving closer to fully curing HIV by designing a more accurate, cost effective, and efficient test for detecting how much of the virus is left in the human body.
May 30, 2017
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New trial examines use of nanotechnology to improve delivery of drugs to HIV patients
Successful results of a University of Liverpool-led trial that utilised nanotechnology to improve drug therapies for HIV patients has been presented at the Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI) in Seattle, a leading annual conference of HIV research, clinical practice and progress.
February 24, 2017
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NIDA announces recipients of 2017 Avant-Garde Awards for HIV/AIDS research
NIH awards highlight novel approaches to HIV prevention and treatment.
April 5, 2017
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NIH expands investment in HIV cure research
Six research teams to lead collaborative investigations worldwide.
July 13, 2016
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NIH funds research network focused on HIV-infected youth
Studies also will address HIV prevention among at-risk groups.
September 23, 2016
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NIH research helps explain how antibody treatment led to sustained remission of HIV-like virus
Scientists at the National Institutes of Health have found that the presence of the protein alpha-4 beta-7 integrin on the surface of HIV and its monkey equivalent – simian immunodeficiency virus, or SIV – may help explain why an antibody protected monkeys from SIV in previous experiments.
February 15, 2017
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NIH researchers identify antibody that potently neutralizes 98% of HIV strains
Scientists from the National Institutes of Health have identified an antibody from an HIV-infected person that potently neutralized 98 percent of HIV isolates tested, including 16 of 20 strains resistant to other antibodies of the same class. the remarkable breadth and potency of this antibody, named N6, make it an attractive candidate for further development to potentially treat or prevent HIV infection, say the researchers.
November 15, 2016
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NIH-led effort uses implementation science approaches to reduce mother-to-child HIV transmission
Studies investigate best practices to ease major disease burden in Sub-Saharan Africa.
June 30, 2016
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NIH-supported first HIV vaccine efficacy study begins in South Africa
The first HIV vaccine efficacy study to launch anywhere in seven years is now testing whether an experimental vaccine regimen safely prevents HIV infection among South African adults. the study, called HVTN 702, involves a new version of the only HIV vaccine candidate ever shown to provide some protection against the virus.
November 28, 2016
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Number of HIV-positive cancer patients in the U.S. projected to decrease through 2030
As the population of people living with HIV in the United States ages, the burden of cancer for these patients is expected to shift away from cancers linked to AIDS and toward malignancies that affect the general population, according to a new study led by a University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill researcher.
April 5, 2017
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Nutritious food could improve medication adherence and health in HIV-positive and Diabetes patients
HIV-positive people who received healthy food and snacks for six months were more likely to adhere to their medication regimens, and they, as well as people with type 2 diabetes, were less depressed and less likely to make trade-offs between food and healthcare, according to a new study led by researchers at UC San Francisco.
January 25, 2017
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Misc. - O

Opioids by Injection May Drive HIV Outbreaks
Indiana case offers a lesson for other rural communities
July 20, 2016
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Misc. - P

Peer outreach improves diagnosis and treatment of HIV among sex workers
Sex workers were more likely to regularly visit health clinics for testing and treatment of HIV, AIDS and other sexually transmitted infections after being approached by a peer outreach worker, according to research from the University of Houston.
August 11, 2016
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Prevalence of HIV in western Nepal linked to lack of technical and vocational education
Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) is a global health problem, especially affecting developing countries due to lack of education and awareness of the possible means of transmission. HIV has remained as a big problem in Nepal's western districts, with poor families disproportionately affected. According to government statistics, an estimated 39,249 people in Nepal are living with HIV.
November 11, 2016
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Misc. - R

Remote-controlled implantable device delivers HIV prevention drug
A Houston Methodist research team received a nearly $4 million grant to test a transcutaneously refillable implant that administers pre-exposure prophylaxis drugs to subjects at risk of HIV-exposure.
July 13, 2016
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Research offers new insights into how immunotherapy could help treat or functionally cure HIV
Immunotherapy has revolutionized treatment options in oncology, neurology, and many infectious diseases and now there is fresh hope that the same method could be used to treat or functionally cure HIV, according to two related studies from Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB), and the National Institutes of Health (NIH).
November 9, 2016
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Researchers design inhibitory peptide to unleash defence mechanisms against fungal pathogens
For most people, a simple case of thrush or athlete's foot can be quickly and easily treated using over-the-counter anti-fungal creams and pills. However, even with medication, fungal pathogens can overwhelm a weakened immune system and cause systemic infections - as in people with HIV/AIDS, or organ transplant recipients, for example - posing a severe health risk.
July 19, 2016
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Researchers develop innovative technique for detecting HIV hiding places in infected patients
Discovery of a novel, advanced technique to identify the rare cells where human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) hides in patients taking antiretroviral therapy (ART). this is an important step forward in the search for a HIV/AIDS cure.
September 19, 2016
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Researchers develop new hybrid method to study HIV protein involved in disease progression
More than 36 million people worldwide, including 1.2 million in the U.S., are living with an HIV infection. Today's anti-retroviral cocktails block how HIV replicates, matures and gets into uninfected cells, but they can't eradicate the virus.
August 03, 2016
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Researchers develop new strategy that can revolutionize HIV vaccine design
Vaccines are an essential tool for preventing and treating serious infectious diseases such as polio, chicken pox and measles. But so far it has not been possible to develop vaccines capable of contributing to the treatment and prevention of chronic infectious diseases such as HIV and hepatitis C.
May 17, 2017
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Researchers estimate number of infants born in the U.S. with perinatal HIV infection
A new article published online by JAMA Pediatrics estimates there were 69 perinatal human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections among infants born in the United States in 2013 (1.75 per 100,000 live births), down from an estimated 216 perinatal HIV infections among infants born in 2002 (5.37 per 100,000 live births).
March 19, 2017
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Researchers receive grant to test transcutaneously refillable implant that delivers HIV-prevention drugs
A Houston Methodist research team received a nearly $4 million grant to test a transcutaneously refillable implant that administers pre-exposure prophylaxis drugs to subjects at risk of HIV-exposure.
July 13, 2016
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Misc. - S

Scientists develop new model to help eliminate HIV vulnerability among racial/ethnic groups
Although HIV rates are higher among the African American community compared to the White population, research shows that engagement in risky behaviors does not fully account for these differences.
November 17, 2016
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Serious Infections Tied to Suicide Risk
Danish study finds greater association in those hospitalized with HIV or hepatitis
August 10, 2016
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Sexual Relationships When You're HIV-Positive
Don't worry: you can have good sex and a healthy relationship with your partner, even if one of you has HIV.
December 27, 2016
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Shape-changing enzyme suggests how small doses of anti-HIV drug might treat Alzheimer's
Molecular roadmap provides key evidence supporting proposal to launch clinical trials of efavirenz as an Alzheimer's treatment
June 28, 2016
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Studies shed new light on why young women in South Africa experience high rates of HIV infection
Evidence by the Centre for the AIDS Programme of Research in South Africa (CAPRISA) consortium of South African and North American researchers will be presented on July 18 at the International AIDS 2016 Conference in Durban, shedding new light on why young women in South Africa have high rates of HIV infection.
July 18, 2016
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Study confirms efficacy of PrEP in reducing risk of HIV infection in men who have sex with men
The last phase of ANRS IPERGAY has confirmed that "on-demand" pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) is a highly effective method of reducing the risk of HIV infection in men who have sex with men and who report high-risk behavior. These results will be presented at AIDS 2016 in Durban, South Africa (18 to 22 July). from late 2016, a vast research program, ANRS PREVENIR, will assess PrEP on a large scale in Paris and its suburbs (France).
July 20, 2016
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Study Discounts 'Patient Zero' Myth in AIDS Crisis
Genetic analysis of 40-year-old blood samples shows many North Americans already infected by late 1970s
October 26, 2016
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Study finds 18% increase in HIV treatment success rates
Researchers have been successful in increasing HIV treatment success rates by almost 18 percent.
March 19, 2017
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Study highlights barriers to HIV care in sub-Saharan Africa
Barriers to diagnosis and lack of access to modern medications have combined to place caregivers and HIV-positive patients in sub-Saharan Africa between a rock and a hard place. a new study shows that physicians are often forced to choose between controlling seizures, which can occur if the disease goes undiagnosed for too long, or treating the underlying HIV infection.
December 23, 2016
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Study shows link between inflammatory biomarkers and prevalence of CAD in HIV-infected men
A cardiac imaging study led by Hossein Bahrami, MD, PhD, assistant professor of cardiovascular medicine at the Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California (USC), along with investigators from Johns Hopkins University and five other institutions, showed a correlation between higher inflammatory biomarkers and an increased prevalence of coronary artery disease (CAD) in men infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV).
August 03, 2016
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Sugar-binding protein galectin-9 could be new weapon to fight HIV
The ultimate impediment to a cure for HIV infection is the presence of latent, HIV-infected cells, which can reawaken and produce new virus when antiretroviral drug therapy is stopped.
July 13, 2016
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Misc. - T

Teaching happiness to men with HIV boosts their health
Learning skills for positive emotions result in less HIV in blood and less anti-depressant use
April 17, 2017
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This can Help HIV Patients Battling Lymphoma
Outcomes after the therapy similar to those for patients who don't carry the virus
June 15, 2016
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This USB Stick Performs an HIV Test
Scientists in the UK have developed a USB stick that can quickly and accurately measure the amount of HIV is in a patient's blood.
November 10, 2016
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Topical delivery of AVR drug combination can provide complete protection against HIV
Researchers are edging ever closer to discovering the perfect combination of drugs and drug delivery system that will stop the sexual transmission of HIV. Findings published last week in the journal PLOS ONE confirm that researchers from the Oak Crest Institute of Science, located in Monrovia, CA, have demonstrated for the first time that two powerful antiretroviral (AVR) drugs can provide complete protection against HIV when delivered topically by a sustained release intravaginal ring (IVR) device.
June 14, 2016
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TSRI scientists develop new strategy to design potential HIV vaccine candidates
Want to catch a criminal? Show a mugshot on the news.
June 29, 2016
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Misc. - U

UNC bioethicist addresses roadblocks to HIV research on pregnant women
UNC School of Medicine's Anne Lyerly is addressing the urgent need for effective HIV prevention and treatment for the estimated 1.5 million women worldwide with HIV who give birth each year.
August 18, 2016
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UNC secures $18 million NIH funding to form iTech for facilitating HIV research studies
People under the age of 30 account for the majority, or 40 percent, of new HIV infections in the United States. this age group is also more likely than adults to own a smartphone and use this device to download apps and access health information.
September 23, 2016
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USB Stick Measures HIV Levels Within Half Hour
Researchers at Imperial College London and DNA Electronics, a company with offices in London, UK and Carlsbad, CA, developed a computer USB stick that takes a drop of blood and measures the amount of HIV particles.
November 17, 2016
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UTHealth participates in study to evaluate effectiveness of new injectable HIV medication
The HIV Prevention Trials Network, which includes McGovern Medical School at the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, has launched a study to evaluate whether a new injectable medication can work as well as an existing oral pill to safely protect against HIV among men who have sex with men and transgender women who have sex with men.
April 18, 2017
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Misc. - V

Viral hepatitis kills as many as malaria, TB or HIV/AIDS, finds study
Viral hepatitis has become one of the leading causes of death, disability across the globe
July 7, 2016
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Misc. - W

Wayne State receives NIH funding to address health issues of HIV-positive and at-risk youth
A team of researchers led by Wayne State University has been awarded funding as a part of the Adolescent Medicine Trials Network for HIV/AIDS Interventions, a research network devoted to the health and well-being of adolescents and young adults with HIV or at risk for HIV infection.
September 28, 2016
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Western blot and ELISA tests for HIV: what to expect
The Western blot and ELISA tests are two blood antibody tests that may detect HIV.
March 7, 2017
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What does it take for an AIDS virus to infect a person?
Study identifies characteristics of HIV-1 strains that mediate sexual transmission
January 10, 2017
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When preventing HIV, bacteria in the vagina matter
Some microbes appear to break down drug in prophylactic gel, making it less effective
June 1, 2017
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WHO releases new guidelines on self-testing to improve uptake of HIV diagnosis
In advance of World AIDS Day, the World Health Organization (WHO) has released new guidelines on HIV self-testing to improve access to and uptake of HIV diagnosis.
November 30, 2016
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Women report experimental vaginal ring for HIV prevention did not negatively affect sexual experience
Most women who used an experimental vaginal ring for HIV prevention report that the physical act of sex was largely unaffected by using the product, which is inserted monthly for continuous wear. this finding is among several insights gleaned about experiences of women who used the ring during the ASPIRE study, also known as MTN-020, announced today at the HIV Research for Prevention (HIVR4P) meeting in Chicago.
October 18, 2016
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Women report vaginal ring for preventing HIV had little effect on sexual intercourse
Violence and social harm were associated with low adherence.
October 18, 2016
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