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870 Health - Bacteria - Infections - Viruses Resources

Ebola

Experimental Ebola vaccines elicit year-long immune response
NIH reports final data from large clinical trial in West Africa.
October 11, 2017
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University of Hawaii researcher receives $6.3 million grant for trivalent Ebola vaccine development
University of Hawaii vaccine researcher Axel Lehrer, PhD, has received a nearly $6.3 million grant to test whether the Ebola vaccine formula he has developed will protect against two additional viruses in the same family.
September 28, 2017
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New research finds major disabilities in 80% of Ebola survivors one year after discharge
New research, conducted by Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine and the University of Liverpool, highlights the need for long-term rehabilitation of Ebola survivors after almost 80% of those interviewed were found to have major limitations in mobility, cognition, and vision.
August 21, 2017
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Ebola detected in semen of survivors two years after infection
Researchers suggest updating WHO guidelines and exploring aging
August 2, 2017
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Hemopurifier Filters Ebola, Hep C, Metastatic Melanoma: Interview with James A. Joyce, CEO of Aethlon Medical
Filtering infectious pathogens and cancer cells directly from whole blood has been an almost fantastic proposition, but the Hemopurifier from Aethlon Medical does just that. We've been covering it for over 10 years on Medgadget as it proves itself in clinical trials and new applications for it are discovered. It has already been studied as a treatment option for hepatitis C, metastatic melanoma, and the Ebola virus. Recently at the 2017 BIO International Convention in San Diego, virus capture data was presented from a study of the Hemopurifier involving health-compromised patients infected with a virus.
July 18, 2017
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Antibodies from Ebola survivor protect mice and ferrets against related viruses
NIAID-funded study could lead to broad, versatile treatments for many different Ebolaviruses.
May 18, 2017
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Researchers identify antibodies that hold promise as Ebola treatments
The fight to contain the 2013-16 Ebola outbreak in West Africa was hampered by the lack of an effective treatment or vaccine. Researchers funded in part by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), have studied the blood of an Ebola survivor, searching for human antibodies that might effectively treat not only people infected with Ebola virus, but those infected with related viruses as well.
May 18, 2017
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Ebola Outbreak in Democratic Republic of Congo
Three deaths from Ebola have been confirmed in the Democratic Republic of Congo, and health officials are investigating 17 other suspected cases.
May 15, 2017
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Ebola survivors have a 'unique' retinal scar
Researchers have conducted a study of Ebola survivors to determine if the virus has any specific effects on the back on the eye using an ultra widefield retinal camera.
May 15, 2017
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A big-picture look at the world's worst Ebola epidemic
International team of scientists show how real-time sequencing and data-sharing can help stop the next outbreak
April 12, 2017
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NIH study of Ebola patient traces disease progression and recovery
Analysis of daily gene activation in a patient with severe Ebola virus disease cared for at the National Institutes of Health in 2015 found changes in antiviral and immune response genes that pinpointed key transition points in the response to infection.
April 12, 2017
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Guidelines for disposal of liquid waste from Ebola patients could put sewer workers at risk
Research from Drexel University and the University of Pittsburgh suggests that guidelines for safe disposal of liquid waste from patients being treated for the Ebola virus might not go far enough to protect water treatment workers from being exposed. In a study recently published in the journal Water Environment Research, a group of environmental engineering researchers reports that sewer workers downstream of hospitals and treatment centers could contract Ebola via inhalation -- a risk that is not currently accounted for in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention or World Health Organization Ebola response protocol.
April 11, 2017
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Blood-sucking flies can act as 'flying syringes' to track emergence of new diseases
Blood-sucking flies can act as 'flying syringes' to detect emerging infectious diseases in wild animals before they spread to humans, according to research published in the journal eLife.
March 28, 2017
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New CDISC data standard assists in development of potential Ebola treatments
The Clinical Data Interchange Standards Consortium (CDISC) and the Infectious Diseases Data Observatory (IDDO) announce the availability of a new standard to assist in the collection, aggregation and analysis of Ebola virus disease (EVD) research data. this standard is for use in EVD trials, leading to potential treatments and public health surveillance for this disease.
March 24, 2017
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Interferon drug shows promise in treating Ebola
A pilot study of a class of drugs used to treat hepatitis and some forms of multiple sclerosis has been shown for the first time to ease symptoms of Ebola patients, while also increasing their survival.
March 21, 2017
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Treatment with interferon may ease symptoms of Ebola patients
A pilot study of a class of drugs used to treat hepatitis and some forms of multiple sclerosis has been shown for the first time to ease symptoms of Ebola patients, while also increasing their survival.
March 21, 2017
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Research shows how Ebola viral proteins packaged in exosomes affect immune cells
Cells infected by the deadly Ebola virus may release viral proteins such as VP40 packaged in exosomes, which, as new research indicates, can affect immune cells throughout the body impairing their ability to combat the infection and to seek out and destroy hidden virus. the potential for exosomal VP40 to have a substantial impact on Ebola virus disease is examined in a review article published in DNA and Cell Biology, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers.
March 16, 2017
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Experimental Ebola vaccine regimen induced durable immune response
Antibodies to Ebola present in all participants one year after vaccination
March 14, 2017
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Ebola Vaccine Appears Very Effective in Trial
Drug manufacturer says it will seek regulatory approval by end of 2017
December 23, 2016
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Ebola-affected countries receive NIH support to strengthen research capacity
The recent Ebola epidemic in West Africa highlighted the need for better global preparedness and response to disease outbreaks. to help address that need in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone – the countries most affected by the epidemic – the National Institutes of Health has established a new program to strengthen the research capacity to study Ebola, Lassa fever, yellow fever and other emerging viral diseases.
October 26, 2016
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New mathematical model could help predict potential outbreaks of Ebola and Lassa fever
Potential outbreaks of diseases such as Ebola and Lassa fever may be more accurately predicted thanks to a new mathematical model developed by researchers at the University of Cambridge. this could in turn help inform public health messages to prevent outbreaks spreading more widely.
September 2, 2016
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Misc. - A

A Bizarre Bacteria Could be the Key to Controlling Mosquitoes
In February of 1967, German biologist Hannes Laven hiked to a village 16 miles north of Yangon, Myanmar. He carried with him 100 mosquitoes from Fresno, California–50 males that had been infected with a bacteria called Wolbachia, and 50 females that had not.
February 27, 2017
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A clear picture of bacteria
A new study has frozen bacteria extremely fast to gain a true-to-nature image of the internal and external structure.
January 13, 2017
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A little place for my stuff: How big bacteria can grow depends on how much fat they can make
Just as people endlessly calculate how to upsize or downsize, bacteria continually adjust their volume (their stuff) to fit inside their membrane (their space). But what limits their expansion? The answer will surprise you.
June 26, 2017
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A Lonely Heart Could Worsen a Cold
People who feel isolated tend to have worse symptoms, research shows
March 30, 2017
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A nanomedicine approach against multidrug-resistant bacteria
Several antibacterial nanomaterials (such as silver, zinc oxide, titanium dioxide, tellurium, and copper oxide nanoparticles) can be effective against multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacteria-caused wound infection.
May 26, 2017
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A new place to share GIFs: the DNA of living bacteria
One day we may embed information in our own bodies
July 12, 2017
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A new type of monitoring provides information about the life of bacteria in microdroplets
So far, however, there has been no quick or accurate method of assessing the oxygen conditions in individual microdroplets. this key obstacle has been overcome at the Institute of Physical Chemistry of the Polish Academy of Sciences.
January 11, 2017
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A novel textile material that keeps itself germ-free
Scientists have developed a novel weapon in the battle against deadly hospital-acquired infections -- a textile that disinfects itself. And independent tests show it can reduce bacteria levels by more than 90 per cent. By incorporating the specially-engineered textile in a device designed to be used on hospital doors instead of the traditional aluminum door plate, that part of the door that people push to open it -- they aim to bolster hand hygiene.
October 5, 2017
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A possible alternative to antibiotics
A combination of metals and organic acids is an effective way to eradicate cholera, salmonella, pseudomonas, and other pathogenic bacteria, researchers report. The combination also works on bacteria that attack agricultural crops.
May 23, 2017
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A quarter of nursing home residents are colonized with drug-resistant bacteria
The significant presence of multidrug-resistant gram-negative bacteria (MDR-GNB), such as E. coli, among nursing home residents demonstrates the need for heightened infection control prevention and control measures in nursing homes, according to a meta-analysis now published.
April 27, 2017
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Accidental discovery opens up new way to find unknown viruses
A chance discovery has opened up a new method of finding unknown viruses.
August 4, 2017
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Acid suppression medications linked to serious gastrointestinal infections
In a population-based study from Scotland, use of commonly-prescribed acid suppression medications such as proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) was linked with an increased risk of intestinal infections with C. difficile and Campylobacter bacteria, which can cause considerable illness.
January 5, 2017
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AI can now detect anthrax which could help the fight against bioterrorism
Scientists trained AI to recognize anthrax spores
August 7, 2017
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Air pollution can alter the effectiveness of antibiotics and increases the potential of disease, new study reveals
New research has explored the impact of black carbon on bacteria in the respiratory tract. the study specifically looked into how air pollution affects the bacteria living in our bodies, specifically the respiratory tract -- the nose, throat and lungs.
March 2, 2017
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Air pollution may affect human health via bacteria changes in respiratory tract
New research suggests that air pollution may have an effect on human health by altering bacteria. It shows that black carbon, a major component of air pollution, dramatically changes how bacteria grow and form biofilms, which can affect their survival in the lining of airways and their resistance to antibiotics.
March 3, 2017
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Air pollution particles could make you more susceptible to infection, say scientists
AIR pollution could make you more vulnerable to infection, scientists at a Scots university have revealed.
August 18, 2017
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Airborne diseases: Types, prevention, and symptoms
Many airborne diseases affect humans. Understanding diseases that spread through the air, and how to prevent and avoid them, is important.
May 26, 2017
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Alabama Warns About Dangerous Vibrio Bacteria
A dangerous bacteria has been found in bodies of water throughout Alabama and cases of the disease have been reported along the state's Gulf Coast, health officials warn.
July 10, 2017
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Altered bacterial communities in the gut could be an indicator for Parkinson's disease
In search of a biomarker
August 29, 2017
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Ancient DNA showcases a war between our hominid ancestors and viruses
Viruses reproduce by infiltrating living cells and taking over the biological machinery inside. it's an insidious process that can leave the host with a life-threatening illness, a mild fever, or no ill effects at all. Recent advances in medical science have allowed humans to combat viruses like never before, but a new study from researchers at Rockefeller University shows how our primate ancestors may have waged war on a virus with only the weapon of evolution.
April 13, 2017
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Ancient material, new technology - using silver against microbes
Humans have appreciated silver's antimicrobial activity for millennia. Hippocrates used the precious metal for wound dressings while the pioneers of the American frontier placed coins in their water to guard against bacteria and algae.
April 13, 2017
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Antarctic salt-loving microbes provide insights into evolution of viruses
Scientists studying microbes from some of the saltiest lakes in Antarctica have discovered a new way the microbes can share DNA that could help them grow and survive. The research, based on 18 months of water sampling in remote Antarctic locations, could throw light on the evolutionary history of viruses. The team discovered some of the microbes contained small molecules of DNA called plasmids.
August 21, 2017
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Anti-bacterial fabric holds promise for fighting superbug
Antibiotics have proven to be a valuable weapon in the fight against infectious bacteria. However, due to the excess use of antibiotics in conventional treatments, overtime antibiotics have become less effective. now a Korean industry-academic collaborative group has recently developed an anti-bacterial fabric that are effective against antibiotic-resistant superbugs.
March 8, 2016
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Antibiotic breakthrough: how to overcome gram-negative bacterial defenses
Scientists report that they now know how to build a molecular Trojan horse that can penetrate gram-negative bacteria, solving a problem that for decades has stalled the development of effective new antibiotics against these increasingly drug-resistant microbes.
May 10, 2017
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Antibiotic gel prevents borreliosis resulting from tick bites
An antibiotic gel based on azithromycin, an antibiotic with antibacterial properties, helps to prevent the onset of Lyme borreliosis following a tick bite, finds new research.
December 20, 2016
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Antibiotic Overuse Behind 'Superbug' Outbreak
Finding could have implications for U.S. hospitals, study authors say
January 25, 2017
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Antibiotic releasing polymer may help eradicate joint implant infection
A team of Massachusetts General Hospital investigators has developed an antibiotic-releasing polymer that may greatly simplify the treatment of prosthetic joint infection. In their recent report published in Nature Biomedical Engineering, the researchers describe how implants made from this material successfully eliminated two types of prosthetic infection in animal models.
July 18, 2017
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Antibiotic resistance persists in bacteria, even absent selection pressure from antibiotics
Plasmids are pieces of independent DNA that often carry multiple antibiotic resistance genes. Plasmids can jump from one bacterium to another, spreading that resistance. a team of investigators now shows that bacteria that acquire plasmids containing resistance genes rarely lose them.
August 1, 2016
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Antibiotic resistance: a healthcare emergency?
Antibiotic resistance has been described as 'the healthcare emergency of our time' -- is this an accurate description?
June 26, 2017
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Antibiotic restores cell communication in brain areas damaged by Alzheimer's-like disease in mice
New research has found a way to partially restore brain cell communication around areas damaged by plaques associated with Alzheimer's disease.
November 15, 2016
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Antibiotic use during peripartum period linked to greater risk of inflammatory condition in offspring
A study by researchers at the University of Chicago Medicine shows that when mice that are genetically susceptible to developing inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) were given antibiotics during late pregnancy and the early nursing period, their offspring were more likely to develop an inflammatory condition of the colon that resembles human IBD.
July 11, 2017
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Antibiotic use makes immune cells less effective in fighting infections
Adding another reason for doctors to avoid the overuse of antibiotics, new research shows that a reduction in the variety of microbes in the gut interferes with the immune system's ability to fight off disease.
August 17, 2017
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Antibiotic-resistant bacteria in ready-to-eat foods
Research shows that antibiotic-resistant bacteria are present in many ready-to-eat foods such as fresh produce and dairy products and may serve as a source of human exposure to antibiotic-resistant bacteria.
June 5, 2017
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Antibiotics may increase the risk of bowel cancer
According to a recent study published in the journal Gut, long-term use of antibiotics during adulthood increases the likelihood of developing precursors to bowel cancer. the research, once again, underlines the vital role of gut bacteria.
April 5, 2017
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Antimicrobial peptide packaged in silicon nanoparticle could combat drug-resistant bacteria
Antibiotic resistance is a growing problem, especially among a type of bacteria that are classified as "Gram-negative." These bacteria have two cell membranes, making it more difficult for drugs to penetrate and kill the cells.
July 13, 2017
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Antimicrobial protein reduces creamy white lesions linked to oral thrush in mouse models
An antimicrobial protein caused a dramatic reduction in the creamy white lesions associated with oral thrush in a preclinical study, report microbiologists with McGovern Medical School at the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth).
April 11, 2017
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Antimicrobial Resistance Diagnostic Challenge selects 10 semifinalists in first phase of competition
Each will receive $50,000 to develop prototypes of diagnostics to improve detection of drug resistant bacteria.
March 27, 2017
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Antimicrobial substances identified in Komodo dragon blood
In a land where survival is precarious, Komodo dragons thrive despite being exposed to scads of bacteria that would kill less hardy creatures. now in a study, scientists report that they have detected antimicrobial protein fragments in the lizard's blood that appear to help them resist deadly infections. the discovery could lead to the development of new drugs capable of combating bacteria that have become resistant to antibiotics.
February 22, 2017
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Antiviral Flu Drugs Safe in Mid-to-Late Pregnancy
No higher rates of complications seen in babies when mom took these meds after 22 weeks of pregnancy
March 1, 2017
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Are Heartburn Meds and Superbug Infections Linked?
Recurring bouts of C. difficile were more common in those who took drugs that lower stomach acid
March 27, 2017
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Are Gut Bacteria Linked to Chronic Fatigue Syndrome?
Intestinal bacteria yield clues to the mysterious ailment, researchers say
April 27, 2017
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Are stem cells the link between bacteria and cancer?
New mechanism of stomach gland regeneration reveals impact of Helicobacter pylori infection
August 17, 2017
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Are Vitamin Supplements Killing Our Gut Bacteria?
We consume all sorts of things before really knowing how they're going to affect us, including probiotics and dietary supplements. But given how preliminary our understanding of our gut bacteria is, it's very likely that some supplements can work in direct opposition of others. For instance, vitamin A might kill a bacteria hypothesized to promote childhood growth.
May 17, 2017
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As Tolstoy noted (sort of), all unhappy microbiomes are unhappy in their own way
The bacterial communities that live inside everyone are quite similar and stable when times are good, but when stress enters the equation, those communities can react very differently from person to person.
August 23, 2017
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Assembling life's molecular motor
As part of a project dedicated to modeling how single-celled purple bacteria turn light into food, a team of computational scientists simulated a complete ATP synthase in all-atom detail. the work builds on the project's first phase--a 100-million atom photosynthetic organelle called a chromatophore--and gives scientists an unprecedented glimpse into a biological machine whose energy efficiency far surpasses that of any artificial system.
May 15, 2017
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Assembling nanomachines in bacteria
One of the oldest nanomachines in biology is the bacterial flagellum. This apparatus is evolutionary essential, endowing onto bacteria the ability to move. The flagellum shares high similarity with another bacterial structure, the injectisome, which as the name implies is how some bacteria deliver their content to infect a host.
August 9, 2017
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Assembling nanomachines in bacteria
Researchers have used X-ray crystallography and electron microscopy to resolve the assembly of the export gate apparatus in Salmonella. The new details of this nanomachine are expected to clarify how bacteria infect eukaryotic cells and present new molecular targets for drug discovery.
August 9, 2017
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Atomic-level motion may drive bacteria's ability to evade immune system defenses
A study from Indiana University has found evidence that extremely small changes in how atoms move in bacterial proteins can play a big role in how these microorganisms function and evolve.
April 21, 2017
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Atomic-level motion may drive bacteria's ability to evade immune system defenses
A study has found evidence that extremely small changes in how atoms move in bacterial proteins can play a big role in how these microorganisms function and evolve traits, such as antibiotic resistance.
April 21, 2017
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Atypical pneumonia: Causes, symptoms, and treatment
Atypical pneumonia is an infection of the respiratory system. It is often called walking pneumonia.
June 16, 2017
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Misc. - B

Bacteria act as aphrodisiac for the closest relatives of animals
Choanoflagellates take cues from bacteria when choosing their life trajectory
September 4, 2017
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Bacteria are brewing up the next generation of antivenoms
DANIEL DEMPSEY WAS a grad student stationed in the jungles of Monteverde, Costa Rica when he first encountered the danger of a snakebite. the biologist was walking through the forest one day, catching bats to study them for malaria, when he almost stepped on the black, arrow-shaped head of an enormous pit viper--a fer-de-lance.
March 19, 2017
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Bacteria as Anti-Cancer Therapy? Interview with Professor Sylvain Martel
Researchers at Universite de Montreal, Polytechnique Montreal, and McGill University have developed a new way to carry anti-cancer drugs to a target site in the body -- using bacteria.
October 28, 2016
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Bacteria can mutate at different speeds to survive under difficult circumstances, study shows
Bacteria need mutations -- changes in their DNA code -- to survive under difficult circumstances. When necessary, they can even mutate at different speeds. this is shown in a recent study by the Centre of Microbial and Plant Genetics at KU Leuven (University of Leuven), Belgium. the findings open up various new avenues for research, ranging from more efficient biofuel production methods to a better treatment for bacterial infections and cancer.
May 2, 2017
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Bacteria communicate to ramp up collective immune response to viral threats
Bacteria can boost their own immune systems by "talking" to each other, surprising new research shows. this research provides new insight into how groups of bacteria collectively defend against viral threats.
November 18, 2016
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Bacteria free themselves with molecular 'speargun'
Many bacteria are armed with nano-spearguns, which they use to combat unwelcome competitors or knockout host cells. The pathogen responsible for tularemia, a highly virulent infectious disease, uses this weapon to escape from its prison in cells defending the host, report researchers.
June 16, 2017
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Bacteria free themselves with nano-spearguns
Many bacteria are armed with nano-spearguns, which they use to combat unwelcome competitors or knockout host cells. The pathogen responsible for tularemia, a highly virulent infectious disease, uses this weapon to escape from its prison in cells defending the host.
June 16, 2017
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Bacteria from hot springs solve mystery of metabolism
Combustion is often a rapid process, like fire. How can our cells control the burning process so well? The question has long puzzled researchers. Using bacteria from hot springs, researchers now have the answer.
June 19, 2017
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Bacteria genes offer new strategy for sterilizing mosquitoes
Genetic engineering could deplete populations of disease-carrying insects
February 27, 2017
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Bacteria harness the lotus effect to protect themselves
Biofilms: Researchers find the causes of water-repelling properties
May 16, 2017
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Bacteria help carnivorous plants drown their prey
Microbes alter surface tension in the water traps of pitcher plants
November 22, 2016
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Bacteria in the sky may help to make it rain
Here's how they do it.
June 26, 2017
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Bacteria may supercharge the future of wastewater treatment
Wastewater treatment plants have a PR problem: People don't like to think about what happens to the waste they flush down their toilets. But for many engineers and microbiologists, these plants are a hotbed of scientific advances.
May 31, 2017
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Bacteria on surfaces - strength of adhesion does not depend on size of contact area
Bacteria of the species Staphylococcus aureus are among the most widespread and dangerous pathogens of our time. One of the reasons for their effectiveness is their ability to adhere to both synthetic and natural surfaces, where they form very persistent biofilms. These biofilms effectively protect the individual pathogens making them very difficult to remove from a surface.
July 11, 2017
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Bacteria Powered Bio-Bots Avoid Obstacles on Way to Target
Microscopic robots, powered by bacterial flagellation, are a curious branch of robotics research, potentially leading to devices that can deliver drugs, perform surgical tasks, and help out with diagnostics. While bacteria has been harnessed in the past to power small devices, having those devices actually navigate to a desired target has been a challenge. at Drexel University researchers are now using electric fields to help their bacterial biobots detect obstacles and float around them on their way to the final destination.
March 18, 2016
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Bacteria Powered Clothing Helps Cool Body as Humidity Levels Change
Living microorganisms have recently been looked upon as a possible tool for solving a number of technological, environmental, and medical challenges. Bacteria that consumes crude oil, for example, may be an efficient tool for cleaning up oil spills, while in medicine bacteria may play a large role in biologic drug manufacturing.
June 2, 2017
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Bacteria Resistant to a Last-Resort Drug Showed Up on a Us Pig Farm
No Meat was Contaminated, But the Rare Gene Could Easily Spread
December 6, 2016
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Bacteria responsible for legionellosis modulates the host cell metabolism to its advantage
The bacterial pathogen Legionella pneumophila has developed a specific strategy to target the host cell mitochondria, the organelles in charge of cellular bioenergetics, scientists have shown. New work provides precious information on how a pathogen manipulates the cellular metabolism to replicate intracellularly, and proposes a new concept of protection of host cells from Legionella-induced mitochondrial changes in order to fight infection.
September 6, 2017
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Bacteria self-organize to build working sensors
Bacteria with synthetic gene circuit self-assemble to build working device with gold nanoparticles
October 9, 2017
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Bacteria self-organize to build working sensors
Researchers at Duke University have turned bacteria into the builders of useful devices by programming them with a synthetic gene circuit.
October 9, 2017
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Bacteria sized molecules created in lab
Scientists have created giant molecules – the size of bacteria – that may be useful in future quantum computers.
August 29, 2016
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Bacteria stab amoebae with micro-daggers
Researchers have discovered a type of bacteria that uses tiny daggers to prevent itself from being eaten by amoebae. The scientists also resolved the three-dimensional structure of the mechanism that allows the micro-daggers to be shot quickly.
August 17, 2017
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Bacteria used as factories to produce cancer drugs
Researchers have developed a method of producing P450 enzymes -- used by plants to defend against predators and microbes -- in bacterial cell factories. The process could facilitate the production of large quantities of the enzymes, which are also involved in the biosynthesis of active ingredients of cancer drugs.
June 2, 2017
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Bacteria used as factories to produce cancer drugs
Researchers at the Novo Nordisk Foundation Center for Biosustainability in Denmark have developed a method of producing P450 enzymes - used by plants to defend against predators and microbes - in bacterial cell factories. The process could facilitate the production of large quantities of the enzymes, which are also involved in the biosynthesis of active ingredients of cancer drugs.
June 2, 2017
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Bacteria with multicolor vision
MIT researchers have engineered bacteria with "multicolor vision' -- E. coli that recognize red, green, or blue (RGB) light and, in response to each color, express different genes that perform different biological functions.
May 26, 2017
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Bacteria-coated nanofiber electrodes digest pollutants
Cornell materials scientists and bioelectrochemical engineers may have created an innovative, cost-competitive electrode material for cleaning pollutants in wastewater.
June 27, 2017
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Bacteria-coated nanofiber electrodes clean pollutants in wastewater
Researchers may have created an innovative, cost-competitive electrode material for cleaning pollutants in wastewater.
June 28, 2017
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Bacterial biofilms, begone
By some estimates, bacterial strains resistant to antibiotics '- so-called superbugs - will cause more deaths than cancer by 2050.
August 1, 2017
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Bacterial biofilms, begone
Researchers have created a new material that inhibits biofilm formation of a virulent superbug
August 1, 2017
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Bacterial boost for bio-based fuels
"Electrical' bacteria are the key ingredient in a new process that recycles wastewater from biofuel production to generate hydrogen. the hydrogen can then be used to convert bio-oil into higher grade liquid fuels such as gasoline or diesel.
May 5, 2017
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Bacterial by-product helps correct gut microbiome imbalance in mouse model of ALS
A bacterial by-product known to be important in maintaining gut health may slow the progression of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or ALS - a progressive, neurodegenerative disease.
January 27, 2017
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Bacterial cell counting and sizing using the Multisizer
What are the main applications of bacterial cell counting and sizing?
March 15, 2017
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Bacterial infections may trigger dysregulation of blood formation
It has been thought that only immune cells would act as the line of defense during bacterial infection. However, recent research has revealed that hematopoietic stem cells, cells that create all other blood cells throughout an individual's lifetime, are also able to respond to the infection. A collaboration between researchers from Japan and Switzerland found that bacterial infection activates hematopoietic stem cells in the bone marrow and significantly reduces their ability to produce blood by forcibly inducing proliferation.
August 23, 2017
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Bacterial L-forms: An independent form of life that can multiply indefinitely
Bacteria able to shed their cell wall assume new, mostly spherical shapes. Researchers have shown that these cells, known as L-forms, are not only viable but that their reproductive mechanisms may even correspond to those of early life forms.
December 6, 2016
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Bacterial nanosized speargun works like a power drill
In order to get rid of unpleasant competitors, some bacteria use a sophisticated weapon -- a nanosized speargun. Researchers at the University of Basel's Biozentrum have now gained new insights into the construction, mode of action and recycling of this weapon.
September 25, 2017
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Bacterial nanosized speargun works like a power drill
In order to get rid of unpleasant competitors, some bacteria use a sophisticated weapon -- a nanosized speargun. Researchers have now gained new insights into the construction, mode of action and recycling of this weapon. The speargun drills a hole into the neighboring cells in only a few thousandths of a second and injects a cocktail of toxins.
September 25, 2017
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Bacterial organizational complexities revealed
For the first time, scientists have visualized the fine details of bacterial microcompartment shells - the organisms' submicroscopic nanoreactors, which are comprised completely of protein.
June 23, 2017
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Bacterial protein acts as aphrodisiac for choanoflagellates
Researchers investigating how single-celled organisms evolved to become multicellular stumbled across a strange phenomenon during their experiments: Single-celled eukaryotes called choanoflagellates, which are the closest living relatives to animals, begin to sexually reproduce in response to a protein produced by bacteria.
August 31, 2017
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Bacterial 'sabotage' handicaps ability to resolve devastating lung inflammation in cystic fibrosis
The chronic lung inflammation that is a hallmark of cystic fibrosis, has, for the first time, been linked to a new class of bacterial enzymes that hijack the patient's immune response and prevent the body from calling off runaway inflammation, according to a laboratory investigation.
December 13, 2016
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Bacterial superantigens turn our immune cells to the dark side
A subpopulation of immune cells that normally fend off pathogens can turn against the host during certain infections, a new study reveals.
June 19, 2017
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Bacterium promotes colorectal tumor growth
Recent research finds a bacterium that drives tumor growth in colorectal cancer, which is the second leading cause of cancer-related death.
July 14, 2017
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Bagged Salads May be Fertile Ground for Bacteria
Study found juices released from damaged leaves encouraged salmonella spread
November 18, 2016
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Bats Harbor Viruses Linked to Outbreaks in Humans
Two of these are linked to past infections with serious respiratory diseases
June 12, 2017
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Binge-eating bacteria extract energy from sewage
Domestic sewage contains various organic substances, mainly from toilets and kitchens. These are harmful to the environment, but also contain energy. Researchers from Ghent University discovered how to efficiently extract this energy from the wastewater.
November 24, 2016
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Bio-based p-xylene oxidation into terephthalic acid by engineered E. coli
Researchers have established an efficient biocatalytic system to produce terephthalic acid (TPA) from p-xylene (pX). It will allow this industrially important bulk chemical to be made available in a more environmentally-friendly manner.
June 5, 2017
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Biochemical self-destruct trigger guards brain cells when fighting against West Nile virus
In a turnabout, a biochemical self-destruct trigger found in many other types of cells appears to guard the lives of brain cells during an infection with West Nile virus.
May 18, 2017
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Biofuels from bacteria
New clean energy source?
August 21, 2017
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Biologists control gut inflammation by altering the abundance of resident bacteria
Numerous human diseases, including inflammatory bowel disease, Diabetes and autism spectrum disorders are linked to abnormal gut microbiomes, but an open question is whether these altered microbiomes are drivers of disease. a new study took aim at that question with experiments in zebrafish to dissect whether changes in the abundance of certain gut bacteria can cause intestinal inflammation.
February 16, 2017
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Biologists discover timesharing strategy in bacteria
Communities found to coordinate feeding to streamline efficiency
April 6, 2017
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Biophysics explains how immune cells kill bacteria
A new data analysis technique, moving subtrajectory analysis defines the dynamics and kinetics of key molecules in the immune response to an infection. These biophysical descriptions are expected to clarify the TCR microcluster, an essential assembly for a T cell to initiate its attack on a pathogen.
August 16, 2017
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Blowing Out Birthday Candles Means Blasting Cakes With Spit
When celebrating birthdays, blowing out a cake full of candles and singing a public domain song is a time-honored tradition. Yet has it ever occurred to you that this ritual means that the birthday celebrant is just blasting spit over the candles and the top layer of the cake? Well, now it has.
July 27, 2017
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Boffins find evidence of strange uranium-producing bacteria lurking underground
It's easier to mine than uraninite ore, too
June 2, 2017
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Bonn scientists identify immune factor partially responsible for chronic viral infection
Many viral diseases tend to become chronic - including infections with the HI virus. In persons affected, the immune response is not sufficient to eliminate the virus permanently. Scientists at the University of Bonn have now identified an immune factor which is partially responsible for this. Their results give rise to hopes for new therapeutic approaches.
March 8, 2016
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Brazilian researchers reveal nanoparticle-based strategy to combat antibiotic-resistant bacteria
A new strategy to combat antibiotic-resistant bacteria has been described by Brazilian researchers in Scientific Reports, an online journal owned by Springer Nature.
July 11, 2017
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Breaking through the wall in bacterial membrane vesicle research
Researchers used advanced imaging techniques to investigate the formation of membrane vesicles in a Gram-positive bacterium, a process that is poorly understood, particularly in bacteria with thick cell walls.
September 12, 2017
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Breast cancer: Bacterial deficiency linked with onset
Researchers examined the bacterial makeup of breast tissue in women with breast cancer and found that it has insufficient levels of a certain bacterial genus called Methylobacterium.
October 9, 2017
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Breast-feeding transfers beneficial bacteria to the baby's gut, new study finds
Mothers protect their babies and teach them habits to stay healthy and safe as they grow. a new UCLA-led study shows that beneficial bacteria from mothers do much the same thing.
May 8, 2017
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Bringing bacteria's defense into focus
By taking a series of near-atomic resolution snapshots, Cornell University and Harvard Medical School scientists have observed step-by-step how bacteria defend against foreign invaders such as bacteriophage, a virus that infects bacteria.
July 10, 2017
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'Brute force' can overcome antibiotic resistance
Antibiotics can still kill drug-resistant bacteria if they 'push' hard enough into bacterial cells
February 3, 2017
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Byzantine skeleton yields 800-year-old genomes from a fatal infection
New insight has been gained into the everyday hazards of life in the late Byzantine Empire, sometime around the early 13th century, as well as the evolution of Staphylococcus saprophyticus, a common bacterial pathogen.
January 10, 2017
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Misc. - C

Calcium could be the answer to C. difficile infection
Scientists have found that a dangerous bacterium capable of causing serious gut infections is triggered by excess calcium in its environment, but the triggering factor might also provide the solution.
July 14, 2017
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Campylobacter continues to be leading cause of foodborne infections in Denmark
Campylobacter is to blame for more than 4,600 foodborne infections in Denmark and is thus still the most common cause of foodborne disease. This is one of the findings of the annual report for 2016 on the incidence of diseases that can be transmitted from animals and food to humans. The report was prepared by the National Food Institute, Technical University of Denmark, in cooperation with Statens Serum Institut - the national institute of public health - and the Danish Veterinary and Food Administration. Researchers, government agencies, and industry are considering initiatives that can lead to the bacteria making fewer Danes fall ill.
June 29, 2017
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Can HSV2 be transmitted through oral sex? What you need to know
Herpes simplex virus type 2 is a form of herpes virus that can be sexually transmitted and causes lesions, such as sores and blisters, to form on the skin.
September 25, 2017
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Can You Change Your Gut Bacteria?
Nicole Burke and Ryan Miller live on a farm with their 4-year-old daughter, eating a diet rich in homegrown vegetables and kombucha -- an organic tea fermented in a cocktail of yeast and bacteria.
May 31, 2017
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Cancer-death button gets jammed by gut bacterium
A type of bacterium is associated with the recurrence of colorectal cancer and poor outcomes, research show. Scientists found that Fusobacterium nucleatum in the gut can stop chemotherapy from causing a type of cancer cell death called apoptosis.
July 27, 2017
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Carbohydrate found in cranberries may aid growth of beneficial gut bacteria, study reports
Many scientists are paying new attention to prebiotics, that is, molecules we eat but cannot digest, because some may promote the growth and health of beneficial microorganisms in our intestines, says nutritional microbiologist David Sela at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. In a new study, he and colleagues report the first evidence that certain beneficial gut bacteria are able to grow when fed a carbohydrate found in cranberries and further, that they exhibit a special nontypical metabolism.
July 10, 2017
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CDC warns about steep rise in STDs among Americans
According to a statement from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention yesterday (26th September 2017), in 2016, a survey has revealed that more than 2 million Americans have been diagnosed with a sexually transmitted disease (STD) including infections such as gonorrhea, syphilis and Chlamydia. This is one of the highest numbers that have been detected till date they say.
September 27, 2017
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CDC warns against eating placenta--in case you needed another reason
Oregon mom's organ pills packed with infectious bacteria, which spread to the baby.
June 30, 2017
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CDC Warns of Uptick in Cyclospora Infections
The CDC issued a health advisory alert this week about a rise in reported infections from Cyclospora cayetanensis -- a parasite that commonly causes diarrhea.
August 9, 2017
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CDC: Backyard Chickens Mean Salmonella Outbreaks, So Wash Your Hands
In the last decade or so, raising backyard chickens has become a popular hobby. Maybe it's due to a receession-era homesteading impulse, or people prioritizing really local food. However, live chickens and ducks have been linked to almost 1,000 known cases of Salmonella, which have sent hundreds of people to the hospital and killed one person. About one-third of those cases were in children under age 5.
August 22, 2017
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Cell-permeable nanobodies
Antibodies are one of the main weapons of our immune system. They dock to viruses, bacteria and other invaders that course through our blood, and thereby render them harmless. Antibodies also play a key role in the diagnosis and treatment of diseases and in research.
July 19, 2017
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Cells that die with a bang contribute to high death rate in bloodstream infections
Cells lining blood vessels in the lungs that are exposed to bacterial toxins don't die easy, according to a new study. When these blood vessel cells come into contact with bacterial toxins called lipopolysaccharides, an explosive form of cell death known as pyroptosis occurs. Without these enzymes, pyroptosis cannot occur, making these caspases attractive targets for drugs that can prevent tissue damage caused by infections.
October 10, 2017
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Certain Kinds of Vaginal Bacteria can Actually Boost Hiv Risk
The Balance of Microbes can Change your Susceptibility
January 10, 2017
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Chaining up diarrhea pathogens
Researchers have clarified how vaccinations can combat bacterial intestinal diseases: vaccine-induced antibodies in the intestine chain up pathogens as they grow in the intestine, which prevents disease and surprisingly also hinders the spread of antibiotic resistance.
April 18, 2017
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Changing routine boarding protocols on planes could reduce rampant transmission of diseases
During major epidemics, cramped airplane cabins are fertile ground for the spread of infection, but new research suggests changing routine boarding protocols could be a key to reducing rampant transmission of disease.
September 1, 2017
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Chatting coordinates heterogeneity in bacteria
Bacterial populations can, under certain conditions, react in a coordinated manner to chemical messages produced by a minority of their members, as a new theoretical study carried out by biophysicists shows.
July 26, 2017
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Chemical coatings boss around bacteria, in the bugs' own language
Researchers have developed a way to place onto surfaces special coatings that chemically 'communicate' with bacteria, telling them what to do. The coatings, which could be useful in inhibiting or promoting bacterial growth as needed, possess this controlling power over bacteria because, in effect, they 'speak' the bug's own language.
May 30, 2017
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Chemical coatings boss around bacteria, in the bugs' own language
Princeton researchers have developed a way to place onto surfaces special coatings that chemically "communicate" with bacteria, telling them what to do. The coatings, which could be useful in inhibiting or promoting bacterial growth as needed, possess this controlling power over bacteria because, in effect, they "speak" the bug's own language.
May 30, 2017
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Chemicals from gut bacteria maintain vitality in aging animals
Indoles help worms/flies/mice live stronger for longer
August 21, 2017
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Chewing gum rapid test for inflammation
Dental implants occasionally entail complications: Six to fifteen percent of patients develop an inflammatory response in the years after receiving a dental implant. This is caused by bacteria destroying the soft tissue and the bone around the implant in the worst case.
August 16, 2017
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Chlamydia: how bacteria take over control
To survive in human cells, chlamydiae have a lot of tricks in store. Researchers have now discovered that the bacterial pathogens also manipulate the cells' energy suppliers in the process.
March 28, 2017
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Cholera bacteria stab and poison enemies at predictable rates
Scientists use physics equations that describe molecular interactions to predict bacterial battles, and find correlation in genomes between weaponry and resource sharing.
February 6, 2017
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Cholera vaccines provide substantial protection for adults but less effective for children, review shows
A new review of the research literature led by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health shows that cholera vaccines provide substantial protection for adults but provide significantly less protection for children under age 5, a population particularly at risk for dying from this diarrheal disease.
August 9, 2017
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Citizen scientists help infectious bacteria researchers
A novel method for assessing human/virus interactions in the natural environment has now been developed using citizen scientists wearing boot socks over their shoes during walks in the countryside. In the process, they found that slightly less than half of the socks were positive for the infectious disease, Campylobacter.
June 5, 2017
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Clinical trial shows safety, effectiveness of pre-prepared cells to treat drug-resistant viral infections
Patients who receive a hematopoietic stem cell transplant are at risk of developing potentially lethal viral infections. Some of the infections can be treated with available drugs, but they are not always effective and side effects can be significant. Researchers at the Center for Cell and Gene Therapy at Baylor College of Medicine, Texas Children's Hospital and Houston Methodist have developed an alternative treatment in which virus-specific cells protect patients against severe, drug-resistant viral infections.
August 8, 2017
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Coating individual bacterial cells with a conducting polymer
Under anaerobic conditions, certain bacteria can produce electricity. This behavior can be exploited in microbial fuel cells, with a special focus on wastewater treatment schemes. A weak point is the dissatisfactory power density of the microbial cells.
June 27, 2017
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Cocktail of bacteria-killing viruses prevents cholera infection in animal models
Oral administration of viruses that specifically target cholera bacteria prevents infection and cholera-like symptoms in animal model experiments
February 1, 2017
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Colon of patients with IBS reacts differently to bacteria
The intestinal barrier of patients with the gastrointestinal disease IBS allows bacteria to pass more freely than in healthy people, according to a study. The study is the first to investigate IBS using living bacteria.
September 6, 2017
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Combatting Antibiotic Resistance, the role of POC Diagnostics
As we enter colder months the rate of illnesses is set to rise. Without testing for specific viruses or pathogens how do doctors know what to prescribe patients? what is typically the diagnostic gold standard approach?
December 9, 2016
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Combination treatment could be more effective against common infection
The common and highly resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacterium is a fatal threat to weakened and ill patients. A new study from Lund University in Sweden now shows that a combination treatment using two different types of antibiotics can reduce mortality up to five times.
July 4, 2017
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Common acid reflux medications promote chronic liver disease
Approximately 10 percent of Americans take a proton pump inhibitor drug to relieve symptoms of frequent heartburn and acid reflux. That percentage can be much higher for people with chronic liver disease. Researchers have discovered evidence in mice and humans that these medications alter gut bacteria in a way that promotes three types of chronic liver disease.
October 10, 2017
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Common antimicrobials help patients recover from MRSA abscesses
Trial counters current thinking about treatment effectiveness
June 29, 2017
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Common antimicrobials help patients recover from MRSA abscesses
NIAID-funded trial counters current thinking about treatment effectiveness.
June 29, 2017
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Common disease-causing bacteria can live airborne for 45 minutes, study shows
Scientists have developed a new technique to study how some common disease-causing bacteria can spread up to 4 meters and remain alive in the air for up to 45 minutes.
June 19, 2017
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Common Food Nutrient Tied to Risky Blood Clotting
Gut bacteria reacts to compound in eggs and meat to produce chemical that ups heart disease risk, study says
April 24, 2017
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Common, inexpensive antimicrobials can help patients heal from MRSA skin abscesses
Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bacteria are resistant to multiple antibiotics and commonly cause skin infections that can lead to more serious or life-threatening infection in other parts of the body. In new findings published in The New England Journal of Medicine, researchers found that two common, inexpensive antimicrobials can help patients heal from MRSA skin abscesses. The findings suggest that current treatment options for MRSA still have a role, even as scientists continue to search for new antimicrobial products. The research was funded by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), a part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH).
June 29, 2017
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Complex malaria vaccine protects monkeys against virulent parasite strains
Researchers from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health, modified an experimental malaria vaccine and showed that it completely protected four of eight monkeys that received it against challenge with the virulent Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasite. In three of the remaining four monkeys, the vaccine delayed when parasites first appeared in the blood by more than 25 days.
May 22, 2017
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Controlling bacteria's necessary evil
Quorum sensing helps beneficial bacteria reign in their pathogenic origins
May 10, 2017
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Cortisol mediates communication between gut bacteria and brain metabolites, study suggests
Gut microbes have been in the news a lot lately. Recent studies show they can influence human health, behavior, and certain neurological disorders, such as autism. But just how do they communicate with the brain? Results from a new University of Illinois study suggest a pathway of communication between certain gut bacteria and brain metabolites, by way of a compound in the blood known as cortisol. And unexpectedly, the finding provides a potential mechanism to explain the characteristics of autism.
August 21, 2017
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Could fungi be a vast, untapped source of new antibiotics?
Fungi could harbor a vast treasure trove for new drugs to fight infections caused by bacteria and other microbes. this was the conclusion that scientists from the Chalmers University of Technology in Gothenburg, Sweden, came to after scanning the genomes of several species of fungi and identifying more than 1,000 pathways that make bioactive compounds. the team believes that the finding could be an important step toward solving the global problem of antibiotic resistance.
April 21, 2017
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Could new 'helper drugs' restore antibiotic susceptibility in superbugs?
Using state-of-the-art genomics tools, researchers have pinpointed genes that contribute to antibiotic resistance in two global superbugs. they show how such a discovery could lead to "helper drugs" with the potential to restore the susceptibility of resistant bacteria to antibiotics.
March 14, 2017
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Could probiotics replace antibiotics in wound healing?
The microbiome is known to play a major role in gut health, but what about our skin? Billions of bacteria reside there, and the probiotic types may hold great potential to prevent infections during wound healing.
August 3, 2017
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Cosmetic makers harness microbiome to help treat skin conditions
Cosmetic companies have started developing and selling products designed to harness the skin microbiome to help treat a range of skin conditions from acne to eczema. Skeptics, however, warn that touting such an approach is premature because scientists are still working to understand the bacteria that live on our skin and interact with it. the cover story in Chemical & Engineering News, the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, scopes out the scene.
May 10, 2017
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Cyanobacteria: the future of sunscreen?
Sunscreens and moisturizers derived from biological sources such as cyanobacteria could represent a safer alternative to current, synthetically produced cosmetics, research suggests.
January 13, 2017
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Crystallography provides battle-plan blueprints for attacking disease-causing bacteria
X-rays helped scientists to look under the bonnet of two common bacteria that opportunistically infect people, so as to better understand the mechanics involved. The blueprints may be used to design new drugs, which are badly needed.
August 9, 2017
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Cystic fibrosis: Interactions between bacteria that infect lungs uncovered
Dangerous strain may promote lung colonization by other bacteria normally found in the mouth
April 27, 2017
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Cytotoxins contribute to virulence of deadly epidemic bacterial infections
Severity of group a Streptococcus infections, including 'flesh-eating disease,' attributed to presence of 2 toxins
February 2, 2017
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Misc. - D

Dangerous shortage of essential antibiotics is all about $$
Old drugs don't make money, but are better for patients and fight drug resistance.
May 15, 2017
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Deadly superbugs may be spreading, evolving quietly among the healthy
Harvard researcher thinks we should change our strategy to get ahead of them.
January 17, 2017
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Decline in Kids' Ear Infections Linked to Vaccine
The shots are effective in killing the main bacterial cause, but other germs are growing, researchers find
August 7, 2017
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Deep-dwelling bacteria could rewrite our understanding of where alien life could take hold
Finding bacteria in extreme environments, like at thermal ocean vents or in the sulfur pools at Yellowstone, isn't all that novel. In 1991, remote-control robots brought out samples of pitch-black fungi that had been growing inside the ruins of the Chernobyl reactor.
October 20, 2016
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Designer biosensor can detect antibiotic production by microbes
Researchers from North Carolina State University have engineered designer biosensors that can detect antibiotic molecules of interest. The biosensors are a first step toward creating antibiotic-producing "factories" within microbes such as E. coli.
October 3, 2017
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Designing better nanodisks to observe viral infections
Harvard Medical School researchers have improved the design of tiny nanodiscs–synthetic models of cell membranes used to study proteins that control what enters and leaves a cell. the enhancements provide an unprecedented view of how viruses infect cells.
November 22, 2016
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Details of Lassa virus structure could inform development of vaccines, therapies
A 10-year Lassa virus research project has yielded structural and functional details of a key viral surface protein that could help advance development of Lassa vaccines and antibody-based therapeutics, which are currently lacking. The work was led by the Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) and funded by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, part of the National Institutes of Health.
June 2, 2017
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Diabetes linked to bacteria invading the colon
In humans, developing metabolic disease, particularly type 2 diabetes, is correlated with having bacteria that penetrate the mucus lining of the colon, according to a new study.
May 30, 2017
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Did Your UTI Come From a Chicken Coop?
Poultry samples with bacteria were found to have same genetic fingerprints as some infected patients' urine
October 9, 2017
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Diet and antibiotic use can change gut microbiota contributing to IBS symptoms
A recent review of research suggests that changes to the microorganisms (microbiota) in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract may be a cause of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). the review article is published in the American Journal of Physiology–Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology.
January 27, 2017
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Discovery could influence methods to control bacteria on medical and other surfaces
Flexible flagella fight flow: Bacteria change a liquid's properties and escape entrapment
June 30, 2017
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Disease resistance successfully spread from modified to wild mosquitoes
NIAID-funded group assesses mating of genetically modified species
September 28, 2017
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Dissecting bacterial infections at the single-cell level
Technological advances are making the analysis of single bacterial infected human cells feasible. now researchers have used this technology to provide new insight into the Salmonella infection process.
November 18, 2016
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DNA markers distinguish between harmless, deadly bacteria
Large genome study IDs potential virulence factors to discriminate new species
December 19, 2016
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Do microbes control our mood?
Our intestine hosts a complex ecosystem of bacteria; we call it the gut microbiota, which includes at least 1000 difference species. we get most of our gut microbes soon after birth, although there is evidence of colonization even during prenatal life. now new research on gut bacteria may change the way we look at anxiety, depression, and behavioral disorders, say scientists.
October 20, 2016
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Docs Prescribe Antibiotics If Patients Expect Them
Study found physicians might even give the drugs if they didn't suspect a bacterial infection
February 17, 2017
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Doctors Finally Prescribing Fewer Antibiotics, But Continue Prescribing Unnecessary Antibiotics
A new report shows that overall antibiotic prescriptions are down 9%, but 1-in-5 antibiotics prescriptions aren't doing any patients any good.
August 23, 2017
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Dragon blood may help wounds heal faster
A Komodo dragon-inspired compound slays tough bacterial infections in mice
April 11, 2017
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Drug-delivering micromotors treat their first bacterial infection in the stomach
Nanoengineers have demonstrated, for the first time, using micromotors to treat a bacterial infection in the stomach. These tiny vehicles, each about half the width of a human hair, swim rapidly throughout the stomach while neutralizing gastric acid and then release their cargo of antibiotics at the desired pH.
August 16, 2017
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Drugs from nature: Big effects of multiple compounds in small amounts
A research group has discovered a whole class of new peptides with which bacteria are able to kill insect larvae.
December 13, 2016
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During a hospital stay, all microbial hell breaks loose between you and the room
Within 24 hours, your microbes stake their flags in their new hospital territory.
May 26, 2017
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Dutch scientists discover favorable conditions for growth of Legionella bacteria
The bacteria that cause Legionnaire's disease grow well in warm tap water installations with ample dissolved organic matter--conditions that support the growth of biofilms.
January 6, 2017
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Misc. - E

E. coli bacteria's defense secret revealed
By tagging a cell's proteins with fluorescent beacons, researchers have found out how E. coli bacteria defend themselves against antibiotics and other poisons. Probably not good news for the bacteria.
June 13, 2017
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E. coli tripeptide production model reveals surprising complexity
Creating a small protein in a simple organism is a breathtakingly complex undertaking, a new computer modeling has revealed. RIKEN scientists have mapped how the concentrations of more than 240 compounds vary with time when the tiny single-celled bacterium Escherichia coli makes a small protein (PNAS, "Reaction dynamics analysis of a reconstituted Escherichia coli protein translation system by computational modeling").
August 25, 2017
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UBC researchers develop method to quickly and sensitively assess malaria progression
Left untreated, malaria can progress from being mild to severe -- and potentially fatal -- in 24 hours. So researchers at the University of British Columbia developed a method to quickly and sensitively assess the progression of the mosquito-borne infectious disease, which remains a leading killer in low-income countries.
August 11, 2017
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Edinburgh Research & Innovation announces new AIMday programme to tackle challenges of infectious diseases
With viruses such as Ebola, MERS-CoV and Zika making global headlines, and the progressive development of antimicrobial resistance worldwide, Edinburgh Research & Innovation, the commercialisation arm of the University of Edinburgh, has announced a new AIMday® for companies looking to find expertise and innovative solutions to dealing with the challenges of microbial infection.
September 2, 2016
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Einstein researchers receive three NIH grants to protect against deadly viruses
The NIH has awarded Einstein researchers three grants totaling more than $12 million to protect against three deadly viruses--Ebola, Marburg and hantavirus. Research collaborations between Kartik Chandran, Ph.D., professor of microbiology & immunology and the Harold and Muriel Block Faculty Scholar in Virology, and Jonathan Lai, Ph.D. associate professor of biochemistry, have led to novel approaches for developing vaccines and treatments.
August 11, 2017
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Effectiveness of fiber-rich diet depends on type of bacteria in dieter's intestine, study shows
In the era of personalized nutrition, there might be value in getting your stool tested and your gut bacteria counted before starting on a new diet. The results can be used to predict whether a particular diet will work for you. This follows a study in the International Journal of Obesity, published by Springer Nature, which shows that the increasingly popular fiber-rich "New Nordic Diet" might not work for everyone.
September 12, 2017
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Electric impulses clean industrial water and paints
Most paints for households or industry are based on water and, hence, are environmentally more compatible than paints based on solvents. Water-based paints, however, have one drawback: Microorganisms, such as bacteria, feel very comfortable and spread.
May 9, 2017
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Engineered E. coli bacteria can help detect environmentally relevant concentrations of EDCs
Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) have been implicated in the development of obesity, Diabetes and cancer and are found in a wide array of products including pesticides, plastics and pharmaceuticals. EDCs are potentially harmful, even at low concentrations, equal in some cases to mere milligrams dissolved in in a swimming pool full of water.
January 11, 2017
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Engineered Nanosponges Could Help Treat Antibiotic-Resistant Infections
In a new study, researchers show that engineered nanosponges that are encapsulated in the membranes of red blood cells can reduce the severity of infections caused by group a Streptococcus, the bacteria responsible for strep throat and life-threatening infections such as necrotizing fasciitis, or flesh-eating disease.
April 25, 2017
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Enterococci may have evolved antimicrobial resistance millions of years ago
Enterococci bacteria are the bane of hospitals, causing thousands of multidrug-resistant infections in patients each year. Now, researchers have traced evidence of the bacteria's evolutionary history back 425 million years and theorize that the same traits that allow the bacteria to thrive in hospitals likely emerged when they were carried onto land in the guts of the world's first terrestrial animals. the study was funded in part by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health.
May 11, 2017
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Enterococcus faecalis: Infections, transmission, and treatment
Enterococcus is a type of bacteria that is typically present in the gut and bowel.
July 12, 2017
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Enzyme is crucial for combatting antibiotic-resistant E. coli infections
New research is expected to pave the way for new approaches to kill bacteria that no longer respond to conventional antibiotics.
October 27, 2016
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Epigenetic drugs show promise as antivirals
Some epigenetic pharmaceuticals have the potential to be used as broad spectrum antivirals, according to a new study. The study demonstrated that histone methyltransferases EZH2/1 inhibitors, which are being used in cancer clinical trials, have activity against a variety of viruses, including herpes simplex virus (HSV).
August 15, 2017
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EUCAST experts say that genetic testing methods cannot be used to determine antimicrobial susceptibility
Experts at the European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST), who define the optimal drug concentrations to inhibit the growth of pathogens, have found that genetic methods cannot yet be used to test for susceptibility in a number of important bacterial species.
December 9, 2016
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Even bacteria have baggage, and understanding that is key to fighting superbugs
New research points to treatment strategies for multi-drug antibiotic resistance using currently available drugs. The study demonstrates how different adaptation histories of bacterial pathogens to antibiotics leads to distinct evolutionary dynamics of multi-drug resistance.
August 8, 2017
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Evolutionary Conservation of An Antimicrobial Net
Researchers Have Learned An Immune Mechanism to Control Pathogens is Similar In Humans and Amoebae
March 8, 2016
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Excessive alcohol consumption impacts breathing
Researchers have discovered a potential new health concern related to excessive alcohol consumption. Adults who drink excessively were found to have less nitric oxide in their exhaled breath than adults who don't drink. Nitric oxide helps protect against certain harmful bacteria.
August 1, 2016
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Experiment designed to test 'smart' antibacterial surfaces in space
Leti, an institute of CEA Tech, and three French partners are collaborating in a "house-cleaning" project aboard the International Space Station that will investigate antibacterial properties of new materials in a zero-gravity environment to see if they can improve and simplify cleaning inside spacecraft
November 15, 2016
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Explosion in number of known life forms
New research has helped increase the number of known genomes by almost 10 percent. Scientists have obtained 7,280 bacterial and 623 archaeal genomes (genetic materials from microorganisms) from environmental samples, explains a new article.
September 12, 2017
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Exposure to antimicrobials during development may cause irreversible outcomes
Exposure to environmental levels of triclocarban (TCC), an antibacterial chemical common in personal care products like soaps and lotions as well as in the medical field, can transfer from mother to offspring and interfere with lipid metabolism, new research shows.
August 9, 2017
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Exposure to Nanoparticles can Activate Dormant Viruses in Lung Tissue Cells
Nanoparticles emitted by combustion engines can activate dormant viruses in lung tissue cells. the study's results have been published in the 'Particle and Fibre Toxicology' journal. this study was carried out by researchers from Helmholtz Zentrum M, a partner in the German Center for Lung Research (DZL).
January 17, 2017
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Extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBL): Infection and treatment
Extended-spectrum beta-lactamases, or ESBLs, are enzymes produced by certain types of bacteria. These enzymes can break down the active ingredients in many common antibiotics, making them ineffective.
September 26, 2017
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Extraordinary resilience of deadly bacterium explained
Researchers have identified how the pathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa uses tension-activated membrane channels to stop itself from swelling up and bursting when it is suddenly exposed to water. the study helps explain how this bacterium -- a major cause of hospital-acquired infections -- persists in a variety of different environments.
April 19, 2017
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Eye microbiome trains immune cells to fend off pathogens in mice
NIH study shows microbe living on the surface of the eye protects cornea from infection.
July 11, 2017
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Misc. - F

FAQ: What To Know About Dangerous Vibrio Bacteria
Public health officials are warning people with cuts, abrasions, and certain health conditions to stay out of warm saltwater and not to eat raw or undercooked seafood after four people in Alabama contracted vibriosis, an infection that is often mild but can turn deadly.
July 14, 2017
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Farm-raised superbugs find their way into kids' noses somehow
In rural community, germs spread to farm workers' family and community kids.
April 11, 2017
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Faster (cheaper) method for making big bioactive ring molecules
A pair of chemists has developed a faster, cheaper method for synthesizing ring molecules called cyclic depsipeptides found in antibiotics, anti-retrovirals and pesticides.
December 13, 2016
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Faster way of detecting bacteria could save your life
A faster way to detect the bacteria causing patients to become sick has now been developed, giving physicians a better chance at saving lives.
February 3, 2017
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Fat can neutralize listeria
Certain fatty acids are not just part of a healthy diet. They can also neutralize the harmful listeria bacterium, a new study shows. This discovery could eventually lead to improved methods to combat dangerous and drug-resistant bacteria.
May 23, 2017
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FDA bans antibacterial soaps, says there's no evidence they actually work
Manufacturers failed to show that antimicrobial soaps are safe for long-term use, or that they're any more effective than regular soap.
September 2, 2016
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FDA bans antibacterial soaps; "No scientific evidence" they're safe, effective
Ban applies to soaps with any of 19 chemicals, including triclosan.
September 2, 2016
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FDA bans chemicals in antibacterial soaps
As of today, antibacterial soaps have a short shelf life. the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has banned soap products containing 19 active ingredients, including the notorious chemical triclosan, marketed as antiseptics.
September 2, 2016
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FDA Cracks Down on Antibacterial Soaps
Says the products are no better than traditional soap, and may pose risk of bacterial resistance
September 2, 2016
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FDA OK's New Drug for Antibiotic-Resistant UTIs
The FDA has approved a new treatment for a serious, antibiotic-resistant urinary tract infection that can affect people in hospitals and long-term care facilities.
September 1, 2017
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FDA Recalls Liquid Pharmaceutical Products
Concerns over possible bacterial contamination that could cause severe infections in patients prompted the move
August 16, 2017
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Fecal microbiota transplants improve cognitive impairment caused by severe liver disease
Fecal microbiome transfer significantly reduced the number of hospitalizations compared to standard of care treatment
April 21, 2017
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Feeling anxious? Your gut bacteria might be to blame
All of us experience anxiety at one point or another; whether down to a job interview or a first date, that nervous feeling in the gut often takes hold. Interestingly, a new study suggests that when it comes to anxiety, the gut could play a key role.
August 25, 2017
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Fighting fire blight and detecting Salmonella
Researchers have created an effective weapon against the plant disease fire blight and a new method for detection of Salmonella. Both are based on particular viruses that attack only one species of bacteria.
June 13, 2017
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First atomic structure of an intact virus deciphered with an X-ray laser
An international team of scientists has for the first time used an X-ray free-electron laser to unravel the structure of an intact virus particle on the atomic level. The method used dramatically reduces the amount of virus material required, while also allowing the investigations to be carried out several times faster than before.
June 19, 2017
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FishTaco can analyze your microbiome before or after you eat a fish taco
Our microbiomes: who understands them? Scientists? the bacteria colonizing our guts? the guy who made the Mexican food we just ate? Wrong. it's our computers. Researchers have tasked them to create a new way to analyze and understand our microbiomes electronically. the service is called "Functional Shifts' Taxonomic Contributors" or, obviously, FishTaco.
January 20, 2017
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Five home remedies for UTIs
A urinary tract infection is a common condition, often referred to as a UTI, that can be treated with home remedies.
June 23, 2017
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Five new synthetic yeast chromosomes assembled
30% of organism's genetic material swapped for engineered replacements
March 9, 2017
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Five tips for treating bacterial vaginosis at home
Bacterial vaginosis is the most common vaginal infection. What ways can women treat this condition at home?
May 22, 2017
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Feeling lonely may worsen cold symptoms
Sore throat, runny or stuffed nose, cough, headache - the symptoms of the common cold have gripped us all at one point or another. According to a new study, however, the severity of such symptoms may depend on one's feelings of loneliness.
March 30, 2017
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Fluctuating environments can help cooperating bacteria
Cooperating bacterial populations are more likely to survive in changing habitats, new research shows.
October 12, 2017
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For vaccinations, will people follow the herd or free-ride off it?
It could lead to greater vaccine uptake, but could also risk free-riding.
March 10, 2017
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Frog Slime Could Prevent the Next Pandemic
New research from Emory University School of Medicine shows that a chemical in the mucus of South Indian frogs is capable of killing certain strains of the influenza virus. It'll take a while for scientists to translate this finding into a useful medicine, but the discovery could lead to an entirely new source of powerful anti-viral drugs.
April 18, 2017
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Frog slime kills flu virus
Mining host defense peptides found in skin mucus
April 18, 2017
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Frozen chemistry controls bacterial infections
Chemists and molecular biologists have made an unexpected discovery in infection biology. the researchers can now show that two proteins that bind to one another slow down a chemical reaction central to the course of the disease in the bacteria Yersinia pseudotuberculosis.
March 3, 2017
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Fungi awake bacteria from their slumber
Study reveals that fungi stimulate microbial activity in dry soils
June 7, 2017
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Misc. - G

Gene transfer on the fungal highway
Researchers show how fungi can improve the genetic makeup of bacteria and their potential for the breakdown of harmful substances
December 14, 2016
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Genes, early environment sculpt the gut microbiome
Environment and genetics determine relative abundance of specific microbes in the gut, new research shows. the findings represent an attempt to untangle the forces that shape the gut microbiome, which plays an important role in keeping us healthy.
November 28, 2016
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Genetic mutation may increase susceptibility to cytomegalovirus infection
Experimenting with human cells and mice, Johns Hopkins researchers have found that a genetic mutation that alters a protein called NOD1 may increase susceptibility to human cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection. CMV is a common pathogen that infects almost 60 percent of adults in the U.S., according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and can lead to devastating developmental defects in fetuses and severe disease in people with weakened immune systems.
December 20, 2016
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Genetic mutations that drive antibiotic resistance in bacteria
Scientists have identified novel mutations in bacteria that promote the evolution of high-level antibiotic resistance.
February 21, 2017
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Genetically engineered bacteria--spread by mosquito sex--could spell the end of malaria
Scientists spent ten years developing the special bug.
September 29, 2017
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Genetically Programmed Bacteria Grow Into Electronic Devices
For folks that fear the consequences of genetic engineering and related fields, it's time to dial it up to eleven. That's because researchers at Duke University have now demonstrated that they're able to genetically modify bacteria to coax them to produce electronic devices, potentially leading to a new and surprising way for to interface with our bodies.
October 12, 2017
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Genomic sequencing illuminates recent Shigella outbreaks in California
Researchers identify genes associated with toxin production and antibiotic resistance
December 23, 2016
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Genomic sequencing reveals new insights into major shigellosis outbreaks in California
In a study that could have significant impact on how disease outbreaks are managed, researchers at UC Davis and the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) have sequenced and analyzed genomes from Shigella sonnei (S. sonnei) bacteria associated with major shigellosis outbreaks in California in 2014 and 2015.
December 23, 2016
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Genetically enhanced bacteria wired with color vision create artwork
The DNA-based RGB system involves only 18 genes.
May 23, 2017
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Genetics reveal mysteries of hard-to-treat bacterial infection in cystic fibrosis
New research on bacteria that cause major problems for those with cystic fibrosis reveals clues as to how it proliferates for so long in the lungs and offers new ideas for treatments to explore.
March 27, 2017
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Genomics technique could accelerate detection of foodborne bacterial outbreaks
A new testing methodology based on metagenomics could accelerate the diagnosis of foodborne bacterial outbreaks, allowing public health officials to identify the microbial culprits in less than a day.
November 30, 2016
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Germ-Zapping Robot Kills Hard-To-Clean Superbugs
A New Jersey hospital has employed a robot to do its dirty work.
August 8, 2017
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Getting antibiotics as a baby may have lasting effects on brain, behavior
Mouse study backs up human observations showing long-term changes.
April 5, 2017
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Global leaders announce launch of new council to help eradicate malaria
Bill Gates, co-chair of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, and Ray Chambers, the United Nations Secretary-General's Special Envoy for Health in Agenda 2030 and for Malaria, today announced the launch of the End Malaria Council, a group of influential public and private sector leaders who aim to ensure malaria eradication remains a top global priority.
January 20, 2017
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Glowing bacteria detect buried landmines
Researchers remotely detect buried landmines, using fluorescent bacteria encased in polymeric beads, illuminated by a laser-based scanning system
April 11, 2017
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Glowing Molecular Sensor Helps Spot New Useful Antibiotics
Microorganisms are natural factories for all sorts of biomolecules, and some of them produce antibiotics that can be very useful in medical practice.
October 5, 2017
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Gold nanoclusters possess surprisingly high wide-spectrum antimicrobial activity
Researchers in Singapore have demonstrated that it is possible to confer antimicrobial activity to gold nanoparticles, which have long been considered as inert, by way of controlling their sizes to the nanocluster range.
June 21, 2017
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'Good' bacteria is potential solution to unchecked inflammation seen in bowel diseases
In a new report, researchers describe how inflammation can go unchecked in the absence of a certain inhibitor called NLRP12, adding that beneficial bacteria may be the key to helping to reverse a cycle of gut inflammation seen in certain inflammatory bowel diseases.
March 13, 2017
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'Good' Bacteria Last in Stool Transplant Patients
Small study shows helpful gut germs are still there 2 years on
June 16, 2017
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Good drugs for bad bugs: Simple changes to antibiotic treatment of MRSA may help beat the bacteria
Simple changes to the antibiotic treatment of MRSA may help beat the bacteria, explain scientists. 20% of patients infected with MRSA die from systemic infections. Antimicrobial resistance infections are projected to cause more deaths than cancer by 2050 if not addressed urgently.
November 15, 2016
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Google's life sciences unit is releasing 20 million bacteria-infected mosquitoes in Fresno
Verily, the life sciences arm of Google's parent company Alphabet, has hatched a plan to release about 20 million lab-made, bacteria-infected mosquitoes upon Fresno, California -- and that's a good thing!
July 14, 2017
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Greenland's ice sheet is full of toxins waiting to break free--and microbes that eat them
But they can't dine us away from disaster.
July 11, 2017
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Gruesome case of flesh-eating bacteria has beach city anxious, skeptical
A Facebook post drew attention, but authorities want more information.
August 2, 2017
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Gut bacteria affect intestines and brain in IBS patients
Irritable bowel syndrome is one of the most common gastrointestinal problems, yet little is known about its causes. Treatment options focus on relieving the symptoms - which often include anxious behavior - rather than curing the illness. new research may have found a connection between gut bacteria and behavior in IBS patients, which could inform new treatments.
March 2, 2017
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Gut bacteria can aid recovery from spinal cord injury, study suggests
Spinal cord injury alters the type of bacteria living in the gut and that these changes can exacerbate the extent of neurological damage and impair recovery of function, new research suggests. the study demonstrates that counteracting these changes with probiotics could aid patients' recovery from spinal cord injuries.
October 17, 2016
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Gut bacteria compound may help to prevent type 2 diabetes
New research from Finland suggests that higher blood levels of indolepropionic acid - a product of gut bacteria that is increased by a fiber-rich diet - may help to protect against type 2 diabetes.
April 12, 2017
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Gut bacteria could protect cancer patients and pregnant women from Listeria
Researchers have discovered that bacteria living in the gut provide a first line of defense against severe Listeria infections. The study suggests that providing these bacteria in the form of probiotics could protect individuals who are particularly susceptible to Listeria, including pregnant women and cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy.
June 6, 2017
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Gut bacteria influence the brain indirectly, study shows
A new study has found that there is a three-way relationship between a type of gut bacteria, cortisol, and brain metabolites. This relationship, the researchers hypothesize, may potentially lead to further insight into autism, but more in-depth studies are needed.
August 22, 2017
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Gut bacteria may protect infants from intestinal infection
Gastroenteritis is one of the main causes of death in children under 5 years old, leading to 2.5 million deaths annually, with younger infants being most at risk. new research in mice has shown promising evidence that a type of gut bacteria could provide protection against the adverse effects of gastrointestinal infections in babies.
April 21, 2017
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Gut bacteria may turn common nutrient into clot-enhancing compound
Gut bacteria can produce a clot-enhancing compound when people eat a nutrient found in a variety of foods including meat, eggs and milk, according to new research.
April 24, 2017
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Gut bacteria that 'talk' to human cells may lead to new treatments
Scientists developed a method to genetically engineer gut bacteria to produce molecules that have the potential to treat certain disorders by altering human metabolism.
August 30, 2017
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Gut bacteria-produced compound may stave off aging
Researchers examined a class of chemical compounds called indoles and found that they have potential for extending vitality in our fellow mammals, mice. The findings could pave the way for a drug that could one day help humans to "live better for longer."
August 22, 2017
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Gut bacterium can stop chemotherapy from causing cancer cell death
Fusobacterium nucleatum promotes resistance to chemotherapy in colon cancer patients by turning off the push button for cancer cell suicide
July 27, 2017
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Gut colonization linked to development and progress of heart failure
In the gut of patients with heart failure, important groups of bacteria are found less frequently and the gut flora is not as diverse as in healthy individuals. Data obtained by scientists of the German Centre for Cardiovascular Research (DZHK) provide valuable points of departure for understanding how gut colonization is associated with the development and progress of heart failure.
July 11, 2017
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Gut microbe may improve fatty liver
Oral administration of a commensal gut microbe, Faecalibacterium prausnitzii, improves fatty liver in mice. F. prausnitzii is considered one of the most important bacterial indicators of a healthy gut. It has been shown to reduce inflammatory diseases in mice but its effects on liver have never before been studied.
April 5, 2017
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Gut microbes may talk to the brain through cortisol
Gut microbes have been in the news lately. Recent studies show they can influence human health, behavior, and certain neurological disorders, such as autism. But just how do they communicate with the brain? Results from a new study suggest a pathway of communication between certain gut bacteria and brain metabolites, by way of a compound in the blood known as cortisol. And unexpectedly, the finding provides a potential mechanism to explain the characteristics of autism.
August 21, 2017
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Gut microbe mix may spark Parkinson's
In mice, brain inflammation, motor problems linked to intestinal bacteria
December 1, 2016
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Gut microbes contribute to age-associated inflammation, mouse study shows
Inflammation increases with age and is a strong risk factor for death in the elderly, but the underlying cause has not been clear. a new study reveals that gut microbes are one of the culprits behind age-associated inflammation and premature death in mice. Imbalances in the gut microbes in older mice cause the intestines to become leaky, allowing the release of bacterial products that trigger inflammation and impair immune function.
April 12, 2017
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Gut microbes influence the body's response to high-fat diet
New research explains why the same high-fat diet affects people differently. The team found that they could predict which mice would gain more weight and develop glucose intolerance after switching to a high-fat diet by using gut microbe signatures that were present before the switch.
July 6, 2017
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Gut microbes promote motor deficits in a mouse model of Parkinson's disease
Gut microbes may play a critical role in the development of Parkinson's-like movement disorders in genetically predisposed mice, researchers report. Antibiotic treatment reduced motor deficits and molecular hallmarks of Parkinson's disease in a mouse model, whereas transplantation of gut microbes from patients with Parkinson's disease exacerbated symptoms in these mice. the findings could lead to new treatment strategies for the second most common neurodegenerative disease in the United States.
December 1, 2016
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Gut microbiota may play important role in influencing onset of blinding wet AMD
Age-related Macular Degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of irreversible blindness in the industrialized world, affecting over 10 million individuals in North America. a study lead by Dr. Przemyslaw (Mike) Sapieha, researcher at H󯨴al Maisonneuve-Rosemont (CIUSSS de l'Est-de-l'ͬe-de-Montreal) and professor at the University of Montreal, published in EMBO Molecular Medicine, uncovered that bacteria in your intestines may play an important role in determining if you will develop blinding wet AMD.
November 15, 2016
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Gut microbiota of larvae has an impact on mosquito's ability to transmit human pathogens
Researchers have demonstrated that differential bacterial exposure during the development of mosquito larvae (Aedes aegypti) can have carry-over effects on adult traits related to an insect's ability to be a successful vector of arboviruses. This study represents an important step toward a more comprehensive understanding of how the environment shapes the risk of vector-borne disease.
September 6, 2017
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Gut's microbial community shown to influence host gene expression
New research is helping to tease out the mechanics of how the gut microbiome communicates with the cells of its host to switch genes on and off.
November 23, 2016
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Misc. - H

Half of all seniors who went to doctor for common cold prescribed unnecessary antibiotics
Nearly one in two seniors in Ontario who visited a family doctor for a non-bacterial infection received an unnecessary antibiotic prescription, according to a new study.
May 9, 2017
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Handwashing with cold water just as good as hot water for killing bacteria
Many of us have been taught from an early age that washing our hands with hot water and soap is crucial for keeping germs at bay. The United States government regulations also insist on the importance of hot water temperature for the health and safety of U.S. consumers. But is there any scientific evidence in support of this claim? A new study investigates.
May 31, 2017
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Harnessing CRISPR for rapid detection of viral and bacterial infection
Researchers have created a version of CRISPR-Cas that can be used to diagnose infections, such as Zika and dengue, with a high level of sensitivity.
April 13, 2017
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Heat Activated Molecular Switches for Precise Controlled Delivery of Bacterial Therapeutics
Microbial therapeutics is a growing field which uses engineered bacteria to fight various diseases and health conditions. Researchers from California Institute of Technology have now developed a temperature sensitive engineered microbial system. These microbes could, in theory, be administered to patients with specific diseases. Once the bacteria reach the site of interest, precise ultrasound pulses can be given to gently heat specific areas in the tissue that will activate release of therapeutics.
November 17, 2016
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Herpes virus in mountain gorillas has similarity to EBV found in humans
Epstein Barr virus, or EBV, infects more than 90 percent of the human population, typically without major health consequences or symptoms. It can be challenging, however, for people with HIV/AIDS and suppressed immune systems, leading to certain forms of cancer. The Epstein-Barr virus is also one of the major causes of mononucleosis, commonly called the "kissing disease."
July 13, 2017
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High prevalence of CRE in Washington, D.C. healthcare facilities
Combatting antibiotic-resistant infections
June 15, 2017
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High fat diet reduces gut bacteria, Crohn's disease symptoms
Results could lead to new anti-inflammatory probiotics
June 22, 2017
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High-resolution pH imaging elucidates energy mechanisms in creating bacterial flagella
Researchers have developed methods to detect pH in vivo, and elucidate phenomena driving protein export in biological activities.
January 13, 2017
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HMS scientists listen to crosstalk between gut microbes and immune system
The human gut is home to some 100 trillion bacteria, comprising between 250 and 500 species. this astounding array of organisms, collectively known as the gut microbiome, is a powerful regulator of disease and health and has been implicated in conditions ranging from inflammatory bowel disease to multiple sclerosis.
February 16, 2017
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Hog workers carrying livestock-related, drug-resistant bacteria may be developing skin infections
New Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health-led research suggests that some workers at industrial hog production facilities are not only carrying livestock-associated, antibiotic-resistant bacteria in their noses, but may also be developing skin infections from these bacteria.
November 17, 2016
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Horrific flesh-eating bacteria that killed man in four days expected to rise
Climate change and raw oyster trend are boosting cases involving the ferocious microbe.
October 22, 2016
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Hospitals can rapidly identify life-threatening bacteria
Soon in virtually every hospital it will be possible to identify the bacterial species responsible for an infection developing in a patient in a matter of just a few minutes. a new, easy-to-adapt and inexpensive analytical procedure has been developed by researchers from the Institute of Physical Chemistry of the Polish Academy of Sciences in Warsaw.
January 25, 2017
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Household transmission of C. difficile to children, pets may be cause for community-related infections
Household transmission of Clostridium difficile to pets and children may be a source of community-associated C. difficile infections according to findings from a new study published today in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, the journal of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. the study found that patients with this bacteria can colonize or infect household contacts following or during treatment for an infection.
August 30, 2016
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Houston, you Have a 'Superbug'
Researchers don't know why strain of antibiotic-resistant bacteria is affecting this one U.S. city
May 16, 2017
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How a bacterial protein's structure aids biomedical studies
A light-sensing protein from a salt-loving, sulfur-forming microbe has proved key to developing methods essential to advanced drug discovery, understanding human vision and other biomedical applications. In a new review, researchers present a history of decades of research of this microbe and the many new technologies that have enabled these applications.
January 31, 2017
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How a year in space affected the bacteria in Scott Kelly's gut
A shift in the GI tract
February 3, 2017
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How bacteria hunt other bacteria
A bacterial species that hunts other bacteria has attracted interest as a potential antibiotic, but exactly how this predator tracks down its prey has not been clear. a new study reveals that the bacterial predator Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus homes in on its target by taking advantage of fluid forces generated by its own swimming movements and those of its prey. These bring the bacteria in close proximity, giving BV a greater chance of successful attack.
March 28, 2017
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How bacteria survive antibiotic treatment
Multiresistant bacteria scientists around the world are working hard to win the battle against multi-resistant bacteria. a new publication now presents how even sensitive bacteria often manage to survive antibiotic treatment as so-called 'persister cells.' the comprehensive perspective on this phenomenon may help to improve current options of drug treatment and could even inspire the discovery of novel antibiotics targeting these notoriously difficult-to-treat persister bacteria.
December 19, 2016
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How bacterial organelles assemble
Structure of microcompartment's protein shell could help research in bioenergy, pathogenesis, and biotechnology
June 22, 2017
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How Do you Catch a Cold or the Flu?
At the first sign of a cold or flu, you may wonder how it happened -- especially if you've taken steps to avoid germs. Here's exactly how you get sick, and what you need to know to protect yourself next time.
January 20, 2017
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How does the immune system know friend from foe in gut bacteria?
In order to maintain health, the human immune system must distinguish between friend, or the tissues of the human body, and foe, or the invasive pathogens that cause disease. this challenge is particularly apparent in the human gut, where it is not just cells of the host, but also the trillions of bacteria that co-exist and work with them that must be treated as friendly.
March 13, 2017
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How flu viruses hijack human cells
Much is known about flu viruses, but little is understood about how they reproduce inside human host cells, spreading infection. Now, a research team has identified a mechanism by which influenza A, a family of pathogens that includes the most deadly strains of flu worldwide, hijacks cellular machinery to replicate.
May 5, 2017
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How gut bacteria may affect anxiety
Tiny molecules could be key to microbes' long-distance effect on the brain
August 29, 2017
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How head-on collisions of DNA protein machines stop replication
The collisions promote mutations that may help bacteria adapt to stress
August 15, 2017
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How hibernating ribosomes wake up
Scientists have uncovered the way a bacterial ribosome moves from an inactive to an active form, and how that 'wake up call' is key to its survival.
September 12, 2017
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How humans and their gut microbes may respond to plant hormones
A bowl of salad contains more than vitamins and minerals. Plant matter also includes remnants of the hormones plants produce to control how they grow, age, and manage water intake. Recently, scientists have reported that our gut microbes and cells may respond to these hormones and even produce similar molecules of their own. Researchers now explore how plant hormones may influence human health.
August 22, 2017
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How plankton and bacteria shape ocean spray
As the oceans ebb and flow, the resulting waves and splashes form tiny bubbles.The bubbles burst and release a vapor -- called sea spray aerosol -- into the air. this aerosol scatters sunlight and is involved in forming clouds and ultimately climate. But no two bubbles are the same, researchers report. they analyzed sea spray and found that the atmospheric-changing properties of the bubbles are influenced by phytoplankton and bacteria in the water.
May 11, 2017
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How Scientists Are Preparing for a World Without Antibiotics
5 Strategies for Beating Antibiotic Resistance
November 28, 2016
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How to clean your retainer: Eight helpful tips
Most people would never consider going days without brushing their teeth. However, many retainer wearers go for long stretches of time without cleaning these devices.
June 13, 2017
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How to disrupt bacteria to better treat infections
Goal is to lessen our reliance on antibiotics
April 12, 2017
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How to not get deadly flesh-eating bacteria in your new tattoo
A recent case study is scary, but tattoos aren't really to blame.
June 6, 2017
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How to peel a bug: Engineering fast and effective antimicrobial killers
Scientists from the London Centre for Nanotechnology (LCN) and National Physical Laboratory (NPL) have engineered a new way to kill bacteria, and subsequently visualised in real time how the bacteria under attack were stripped of their protective membranes and died.
October 22, 2016
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Human Gut Germs Dictated by Diet
Lifestyle advances over thousands of years may have altered people's microbial makeup, study suggests
August 23, 2017
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Human gut microbe may help treat autoimmune diseases, say researchers
Mayo Clinic researchers, along with colleagues at the University of Iowa, report that a human gut microbe discovered at Mayo Clinic may help treat autoimmune diseases, such as multiple sclerosis. The findings appear in Cell Reports.
August 8, 2017
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Hydrophobic proteins on virus surfaces can help purify vaccines
Through experimental and computational tests, new research expands on the theory of virus surface hydrophobicity. by being slightly water-repellent, the outer layers of proteins in virus capsids affect how it interacts with cells and the environment. Understanding this more can improve vaccine production and virus detection.
March 24, 2017
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'Hypermutators' drive pathogenic fungi to evolve more rapidly
Fungus can rapidly shrug off challenge of anti-fungal drugs
September 26, 2017
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Misc. - I

Illegal diversion of opioids linked to cluster outbreak of Serratia marcescens bacteria
An illegal diversion of opioids by a hospital nurse tampering with syringes was responsible for a cluster outbreak of Serratia marcescens, a gram-negative bacteria, according to research published online today in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, the journal of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. Five patients admitted to five different hospital wards within University Hospital in Madison, Wisconsin developed identical bacteria strains.
July 7, 2017
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Imbalanced gut microbiome linked to systemic sclerosis, study suggests
Americans and Norwegians with systemic sclerosis had higher levels of bacteria that can cause inflammation and lower levels of bacteria that are believed to protect against inflammation compared with healthy people.
May 12, 2017
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Immune system can be modulated by targeted manipulation of cell metabolism
In its attempt to fight a serious bacterial infection, caused by listeria, for example, the immune system can become so over-activated that the resulting inflammatory response and its consequences can quickly lead to death. Scientists have now demonstrated in an animal model that such an excessive response by the immune system can be modulated by targeted manipulation of the sugar metabolism to produce an immune response that efficiently eliminates the pathogens without causing any harmful secondary reactions.
August 21, 2017
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Immunology: Live and let live
In order to maintain the microflora in the gut, the immune system must be taught to tolerate foreign bacteria. Researches have now shown how immune surveillance cells are educated to perform this task.
March 10, 2017
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Important bio-chemical produced on a large scale by E.coli
If you had a company that manufactured valuable ingredients for chemicals like detergens or paint, you would probably like to produce the ingredients in large quantities, sustainably, and at a low cost. That's what researchers from the Novo Nordisk Foundation Center for Biosustainability -- DTU Biosustain -- at DTU can now do. the researchers have developed an E. coli cell line, which produces large quantities of the compound serine.
January 11, 2017
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Importance of rare microbial species is much greater than you think
The rare bacterial species in a microbial community -- species that each make up rarely more than one tenth of one percent of the entire population -- play a very important role in ecosystem health and stability, report researchers.
March 3, 2017
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In dying, blood-starved heart, bacteria injections offer cellular life support
With light, photosynthetic bacteria feed heart cells needed oxygen and dodge damage.
June 15, 2017
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In the Arctic, carbon dioxide goes down where methane comes up
Surprisingly, CO2 removal by plankton counteracts methane emissions.
May 11, 2017
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Increase in reported cases of Cyclospora infections compared to last year, CDC reports
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has released a Health Alert Network (HAN) Health Advisory on 7th August 2017, Monday, in order to alert the health care facilities and the public health department on the increase in the reported cases of cyclosporiasis. The Health Advisory also aims at providing guidance to the healthcare providers on the rise in the reported cases.
August 9, 2017
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Increasing susceptibility of Staphylococcus aureus in the United States
Findings from a study that looked at susceptibility trends of Staphylococcus aureus in US hospital patients showed that key antibiotics used to treat the bacteria became more active over the course of the study, a rare occurrence.
June 5, 2017
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Ineffective antibiotics form strong teams against deadly super bacteria
Combinations of three antibiotics -- that are each ineffective against superbugs when used alone -- are capable of eradicating two of the six ESKAPE pathogens when delivered together, scientists have discovered.
May 25, 2017
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Infant's prolonged infection reveals mutation that helps bacteria tolerate antibiotics
A life-threatening infection in an infant with leukemia led to a discovery of how prolonged infection sets the stage for bacterial persistence despite antibiotic susceptibility.
January 3, 2017
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Inflammation, Gut Bacteria Tied to Type 1 Diabetes
However, it's not yet clear if these factors actually cause the disease
January 19, 2017
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International competition benchmarks metagenomics software
Evaluating the ability of software to assemble, classify and analyze complex pools of bacterial DNA
October 2, 2017
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Intestinal bacteria alter gut and brain function, study shows
The goal of a new study was to explore whether fecal microbiota from human IBS patients with diarrhea has the ability to influence gut and brain function in recipient mice. Using fecal transplants, researchers transferred microbiota from IBS patients with or without anxiety into germ-free mice.
March 1, 2017
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Intestinal bacteria may protect against diabetes
A high concentration of indolepropionic acid in the serum protects against type 2 diabetes, shows a new study. Indolepropionic acid is a metabolite produced by intestinal bacteria, and its production is boosted by a fibre-rich diet. According to the researchers, the discovery provides additional insight into the role of intestinal bacteria in the interplay between diet, metabolism and health.
April 11, 2017
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Invention uses bacteria to purify water
A University of British Columbia-developed system that uses bacteria to turn non-potable water into drinking water will be tested next week in West Vancouver prior to being installed in remote communities in Canada and beyond.
April 4, 2017
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Is whole wheat bread better than white? That may depend on your gut bacteria.
There's no such thing as one-size-fits-all nutrition.
June 6, 2017
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Is your ATM Dispensing Bacteria?
Study in New York City found most of the germs came from human skin, food
November 16, 2016
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Misc. - J

JAX researchers explore how dendritic cells promote adaptive immunity to virus
A research team led by Jackson Laboratory (JAX) Professor Karolina Palucka, M.D., Ph.D., in collaboration with a research team at Institut Curie in France led by Dr. Nicolas Manel, have addressed a long-standing puzzle of immunology: How do dendritic cells (DCs) do their job of promoting adaptive immunity to a virus while avoiding getting infected themselves?
July 7, 2017
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Misc. - K

Kent State professor offers reliable information about vaccine safety, urges to promote immunization
The center of a public health debate is whether parents should have their children vaccinated. Tara Smith, Ph.D., professor of epidemiology at Kent State University's College of Public Health, challenges statements made by influential individuals who oppose the widespread use of vaccines, and she calls upon her colleagues in the scientific community to speak out to promote vaccination.
July 19, 2017
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Killer antibiotic now 25,000× more potent--and resistant to drug resistance
Chemical changes give drug three killing methods plus a way to daze evolution.
May 31, 2017
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Killing bacteria by hacking plastics with silver and electricity
Researchers have developed an innovative way of hacking conducting plastics so as to prevent bacterial growth using silver nanoparticles and a small electrical current. The method could prove to be useful in preventing bacterial infections in hospitals.
August 14, 2017
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Killing bacteria by hacking plastics with silver nanoparticles and electricity
Researchers at the Swedish Medical Nanoscience Center at Karolinska Institutet have developed an innovative way of hacking conducting plastics so as to prevent bacterial growth using silver nanoparticles and a small electrical current. The method, which could prove to be useful in preventing bacterial infections in hospitals, is presented in the scientific journal Advanced Healthcare Materials.
August 15, 2017
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Killing bacteria with a silver-cotton nanocomposite material
Silver has been used as an antimicrobial agent for more than 100 years. Today, silver in the form of nanoparticles is incorporated in such products as plastic food containers, medical materials, and clothing. In textiles, however, preventing the nanoparticles' antimicrobial properties from washing away has always been a problem. But not anymore.
July 4, 2017
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Killing off rivals makes for happy families, bacteria study finds
Populations of bacteria will attack distantly related competitors in order to create a peaceful community in which they can flourish, according to a study.
February 6, 2017
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Know thy enemy: Kill MRSA with tailored chemistry
Targeting bacteria's use of vitamin B9 could prevent antibiotic resistance
December 22, 2016
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Komodo dragon blood may lead to new antibiotics
Each year, more than 23,000 people in the United States die as a result of infections that are resistant to current antibiotics, highlighting the desperate need to develop new antimicrobial medications. a new study reveals how the blood of the Komodo dragon could help to achieve this goal.
April 12, 2017
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Komodo dragons help researchers understand microbial health in captive animals
A new study is the first to identify similarities in the way in which Komodo dragons and humans and their pets share microbes within closed environments.
November 29, 2016
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Misc. - L

Lactate from human cells may trigger key step in invasion by meningitis-causing bacteria
Findings could improve understanding of how harmless bacteria in throat can turn dangerous
April 6, 2017
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Landmark study of virosphere uncovers 1445 viruses
A landmark study of the virosphere of the most populous animals -- those without backbones such as insects, spiders and worms and that live around our houses -- has uncovered 1445 viruses, revealing people have only scratched the surface of the world of viruses -- but it is likely that only a few cause disease.
November 24, 2016
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Last-line antibiotics are failing
On the occasion of the 9th European Antibiotic Awareness Day, the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) is releasing its latest EU-wide data on antibiotic resistance and antibiotic consumption. In 2015, antibiotic resistance continued to increase for most bacteria and antibiotics under surveillance.
November 18, 2016
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Legionella bacteria's escape route revealed
The precise mechanism used by Legionella bacteria to escape the body's defenses has been unpicked in intricate detail and is described for the first time in a new article.
April 11, 2017
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Lichens are an early warning system for forest health
Scientists tap symbiotic lichens as sentinels of air quality, and now, climate problems
November 15, 2016
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Light Activated Gold Nanoparticles Rapidly Destroy Potentially Deadly Bacterial Cells
Researchers have developed a new technique for killing bacteria in seconds using highly porous gold nanodisks and light, according to a study published today in Optical Materials Express, a journal published by the Optical Society. the method could one day help hospitals treat some common infections without using antibiotics, which could help reduce the risk of spreading antibiotics resistance.
March 18, 2016
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Light rain can spread soil bacteria far and wide, study finds
Global precipitation may account for 1 to 25 percent of bacteria emitted from land
March 7, 2017
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Link between chronic fatigue syndrome and gut bacteria explored
Chronic fatigue syndrome is a poorly understood condition; its exact causes are still not known. as medical researchers dig deeper, the potential involvement of gut bacteria is coming to the fore, revealing that the microbiome may play a significant role.
April 26, 2017
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Link between common brain disease and gut microbiome
Bacteria in the gut microbiome drive the formation of cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs), clusters of dilated, thin-walled blood vessels in the brain that can cause stroke and seizures. the research team's research suggests that altering the microbiome in CCM patients may be an effective therapy for this cerebrovascular disease.
May 10, 2017
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Link between microbiome in the gut, Parkinson's discovered
Parkinson's disease, and medications to treat Parkinson's, have distinct effects on the composition of the trillions of bacteria that make up the gut microbiome, new research shows.
March 2, 2017
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Listerine Kills Gonorrhea Bacteria, But Please don't Get Any Ideas
Scientists have concluded that mouthwash kills gonorrhea bacteria–in your mouth, that is. I can't vouch for your other parts, but maybe don't put mouthwash there.
December 20, 2016
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Live antibiotics use bacteria to kill bacteria
Prescribing a predator could be the answer to multidrug resistance
June 13, 2017
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Long-term chronic bone loss occurs even after one time malaria infection
Malaria caused by Plasmodium parasites is a life-threatening infectious disease that kills at least half a million people annually while causing over 200 million new infections. In some cases, complications can quickly develop such as cerebral malaria, respiratory distress and severe anemia, often leading to death. The majority of patients recover from disease, however, there is increasing evidence to suggest that survivors experience long-term 'hidden' pathologies due to infection that are as yet poorly defined.
June 2, 2017
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Looking for life's (lower) limits
Just how little energy life needs to survive is the subject of a new study. by analyzing maintenance budgets and cellular processes across species and sizes of bacteria, researchers found distinct trends along the spectrum and one surprising constant. Their investigation into the lower bound of energy required for life helps us understand ecological constraints on other planetary bodies in our solar system as well as our own.
February 6, 2017
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Losing tropical forest might raise risks of human skin ulcers, deformed bones
Bacteria causing Buruli disease prosper with certain landscape changes
December 6, 2016
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Misc. - M

Magnetic brain stimulation causes weight loss by making gut bacteria healthier
A new study finds that a noninvasive electromagnetic brain stimulation technique helps obese people lose weight, partly by changing the composition of their intestinal bacteria -- the so-called gut microbiota.
April 3, 2017
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Magnetic Fields to Destroy Bacteria on Artificial Joints
Scientists at UT Southwestern Medical Center have developed a new technique using high-frequency alternating magnetic fields to heat artificial joints in the body and destroy bacterial films on their surfaces.
August 9, 2017
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Magnetic purification of blood 'pulls out' the bacteria
Blood poisoning is still fatal in more than 50% of cases, but can be cured if treated at an early stage. the highest priority is therefore to act quickly. for this reason, doctors usually administer antibiotics even in the event of a suspicion of blood poisoning, without first ascertaining whether it is actually a bacterial sepsis, which in turn greatly increases the risk of resistance to antibiotics developing.
December 6, 2016
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Magnetized viruses attack harmful bacteria
Phage-enhanced nanoparticles to kill bacteria that foul water treatment systems
August 1, 2017
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Majority of dengue virus infections appear to happen very close to home
The majority of dengue virus infections appear to happen very close to home and are transmitted from the same family of mosquitoes, suggests new research led by the University of Florida and the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.
March 24, 2017
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Maple syrup extract boosts antibiotics, may ward off 'superbugs'
It is well-known that prolonged exposure to high doses of antibiotics can increase tolerance and sometimes strengthen the very bacteria that antibiotics are trying to kill. new research, however, suggests that an extract from maple syrup may boost the efficacy of antibiotics and reduce their side effects.
April 3, 2017
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Measles outbreak rages after anti-vaccine groups target vulnerable community
Cases mount in Minnesotan Somali community after "abhorrent' anti-vaccine tactics.
May 5, 2017
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Mechanism of protective protein identified in fight against harmful bacteria
A new understanding of a protein that plays an important role in protecting bacterial cells associated with harmful infections has been gathered through new research. Understanding the protein's protective mechanism could help in the development of new antibacterial agents, say scientists.
November 21, 2016
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Medical Device Coating Points To and Kills Bacteria
Researchers at KAUST (King Abdullah University of Science and Technology) in Saudi Arabia, not to be confused with KAIST (Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology), have developed a special nanoparticle coating that can be used to give the surfaces of medical devices antibacterial properties.
July 17, 2017
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Meerkats use bacteria from their butts to make stinky graffiti
Anal glands have never been so interesting.
June 12, 2017
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Metabolism can impact host's susceptibility to develop malaria
Researchers from Instituto de Medicina Molecular (iMM) Lisboa have found that the host's susceptibility to develop malaria depends on his or her metabolic state, which can be easily manipulated through external stimuli such as dietary patterns.
September 25, 2017
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MGH scientists show how Shigella survives journey from mouth to the colon
Surviving the treacherous journey through the human body from the mouth to the colon takes a special kind of bacterial pathogen. Shigella - a group of bacteria responsible for much of the diarrheal disease affecting children in the developing world - travels unimpeded from the mouth to the colon, where they unleash powerful machinery to trigger debilitating diarrhea.
May 31, 2017
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Microbes evolved to colonize different parts of the human body
Geology software used to measure relative abundance of bugs
March 19, 2017
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Microbes in your gut influence age-related macular degeneration
Bacteria in your intestines may play an important role in determining if you will develop blinding wet Age-related Macular Degeneration (AMD).
November 15, 2016
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Microbial manufacturing
Using advanced fermentation technology, industrial biotech startup Manus Bio hopes to make manufacturing flavors, fragrances, and other products greener and more cost-effective – and maybe create new products in the process.
February 3, 2017
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Microbiome diversity is influenced by chance encounters
Study finds a role for randomness in the composition of the gut's microbe populations
March 3, 2017
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Micromotors Powered by Stomach Acids Lower pH, Safely Release Antibiotics
Researchers at University of California San Diego have developed tiny micromotors that propel themselves around the stomach, neutralizing the acids within, eventually releasing a cargo of drugs once the pH is at a desired level. This approach can change how antibiotics and other pH sensitive drugs are delivered, as currently proton pump inhibitors have to be administered to reduce acidity before administering such drugs.
August 17, 2017
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Midwater ocean creatures use nanotech camouflage
Optical coatings on crustaceans appear to be living bacteria
October 27, 2016
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Mining: Bacteria with Midas touch for efficient gold processing
Special 'nugget-producing' bacteria may hold the key to more efficient processing of gold ore, mine tailings and recycled electronics, as well as aid in exploration for new deposits, research has shown.
April 28, 2017
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MIT researchers develop new machine to rapidly produce customized peptides
Manufacturing small proteins known as peptides is usually very time-consuming, which has slowed development of new peptide drugs for diseases such as cancer, diabetes, and bacterial infections.
February 27, 2017
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MIT used bacteria to create a self-ventilating workout shirt
Next step: a garment that releases a nice aroma at the gym.
May 22, 2017
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Molecular biologist explores simple, innovative methods of developing new antibiotics
Antibiotic-resistant bacteria are a major problem worldwide. Molecular biologist Changsheng Wu explored innovative methods of developing new antibiotics more simply and more easily. He also discovered a new type of antibiotic.
October 27, 2016
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Molecular chameleons reveal bacterial biofilms
Molecules that change color can be used to follow in real-time how bacteria form a protective biofilm around themselves. this new method may in the future become significant both in medical care and the food industry, where bacterial biofilms are a problem.
November 23, 2016
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Molecular chameleons reveal bacterial biofilms
Molecules that change colour can be used to follow in real-time how bacteria form a protective biofilm around themselves. this new method, which has been developed in collaboration between researchers at Linkg University and Karolinska Institutet in Sweden, may in the future become significant both in medical care and the food industry, where bacterial biofilms are a problem.
November 23, 2016
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Molecular map shows novel way to stop dangerous bioweapon
During World War II, the Soviet Red Army was forced to move their biological warfare operations out of the path of advancing Nazi troops. Among the dangerous cargo were vials of Francisella tularensis, the organism that causes tularemia and one of the world's most infectious pathogens.
September 6, 2017
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Molecular 'Trojan horses' render infections visible
Multi-resistant gram-negative bacteria are particularly difficult to control with antibiotics. An agent must first penetrate through a double-hulled cell wall to be able to have an effect. In addition, some infections are difficult to diagnose because they are located deeply inside the body.
July 4, 2017
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Molecular troublemakers instead of antibiotics?
How proteins prevent communication between bacteria
July 29, 2016
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Molecular Velcro boosts microalgae's potential in biofuel, industrial applications
Michigan State University scientists have engineered "molecular Velcro" into to cyanobacteria, boosting this microalgae's biofuel viability as well as its potential for other research.
December 21, 2016
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More evidence on link between antibiotic use and antibiotic resistance
The European Food Safety Authority, the European Medicines Agency and the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control are concerned about the impact of use of antibiotics on the increase in antibiotic-resistant bacteria. The report presents new data on antibiotic consumption and antibiotic resistance and reflects improved surveillance across Europe.
July 27, 2017
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More than 99 percent of the microbes inside us are unknown to science
A survey of DNA fragments circulating in the blood suggests the microbes living within us are vastly more diverse than previously known. In fact, 99 percent of that DNA has never been seen before.
August 23, 2017
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More Tick-Borne Powassan Disease Expected in U.S.
Cases of a rare but potentially life-threatening tick-borne disease called Powassan are expected to rise in the United States this year as warmer winters lead to rising tick populations, experts say.
May 3, 2017
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More U.S. Kids Getting Drug-Resistant Infections
Finding highlights growing problem of antibiotic resistance
November 17, 2016
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More virus infection, please
Scientists have generated a new plasmid-based reverse genetics system for rotaviruses.
February 24, 2017
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Mosquitoes infected with virus-suppressing bacteria could help control dengue fever
Strategic releases could transform mosquito populations and virus transmission across cities
May 30, 2017
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Moth Gut Bacteria Could Help Create new Antibiotics
This Benevolent Bacteria Fends Off Deadly Microbial Invaders
January 19, 2017
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Moth gut bacterium defends its host by making antibiotic
Nearly half of all insects are herbivores, but their diets do not consist of only plant material. It is not uncommon for potentially harmful microorganisms to slip in during a feast. Researchers now report that these insects use an ironic strategy to resist microbial infections. a bacterial species commonly found in the gut of the cotton leafworm and other moths secretes a powerful antimicrobial peptide, killing off competitors.
January 19, 2017
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Mouthwash Kills Gonorrhea Germs in Mouth, Throat
Listerine's maker has long made the claim, and new Australian research seems to confirm it
December 20, 2016
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Moving toward faster, more accurate detection of food- and water-borne bacteria
Food poisoning is a scourge. Yet preventing it is far from foolproof. But in a new study, scientists report that they are closing in on a way to use a combination of color-changing paper and electrochemical analysis -- on plastic transparency sheets or simple paper -- to quickly, cheaply and more accurately detect bacterial contamination of fruits and vegetables in the field before they reach grocery stores, restaurants and household pantries.
March 8, 2017
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MRSA correlated to eczema? An interview with Dr Bjorn Herpers
How much evidence is there that MRSA is correlated with eczema?
August 31, 2016
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MRSA survival chances predicted by DNA sequencing the superbug
Sequencing the DNA of the MRSA superbug can accurately identify patients most at risk of death and could help medics develop new treatments as we move towards personalised medicine, say scientists.
August 7, 2017
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Multi-antioxidant nanoparticles to treat sepsis
With an incidence of 31.5 million worldwide and a mortality of around 17%, sepsis remains the most common cause of death in hospitalized patients, even in industrialized countries where antibiotics and critical care facilities are readily available.
July 12, 2017
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Misc. - N

Nano factories to prevent bacterial colonization
The 2016 research prize from the Dr. Karl Helmut Eberle-Stiftung, a foundation supporting innovative research, will provide €300,000 to the University of Konstanz in 2016.
November 28, 2016
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Nano fiber feels forces, hears sounds made by cells
Engineers have developed a miniature device that's sensitive enough to feel the forces generated by swimming bacteria and hear the beating of heart muscle cells. the device is a nano-sized optical fiber that detects forces down to 160 femtonewtons and sound levels down to -30 decibels. Applications include measuring bio-activity at the single cell level, or ultra-sensitive mini stethoscopes to monitor cellular acoustics in vivo.
May 15, 2017
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Nano-antibiotics
Antibiotic resistance is a growing problem, especially among a type of bacteria that are classified as "Gram-negative." These bacteria have two cell membranes, making it more difficult for drugs to penetrate and kill the cells.
July 13, 2017
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Nanoengineers show how micromotors treat a bacterial infection in the stomach
Nanoengineers at the University of California San Diego have demonstrated for the first time using micromotors to treat a bacterial infection in the stomach. These tiny vehicles, each about half the width of a human hair, swim rapidly throughout the stomach while neutralizing gastric acid and then release their cargo of antibiotics at the desired pH.
August 16, 2017
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Nanofiber coating prevents infections of prosthetic joints
In a proof-of-concept study with mice, scientists at the Johns Hopkins University show that a novel coating they made with antibiotic-releasing nanofibers has the potential to better prevent at least some serious bacterial infections related to total joint replacement surgery.
October 22, 2016
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Nanofiber Coating with Built-In Antibiotics Prevents Bacterial Infections on Metal Implants
Artificial joint implants tend to be breeding grounds for bacterial infections, often developing biofilms that eventually require revision surgeries. Patients are requried to stay on antibiotics following implantation and confirmed infections can require an even greater antibiotic punch. There have been attempts to integrate antibiotics within the implants so they prevent bacteria from taking hold, but success has been limited.
November 1, 2016
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Nanofiber feels forces and hears sounds made by cells
Engineers at the University of California San Diego have developed a miniature device that's sensitive enough to feel the forces generated by swimming bacteria and hear the beating of heart muscle cells.
May 15, 2017
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Nanoinjection increases survival rate of cells
Physicists at Bielefeld University develop new method for microscopic research
March 1, 2017
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Nanoparticle exposure can awaken dormant viruses in the lungs
Nanoparticles from combustion engines can activate viruses that are dormant in lung tissue cells. this is the result of a study by researchers of Helmholtz Zentrum M, a partner in the German Center for Lung Research (DZL), which has now been published in the journal Particle and Fibre Toxicology ("Nanoparticle exposure reactivates latent herpesvirus and restores a signature of acute infection").
January 16, 2017
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Nanoparticles coated with antibiotic eliminate drug-resistant bacteria
The method consists of coating nanoparticles that are made of silver and silica - potentially toxic to both microorganisms and human cells - with a layer of antibiotic. Owing to chemical affinity, the resulting nanopharmaceutical acts only on the pathogens and is inert to the organism.
July 10, 2017
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Nanophotonic chip system measures light from a single bacterial cell to enable portable chemical detection
Researchers at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem have created a nanophotonic chip system using lasers and bacteria to observe fluorescence emitted from a single bacterial cell. To fix the bacteria in place and to route light toward individual bacterial cells, they used V-groove-shaped plasmonic waveguides, tiny aluminum-coated rods only tens of nanometers in diameter.
August 30, 2017
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Nanosponges lessen severity of Streptococcal infections
In a new study, researchers show that engineered nanosponges that are encapsulated in the membranes of red blood cells can reduce the severity of infections caused by group a Streptococcus, the bacteria responsible for strep throat and life-threatening infections such as necrotizing fasciitis, or flesh-eating disease. the new treatment approach could be particularly useful for severe or antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections.
April 24, 2017
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Nanotechnology based antimicrobial packaging to enhance food safety and reduce waste
The European Union (EU) has awarded the international NanoPack consortium €7.7 million to develop and demonstrate a solution for extending food shelf life by using novel antimicrobial surfaces.
January 16, 2017
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Nanotechnology Helps Expose Workings of Bacterial 'Machines'
Researchers at the University of Liverpool have probed the structure and material properties of protein mechanisms in bacteria, which have the ability to change carbon dioxide into sugar through photosynthesis. Details of this research have been published in the journal Nanoscale.
June 9, 2017
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Nanotechnology reveals hidden depths of bacterial 'machines'
New research from the University of Liverpool, published in the journal Nanoscale, has probed the structure and material properties of protein machines in bacteria, which have the capacity to convert carbon dioxide into sugar through photosynthesis.
June 8, 2017
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NASA keeps a close eye on tiny stowaways
Wherever you find people, you also find bacteria and other microorganisms. The International Space Station is no exception.
June 28, 2017
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Nasal Flu Vaccine's Demise May Mean Fewer Immunized KIds
Overall Child Immunization Rates Fell After Cdc Advised Against The Inhaled Form, Study Shows
September 1, 2017
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Nausea after eating: Symptoms, causes, and treatment
Many people will experience feelings of nausea after eating too much food in one sitting. However, feeling nauseated after eating on a regular basis can be related to a variety of conditions.
May 26, 2017
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Navigating vaccine hesitancy: what can the physician do?
Monday morning: a routine visit by a young mother with her small child. a discussion about vaccine safety ensues. After an average visit of between 10 and 19 minutes, and equipped with the latest statistics and several leaflets, the mother leaves to consider her options.
April 18, 2017
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Nearly 20% of patients treated with antibiotics experience adverse side effects, study finds
A study examining the impact of antibiotics prescribed for nearly 1500 adult patients admitted to The Johns Hopkins Hospital found that adverse side effects occurred in a fifth of them, and that nearly a fifth of those side effects occurred in patients who didn't need antibiotics in the first place.
June 14, 2017
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Nerves control the body's bacterial community
Research team proves, for the first time, that there is close cooperation between the nervous system and the microbial population of the body
September 26, 2017
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Neutralizing antibodies from Ebola survivors can protect mice against deadly viral challenge
A study by scientists at the Emory Vaccine Center, in collaboration with the biotechnology company Atreca, Inc., has found that antibodies generated from the blood of survivors of Ebola virus disease can strongly neutralize the Ebola virus in the laboratory and protect mice from a lethal viral challenge.
October 26, 2016
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New antibiotic from bacteria found on Kenyan ant could help beat MRSA
A new antibiotic, produced by bacteria found on a species of African ant, is very potent against antibiotic-resistant 'superbugs' like MRSA according to scientists.
February 15, 2017
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New antibiotic mined from human gut reverses drug resistance in superbugs
Using DNA sequences, scientists decode new antibiotics used in gut warfare.
October 19, 2016
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New antibiotic-releasing polymer may simplify treatment of prosthetic joint infection
A team of Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) investigators has developed an antibiotic-releasing polymer that may greatly simplify the treatment of prosthetic joint infection. In their recent report published in Nature Biomedical Engineering, the researchers describe how implants made from this material successfully eliminated two types of prosthetic infection in animal models.
July 18, 2017
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New antifungal drug developed to help in treatment of invasive fungal infections
University of Liverpool researchers, working with F2G Limited (Eccles, Manchester), have developed a new antifungal drug to help in the treatment of life threatening invasive fungal infections such as invasive aspergillosis.
October 6, 2017
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New antiviral drug candidate effective against broad range of coronaviruses
Coronaviruses are a genetically diverse family of viruses that infect birds and mammals, with most coronavirus strains limited to infecting only certain hosts. Human coronaviruses, for example, cause up to 30 percent of common colds.
June 29, 2017
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New bacteria groups, and stunning diversity, discovered underground
One of the most detailed genomic studies of any ecosystem to date has revealed an underground world of stunning microbial diversity, and added dozens of new branches to the tree of life.
October 22, 2016
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New biological mechanism generates cells to fight against Candida albicans infections, find researchers
Researchers from the Universitat de Val筣ia (UV) and the Cedar Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles have partnered to describe a biological mechanism that generates cells which are better equipped to fight off serious infections caused by the Candida albicans fungus.
October 26, 2016
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New class of membrane-busting compounds can combat MRSA skin infections in mice
Public health officials are increasingly concerned over methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). the bacteria have developed resistance to a number of treatments, even antibiotics of last resort in some cases. now researchers report in ACS' journal Bioconjugate Chemistry that a new class of compounds can treat MRSA skin infections in mice with no signs of acute toxicity, and no signs that the bacteria would develop resistance to them after many applications.
March 15, 2017
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New diagnostic system enables rapid, accurate customization of antibiotic treatments
A diagnostic system developed at the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology enables rapid and accurate customization of the antibiotic to the patient. The system makes for faster diagnostics, earlier and more effective treatment of infectious bacteria, and improved patient recovery times.
June 29, 2017
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New disgnostic tool could help doctors make more informed prescriptions
Students from the University of Sheffield are building a device capable of quickly diagnosing bacterial infections, which could help doctors improve the way they prescribe treatment for patients.
October 22, 2016
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New find could be oldest evidence of life ever discovered
This looks like single-celled life that originated near a seafloor hydrothermal vent.
March 1, 2017
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New giant viruses suggest their genomes expanded like an accordion
More giant virus genomes suggest their DNA is mostly random scraps.
April 7, 2017
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New heart attack treatment uses photosynthetic bacteria to make oxygen
Cyanobacteria lessened damage to rat hearts deprived of blood supply
June 14, 2017
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New insights on how pathogens escape the immune system
The bacterium Salmonella enterica causes gastroenteritis in humans and is one of the leading causes of food-borne infectious diseases. During the infection, the germ is able to trick the immune system. Researchers found a mechanism the pathogen uses. they hope to use the gained knowledge in the fight against cancer and other aging-associated diseases.
March 3, 2017
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New invention uses bacteria to purify water
A new system that uses bacteria to turn non-potable water into drinking water will be tested next week in West Vancouver prior to being installed in remote communities in Canada and beyond.
April 4, 2017
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New Joint Implant Coating to Prevent Bacterial Infections
Much too often artificial joints become infected after implantation and revision procedures are common. Antibiotic-enriched bone cement is often positioned within an infected joint after removing the implant and allowed to do its thing for a number of weeks before a new implant is introduced.
July 28, 2017
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New Laser-Induced Graphene Kills Bacteria, Resists Biofouling
Recently, scientists from Rice University and Ben-Gurion University of the Negev (BGU) explored the fact that induced graphene (LIG) is an extremely effective anti-fouling material and becomes a bacteria zapper when electrified.
May 23, 2017
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New light shed on dynamics of type IV pili and twitching motility
Directional light triggers asymmetric distribution of type IV pili in cyanobacteria
June 15, 2017
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New light shed on functioning of human gut bacteria
Researchers shed new light on the functioning of human gut bacteria, revealing how nutrients are transported into the bacterial cell.
January 11, 2017
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New mechanism for bacterial division discovered in some bacteria
Scientists show how some pathogenic bacteria -- such as the mycobacteria that cause tuberculosis -- use a previously unknown mechanism to coordinate their division. The discovery could help develop new ways to fight them.
June 26, 2017
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New mechanism for Type IV pili retraction in Vibrio cholerae
Although pathogenic bacteria often rely on a specialized molecular motor to retract their pili, a new study reveals that a minor pilin protein elicits pilus retraction in the cholera bacterium, Vibrio cholerae.
January 4, 2017
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New mechanism to control human viral infections discovered
A long-sought-after mechanism has been found in human cells that creates immunity to influenza a virus, which causes annual seasonal epidemics and occasional pandemics.
December 5, 2016
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New method can precisely track replication of yellow fever virus in host immune cells
Researchers from Princeton University's Department of Molecular Biology have developed a new method that can precisely track the replication of yellow fever virus in individual host immune cells. the technique, which is described in a paper published March 14 in the journal Nature Communications, could aid the development of new vaccines against a range of viruses, including Dengue and Zika.
March 14, 2017
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New Microscopy Technique Identifies and Quantifies Bacterial Infections in Minutes
A European scientific collaboration headed by scientists at ICFO-The Institute of Photonic Sciences in Barcelona, Spain, has produced a small microscope that can help to quickly identify bacterial pathogens and presence of certain biomarker proteins. While the potential of this technology spans across a whole section of medicine, the initial clinical application may be for early diagnosis of sepsis. In the future the team plans on having their technology detect microRNAs, interleukins, and a variety of other disease markers.
August 29, 2016
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New picture emerges on the origins of photosynthesis in sun-loving bacteria
Biologists have gained important new insights by resolving with near-atomic clarity, the very first core membrane protein structure in the simplest known photosynthetic bacterium, called Heliobacterium modesticaldum (Helios was the Greek sun god). By solving the heart of photosynthesis in this sun-loving, soil-dwelling bacterium, the research team has gained a fundamental new understanding of the early evolution of photosynthesis, and how this vital process differs between plants systems.
July 27, 2017
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New research describes how bacteria resists 'last-resort' antibiotic
An international research team has provided the first clues to understand how the mcr-1 gene protects bacteria from colistin -- a 'last resort' antibiotic used to treat life-threatening bacterial infections that do not respond to other treatment options.
January 6, 2017
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New research pinpoints how bacteria get into lungs of healthy people
They traveled a huge distance, evaded a protective barrier, and found themselves in a strange and unwelcoming land.
February 24, 2017
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New research sheds light on movement of white blood cells to sites of infection
One of the mysteries of the living body is the movement of cells - not just in the blood, but through cellular and other barriers. new research in the Weizmann Institute of Science has shed light on the subject, especially on the movement of immune cells that race to the sites of infection and inflammation. the study revealed that these cells - white blood cells - actively open large gaps in the internal lining of the blood vessels, so they can exit through the vessel walls and rapidly get to areas of infection.
April 10, 2017
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New rules for cellular entry may aid antibiotic development
Tests show clues to fighting drug-resistant gram-negative bacteria
May 10, 2017
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New study finds huge problem of multi-drug resistant infections among children
The adage that kids are growing up too fast these days has yet another locus of applicability.
February 24, 2017
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New study finds that CRP point-of-care testing reduces antibiotic prescribing for chest infections
A pilot study into the use of near patient diagnostics in general practice, to help GPs and nurse practitioners prescribe antibiotics for chest infections more precisely, has won a national Public Health England Award.
July 4, 2017
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New "Superantibiotic" is an Microbe-busting Mega-weapon
We may soon have a soon last-line antibiotic -- vancomycin 3.0. Earlier versions were developed as far back as the 50s and have helped lead the fight against bacteria. The microbes have been fighting back, though, and hard. There are now more than a dozen types of antibiotic-resistant diseases, and we need new weapons in this war, fast. And that's just what vancomycin 3.0 is for.
June 8, 2017
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New system makes fast, customized antibiotic treatments possible
Using nanotechnology, image processing tools and statistical analysis, researchers have developed a system that enables faster diagnostics, earlier and more effective treatment of infectious bacteria, and improved patient recovery times.
June 29, 2017
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New system makes fast, customized antibiotic treatments possible
A diagnostic system developed at the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology enables rapid and accurate customization of the antibiotic to the patient. The system makes for faster diagnostics, earlier and more effective treatment of infectious bacteria, and improved patient recovery times.
June 29, 2017
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New technology can help fight against antimicrobial resistance
Antimicrobial resistance is a growing problem, as some infections that used to be easily cured are now immune to even our most powerful antibiotics. These resistant microorganisms are called superbugs, and their infections are difficult to treat and may be transmitted to other people, especially those already ill and therefore vulnerable. One of the biggest arenas of this fight is hospitals and other health care facilities, but new technology is joining the battle.
July 4, 2017
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New tool to distinguish between viral, bacterial infections
Goal is to reduce unnecessary use of antibiotics, combat antibiotic resistance
July 28, 2017
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New treatment for antibiotic resistant bacteria and infectious disease
A new treatment pathway for antibiotic resistant bacteria and infectious diseases with benefits for patients and health care providers has been described in a new report.
March 31, 2017
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New treatment for C.diff infections reduces recurrences by 40%, study finds
A new treatment for Clostridium difficile (C.diff) infections reduces recurrent infections by nearly 40%, a large study has found.
January 25, 2017
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New type of monitoring provides information about the life of bacteria in microdroplets
In the future, it will be possible to carry out tests of new drugs on bacteria much more efficiently using microfluidic devices, since each of the hundreds and thousands of droplets moving through the microchannels can act as separate incubators. So far, however, there has been no quick or accurate method of assessing the oxygen conditions in individual microdroplets.
January 11, 2017
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New, easy-to-adapt analytical procedure can quickly identify bacteria in hospitals
Soon in virtually every hospital it will be possible to identify the bacterial species responsible for an infection developing in a patient in a matter of just a few minutes. a new, easy-to-adapt and inexpensive analytical procedure has been developed by researchers from the Institute of Physical Chemistry of the Polish Academy of Sciences in Warsaw.
January 25, 2017
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Newborn baby's infection offers a cautionary tale about placenta pills
When I was pregnant, I spent a lot of time searching for good information about how to keep both my baby and myself healthy after birth. Googling "placenta" and "eat," I got a list of stories that reached nearly opposite conclusions about the practice.
July 28, 2017
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NIAID scientists identify cause, possible treatment for life-threatening gut condition
Investigators at the National Institutes of Health and international colleagues have discovered a genetic cause and potential treatment strategy for a rare immune disorder called CHAPLE disease. Children with the condition can experience severe gastrointestinal distress and deep vein blood clots. No effective treatments are available to ameliorate or prevent these life-threatening symptoms.
June 29, 2017
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NIAID-sponsored study to assess shorter-duration antibiotics in children
Physicians at five U.S. medical centers are planning to enroll up to 400 children in a clinical trial to evaluate whether a shorter course of antibiotics – five days instead of 10 – is effective at treating community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in children who show improvement after the first few days of taking antibiotics. the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health, is sponsoring the clinical trial, which will use an innovative evaluation method developed by a group of scientists who specialize in antibiotic resistance research.
November 28, 2016
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NIAID-Sponsored Trial of Experimental Chikungunya Vaccine Begins
A clinical trial of an experimental vaccine to prevent infection with chikungunya virus is now enrolling healthy adult volunteers at three sites in the United States. The Phase 1/2 trial, which is sponsored by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health, is being conducted at several NIAID-funded Vaccine and Treatment Evaluation Units. The candidate vaccine, MV-CHIKV, was developed by Themis Bioscience of Vienna, Austria.
June 5, 2017
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NIH Funds Seven International Centers of Excellence for Malaria Research
The awards fund three new and four existing centers that work in 14 countries in Africa, Asia and Latin America.
April 21, 2017
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NIH herpesvirus study in mice leads to discovery of potential broad-spectrum antiviral
After herpesviruses infect a cell, their genomes are assembled into specialized protein structures called nucleosomes. Many cellular enzyme complexes can modulate these structures to either promote or inhibit the progression of infection. Scientists studying how one of these complexes (EZH2/1) regulated herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection unexpectedly found that inhibiting EZH2/1 suppressed viral infection. The research group, from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) at the National Institutes of Health, then demonstrated that EZH2/1 inhibitors also enhanced the cellular antiviral response in cultured cells and in mice.
August 15, 2017
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NIH renews major grant for UW-led research center to understand malaria in India
The National Institutes of Health has renewed a major grant that funds a University of Washington-led research center to understand malaria in India.
June 19, 2017
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NIH researchers identify key regulator of fetal growth in mice
Findings reveal new, developmental role for proteins that typically combat ancient viruses.
May 18, 2017
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NIH scientists advance understanding of herpesvirus infection
Protein complexes identified that control infection and reactivation.
April 12, 2017
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NIH scientists create Salmonella-infected mouse model to study life-threatening meningitis
National Institutes of Health (NIH) scientists have established in mice a way to study potentially life-threatening meningitis caused by Salmonella. Bacterial meningitis happens when bacteria infect the central nervous system (CNS), causing a serious disease that can be life-threatening and difficult to diagnose and treat. Patients who survive often have permanent brain damage.
December 9, 2016
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NIH study: Glutamine suppresses herpes in mice and guinea pigs
Results suggest possible new treatment approach.
June 16, 2017
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No microbes? No problem for caterpillars
Caterpillars have far less bacteria and fungi inhabiting their gut than other animals and the microbes that inside them seem to lack any identifiable role, aside from occasionally causing disease.
August 22, 2017
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Norovirus Closes Schools, Spreads Misery
Schools from Rhode Island to California have closed down for days this winter after students and teachers became ill with what is believed to be norovirus, public health officials say.
February 17, 2017
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Novel antibacterial wound cover could prevent thousands of infections each year
Researchers develop bacteria-fighting wound dressing made with the help of crustaceans
May 1, 2017
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Novel antibiotic resistance gene in milk
A new antibiotic resistance gene has been found in bacteria from dairy cows. this gene confers resistance to all beta-lactam antibiotics including the last generation of cephalosporins used against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. a transfer to S. aureus which is likely according to the researchers would jeopardize the use of reserve antibiotics to treat human infections caused by multidrug-resistant bacteria in hospitals.
April 26, 2017
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Novel antiviral drug can protect transplant patients against CMV infections
In a significant advance in improving the safety of donor stem cell transplants, a major clinical trial led by researchers at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women's Hospital has shown that a novel agent can protect against the most common viral infection that patients face after transplantation.
February 24, 2017
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Novel approach to seeing dengue infection in the body
Positron emission tomography (PET) paired with the glucose metabolism probe, fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), is considered 'old' technology in the field of cancer. A team found a new use for this 'old' technology in infectious diseases research. Using FDG-PET to image dengue infection in mice, the team has potentially uncovered a novel way to track the infection in real-time and more accurately assess the effectiveness of new dengue treatments.
June 6, 2017
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Novel nanofiber coating shows potential to prevent bacterial infections of orthopaedic prostheses
In a proof-of-concept study with mice, scientists at the Johns Hopkins University show that a novel coating they made with antibiotic-releasing nanofibers has the potential to better prevent at least some serious bacterial infections related to total joint replacement surgery.
October 22, 2016
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NTNU researcher uses big data to understand how immune system responds to viral attack
An enzyme found in many bacteria, including the bacterium that gives us strep throat, has given mankind a cheap and effective tool with which to edit our own genes. this technology, called CRISPR, is also being used to understand how the immune system responds to a viral attack.
January 30, 2017
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Nurses' 'Scrubs' Pick Up Bad Hospital Germs
Superbug MRSA, other disease-causing bacteria detected on uniforms in ICU
October 27, 2016
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NUS researchers uncover hidden vulnerabilities on surface of dengue virus
A team of researchers from the National University of Singapore (NUS) has uncovered hidden vulnerabilities on the surface of the dengue virus. this novel discovery means that scientists can now develop strategies to target these weak spots for treatment of dengue, and possibly other closely related diseases like Zika, influenza and chikungunya.
March 30, 2017
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Misc. - O

Ocular microbiome trains developing immune system to ward off pathogens, study shows
Bugs in your eyes may be a good thing. Resident microbes living on the eye are essential for immune responses that protect the eye from infection, new research shows. The study, which appears in the journal Immunity on July 11, demonstrates the existence of a resident ocular microbiome that trains the developing immune system to fend off pathogens.
July 11, 2017
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Omega-3 fatty acids weaken Listeria, study finds
Numerous studies have documented the potential health benefits of omega-3 fatty acids, which include a reduced risk of diabetes, obesity, asthma, and even heart disease. Now, researchers have found that omega-3 could also help to weaken the bacterium Listeria monocytogenes, which is responsible for the life-threatening infection listeriosis.
May 23, 2017
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Omega-3 may keep gut microbiota diverse and healthy
A new study published in the journal Scientific Reports finds that people who eat foods rich in omega-3 fatty acids have more bacterial diversity in the gut, which promotes better overall health.
September 12, 2017
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One-two punch may floor worst infections
Researchers find combo therapy stops antibiotic drug resistance
March 6, 2017
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Online epidemic tracking tool embraces open data and collective intelligence to understand outbreaks
Researchers have developed Microreact, a free, real-time epidemic visualisation and tracking platform that has been used to monitor outbreaks of Ebola, Zika and antibiotic-resistant microbes. the team has collaborated with the Microbiology Society to allow any researcher around the world to share their latest information about disease outbreaks.
November 30, 2016
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Only 52% of Patients with Most Common Infections Receive Recommended Antibiotics
Earlier this year, a study showed that nearly one-in-three antibiotics prescriptions in the U.S. aren't necessary, and a new analysis of available medical data claims that only half of the people who receive antibiotics for the most common types of infection are receiving the right kind of drug.
October 22, 2016
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Optical tractor beam traps bacteria
Up to now, if scientists wanted to study blood cells, algae, or bacteria under the microscope, they had to mount these cells on a substrate such as a glass slide. Physicists have now developed a method that traps biological cells with a laser beam enabling them to study them at very high resolutions.
December 13, 2016
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Optical tractor beam traps bacteria for nanoscopy
Up to now, if scientists wanted to study blood cells, algae, or bacteria under the microscope, they had to mount these cells on a substrate such as a glass slide. Physicists at Bielefeld and Frankfurt Universities have developed a method that traps biological cells with a laser beam enabling them to study them at very high resolutions. In science fiction books and films, the principle is known as the 'tractor beam'.
December 13, 2016
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Oral bacteria may help forensic scientists estimate time since death
Accurately determining the time since death is an important aspect of forensic sciences and casework.
August 1, 2017
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Our body contains more diverse microbes than previously known, new survey suggests
A new survey of DNA fragments circulating in human blood suggests our bodies contain vastly more diverse microbes than anyone previously understood. What's more, the overwhelming majority of those microbes have never been seen before, let alone classified and named.
August 23, 2017
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Our complicated relationship with viruses
Nearly 10 percent of the human genome is made of bits of virus DNA. for the most part, this viral DNA is not harmful. In some cases, scientists are finding, it actually has a beneficial impact.
November 28, 2016
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Overcoming the last line of antibiotic resistance against bacterial infections
How S. aureus cause infections: Implications for antibiotic resistance
August 21, 2017
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Oxford Nanoimaging Report on how a Desktop Microscope Delivering Single Molecule, Super-resolution Performance, is Being Applied at the MRC Centre for Molecular Bacteriology & Infection
Oxford Nanoimaging Limited manufacture and sell microscopes offering super-resolution and single-molecule performance to research users. Today, the company reports on the work of early-adopters for their Nanoimager technology at the MRC Centre for Molecular Bacteriology and Infection located at Imperial College, London.
November 22, 2016
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Misc. - P

Particle Physics Might Make Your Raw Milk Safer to Drink
There are a vocal minority of folks who simply don't want to drink pasteurized milk. Maybe they're worried about the nutritional content, or not getting the good bacteria they need. Sure, they're potentially subjecting themselves to tuberculosis or a Listeria infection, but it's still a vocal group.
June 14, 2017
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Passing the chemical Turing test: Making artificial and real cells talk
The classic Turing test evaluates a machine's ability to mimic human behavior and intelligence. to pass, a computer must fool the tester into thinking it is human -- typically through the use of questions and answers. But single-celled organisms can't communicate with words. now researchers have demonstrated that certain artificial cells can pass a basic laboratory Turing test by 'talking' chemically with living bacterial cells.
January 25, 2017
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Penn researchers shed new light on potential causes of premature birth
Depending on the specific type, bacteria in a woman's vagina and cervix may increase the risk of premature birth or protect against it, according to new research from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. Results of the study provide groundbreaking information that the authors suggest could help physicians learn how to prevent preterm birth, either by eliminating the "bad" bacteria, or increasing the "protective" bacteria.
January 27, 2017
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Penn State researchers develop novel compound to combat cytomegalovirus
A Retro94-based compound may prevent a common and sometimes fatal virus -- human cytomegalovirus (CMV) -- from reproducing and help to protect immunocompromised patients, such as those with HIV, on chemotherapy, with transplants, and infants from the effects of the disease, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers.
January 10, 2017
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Penn State researchers receive NIH funding to explore malaria transmission in Southeast Asia
Researchers at Penn State have received more than $1 million in first-year funding from the National Institutes of Health to investigate malaria transmission in Southeast Asia with a goal of working toward the disease's elimination in the region. they will receive up to approximately $9 million over seven years for this project.
April 24, 2017
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Penn study points to novel therapeutic strategy for preventing severe tooth decay in toddlers
Though most tooth decay can be blamed on bacteria, such as Streptococcus mutans, the fungus Candida albicans may be a joint culprit in an alarmingly common form of severe tooth decay affecting toddlers known as early childhood caries.
June 19, 2017
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People who feel lonely likely to report more severe symptoms from common cold, study shows
Suffering through a cold is annoying enough, but if you're lonely, you're likely to feel even worse, according to Rice University researchers.
March 30, 2017
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Peptides versus superbugs
Several peptides have an antibacterial effect - but they are broken down in the human body too quickly to exert this effect. Researchers have now succeeded in encasing peptides in a protective coat, which could prolong their life in the human body.
October 18, 2016
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Peptides versus superbugs
Several peptides have an antibacterial effect - but they are broken down in the human body too quickly to exert this effect. Researchers have now succeeded in encasing peptides in a protective coat, which could prolong their life in the human body.
October 18, 2016
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Peroxisomes identified as 'fighters' in the battle against bacterial infections
New study shows the organelle is required for the innate immune response to engulf, destroy bacteria
August 17, 2017
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Phage therapy shown to kill drug-resistant superbug
Phage therapy could offer a safe and effective alternative to antibiotics in the treatment of Cystic Fibrosis lung infections, researchers have demonstrated. Phages are viruses that kill bacteria but are otherwise harmless. a major advantage is that phages only target the harmful bacteria, so there are less side of the effects often associated with antibiotics.
March 13, 2017
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Phase 3 study shows safety, efficacy of Serum Institute's vaccine against severe rotavirus
Results from a Phase 3 efficacy study in India of the Serum Institute of India Pvt. Ltd.'s rotavirus vaccine BRV-PV (known as ROTASIIL®) were published in the journal Vaccine. The study showed the vaccine to be safe, well tolerated, and to provide significant efficacy against severe rotavirus gastroenteritis. In 2013, an estimated 47,100 rotavirus deaths occurred in India, 22 percent of all rotavirus deaths that occurred globally.
September 26, 2017
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Photosynthesis in the dark? Unraveling the mystery of algae evolution
Researchers compared the photosynthetic regulation in glaucophytes with that in cyanobacteria, to elucidate the changes caused by symbiosis in the interaction between photosynthetic electron transfer and other metabolic pathways. Their findings suggest that cyanelles of the glaucophyte Cyanophora paradoxa retain many of the characteristics observed in their ancestral bacteria, and that C. paradoxa is the primary symbiotic algae most similar to cyanobacteria than other lineages of photosynthetic organisms in terms of metabolic interactions.
April 24, 2017
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Plague bacteria take refuge in amoebae
Yersinia pestis, the bacterium that causes bubonic plague, can survive within the ubiquitous soil protozoan, the amoeba, by producing proteins that protect against the latter microbe's digestion, report scientists.
April 28, 2017
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Polyu Researchers Uncover New Hyper-Resistant, Hypervirulent superbug
The Partner State Key Laboratory of Chirosciences at the Department of Applied Biology and Chemical Technology (ABCT) of The Hong Kong Polytechnic University (PolyU) discovered a newly emerged superbug, hyper-resistant and hypervirulent Klebsiella pneumoniae, which may cause untreatable and fatal infections in relatively healthy individuals and will pose enormous threat to human health.
August 31, 2017
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Portable Antibiotic Resistance Detector Developed
Researchers at University of California, Los Angeles developed a smartphone attachment capable of identifying whether a sample of a given bacteria is resistant to a particular antibiotic. the technology may have great potential for use in areas susceptible to the spread of infectious diseases when expensive laboratory equipment is not available.
December 23, 2016
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Potentially lethal listeria bacteria can persist inside tissue of romaine lettuce, study shows
A Purdue University study shows that the bacteria Listeria monocytogenes can live inside the tissue of romaine lettuce, suggesting that conventional post-harvest sanitization practices might not be sufficient to kill the potentially lethal pathogen.
March 29, 2017
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Pre-treatment of bandages may improve the antibacterial properties of nanoparticles
Pre-treating the fabric surface of the bandages used to treat burns with enzymes and polyethylene glycol or cellulase may promote the adhesion of antibacterial nanoparticles and improve their bacteria-repelling ability.
October 18, 2016
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Predatory bacteria found in study of cystic fibrosis patients' lung microbiome
Cystic fibrosis patients have a wide variety of bacteria in their lungs, including two 'predators' not detected before, according to a new study.
September 26, 2017
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Probiotic bacteria can change intestinal flora of patients with colon cancer, study finds
"The probiotic strains used in this study are a promising positive factor for the continued development of treatments for colon cancer," confirms Yvonne Wettergren, Associate professor in Molecular Medicine at the Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy.
September 25, 2017
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Probiotics benefit in Schizophrenia shaped by yeast infections
In a small pilot study of men with schizophrenia, researchers say they have evidence that adding probiotics -- microorganisms, such as bacteria found in yogurts -- to the patients' diets may help treat yeast infections and ease bowel problems. Probiotics may also decrease delusions and hallucinations, but in the study, these psychiatric benefits mostly affected those without a history of yeast infections.
April 5, 2017
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Prebiotics may be new weapon in the fight against childhood obesity
There may soon be a new tool in the fight against childhood obesity. Prebiotics reduce body fat in children who are overweight or obese by altering their gut microbiota, according to new research published in Gastroenterology, the official journal of the American Gastroenterological Association (AGA).
June 7, 2017
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Probiotics may help treat yeast infections, bowel problems in men with schizophrenia
In a small pilot study of men with schizophrenia, researchers at Johns Hopkins Medicine and Sheppard Pratt Health System say they have evidence that adding probiotics -- microorganisms, such as bacteria found in yogurts -- to the patients' diets may help treat yeast infections and ease bowel problems. Probiotics may also decrease delusions and hallucinations, but in the study, these psychiatric benefits mostly affected those without a history of yeast infections.
April 5, 2017
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Prebiotics reduce body fat in overweight children
There may soon be a new tool in the fight against childhood obesity. Prebiotics reduce body fat in children who are overweight or obese by altering their gut microbiota, according to new research. Prebiotics are non-digestible food ingredients (such as fiber) that act as fertilizers to help stimulate the growth of good bacteria already in the gut, different from probiotics, which introduce new bacteria into the system.
June 7, 2017
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Preserved placenta is associated with risk of infection
A recent case study published by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention highlighted that capsules of dehydrated placenta prepared for human consumption can be a source of infectious agents.
June 30, 2017
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Previous bacterial infection increases risk of newly-diagnosed Sjogren's syndrome
Identifying trigger will hopefully help future development of targeted therapy for patients suffering from this debilitating disease
June 14, 2017
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Protein distribution channel may be new target for combating pathogenic bacterium
A bacterium that attacks people suffering from chronic lung disease and compromised immune systems could be halted by disrupting the distribution channels the organism uses to access the nutrient-rich cytoplasm of its host cell.
August 31, 2017
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Protein feed and bioplastic from farm biogas
A new solution has been developed for converting even small sources of methane-rich biogas into raw materials for animal feed or bioplastic on farms, landfills and wastewater treatment plants. this emission-reducing solution is based on the ability of methanotrophic bacteria to grow on methane in gas fermentors. Methane-rich biogas is generated on farms, landfills and wastewater treatment plants in anaerobic digestion of biological material. Until now, the processing of such gas into biomethane has only been viable on large biogas-producing sites; small biogas sources such as farms have remained largely unexploited.
November 17, 2016
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Protein that inhibits the development of autoimmune diseases discovered
The immune system protects humans from threats such as, for example, disease-causing bacteria, and cancer as well. Yet if the system malfunctions, it can attack the body it is supposed to defend and cause autoimmune diseases such as type one diabetes mellitus or multiple sclerosis. Scientists have now demonstrated that the membrane protein Caveolin-1 plays a key role in immune responses that trigger this type of disease.
August 15, 2017
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PSU research shows how viruses can undergo major mutations without losing ability to infect
Portland State University researchers have found that only about half the genes in a specific virus affecting single cell organisms is needed to infect a host. this means the virus can undergo major mutations without losing its ability to survive and infect.
March 23, 2017
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Misc. - Q

Quantum dots make the leap from TVs to antibacterial eye drops
Quantum dots are transforming electronic displays on TVs and tablets. But now, one group reports in ACS Nano that these tiny structures may someday provide relief for eye infections resulting from contact lens wear, trauma or some types of surgeries.
July 4, 2017
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Quick test finds signs of sepsis in a single drop of blood
A new portable device can quickly find markers of deadly, unpredictable sepsis infection from a single drop of blood.
July 3, 2017
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Misc. - R

Raindrops spew bacteria into the air as they burst–and it's kind of beautiful
Watch it for yourself
March 7, 2017
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Rampant use of antibacterial nanosilver is a resistance risk
Researchers at the University of Technology Sydney warn that the broad-spectrum antimicrobial effectiveness of silver is being put at risk by the widespread and inappropriate expansion of nanosilver use in medical and consumer goods.
March 31, 2017
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Rapid screening machine can read and separate protein sequences
The structural properties of proteins that could eventually become important materials for manufacturing and medicine are revealed by a novel optical technique that works rapidly to sort through amino acid sequences even inside living bacteria, according to a team of engineers.
April 18, 2017
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Recurring Gut Infections on the Rise: Study
Recurring Clostridium difficile intestinal infections are rising sharply in the United States, researchers warn.
July 7, 2017
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Reducing risk of gut bacterial infections with next-generation probiotic?
In laboratory-grown bacterial communities, the co-administration of probiotic Lactobacillus reuteri and glycerol selectively killed C. difficile.
August 9, 2017
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Regular dental visits may help prevent pneumonia, study shows
Good oral hygiene can reduce bad bacteria that cause the lung infection
October 27, 2016
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Remembrance of things past - bacterial memory of gut inflammation
The microbiome, or the collections of microorganisms present in the body, is known to affect human health and disease and researchers are thinking about new ways to use them as next-generation diagnostics and therapeutics.
May 29, 2017
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Remembrance of things past: Bacterial memory of gut inflammation
Stable engineered bacteria that retain long-term memory of gut inflammation could be used as living diagnostics for chronic intestinal diseases and other conditions
May 29, 2017
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Replacing missing gut bacteria could help treat children with rare autoimmune disease
Defects in the body's regulatory T cells (T reg cells) cause inflammation and autoimmune disease by altering the type of bacteria living in the gut, researchers from the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston have discovered.
December 19, 2016
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Research could lead to better vaccines and new antivirals
Scientists have identified a new regulator of the innate immune response–the immediate, natural immune response to foreign invaders. the study suggests that therapeutics that modulate the regulator–an immune checkpoint–may represent the next generation of antiviral drugs, vaccine adjuvants, cancer immunotherapies, and treatments for autoimmune disease.
February 27, 2017
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Research finding could pave way for novel compounds to tackle bacterial resistance
Bacteria or 'superbugs' that have adapted to resist multiple antibiotics are responsible for around 700,000 deaths globally a year; new types of antibiotics are urgently needed.
July 18, 2017
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Research in worms provides a model to study how the human microbiome influences disease
The interaction between bacteria and worms can be used to understand host-microbiome signals in humans that contribute to diseases such as type 2 Diabetes and obesity
December 16, 2016
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Research may provide solutions for the future treatment of diabetes
A new therapy to treat the effects of Diabetes could reside in feces from resveratrol-fed donors
March 9, 2017
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Research networks focus on investigating spread of antimicrobial resistance in humans, animals
"Antimicrobial-resistant bacteria pose a complex challenge. this is why Germany, with its German Antimicrobial Resistance Strategy DART2020, is making sustained efforts to protect the health of humans and animals", says BfR President Professor Dr. Dr. Andreas Hensel. "In the spirit of the One Health strategy, this calls for interdisciplinary research by veterinarians and experts in human medicine as well as molecular biologists and epidemiologists, as successfully demonstrated by the RESET and MedVet-Staph network projects."
May 12, 2017
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Research provides clues to how infectious bacteria may increase risk of cancer
Gastric carcinoma is one of the most common causes of cancer-related deaths, primarily because most patients present at an advanced stage of the disease. The main cause of this cancer is the bacterium Helicobacter pylori, which chronically infects around half of all humans. However, unlike tumor viruses, bacteria do not deposit transforming genes in their host cells and how they are able to cause cancer has so far remained a mystery.
August 17, 2017
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Research provides new insight into how coevolution could shape microbial diversity in human gut
What drives bacterial strain diversity in the gut? Although there are a number of possible explanations, a recent opinion piece published in TRends in Microbiology by Dr Pauline Scanlan, a Royal Society - Science Foundation Ireland Research Fellow at the APC Microbiome Institute, University College Cork, addresses one potentially important and overlooked aspect of this unresolved question.
March 28, 2017
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Research provides novel insights into bacterial toxins
A toxin produced by a bacterium that causes urinary tract infections is related to, yet different in key ways from, the toxin that causes whooping cough, according to new research.
September 5, 2017
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Research reveals how bacteria may use mechanical cues to keep their shape
Bacteria come in all shapes and sizes -- some are straight as a rod, others twist like a corkscrew. Shape plays an important role in how bacteria infiltrate and attack cells in the body. The helical shape of Helicobacter pylori, a species of bacteria which can cause ulcers, may help it penetrate tissues.
July 26, 2017
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Research sheds new light on how dengue virus inflicts more damage during subsequent infections
For most people who contract it, dengue fever is a relatively mild-mannered disease--at least the first time around. for some, however, a subsequent infection by the virus unleashes a vicious and potentially deadly illness.
January 31, 2017
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Research spotlights early signs of disease using infrared light: new research
Nano-medicine could herald fast, easy way to spot early signs of infection, cancer, and difficult to diagnose neurological conditions
March 21, 2017
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Researcher creates molecular diagnostic system that can quickly identify dangerous bacteria
A Michigan State University researcher has developed a faster way to detect the bacteria causing patients to become sick, giving physicians a better chance at saving their lives.
February 3, 2017
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Researchers aim to develop dynamic therapeutics for combating antiviral drug resistance
Antiviral drug resistance has long been a problem in modern society. As viruses evolve, they develop resistance to antiviral drugs, which become less effective at treating diseases such as influenza.
August 23, 2017
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Researchers awarded NIAID grant to develop new tools for eliminating drug-resistant malaria
The University of Maryland School of Medicine has been awarded a $9 million seven-year grant by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) to develop new tools to help eliminate drug-resistant malaria in Southeast Asia and other regions where the disease is common.
April 21, 2017
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Researchers break through the wall in bacterial membrane vesicle research
Many bacteria release membrane vesicles, which are nanoscale spheres consisting of a cellular membrane containing various biomolecules. Membrane vesicles can transport DNA and proteins, and are involved in bacterial interactions. They have potential applications in nanotechnology and biomedicine; e.g., in cancer treatment.
September 12, 2017
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Researchers combat antimicrobial resistance using smartphones
A team of UCLA researchers has developed an automated diagnostic test reader for antimicrobial resistance using a smartphone. the technology could lead to routine testing for antimicrobial susceptibility in areas with limited resources.
December 14, 2016
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Researchers connect brain blood vessel lesions to intestinal bacteria
NIH-funded pre-clinical study links gut microbes and the immune system to a genetic disorder that can cause stroke and seizures.
May 18, 2017
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Researchers create a tiny tractor beam that totes bacteria around
One of the problems with imaging living biological cells is that they don't want to be held still. Or, more accurately, they don't want to be held to a surface like a microscope slide. Prepping and fixing the cells changes them irrevocably, altering whatever a scientist was trying to observe.
December 14, 2016
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Researchers develop new compound to fight cytomegalovirus
A Retro94-based compound may prevent a common and sometimes fatal virus -- human cytomegalovirus (CMV) -- from reproducing and help to protect immunocompromised patients, such as those with HIV, on chemotherapy, with transplants, and infants from the effects of the disease, according to researchers.
January 10, 2017
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Researchers discover biological link between gut bacteria metabolism and obesity
Cleveland Clinic researchers have uncovered a biological link between gut bacteria metabolism and obesity. The team showed that blocking a specific intestinal microbial pathway can prevent obesity and insulin resistance, as well as cause fat tissue to become more metabolically active.
June 30, 2017
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Researchers discover new class of compounds that inhibit bacterial DNA gyrase
An international team of scientists have discovered a new class of compounds that inhibit bacterial DNA gyrase.
June 1, 2017
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Researchers discover new defense mechanism against bacteria during wound healing
Researchers in dermatology at Lund University in Sweden believe they have cracked the mystery of why we are able to quickly prevent an infection from spreading uncontrollably in the body during wounding. they believe this knowledge may be of clinical significance for developing new ways to counteract bacteria.
May 5, 2017
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Researchers discover new, abundant enzyme that helps bacteria infect animals
A new class of enzymes has been discovered in hundreds of bacterial species, including some that cause disease in humans and animals. The discovery provides new insights into how bacteria invade their hosts.
September 12, 2017
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Researchers discover unique microbial photosynthesis
Researchers at Washington State University have discovered a new type of cooperative photosynthesis that could be used in engineering microbial communities for waste treatment and bioenergy production.
January 9, 2017
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Researchers engineer promising live-attenuated RSV vaccine candidate
Crafting a vaccine against RSV (respiratory syncytial virus) has been a minefield for 50 years, but scientists believe they have found the right balance.
December 21, 2016
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Researchers estimate time since death using necrobiome
Currently, when a deceased human is discovered, the forensic techniques for estimating time elapsed since death are not very precise. However, in a new study, researchers have turned to analyzing the human microbiome, the bacteria and other microbes that live on and in our bodies, for clues about the postmortem interval of a cadaver.
December 22, 2016
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Researchers explore how C-section, formula feeding, and antibiotics alter infant's gut microbiome
A new analytical approach, described in open-access journal Frontiers in Pediatrics, shows how different interventions - cesarean section, formula feeding, and antibiotics - can alter an infant's developing gut microbiome.
September 26, 2017
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Researchers explore how E. coli survives in the presence of effective predatory bacteria
The majority of disease-causing bacteria in the body are rendered harmless by the protective effects of the immune system. Those that manage to escape the immune system can be killed by antibiotics, but bacteria are becoming more and more resistant to more and more antibiotics.
February 22, 2016
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Researchers explore if deep-sea sponges could be new source of potential antimicrobials
Marine sponges and the deep-sea ecosystem are comparatively under-studied and under-exploited compared with life in shallower waters - but a team of scientists from the University of Plymouth are identifying and developing potential new antimicrobials produced by the microbiome of sponges which live deep beneath the ocean surface.
August 17, 2017
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Researchers find bacterial protein that boosts insulin-producing cells in zebrafish
A newly discovered bacterial protein produced in the zebrafish gut triggers insulin-producing beta cells of the pancreas to multiply during early larval development, say researchers. the research potentially has human health implications. the findings, which could someday lead to new Diabetes treatments, highlight the important role of resident microbes in development of the pancreas,
December 13, 2016
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Researchers find molecular switch that triggers bacterial pathogenicity
DNA-binding proteins could provide new target for development of drugs to prevent or treat bacterial infection
July 29, 2016
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Researchers gain new understanding of how neutrophils latch onto vessel walls to protect from infection, clean up injured tissue
Study reveals an unexpected trick used by cells to curb an inflammatory response
August 31, 2016
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Researchers get closer to creating new blood test that can identify breast cancer brain metastasis
Houston Methodist cancer researchers are now closer to creating a blood test that can identify breast cancer patients who are at increased risk for developing brain metastasis, and also monitor disease progression and response to therapy in real time.
August 17, 2017
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Researchers highlight need to ensure universal access to old antibiotics
Antibiotics used to treat a variety of common bacterial infections are becoming more difficult to access, mostly because the drugs are less profitable for manufacturers to produce and market.
May 15, 2017
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Researchers identify changes in lung cells following infections
Discovery may lead to new strategies for treating pneumonia
May 17, 2017
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Researchers identify key hormone critical for preventing spread of bacterial pneumonia
Researchers have found that a hormone responsible for controlling iron metabolism helps fight off a severe form of bacterial pneumonia, and that discovery may offer a simple way to help vulnerable patients.
March 28, 2017
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Researchers identify multidrug-resistant E. coli bacteria from new Jersey patient
New Jersey researchers have identified what is believed to be the first strain of Escherichia coli bacteria from a patient in the United States that harbored two mobile genes making it resistant to both broad spectrum carbapenem antibiotics as well as colistin, an older antibiotic increasingly used as a last resort for multidrug-resistant infections.
August 30, 2016
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Researchers identify new antibiotic resistance gene in bacteria from dairy cows
Researchers of the University of Bern have identified a new antibiotic resistance gene in bacteria from dairy cows. this gene confers resistance to all beta-lactam antibiotics including the last generation of cephalosporins used against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. a transfer to S. aureus which is likely according to the researchers would jeopardize the use of reserve antibiotics to treat human infections caused by multidrug-resistant bacteria in hospitals.
April 26, 2017
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Researchers identify new way to prevent pneumococci from entering the brain
An international team of researchers, led from Karolinska Institutet, has identified two receptors on the cells in the blood vessels of the brain that can be blocked and thereby prevent pneumococci from entering the brain. The study, which is published in The Journal of Experimental Medicine, shows that the use of antibodies that block the receptors can potentially be used as a new therapeutic strategy for pneumococcal meningitis.
May 17, 2017
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Researchers identify role of blood-filtering organs in fighting against viral infections
New information about how and where the innate immune system fights off viral infections that enter through the skin could lead to better treatments for viruses like Zika, dengue and measles, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers. The innate immune system is the body's first line of defense, providing broad protection as opposed to the specific immune system which targets the specific threat.
August 17, 2017
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Researchers show how common bacterium in improperly cooked chicken triggers GBS
A Michigan State University research team is the first to show how a common bacterium found in improperly cooked chicken causes Guillain-Barre Syndrome, or GBS.
December 9, 2016
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Researchers show how spinal cord injury causes profound changes in gut microbiota
The community of bacteria that live in our intestines, also called the "gut microbiome," is important to normal intestinal function. Knowing that spinal cord injuries often negatively affect the gut's ability to do its job, researchers at the Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center showed that spinal cord injury causes profound changes in the gut microbiota.
October 18, 2016
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Researchers tweak enzyme 'assembly line' to improve antibiotics
Researchers from North Carolina State University have discovered a way to make pinpoint changes to an enzyme-driven "assembly line" that will enable scientists to improve or change the properties of existing antibiotics as well as create designer compounds. the work is the first to efficiently manipulate which building blocks the enzyme selects in the act of synthesizing erythromycin, an important antibiotic.
November 29, 2016
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Researchers uncover evidence linking mental health disorders and disturbances to gut microbiome
Better understanding the gastrointestinal microbiome may help psychiatrists treat mental health disorders such as depression, highlights a review in Frontiers in Psychiatry.
August 23, 2017
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Researchers uncover global regulator that 'switches on' silent biosynthetic gene clusters
Bacteria have supplied some of today's most indispensable anti-cancer and anti-bacterial drugs. Yet these compounds comprise only a fraction of their possible offerings. Now, researchers have found a way to unleash their full potential as natural product dispensers.
April 13, 2017
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Researchers use mathematical models to explain how bacteria, cancer cells exploit bet-hedging
Modern medicine and treatments for bacterial infections and cancer have significantly increased life spans and improved quality-of-life. However, many drugs eventually fail because of the outgrowth and survival of treatment-resistant populations. a collaborative team of researchers from Moffitt Cancer Center's Integrated Mathematical Oncology (IMO) Program, led by Alexander Anderson, Ph.D., and Oxford University's Department of Computer Science are using mathematical models to explain how bacteria and cancer cells exploit an evolutionary process known as bet-hedging to resist medical intervention.
December 22, 2016
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Researchers' findings offer clue on how to block biofilm shields of bacterial infections
Fatty acids known as oxylipins play a critical role in the formation of the biofilm shield that protects disease-causing bacteria from antibiotics, research reveals for the first time.
December 12, 2016
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Resistance to 'Last Resort' Antibiotics Being Spread to Humans by Flies
The agricultural industry has long been considered an enemy of humanity when it comes to recklessly pumping antibiotics into animals. In further evidence that this practice is fueling a public health crisis, a new study has found a disconcerting trend at Chinese farms: flies are spreading the gene that gives bacteria resistance to our strongest antibiotics, and it's showing up in hospitalized humans.
February 6, 2017
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Respiratory syncytial virus vaccine enters clinical testing
NIH-led trial to evaluate RSV vaccine's safety in healthy adults.
February 22, 2017
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Resurrecting an extinct relative of smallpox could pave the way for better vaccines
Or biowarfare
July 7, 2017
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Rise in antibiotic-resistant gonorrhea, WHO report reveals
Reports from WHO, based on the data collected from 77 countries, reveals that antibiotic resistance of gonorrhea, a common sexually transmitted infection is making the disease much harder and at times impossible to treat.
July 7, 2017
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Routinely prescribed antibiotic may not be best for treating severe C. diff infections
Over the past two decades there has been a sharp rise in the number and severity of infections caused by the bacteria Clostridium difficile. Scientists report that patients with a severe C. diff infection (CDI) were less likely to die when treated with the antibiotic vancomycin compared to the standard treatment of metronidazole.
February 6, 2017
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Misc. - S

Sabotaging bacteria propellers to stop infections
When looking at bacteria, you typically see also flagella: long hairs that protrudes from the bacteria's body. the key function of the flagella is movement -- what scientists call 'motility'. the flagella give the bacteria the ability to swim in their environment by rotating like propellers. Bacteria can have a different number of flagella, and flagella are important because there is a clear correlation between motility and infection.
August 30, 2016
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Sabotaging bacteria propellers to stop infections
Researchers discovered how to stop bacteria motility and thus how to disrupt bacterial infections.
August 31, 2016
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Salford scientists may have found simple way for designing new antibiotics
CANCER researchers in the UK may have stumbled across a solution to reverse antibiotic drug resistance and stop infections like MRSA.
July 12, 2017
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Salicylic acid, a widespread ingredient in pain relief medications, promotes nasal mucosa colonization
An international research team has now shown that this multifaceted compound can also have an unpleasant side effect. Salicylic acid forms complexes with iron and lab tests showed that the iron limitation strongly promotes formation of biofilms by Staphylococcus aureus. this allows the bacteria to survive and persist in our respiratory tract for longer periods of time which eventually trigger life-threatening infections in immunocompromised persons.
February 3, 2017
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San Francisco has a crazy plan to fight pee stink with bacteria-eating enzymes
Urine trouble
September 2, 2016
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Scientific team describes a new molecular mechanism to fight bacterial infections
A new antibacterial mechanism has been identified that protects macrophages -- defense cells in the immune system -- from the infection of the bacteria Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, a pathogen associated with several gastrointestinal diseases. this discovery, carried out with mice, could open new exploration channels for pharmacological treatments of some bacterial infections.
February 2, 2017
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Scientists aim to combat antibiotic-resistant infections by harnessing synthetic mucus
Researchers are pursuing an innovative and unexpected new avenue in the quest to fight antibiotic resistance: synthetic mucus. by studying and replicating mucus' natural ability to control pathogenic bacteria, the scientists hope to find new methods for combating infections.
April 26, 2017
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Scientists Are Creating a Genetic Chainsaw to Hack Superbug DNA to Bits
When folks talk about the gene-editing tool CRISPR, they're usually talking about CRISPR-Cas9, a combination of DNA and enzymes that together act like scissors to cut and paste genes. CRISPR-Cas9 has already been hailed a potential game changer in the fight against cancer, crop pathogens, and environmental problems.
February 24, 2017
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Scientists are spelunking for cave gunk to fight superbugs
Deep in caverns around the world, bacteria are laboring to make antibiotics we can discover and use for ourselves.
May 22, 2017
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Scientists build bacteria-powered battery on a single sheet of paper
Researchers have created a bacteria-powered battery on a single sheet of paper that can power disposable electronics. the manufacturing technique reduces fabrication time and cost, and the design could revolutionize the use of bio-batteries as a power source in remote, dangerous and resource-limited areas.
December 21, 2016
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Scientists build bacteria-powered battery on a single sheet of paper
Instead of ordering batteries by the pack, we might get them by the ream in the future.
December 21, 2016
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Scientists Create Dengue-Resistant Mosquitoes
Hope is to eventually make the bugs fend off multiple infections, including Zika
January 12, 2017
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Scientists create new technique for studying how chlamydia interacts with immune system
Scientists at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute and their collaborators at the University of British Columbia have created an innovative technique for studying how chlamydia interacts with the human immune system.
April 25, 2017
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Scientists decipher mechanism of CA-MRSA that plays role in development of skin infections
Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most feared, multi-resistant pathogens. the bacterium often causes life-threatening infections, particularly in people with a weakened immune system. During the last few years, especially aggressive strains of S. aureus have appeared around the globe, known as so-called "Community-Associated Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus" or CA-MRSA, and they can even trigger serious infections in the skin and tissue of healthy people.
January 24, 2017
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Scientists develop new technique to study longevity of airborne viruses
Cover your mouth when sneezing or coughing and wash your hands. Queensland University of Technology (QUT) and The University of Queensland (UQ) scientists have developed a new technique to study how some common disease-causing bacteria can spread up to 4m and remain alive in the air for up to 45 minutes.
June 19, 2017
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Scientists develop infection model for tick-borne flaviviruses
National Institutes of Health scientists have filled a research gap by developing a laboratory model to study ticks that transmit flaviviruses, such as Powassan virus. Powassan virus was implicated in the death of a New York man earlier this year. The unusual model involves culturing organs taken from Ixodes scapularis ticks and then infecting those organ cultures with flaviviruses, according to researchers at Rocky Mountain Laboratories, part of NIH's National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID).
August 22, 2017
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Scientists discover how essential methane catalyst is made
New ways to convert carbon dioxide (CO2) into methane gas for energy use are a step closer after scientists discovered how bacteria make a component that facilitates the process. Recycling CO2 into energy has immense potential for making these emissions useful rather than a major factor in global warming.
February 22, 2017
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Scientists discover new approach for antifungal drug treatments
Each year, invasive fungal infections sicken an estimated 2 million people worldwide and kill nearly 800,000 - but a team of international scientists have discovered a new approach for antifungal drug treatments.
June 15, 2017
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Scientists discover new structures in bacteria, seek to determine function
Using high magnification imaging, a team of researchers has identified several never before seen structures in bacteria that represent molecular machinery.
June 13, 2017
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Scientists engineer baker's yeast to produce penicillin molecules
The synthetic biologists from Imperial College London have re-engineered yeast cells to manufacture the nonribosomal peptide antibiotic penicillin. In laboratory experiments, they were able to demonstrate that this yeast had antibacterial properties against streptococcus bacteria.
May 4, 2017
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Scientists engineer baker's yeast to produce penicillin molecules
Scientists have inserted fungus genes into a yeast cell to make it produce penicillin molecules
May 4, 2017
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Scientists enlist engineered protein to battle the MERS virus
In June 2012, a 60 year-old man with flu-like symptoms walked into a private hospital in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. Two weeks later, he died from multiple organ failure, becoming the first victim of a mysterious virus that came to be known as Middle East Respiratory Syndrome or MERS.
May 19, 2017
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Scientists find molecular 'key' to killing hearty bacteria
Even a small scrape or cut could lead to a life-threatening infection before antibiotics, but these compounds have been getting less effective as bacteria evolve to combat the threat. the search for new drugs has been slow, though now there may be a way to modify existing drugs to be effective against some of the most hearty bacterial cells.
May 11, 2017
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Scientists find new clues to how RSV causes disease
By age 2, most children have been infected with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), which usually causes only mild cold symptoms. But people with weakened immune systems, such as infants and the elderly, can face serious complications, including pneumonia and -- in some cases -- death.
June 30, 2017
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Scientists have inserted a GIF of a horse into living bacteria -- did your brain just explode?
In a new study published in Nature, a group of scientists at Harvard have successfully stored a GIF-- yes, like a moving meme -- into live bacteria (E. coli to be specific).
July 12, 2017
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Scientists join together to tackle increasing resistance to antibiotic treatments
A team of scientists are to pool their expertise to tackle one of the biggest health challenges facing society - the ability of common infections to resist drug treatment.
July 26, 2017
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Scientists identify a new way gut bacteria break down complex sugars
New light has been shed on the functioning of human gut bacteria which could help to develop medicines in the future to improve health and well-being.
March 22, 2017
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Scientists identify novel technique to build better vaccine adjuvants
A new study demonstrates a novel technique for building better vaccines for infectious diseases. the study shows that a practical method, bacterial enzymatic combinatorial chemistry (BECC), can be used to generate functionally diverse molecules that can potentially be used as adjuvants
May 10, 2017
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Scientists illuminate structures vital to virus replication
In the fight against the viruses that invade everyday life, seeing and understanding the battleground is essential. Scientists at the Morgridge Institute for Research at the University of Wisconsin-Madison have, for the first time, imaged molecular structures vital to how a major class of viruses replicates within infected cells.
June 27, 2017
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Scientists invent new tool for the synthetic biologist's toolbox
Researchers at the University of California San Diego have invented a new method for controlling gene expression across bacterial colonies. The method involves engineering dynamic DNA copy number changes in a synchronized fashion.
July 10, 2017
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Scientists move closer towards simpler, accurate detection of bacterial contaminants in food and water
Food poisoning is a scourge. Yet preventing it is far from foolproof. But in a new study in Analytical Chemistry, scientists report that they are closing in on a way to use a combination of color-changing paper and electrochemical analysis -- on plastic transparency sheets or simple paper -- to quickly, cheaply and more accurately detect bacterial contamination of fruits and vegetables in the field before they reach grocery stores, restaurants and household pantries.
March 8, 2017
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Scientists pave way for new generation of superbug drugs
Scientists are getting closer to solving the problem of antibiotic resistance. new research reveals the mechanism by which drug-resistant bacterial cells maintain a defensive barrier. the findings pave the way for a new wave of drugs that kill superbugs by bringing down their defensive walls rather than attacking the bacteria itself.
February 22, 2016
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Scientists reveal existence of alternative bacterial quorum-sensing mechanism
Whether growing in a puddle of dirty water or inside the human body, large groups of bacteria must coordinate their behavior to perform essential tasks that they would not be able to carry out individually. Bacteria achieve this coordination through a process called quorum sensing in which the microorganisms produce and secrete small molecules called autoinducers that can be detected by neighboring bacterial cells. Only when a large number of bacteria are present can the levels of secreted autoinducer build up to the point where the community can detect them and respond as a coordinated group.
August 21, 2017
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Scientists reveal hidden structures in bacterial DNA
Researchers have described the 3D structure of the genome in the extremely small bacteria Mycoplasma pneumoniae. they discovered previously unknown arrangements of DNA within this tiny bacteria, which are also found in larger cells. Their findings suggest that this type of organization is a universal feature of living cells.
March 23, 2017
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Scientists shed light on evolutionary arms race between CMV and immune system
Imaging CoE scientists have solved a 40-year old mystery and shed light on an evolutionary arms race played out between cytomegalovirus (CMV) and the immune system.
April 10, 2017
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Scientists show how immune system can be modulated by manipulation of sugar metabolism
In its attempt to fight a serious bacterial infection, caused by listeria, for example, the immune system can become so over-activated that the resulting inflammatory response and its consequences can quickly lead to death. Scientists from the Medical University of Vienna and Max F. Perutz Laboratories of MedUni Vienna and the University of Vienna, supervised by Gerhard Zlabinger from the Institute of Immunology, have now demonstrated in an animal model that such an excessive response by the immune system can be modulated by targeted manipulation of the sugar metabolism to produce an immune response that efficiently eliminates the pathogens without causing any harmful secondary reactions.
August 21, 2017
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Scientists solve 30-year old mystery on how resistance genes spread
For more than 30 years, scientists have proposed that resistance genes actually originate from the microorganisms producing the antibiotic. Now, research shows for the very first time that antibiotic resistance genes originate from the same place as the antibiotic compounds, i.e. from a group of soil bacteria called Actinobacteria.
June 16, 2017
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Scientists spy on the secret inner life of bacteria
New images uncover mysterious structures inside microbes, including mini towers, fishhooks, train tracks and horseshoes
June 22, 2017
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Scientists step closer to developing new drug in fight against antimicrobial resistance
Scientists have for the first time determined the molecular structure of a new antibiotic which could hold the key to tackling drug resistant bacteria.
January 31, 2017
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Scientists take steps to inhibit impact of E. coli on human health
By understanding the functional differences between proteins expressed by two E. coli strains, researchers at Kansas State University are exploring new opportunities to inhibit their impacts to human health.
August 8, 2017
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Scientists unlock secrets of indestructible virus to create super-durable materials
It's like the Superman of viruses, astonishingly tough and able to survive in an environment that would dissolve flesh and bone. And now scientists have unlocked the secrets of its indestructibility, potentially allowing them to harness its remarkable properties to create super-durable materials and better treat disease.
July 19, 2017
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Scientists want to turn our gut bacteria into medicine
Bugs not drugs.
August 31, 2017
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Secret code language of bacteria revealed
Antibiotic resistance in pathogenic bacteria is a growing global challenge. Researchers have now discovered that bacteria use a code language to avoid being controlled. Understanding this code language will be paramount to developing new antibiotics in the future.
December 21, 2016
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See how bacterial blood infections in young kids plummeted after vaccines
To celebrate birthdays, my 2- and 4-year-old party animals got vaccinated. Measles, mumps, rubella, chicken pox, diphtheria, tetanus and whooping cough for the older one (thankfully combined into just two shots), and hepatitis a for the younger.
March 15, 2017
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Selectively killing bacteria with magnetic nanoparticles
Based on previous investigations of nanoparticles as effective antibacterial coating ingredients, scientists at Clemson University hypothesized that multianchored magnetic nanoparticles conjugated with sialic-acid moieties that mimic host-cell receptors specific for Escherichia coli strain K99 (EC K99) adhesins would induce rapid clustering of EC K99 in the presence of these nanoparticles, and when such bacteria-nanoparticles aggregates are exposed to an alternating magnetic field (AMF), it would result in enhanced and selective inactivation/killing of EC K99.
July 11, 2017
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Semiconductor-laced bunny eyedrops appear to nuke infections
Quantum dots show promise for fighting bacterial keratitis
July 7, 2017
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Silver Nanoparticle Coating and Tiny Electric Current Prevent Bacteria from Settling on Medical Devices
Silver ions and electric current are well known killers of bacteria that have been utilized to keep things clean in different scenarios for many years. Yet, their use is limited to only certain applications as a fairly high current or potentially toxic concentration of silver ions are needed to destroy bacterial buildup.
August 16, 2017
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Simple method measures how long bacteria can wait out antibiotics
The efficient classification of bacterial strains as tolerant, resistant, or persistent could help to guide treatment decisions, and could ultimately reduce the ever-growing risk of resistance
June 21, 2017
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Simple probiotics can decrease stress-related behavior and anxiety
Probiotics, or beneficial live bacteria that are introduced into the body, have become increasingly popular as a way to improve health and well-being. Previous studies have shown a direct correlation between gut microbes and the central nervous system.
November 21, 2016
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Simple steps can improve survival of sepsis patients
Sepsis, commonly called blood poisoning, is a common affliction that can affect people of all ages. a series of simple measures tested at a Norwegian hospital can make a difference in successfully treating sepsis.
August 31, 2016
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Single strep bacteria protein sets off white blood cell's early warning system
Finding that went unnoticed for almost a century could have implications for vaccine design and treatment of toxic shock syndrome
August 7, 2017
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Sleep loss tied to changes of the gut microbiota in humans
Curtailing sleep alters the abundance of bacterial gut species that have previously been linked to compromised human metabolic health, results from a new clinical study suggests.
October 25, 2016
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Slingshot to shoot drugs onto the site of an infection
Chemists specializing in nanotechnology create a molecular slingshot that could shoot drugs at precise locations in the human body once triggered by specific disease markers.
May 8, 2017
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'Smart' bacteria remodel their genes to infect our intestines
Researchers have described how infectious bacteria can sense they're attached to our intestinal cells, and then remodel their expression of specific genes, including those involved in virulence and metabolism, to exploit our cells and colonize our gut.
February 22, 2017
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Smart Polymer Changes Color and Activates Natural Antimicrobial Enzymes When Bacterial Contamination is Detected
Antibiotic-resistant bacteria that colonize medical equipment and surfaces are causing shocking annual rises in the number of patients becoming infected in clinics and hospitals. Efforts to reduce these numbers are now carried out by a KAUST team through the usage of a smart polymer capable of changing color and activating natural antimicrobial enzymes when bacterial contamination is identified.
July 10, 2017
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Smartphone screen technology used to trick harmful bacteria
Conducting plastics found in smartphone screens can be used to trick the metabolism of pathogenic bacteria, report scientists. By adding or removing electrons from the plastic surface, bacteria may be tricked into growing more or less. The method may find widespread use in preventing bacterial infections in hospitals or improve effectiveness in wastewater management.
September 12, 2017
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Soil bacteria helps protect rice plants from arsenic and fungus
'Cocktail' of soil bacteria can protect rice plants from deadly forces
November 18, 2016
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Some hog workers developing drug-resistant skin infections linked to livestock-associated staph
Some workers at industrial hog production facilities are not only carrying livestock-associated, antibiotic-resistant bacteria in their noses, but may also be developing skin infections from these bacteria, new research suggests.
November 16, 2016
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South Texas fights tuberculosis one blood test at a time
Like most people at Haven for Hope, San Antonio's largest homeless shelter, James Harrison doesn't plan on staying long. "I lost my apartment and had nowhere else to go," he explained.
August 8, 2017
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Sponge bacterium found to encapsulate arsenic drawn from environment
Entotheonella sequesters and neutralizes toxins within sponge host, say Tel Aviv University researchers
February 27, 2017
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Spotting the vaccine-preventable diseases that are back in the waiting room
From rashes to puffy cheeks and persistent coughs, infectious diseases are a complex, everyday threat to human health. the introduction of vaccines was a revolutionary step in combating epidemic viruses and bacteria. However, during an age in which herd immunity is slipping and multidrug-resistant pathogens are on the rise, spotting infectious diseases can feel similar to detective work for many primary care physicians.
April 17, 2017
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St. Kitts launches probe of herpes vaccine tests on U.S. patients
The government of St. Kitts and Nevis has launched an investigation into the clinical trial for a herpes vaccine by an American company because it said its officials were not notified about the experiments.
August 31, 2017
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Staph uses nitric oxide enzyme to colonize noses
Finding suggests novel strategy for preventing S. aureus infections, including MRSA
November 28, 2016
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STDs are becoming more difficult to treat due to antibiotic resistance, warns WHO
The WHO has issued new guidelines for the treatment of three common sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) due to concerns about increasing levels of antibiotic resistance.
September 2, 2016
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Steroid Pills Often Fail Against Bronchitis
Research shows that, like antibiotics, these drugs won't reduce duration or severity of symptoms
August 23, 2017
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StopGerms.org
the ultimately resource to guide you to creating and maintaining a healthy home.
Provides Information
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Strange behavior in the crowded cellular environment
The powerful K computer has been used to show how molecules move within the extremely crowded interior of a bacterial cell.
November 1, 2016
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Structures, mechanisms that enable bacteria to resist antibiotics
Scientists have spent years studying the structures and mechanisms bacteria use to resist antibiotics. Researchers can now describe the efflux pumps and transporters that certain disease-causing bacteria use to keep antibiotics away.
August 1, 2017
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Study finds amoeba 'grazing,' killing bacteria usually protected by film
A professor of bacteriology has shown the first proof that a certain group of amoeba called dictyostelids can penetrate biofilms and eat the bacteria within.
April 18, 2017
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Study finds ethylene release in exhaled breath as early biomarker of bacterial infection
Although ethylene (or ethene) is best known as a plant hormone, humans also produce it as consequence of oxidative stress, caused for example by the UV radiation from the sun. An international team led by Simona Cristescu from Radboud University found that ethylene is produced during inflammation and quickly released in exhaled breath as a biomarker of bacterial infection, thus having important clinical implications.
August 23, 2017
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Study finds high rates of drug resistance to urinary tract infections in Bangladesh
Researchers caution healthcare professionals not to prescribe drugs without lab tests
August 3, 2017
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Study finds increasing susceptibility of Staphylococcus aureus in U.S. hospital patients
Findings from a study that looked at susceptibility trends of Staphylococcus aureus in U.S. hospital patients showed that key antibiotics used to treat the bacteria became more active over the course of the study, a rare occurrence. Researchers at JMI Laboratories evaluated susceptibility trends of antibiotics from 2009 to 2015 by testing clinical isolates from medical centers across the U.S. The research is presented on June 4th at the ASM Microbe conference in New Orleans, Louisiana.
June 5, 2017
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Study finds lack of benefit of cranberry in reducing urinary tract infections among older women
Among older women residing in nursing homes, administration of cranberry capsules compared with placebo resulted in no significant difference in presence of bacteriuria plus pyuria (presence of bacteria and white blood cells in the urine, a sign of urinary tract infection [UTI]), or in the number of episodes of UTIs over l year, according to a study.
October 27, 2016
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Study opens the lid on overprescribing of antibiotics for acute conjunctivitis
A new study suggests that most people with acute conjunctivitis, or pinkeye, are getting the wrong treatment.
June 29, 2017
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Study provides new insights into shared history between lice and bacterial sidekicks
A Florida Museum of Natural History study provides new insights into the complex, shared history between blood-sucking lice and the vitamin-producing bacterial sidekicks that enable them to parasitize mammals, including primates and humans.
April 17, 2017
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Study provides potential new target to combat cytomegalovirus infections
Viruses hijack the molecular machinery in human cells to survive and replicate, often damaging those host cells in the process. Researchers at the University of California San Diego School of Medicine discovered that, for cytomegalovirus (CMV), this process relies on a human protein called CPEB1. the study, published October 24 in Nature Structural and Molecular Biology, provides a potential new target for the development of CMV therapies.
October 22, 2016
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Study provides vital clues to counter superbug antibiotic resistance
An international study led by Monash University has discovered the molecular mechanism by which the potentially deadly superbug 'Golden Staph' evades antibiotic treatment, providing the first important clues on how to counter superbug antibiotic resistance.
May 16, 2017
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Study Questions Fecal Transplant for Gut Infection
In direct comparison, researchers found no real difference compared to antibiotics
January 13, 2017
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Study reveals role of mast cells in severe forms of dengue infection
Why mosquito-borne dengue virus causes more severe disease in some individuals, including hemorrhagic fever with or without shock, remains controversial and researchers are focusing on the factors related to the interaction between the virus and the host immune system, including the role of mast cells. An in-depth review of the latest research showing how mast cells can be both protective and can contribute to the most severe forms of dengue is presented in the article "Role of Mast Cells in Dengue Virus Pathogenesis," published in DNA and Cell Biology, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers.
June 12, 2017
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Study shows how antibiotic treatments may offset beneficial effects of whole grain intake
According to recommendations from the Danish Veterinary and Food Administration, adult Danes should consume at least 75 g whole meal a day. However, it is not only the contents of vitamins, minerals, and fibers that make whole grain products such as rye bread and oatmeal healthy.
April 28, 2017
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Study shows how high fat diets can alter gut bacteria to combat harmful inflammation
Researchers at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine have shown a high fat diet may lead to specific changes in gut bacteria that could fight harmful inflammation--a major discovery for patients suffering from Crohn's disease. Crohn's disease, a type of inflammatory bowel syndrome, causes debilitating intestinal swelling, cramping, and diarrhea. The disease affects half a million people in the United States, but its cause is yet unclear.
June 22, 2017
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Study shows how phage-resistant cells become susceptible upon co-incubation with sensitive bacteria
Bacteriophages (phages) are probably the most abundant entities in nature, often exceeding bacterial densities by an order of magnitude. as viral predators of bacteria, phages have a major impact on bacterial communities by reducing some bacteria and enabling others to flourish. Phages also occasionally package host DNA and deliver it to other bacteria, in a process known as horizontal gene transfer (HGT).
January 11, 2017
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Study uses prebiotic fiber to improve intestinal bacteria profile of children
A couple of teaspoons of a fiber supplement, taken daily, has produced some exciting results that will help children with overweight or obesity maintain a healthier weight and prevent many diseases caused by obesity.
June 7, 2017
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'Superbug' bacteria gang up on us, fueled by antibiotic use, nursing home study suggests
Understanding the ecosystem of multidrug-resistant bacteria, and how antibiotics affect them, could lead to better infection prevention
September 12, 2017
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'Superbug' Gene Spotted on U.S. Pig Farm
Study suggests potential resistance to a last line of antibiotics for humans
December 5, 2016
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'Superbug' Infections Striking More U.S. Kids
Antibiotic-resistant germs no longer confined to hospitals, study warns
February 24, 2017
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Superbug review warns we ignore wildlife at our peril
Governments and researchers need to pay greater attention to the spread of antimicrobial resistance -- or so-called superbugs -- in wildlife and the natural environment, according to a new study.
February 22, 2016
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Supercomputer models play key role in finding new drug candidates to combat antibiotic resistance
Supercomputer simulations at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory have played a key role in discovering a new class of drug candidates that hold promise to combat antibiotic resistance. In a study led by the University of Oklahoma with ORNL, the University of Tennessee and Saint Louis University, lab experiments were combined with supercomputer modeling to identify molecules that boost antibiotics' effect on disease-causing bacteria.
November 17, 2016
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Supercomputer simulations help develop new approach to fight antibiotic resistance
Supercomputer simulations have played a key role in discovering a new class of drug candidates that hold promise to combat antibiotic resistance. In a new study, lab experiments were combined with supercomputer modeling to identify molecules that boost antibiotics' effect on disease-causing bacteria.
November 17, 2016
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SuperSnap Helps Verify Cleanliness of Reusable Endoscopes
Endoscopes are hard to clean due to all the little crevices where pathogens can hide, and this has led to quite a bit of controversy in the last couple of years. While more attention has been bestowed on this problem, there's still a lot of work left to do to improve cleaning procedures, as a recent study showed, so one can't be fully confident that a reused endoscope is free of contaminants.
July 27, 2017
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Supplement maker on FDA blacklist after deadly bacteria found in water system
The bacteria are often drug-resistant and pose a risk in products for kids.
August 14, 2017
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Surprise finding leads to new insights into splenic B cell differentiation
Researchers are familiar with the functions of MZB cells, but the molecular processes involved in their development remained a mystery until an unrelated test revealed that Taok3 plays an essential role. Using these insights, a research team demonstrated that mice genetically lacking in Taok3 did not develop MZB cells, and are more susceptible to bacterial infection.
February 3, 2017
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Swimming microbots can remove pathogenic bacteria from water
The lack of clean water in many areas around the world is a persistent, major public health problem. One day, tiny robots could help address this issue by zooming around contaminated water and cleaning up disease-causing bacteria, report scientists.
June 28, 2017
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Swimming microbots can remove pathogenic bacteria from water
The lack of clean water in many areas around the world is a persistent, major public health problem. One day, tiny robots could help address this issue by zooming around contaminated water and cleaning up disease-causing bacteria.
June 28, 2017
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Swirling swarms of bacteria offer insights on turbulence
When bacteria swim at just the right speed, swirling vortices emerge. as those patterns disintegrate into chaos, physicists detect a telling mathematical signature.
May 16, 2017
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Symbiotic bacteria: from hitchhiker to beetle bodyguard
Bacterial symbionts transition between plant pathogenicity and insect defensive mutualism, a new report demonstrates. the bacterium Burkholderia gladioli lives in specific organs of a plant-feeding beetle and defends the insect's eggs from detrimental fungi by producing antibiotics. However, when transferred to a plant, the bacterium can spread throughout the tissues and negatively affect the plant.
April 28, 2017
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Synthetic biologists engineer inflammation-sensing gut bacteria
Bioengineers demo new class of minimally invasive biosensors
April 6, 2017
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Misc. - T

Tackling antimicrobial resistance by turning ideas into action
"This is our moment to tackle antimicrobial resistance (AMR)," declared Ed Whiting, Head of Policy and Chief of Staff, Wellcome Trust, London at Antibiotic Research UK's inaugural lecture held at Portcullis House, Westminster today. Ed's pragmatic discussion mirrored the theme of the event: turning ideas in action.
October 22, 2016
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Tasmanian Devil Milk Could be a Magic Bullet Against Superbugs
Researchers from Australia have discovered that chemical compounds found in the milk of Tasmanian devils are capable of killing some of the most deadly bacterial infections–a surprising finding that could introduce a new class of weapons in the war against superbugs.
October 17, 2016
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Team reconstructs nanoscale virus features from correlations of scattered x-rays
As part of an international research team, Jeff Donatelli, Peter Zwart and Kanupriya Pande of the Center for Advanced Mathematics for Energy Research Applications (CAMERA) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) contributed key algorithms which helped achieve a goal first proposed more than 40 years ago -- using angular correlations of X-ray snapshots from non-crystalline molecules to determine the 3D structure of important biological objects.
October 5, 2017
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Technology which makes electricity from urine also kills pathogens
Researchers at the University of the West of England have discovered that technology they have developed which has already been proven to generate electricity through the process of cleaning organic waste, such as urine, also kills bacteria harmful to humans.
June 15, 2017
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Tests May bring new Wave of Cancer Detection
New kinds of tests that promise to be less invasive are beginning to exit the lab and enter the market -- with more under development.
March 28, 2017
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The "Asgard archaea" are our own cells' closest relatives
We can't culture them, but their genes suggest a close relationship.
January 13, 2017
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The contradictory catalyst
Using a natural catalyst from bacteria for inspiration, researchers have now reported the fastest synthetic catalysts to date for hydrogen production-- producing 45 million hydrogen molecules per second.
January 24, 2017
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The dust storm microbiome
The airborne dust carried in sand storms affects the health of people and ecosystems alike. New research suggests that part of the effect might not be in the particles of dust but rather in bacteria that cling to them, traveling many kilometers in the air with the storms.
June 27, 2017
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The End is Nigh Now Available on Steam: New Platformer From Super Meat Boy Dev
Prepare for game cartridges, tumours and difficult platforming.
July 13, 2017
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The FDA Finally Bans a Bunch of Pointless Antibacterial Soaps
Sorry, that antibacterial soap isn't doing anything more to clean you up than any other plain bar of soap.
September 2, 2016
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The Hunt for Undiscovered Drugs at the Bottom of the Sea
In 2009, Kerry McPhail descended Jacques Cousteau-style towards the Axial Volcano, inside the cramped, 30-year-old little submarine DSV Alvin, with a pilot and another scientist. Three hundred miles off the coast of Oregon, they were collecting tubeworms, bacterial mats and bivalves living near a deep sea volcanic vent. These samples could potentially yield new pharmaceutical compounds--and in turn, new chemical cures and desperately needed antibiotics that are yet undiscovered.
March 30, 2017
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The Neighborhood Sandbox: A Breeding Ground for Germs
Bacteria, parasites and other nasty surprises may be hiding in the sand
July 7, 2017
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The Post-Antibiotic Era Is Here. Now What?
WHEN ALEXANDER FLEMING came back from a Scottish vacation in the summer of 1928 to find his London lab bench contaminated with a mold called Penicillium notatum, he kicked off a new age of scientific sovereignty over nature.
September 25, 2017
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The rise of giant viruses
The number of microbes in, on, and around the planet is said to outnumber the stars in the sky. The number of viruses found worldwide is at least an order of magnitude greater. As their name suggests, giant viruses are larger than many bacterial and eukaryotic cells. They were first discovered in 2003, and the true breadth of their diversity remains unknown.
June 21, 2017
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The world's art is under attack--by microbes
Bacteria and fungi are a menace to paintings, sculptures, and ancient artifacts.
June 21, 2017
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This disinfection robot can light the way to cleaner hospitals
The bot, made by Blue Ocean Robotics, can go into rooms by itself and use ultraviolet light to kill bacteria.
October 19, 2016
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This Pharmacy Ad Suggests "Very, Very Strong Antibiotics" Even When they Won't Do Any Good
When you're sick, it makes sense that you want a pill to just make all the symptoms go away, which is probably why some doctors continue to prescribe antibiotics even when they aren't necessary and may, in fact, cause harm. It probably doesn't help when a pharmacy perpetuates the myth that we should just take antibiotics whenever we might be sick.
February 28, 2017
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Three Klebsiella species cause life-threatening infections and share drug resistance genes
Three different species of Klebsiella bacteria can cause life-threatening infections in hospital patients and that all three share genes that confer resistance to the most commonly used antibiotics, new research shows. The study improves physicians' understanding of Klebsiella infections and could point toward better ways to fight multi-drug resistant strains of these bacteria.
August 2, 2017
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Time-lapse shows how anticancer and antiviral drugs get into cells
Transporter could be a tool in better treatments
April 17, 2017
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Tiny Nanopatch Shown Highly Effective Against Polio Virus
A new vaccine delivering "Nanopatch" has just been tested that may finally help put an end to polio. Developed by a scientist at Queensland University in Australia and commercialized by Vaxxas, a firm based in Sydney, the patch has microscopic needles projecting from its bottom that pass the vaccine directly to the antigen-presenting cells below the surface of the skin.
October 6, 2017
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Tiny toxic proteins help gut bacteria defeat rivals
Microcins attack pathogens involved in gut inflammation
November 28, 2016
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Toxic Nanoparticles Coated with Antibiotics Safely Kill Drug Resistant Bacteria
A team of Brazilian scientists may have come up with a practical way of killing off resistant bacteria by targeting them with toxic silver-silica nanoparticles coated with an antibiotic. Since antibiotics don't have the full punch to eliminate bacteria resistant to them, the researchers instead used the antibiotic ampicillin as a mechanism to deliver the killer nanoparticles to the pathogens.
July 11, 2017
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Triclosan, banned from soaps but not toothpastes, may help superbugs in gut
Small study finds minor, but troubling, disturbance in the microbial force.
April 13, 2017
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TSRI scientists discover potential new therapy to stop deadly botulinum neurotoxin
Botulinum neurotoxin is probably best known to Americans as BOTOX, a cosmetic medicine, rather than as a cause of potentially dangerous foodborne illnesses. Lesser known is that Clostridium botulinum, the bacterium that causes the neurointoxication, produces one of the most potent toxins on earth and is classified as a potential bioterrorism threat.
May 26, 2017
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Turning the water on in a sink can launch pipe-climbing superbugs
In experimental sinks, it took just seven days for germs to climb up from the P-trap.
March 2, 2017
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Misc. - U

UGA researcher develops clinical decision rule to accurately detect acute bacterial rhinosinusitis
Sinus infections are one of the most common reasons patients walk out of the doctor's office with an antibiotic prescription in hand. The problem is that bacteria causes only about one-third of sinus infections, which means most patients are inappropriately receiving antibiotics.
July 26, 2017
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Ultrastructure of a condensed chromosome-like structure in a cyanobacterium
Eukaryotic cells, including human cells, form paired condensed chromosomes before cell division. the paired chromosomes are then equally divided into the daughter cells. Prokaryotic cells, including bacteria, do not have such a DNA distribution system.
October 20, 2016
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Uncovered: 1,000 new microbial genomes
Potential biotech applications seen with release of 1,003 reference bacterial and archaeal genomes
June 12, 2017
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Understanding antibiotic resistance
Using experimental and computational methods, researchers reveal workings of bacterial defense system
August 15, 2017
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Understanding of herpesvirus infection advanced by new research
Protein complexes identified that control infection and reactivation
April 12, 2017
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Unexpected discovery paves way for new insights in regulation of bacterial virulence
Chemists and molecular biologists have made an unexpected discovery in infection biology. the researchers can now show that two proteins that bind to one another slow down a chemical reaction central to the course of the disease in the bacteria Yersinia pseudotuberculosis. the results have been published in the Journal of Biological Chemistry.
March 3, 2017
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University of Liverpool to establish new research centre to accelerate development of novel antibiotics
A state-of-the-art research centre to help accelerate the development of new antibiotics is set to be established by the University of Liverpool.
March 16, 2017
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UPV/EHU researchers develop coatings to prevent potential bacterial infections in dental implants
The UPV/EHU-University of the Basque Country is developing coatings for dental implants to provide them with capabilities to ensure success when they are implanted
December 25, 2016
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USP researchers develop new platform to detect 416 viruses from tropical regions
Researchers from the University of S⭠Paulo (USP) at Ribeir⭠Preto in Brazil have developed a platform that analyzes clinical samples from patients to diagnose infection by 416 viruses found in the world's tropical regions.
December 1, 2016
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Using big data to understand the body's response to viral attack
An enzyme found in many bacteria, including the bacterium that gives us strep throat, has given humankind a cheap and effective tool with which to edit our own genes. this technology, called CRISPR, is also being used to understand how the immune system responds to a viral attack.
January 30, 2017
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Using biomarkers to diagnose sepsis: an interview with Jordi Trafi
What is sepsis? how does it detrimentally affect the body and why?
September 2, 2016
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Using E. coli to detect hormone disruptors in the environment
Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) have been implicated in the development of obesity, Diabetes and cancer and are found in a wide array of products including pesticides, plastics and pharmaceuticals. EDCs are potentially harmful, even at low concentrations, equal in some cases to mere milligrams dissolved in in a swimming pool full of water. now researchers report that they can quickly detect environmentally relevant concentrations of EDCs using engineered E. coli bacteria.
January 11, 2017
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Using rooster testes to learn how the body fights viruses
Our bodies are constantly under siege by foreign invaders; viruses, bacteria and parasites that want to infiltrate our cells. Using rooster testes, scientists shed light on how germ cells -- sperm and egg -- protect themselves from viruses so that they can pass accurate genetic information to the next generation. the findings could help researchers better fight viruses in chickens and in people.
April 27, 2017
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UT Southwestern researchers find new way to combat multidrug-resistant bacteria in burn injuries
A new way to fight multidrug-resistant bacteria by blinding them rather than killing them proved highly effective in a model of burn injuries, UT Southwestern Medical Center research shows.
December 21, 2016
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UTHealth researchers to study how gut bacteria play role in development of diabetes
A team of researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) School of Public Health has received a $3.1 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to study how gut bacteria play a role in the development of diabetes among residents of Starr County, Texas.
October 6, 2017
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UTI treatment reduces E. coli, may offer alternative to antibiotics
Treatment with molecular decoy may lessen recurrent infections
June 14, 2017
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UV light can aid hospitals' fight to wipe out drug-resistant superbugs
A new tool -- a type of ultraviolet light called UVC -- could aid hospitals in the ongoing battle to keep drug-resistant bacteria from lingering in patient rooms and causing new infections.
January 17, 2017
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Misc. - V

Vanderbilt scientists find new way to destroy microbial vampires
On July 24 Vanderbilt scientist Eric Skaar, Ph.D., MPH, summarized his group's latest paper in a tweet: "If S. aureus is going to drink our blood like a vampire, let's kill it with sunlight."
August 1, 2017
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Viral protein transforms as it measures out DNA
To generate swarms of new viral particles, a virus hijacks a cell into producing masses of self-assembling cages that are then loaded with the genetic blueprint for the next infection. But the picture of how that DNA is loaded into those viral cages, or capsids, was blurry, especially for two of the most common types of DNA virus on earth, bacterial viruses and human herpesvirus.
January 31, 2017
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Virulence of bacterial infections dependent on presence of cytotoxins, study reports
Beginning in the mid-1980s, an epidemic of severe invasive infections caused by Streptococcus pyogenes (S. pyogenes), also known as group a streptococcus (GAS), occurred in the United States, Europe, and elsewhere. the general public became much more aware of these serious and sometimes fatal infections, commonly known as the "flesh-eating disease."
February 2, 2017
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Virus engineered to rely on artificial amino acids, used as vaccine
You make the virus in cells with a weird amino acid, then use it as a vaccine.
December 1, 2016
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Virus infection may be linked to Toledo water crisis, study shows
In August 2014, toxins from algal blooms in Lake Erie shut down the city of Toledo, Ohio's water supply, leaving half a million residents without potable water for more than two days. A new study shows that a virus may have been involved in the crisis and suggests methods for more stringent monitoring of water supplies.
May 31, 2017
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Vitamin D improves gut flora and metabolic syndrome
Extra vitamin D can restore good bacteria in the gut, according to a study in mice, giving hope in the fight against risk factors for Diabetes and heart disease
December 21, 2016
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Misc. - W

Walnuts may contribute to better health by changing makeup of gut bacteria
Research led by Lauri Byerley, PhD, RD, Research Associate Professor of Physiology at LSU Health New Orleans School of Medicine, has found that walnuts in the diet change the makeup of bacteria in the gut, which suggests a new way walnuts may contribute to better health
July 28, 2017
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Walnuts may promote health by changing gut bacteria
A new study has found that walnuts in the diet change the makeup of bacteria in the gut, which suggests a new way walnuts may contribute to better health.
July 28, 2017
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Warmer Temps Speed Infectious Disease Spread
In one year, 2015, the Zika virus leapt out of relative isolation in small groups of islands in the Pacific and tore through the Americas, infecting an estimated 500,000 people in 40 countries.
February 16, 2017
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Watch Raindrops Launch Swarms of Bacteria Into the Air
It's a rainy day, so you stick out your tongue to catch a sip of nature's hydration. as the misty air hits your taste buds, millions of tiny soil bacteria suddenly cry out in terror, and are suddenly silenced.
March 9, 2017
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What gene-swapping cheese microbes could say about antibiotic resistance
You and your favorite cheese--whether it's cheddar, Wensleydale, or a good aged goat brie--have something in common: You're both home to a constantly evolving menagerie of microbes. The bacteria inside you and your fermented dairy live together in a community called a biome, growing and changing in response to their environments. And they adapt to their homes--a cow's hide, a chunk of Swiss, or your gut--by stealing their neighbors' genes.
July 28, 2017
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What's on your skin? Archaea, that's what
Study on human skin microbiome finds archaea abundance associated with age
June 28, 2017
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When preventing HIV, bacteria in the vagina matter
Some microbes appear to break down drug in prophylactic gel, making it less effective
June 1, 2017
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White Kids More Likely to Get Unneeded Antibiotics
Study finds more evidence of racial disparities in ERs
September 5, 2017
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WHO releases first ever list of antibiotic-resistant 'priority pathogens'
The World Health Organization (WHO) today published its first ever list of antibiotic-resistant "priority pathogens"–a catalogue of 12 families of bacteria that pose the greatest threat to human health.
March 3, 2017
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Why one eye-targeting virus could make for a useful gene-delivery tool
In their quest to replicate themselves, viruses have gotten awfully good at tricking human cells into pumping out viral proteins. That's why scientists have been working to use viruses as forces for good: to deliver useful genes to human cells and help patients who lack important proteins or enzymes.
May 11, 2017
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Widow unleashes court fight against scope maker Olympus over superbug outbreak
Three executives from Japan loom large in a cramped courtroom here -- at least their photos do, mounted on a white poster board propped in front of the jury.
June 14, 2017
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With synthetic mucus, researchers take aim at antibiotic resistance
The human body produces about a gallon of mucus per day. by studying and replicating mucus' natural ability to control pathogenic bacteria, scientists hope to find new methods for combatting infections and antibiotic resistance.
April 25, 2017
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Woman Dies from Superbug Resisting all Antibiotics
She died after possibly picking up an infection in an Indian hospital, researchers say
January 13, 2017
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Women referred to HPV center more often have suffered from psychiatric conditions, research shows
New research from Aarhus University shows that women who are referred to an HPV center more often have had psychiatric medicine prescribed or been hospitalized for psychiatric conditions up to five years before they received the vaccine.
September 28, 2017
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World's oldest fossils could help find life beyond Earth
Fossils of 4-billion-year-old bacteria found in Canada hint at the origins of life on Earth. they may also help scientists looking for life on Mars and beyond.
March 1, 2017
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Worms dine on nanoparticles to help test biological force sensor technology
Millimeter-long worms digesting a nanoparticle-laced meal of their favorite bacteria could eventually lead to a new way to see cellular forces at play within our own bodies, including processes like wound healing and cancer growth.
January 1, 2017
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Misc. - X

X-rays capture unprecedented images of photosynthesis in action
An international team of scientists is providing new insight into the process by which plants use light to split water and create oxygen. In experiments, ultrafast X-ray lasers were able to capture atomic-scale images of a protein complex found in plants, algae, and cyanobacteria at room temperature.
November 21, 2016
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Misc. - Y

You may not need to finish your antibiotics (but you probably still should)
Time for a course correction.
July 26, 2017
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Your Appendix May not be as Useless as you Think
New research suggests that the appendix, long believed to be a throwback to our evolutionary past, may serve an important purpose by boosting immunity and acting as a "safe house" for helpful gut bacteria.
January 11, 2017
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Your Crappy American Diet Might Leave your Gut Bacteria Stunted
Adopting a healthy lifestyle might not seem that hard on the outset. you ate a lot of cheeseburgers and drank a lot of soda, and now you're going to stop doing that. But a new study in mice suggests that it takes a while for the gut's bacterial zoo, or microbiome, to adapt to dietary changes. If the results hold in humans, it could mean developing a healthy gut is more than a quick diet fix.
December 29, 2016
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Your kitchen sponge could have more bacteria than a toilet seat
Five of the ten most abundant bacteria species are categorized as potential pathogens.
August 8, 2017
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Misc. - Z

Zap! Graphene is bad news for bacteria
Scientists at Rice University and Ben-Gurion University of the Negev (BGU) have discovered that laser-induced graphene (LIG) is a highly effective anti-fouling material and, when electrified, bacteria zapper.
May 22, 2017
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Zapping bacteria with sanitizers made of paper
Team invents promising technology for killing microbes
May 1, 2017
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Zirconia-doped ceria nanoparticles can act as effective antioxidants in sepsis treatment
During sepsis, cells are swamped with reactive oxygen species generated in an aberrant response of the immune system to a local infection. If this fatal inflammatory path could be interfered, new treatment schemes could be developed. Now, Korean scientists report in the journal Angewandte Chemie that zirconia-doped ceria nanoparticles act as effective scavengers of these oxygen radicals, promoting a greatly enhanced surviving rate in sepsis model organisms.
July 6, 2017
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Tuberculosis

10-dollar test detects tuberculosis in minutes
A microchip-based test developed by A*STAR researchers can diagnose tuberculosis in 15 minutes (Scientific Reports, "Microchip-based ultrafast serodiagnostic assay for tuberculosis"). The test meets the speed, cost, accessibility and disposal standards recommended by the World Health Organization for detecting the deadly disease.
May 17, 2017
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17 Questions and Answers
Confused About Tuberculosis Headlines? Get the Facts
Provides Information
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A doctor's life-enhancing experience of working on a humanitarian TB project
Dr. Mark McNicol, a middle grade specialty doctor from Northern Ireland, recently spent 9 months working for Medicines Sans Frontières/Doctors Without Borders. In an interview with Medical News Today, he explains that the stigma of disease and the suffering of sick people living in poverty made a significant impression on him while treating patients with tuberculosis in the Eurasian country of Georgia.
April 18, 2017
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Ancient Chinese medicine for malaria could potentially aid in treatment of tuberculosis
A centuries-old herbal medicine, discovered by Chinese scientists and used to effectively treat malaria, has been found to potentially aid in the treatment of tuberculosis and may slow the evolution of drug resistance.
December 19, 2016
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Atomic-scale view of bacterial proteins offers path to new tuberculosis drugs
With the first detailed analysis of a cellular component from a close relative of the pathogen that causes tuberculosis, Rockefeller scientists are suggesting strategies for new drugs to curb this growing health problem. Each year, nearly half a million people around the world are infected with mutant TB strains capable of evading existing antibiotics.
February 3, 2017
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Atomic-scale view of bacterial proteins offers path to new tuberculosis drugs
With the first detailed analysis of a cellular component from a close relative of the pathogen that causes tuberculosis, Rockefeller scientists are suggesting strategies for new drugs to curb this growing health problem. Each year, nearly half a million people around the world are infected with mutant TB strains capable of evading existing antibiotics.
February 3, 2017
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Bacteria from cystic fibrosis patient could help thwart antibiotic-resistant TB
The number of drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) cases is rising globally. But a newly discovered natural antibiotic -- produced by bacteria from the lung infection in a cystic fibrosis patient -- could help fight these infections. Lab testing shows that the compound is active against multi-drug resistant strains.
June 14, 2017
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Compound from soil bacteria could translate into new drug lead for TB
A new treatment for tuberculosis (TB) is set to be developed using compounds derived from bacteria that live in soil - according an international collaboration of researchers, including the University of Warwick.
March 1, 2017
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Fight against TB threatened by drug resistance
Today is World TB Day. Although there is much to celebrate, with 49 million lives being saved through the diagnosis and treatment of tuberculosis (TB) between 2000 and 2015, the rise in TB-causing bacteria that are resistant to key treatments now threatens to derail decades of progress in controlling TB.
March 24, 2017
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LSTM scientists describe new approach to screening potential TB treatments
Scientists from LSTM's Research Centre for Drugs and Diagnostics (RCDD) have described in a paper published today in Scientific Reports, a new way of screening potential treatments for Tuberculosis (TB) which may assist in the identification and prioritisation of new therapies which could potentially reduce the duration of current TB treatment.
March 28, 2017
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Marine natural compounds hold potential to combat tuberculosis
UCF graduate student Carolina Rodrigues Felix led the study in UCF Assistant Professor Kyle Rohde's lab. Through a partnership with graduate student Amy Wright of the Florida Atlantic University's Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute, the team screened 4,400 chemical extracts derived from extracts of sponges and other marine organisms to see if they could kill the dormant tuberculosis bacteria. Tuberculosis is a highly contagious disease that is one of the top 10 causes of death worldwide.
July 6, 2017
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Mycobacteria use protein to create diverse populations, avoid drugs
NIH-funded research could aid fight against tuberculosis.
May 31, 2017
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New Cornell discovery could lead to effective treatment for tuberculosis
A recent discovery by Cornell University researchers could lead to a new, effective treatment for persistent tuberculosis infections.
July 7, 2017
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New TB drug candidates developed from soil bacteria
A new treatment for TB set to be developed using compounds derived from bacterium that live in soil, according to international collaboration of researchers. a new compound — created from soil bacteria which prevent other bacteria growing around them — is an effective killer of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, which causes TB, say the scientists.
March 1, 2017
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Newly discovered natural antibiotic could help fight against drug-resistant TB
The number of drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) cases is rising globally. But a newly discovered natural antibiotic -- produced by bacteria from the lung infection in a cystic fibrosis patient -- could help fight these infections. Lab testing reported in the Journal of the American Chemical Society shows that the compound is active against multi-drug resistant strains.
June 14, 2017
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Novel computer tool predicts impact of short-course treatment regimen against MDR-TB
Johns Hopkins researchers have developed a computer simulation that helps predict under which circumstances a new short-course treatment regimen for drug-resistant tuberculosis could substantially reduce the global incidence and spread of the disease.
December 16, 2016
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Researchers use tiny 3D spheres to combat tuberculosis
A new 3D system has been used to study human infection in the laboratory. the team, which includes infection researchers, engineers and bioinformaticians have used an electrostatic encapsulation technique to make tiny 3D spheres within which human cells are infected with tuberculosis (TB) bacteria to generate conditions that more closely reflect events in patients.
February 7, 2017
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Study finds current annual TB screening in North America to be costly with limited health benefits
Tuberculosis (TB) is a recognized hazard for healthcare workers, but the annual screening strategy currently in place in Canada and the United States is costly with very limited health benefits and should be reconsidered, according to a new study led by a team from the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre (RI-MUHC). The findings, published in the journal BMC Medicine, suggest health agencies in North America should consider switching to a targeted strategy focusing on high-risk healthcare workers only.
July 31, 2017
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'Survival gene' stops strains of TB mutating into deadly 'superbugs'
Discovery of gene in bacteria has important implications for understanding antibiotic resistance
January 27, 2017
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TB Alliance urges WHO to add Mycobacterium tuberculosis to list of drug-resistant bacteria
TB Alliance and the broader TB community urge that the World Health Organization (WHO) add Mycobacterium tuberculosis to the critical group within the list of drug-resistant bacteria identified as urgent priorities for research and development.
March 3, 2017
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TB bacterium may suppress immune system to spread disease
Scientists have a good understanding of how the bacterium that causes tuberculosis, one of world's leading causes of death, evades the immune system to establish a foothold in the body. However, what has not been clear is the role of the pathogen in undermining the immune system to promote spread of the disease. Now, a new study uncovers evidence that the disease bacterium disrupts regulatory pathways in white blood cells that limit tissue destruction.
June 2, 2017
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This Tiny Bot Glows to Diagnose Tuberculosis
Much Faster Than the Existing Test
March 2, 2016
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Tuberculosis: Researchers uncover how bacteria burst our cells
Scientists unveil the complex molecular structure that causes lethal infections by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). Their findings might have implications for potential therapies against antibiotic-resistant tuberculosis.
April 10, 2017
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Tuberculosis: Soil bacteria compound may yield potent new drug
Researchers have discovered a compound found in soil bacteria that could lead to new drugs to combat tuberculosis, a global disease that is becoming increasingly resistant to current treatments. they have produced synthetic versions of the natural compound and showed that they can kill the tuberculosis bacterium in the laboratory.
March 2, 2017
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Zika

FDA Approves Test to Screen Donated Blood for Zika
Though the virus is mainly spread by mosquitoes, it can be transmitted through blood transfusions
October 6, 2017
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How Zika Virus Went From Mild to Devastating
Mouse study suggests one genetic mutation in 2013 unleashed its ability to attack developing fetal brains
September 28, 2017
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Rapid, Easy Zika Test Developed
Dipstick strip can diagnose the difference between Zika and dengue fever in a critical time frame
September 27, 2017
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Study: Antibody neutralizes dengue and Zika virus in mice
Brazil and other areas hardest hit by the Zika virus -- which can cause babies to be born with abnormally small heads -- are also home to dengue virus, which is spread by the same mosquito species.
September 25, 2017
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Brain cancer could be treated with Zika virus
A new study looks into the potential of the Zika virus to target and kill brain cancer cells. The results, so far, are encouraging, but researchers suggest that there is a long way to go until a safe and effective treatment is reached.
September 5, 2017
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Could the Zika Virus Help Battle a Deadly Brain Cancer?
Research is early, but appears promising
September 5, 2017
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Zika could one day help combat deadly brain cancer
Zika's damaging neurological effects might someday be enlisted for good -- to treat brain cancer.
September 5, 2017
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Zika virus kills brain cancer stem cells
Virus potentially could be used to treat deadly disease
September 5, 2017
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Scientists develop new attract-and-kill technique to eradicate mosquitoes
Mosquitoes aren't just blood thirsty. They also have a sweet tooth, relying on plant nectar to get the sugar they need to survive. Exploiting this weakness, scientists have developed an environmentally friendly eradication method. The new, inexpensive technique tricks these annoying pests into gorging themselves on insecticides laced with a concoction that mimics the sweet-smelling scents and aromas that they find irresistible. It could bolster efforts to suppress malaria, Zika and other mosquito-borne diseases worldwide.
August 23, 2017
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Oropouche virus could cause serious public health problem in Brazil, researcher warns
After the Zika epidemic, which began in 2015, and the outbreak of yellow fever early in 2017, Brazil runs a serious risk of being afflicted by Oropouche, another virus that is widely distributed throughout South and Central America and the Caribbean.
August 22, 2017
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Zika May Not Last in Semen as Long as Thought
Men should still follow CDC guidelines and use condoms for at least 6 months, health experts say
August 18, 2017
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Paper Test for Zika Powered by Gold Nanoparticles
Zika is often a silent disease that might not display any symptoms in infected persons, making screening particularly important. In the developing world, mobile testing systems that can be easily transported and used are not available, so sending a sample to a lab is still required to detect Zika infected individuals. Researchers at Washington University in St. Louis may have come up with an effective, easy to use Zika test that can survive hot and humid environments and that can be administered by just about anyone.
August 15, 2017
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Zika Virus Tied to Neurological Woes in Adults
35 infected people were hospitalized with such conditions in Brazil during last year's outbreak
August 14, 2017
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ASU Biodesign researchers develop more potent, safer plant-based Zika vaccine
The worldwide Zika threat first emerged in 2015, infecting millions as it swept across the Americas. It struck great fear in pregnant women, as babies born with severe brain birth defects quickly overburdened hospitals and public health care systems.
August 9, 2017
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Mouse model developed to allow study of Zika virus transmission
Scientists at the National Institutes of Health have developed a mouse model to study the sexual and fetal transmission of Zika virus. This will enable studies to further understanding of how the Zika virus spreads, thereby allowing treatments to be developed.
August 4, 2017
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Prior flavivirus disease does not worsen Zika infection in rhesus macaques
Rhesus macaques previously infected with dengue or yellow fever viruses appear to be neither more nor less susceptible to severe infection with Zika virus, according to new research published in PLOS Pathogens.
August 4, 2017
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NIH Scientists Track Zika Virus Transmission in Mice
Study analyzes how virus is spread sexually and from mother to fetus.
August 3, 2017
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Suspected Case of Zika Discovered in Texas
A suspected case of mosquito transmission of the Zika virus in Texas would, if confirmed, be the first known instance of local mosquito transmission of the virus in the continental United States this year.
July 27, 2017
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Kidenga app tracks mosquito activity and disease symptoms for summer travelers
Just because Zika isn't in the news as much lately, doesn't mean the mosquito-borne infection no longer is a health threat. Researchers at the University of Arizona Mel and Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health and public health officials continue to seek a better understanding of how Zika may spread and if and where it may become endemic.
July 26, 2017
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Poor Vision May Be Sign of Zika Damage in Babies
All infants with prenatal exposure to the virus need a vision exam, researchers say
July 17, 2017
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Prior dengue fever in people infected by Zika does not lead to worse illness
Individuals who are infected by Zika virus after having dengue fever do not appear to become more severely ill than people with Zika who have never had dengue.
July 14, 2017
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Experimental Zika virus vaccines restrict in utero virus transmission in mice
Vaccines protect against Zika-related congenital damage.
July 13, 2017
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Potential vaccines could protect developing fetus from Zika virus, UTMB study shows
Immunizing female mice with a Zika vaccine can protect their developing fetus from infection and birth defects during pregnancy, according to new research from The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston.
July 13, 2017
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New DNA-based vaccine protects testes, sperm from Zika-related damage in mouse models
While the Zika virus is primarily transmitted by mosquitoes, research has shown that the disease can affect semen and sperm and can therefore be spread through sexual intercourse.
July 11, 2017
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Malaria drug protects fetal mice from Zika virus, NIH-funded study finds
Blocking a key placental defense may limit maternal-fetal transmission of the virus.
July 10, 2017
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NIH launches prospective study of Zika and HIV co-infection during pregnancy
The National Institutes of Health has launched a study to determine the potential risks that infection with the Zika virus might pose for pregnancies in which the mother is also infected with HIV. At this point, little is known about whether Zika virus infection poses additional risks for maternal or infant health in pregnancies already complicated by HIV.
July 10, 2017
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Novel vaccine approach appears to protect fetus from CMV infection, animal study shows
Long before the Zika virus became a global fear, cytomegalovirus, or CMV, was commonly infecting developing fetuses and causing many of the same brain and developmental impairments.Long before the Zika virus became a global fear, cytomegalovirus, or CMV, was commonly infecting developing fetuses and causing many of the same brain and developmental impairments.Long before the Zika virus became a global fear, cytomegalovirus, or CMV, was commonly infecting developing fetuses and causing many of the same brain and developmental impairments.
July 6, 2017
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Zika: costs of prevention and control
Can you please outline the main findings of the recent study published in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases on the costs to society of a Zika outbreak?
July 6, 2017
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Major study to examine clinical outcomes of children infected with Zika virus after birth
Researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus and the Baylor College of Medicine will join with Guatemalan investigators in a major study examining the clinical outcomes of children infected with the Zika virus after being born, focusing on long-term brain development.
June 19, 2017
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Mutant mosquitoes make insecticide-resistance monitoring key to controlling Zika
One of the most common insecticides used in the battle against the Aedes aegypti mosquito has no measurable impact when applied in communities where the mosquito has built up resistance to it, a study finds.
June 19, 2017
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Study to examine effects of Zika infection in Guatemalan infants and children
NIH-funded study will characterize outcomes of infection acquired after birth.
June 19, 2017
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Insecticides and chemicals used to combat Zika linked to reduced motor function in infants
A chemical currently being used to ward off mosquitoes carrying the Zika virus and a commonly used insecticide that was threatened with a ban in the United States have been associated with reduced motor function in Chinese infants, a University of Michigan study found.
June 9, 2017
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Vaginal Bacteria May Affect Herpes and Zika Virus
Healthy 'bugs' might alter how the viruses work, researcher says
June 9, 2017
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Zika virus infection during pregnancy causes birth defects in 5% of babies, study finds
According to a report published today in the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report of Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 5% of women in the U.S. and its territories who had confirmed Zika virus infection during pregnancy had a baby or fetus with Zika virus-associated birth defects.
June 9, 2017
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Reliable clinical assay detects Zika virus from semen samples
Research presented at ASM Microbe 2017 by experts at the Fertility and Cryogenics Lab shows a reliable clinical assay that can detect the Zika virus from semen samples.
June 5, 2017
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Research shows new Zika virus vaccine that offers 100% protection in mice
Research presented by Farshad Guirakhoo, Ph.D., Chief Scientific Officer, GeoVax, Inc., at the ASM Microbe 2017 meeting showed a new Zika virus vaccine that gives 100% protection in mice. The vaccine is the first to be based on the Zika virus NS1 protein, and the first to show single-dose protection against Zika in an immunocompetent lethal mouse challenge model. Results of the study were presented on June 4 at the American Society for Microbiology (ASM) Microbe conference in New Orleans.
June 5, 2017
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Zika: What to Expect this Year
The Zika virus, spread by the bite of infected mosquitoes and other means, is here to stay, and with it the potential for serious birth defects, public health experts warned today.
June 2, 2017
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New insights into how the Zika virus causes microcephaly
Scientists have uncovered why Zika virus may specifically target neural stem cells in the developing brain, potentially leading to microcephaly.
June 1, 2017
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Virus hunters draw a map of Zika's spread with DNA
By the time the World Health Organization declared Zika a global health emergency nearly a year later, the outbreak had spread to 26 countries and territories in the Americas, infecting hundreds of thousands of people and leaving many babies with an incurable developmental defect called microcephaly.
May 24, 2017
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Zika virus likely circulated in Americas long before detection during 2015-16 epidemic
Analysis of the largest collection of Zika genomes to date reveals the trajectory and evolution of the virus as it spread throughout the Americas, with implications for future surveillance efforts.
May 24, 2017
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Zika virus spread undetected for many months, NIH-supported study finds
Virus quickly spread in the Americas, then diverged into distinct genetic groups.
May 24, 2017
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Scientists to test Zika virus on brain tumors
In a revolutionary first, scientists will test whether the Zika virus can destroy brain tumor cells, potentially leading to new treatments for one of the hardest to treat cancers.
May 19, 2017
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Study findings shed new light on coinfection with chikungunya, dengue or Zika viruses
A new study led by Colorado State University researchers found that Aedes aegypti, the primary mosquito that carries Zika virus, might also transmit chikungunya and dengue viruses with one bite. The findings shed new light on what's known as a coinfection, which scientists said is not yet fully understood and may be fairly common in areas experiencing outbreaks.
May 19, 2017
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Zika Mosquito Can Transmit Other Viruses, Too
3-in-1 bite might also spread chikungunya and dengue fever, study says
May 19, 2017
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Researchers find persistence of Zika virus in cerebrospinal fluid, lymph nodes of rhesus monkeys
Zika virus can persist in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), lymph nodes and colorectal tissue of infected rhesus monkeys for weeks after the virus has been cleared from blood, urine and mucosal secretions, according to a study published online in Cell. the research was led by Dan H. Barouch, M.D., Ph.D., and colleagues at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Harvard Medical School and was funded in part by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH).
April 28, 2017
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Zika virus persists in the central nervous system and lymph nodes of Rhesus monkeys
Virus found in tissues weeks after clearance from blood.
April 28, 2017
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Zika RNA now found in a second mosquito species
Zika RNA has now been found in Aedes albopictus. That's not the species -- known as Aedes aegypti -- most often associated with Zika. But scientists have never discounted Aedes albopictus as another possible carrier of the potentially deadly virus.
April 17, 2017
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Another Type of Mosquito May Carry Zika
Genetic fragments, but not live virus, were found; researchers call for more testing of mosquito types
April 14, 2017
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U.S. Blood Supply Safe from Zika Virus: Officials
They detail steps being taken to protect people who need transfusions
April 7, 2017
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Zika-related birth defects reported by 1 in 10 US based pregnant women infected by the virus in 2016
The new Vital Signs report, released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), has reported that of 250 pregnant women confirmed with Zika infection in 2016, approximately 1 in 10 of them had a fetus or infant with virus-related birth defects. this report is the first of its kind, to present an analysis from a sample of US women with a definite case of Zika infection during pregnancy.
April 5, 2017
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Birth Defects Strike 1 in 10 U.S. Pregnancies Affected by Zika
CDC report also says too few babies are tested for the virus
April 4, 2017
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Phase 2 clinical study of investigational Zika vaccine begins in the U.S., Central and South America
Vaccinations have begun in a multi-site Phase 2/2b clinical trial testing an experimental DNA vaccine designed to protect against disease caused by Zika infection. the vaccine was developed by government scientists at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH). NIAID is leading the trial, which aims to enroll at least 2,490 healthy participants in areas of confirmed or potential active mosquito-transmitted Zika infection, including the continental United States and Puerto Rico, Brazil, Peru, Costa Rica, Panama and Mexico.
March 31, 2017
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Phase 2 Zika vaccine trial begins in U.S., Central and South America
Study will evaluate NIH's experimental DNA vaccine.
March 31, 2017
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Programmable RNA nanoparticles could protect against Zika virus
Using a new strategy that can rapidly generate customized RNA vaccines, MIT researchers have devised a new vaccine candidate for the Zika virus.
March 29, 2017
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Zika virus: Cure steps closer with protein-mapping study
There is currently no vaccine or medicine against Zika - a mosquito-borne virus that causes birth defects and, in its recent outbreak, has infected more than 1 million people in the Americas and Caribbean. Now, by mapping a protein that helps the Zika virus to replicate and spread, researchers take a significant step toward a cure.
March 28, 2017
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Scientists crack crystal structure of entire ZIKV NS5 protein
Zika virus, which causes Zika virus disease, is spread to people primarily through the bite of an infected Aedes aegypti or Aedes albopictus mosquito. An infected pregnant woman can pass ZIKV to her fetus during pregnancy or around the time of birth. Sex is yet another way for infected persons to transmit ZIKV to others.
March 27, 2017
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Amazingly fast, cheap genome sequencing: Zika virus mosquito genome assembled from scratch
A team of scientists has developed a new way to sequence genomes, which can assemble the genome of an organism, entirely from scratch, dramatically cheaper and faster.
March 24, 2017
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Researchers describe set of observable characteristics linked to congenital Zika syndrome
Even as the Zika virus becomes more prevalent -- the Centers for Disease Control reports that the number of U.S. infants born with microcephaly and other birth defects is 20 times over the normal rate -- researchers are still trying to fully pin down the identifying consequences of the viral infection.
March 24, 2017
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Testing for Zika virus: There's an app for that
Prototype dramatically cuts cost, time for detection of mosquito-borne illness
March 19, 2017
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Zika virus may also cause serious cardiovascular complications, research shows
Zika also may have serious effects on the heart, new research shows in the first study to report cardiovascular complications related to this virus, according to data being presented at the American College of Cardiology's 66th Annual Scientific Session.
March 10, 2017
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DNA may offer rapid road to Zika vaccine
Multiple tests searching for way to thwart devastating virus
February 28, 2017
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Risk of Birth Defects from Zika 20 Times Higher
Finding highlights importance of preventing infection during pregnancy, researchers say
March 2, 2017
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Device will rapidly, accurately and inexpensively detect zika virus at airports and other sites
About the size of a tablet, a portable device that could be used in a host of environments like a busy airport or even a remote location in South America, may hold the key to detecting the dreaded Zika virus accurately, rapidly and inexpensively using just a saliva sample.
February 22, 2017
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Does Zika Harm Male Fertility?
Researchers at the CDC are working with a fertility clinic in Puerto Rico, which has been hard-hit by Zika, to determine if men infected by the virus have lower sperm counts or sperm that doesn't work as well in the weeks and months after infection.
February 22, 2017
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New portable device may hold key to accurately detecting Zika virus
About the size of a tablet, a portable device that could be used in a host of environments like a busy airport or even a remote location in South America, may hold the key to detecting the dreaded Zika virus accurately, rapidly and inexpensively using just a saliva sample. While scientists across the world are scrambling to find some sort of immunization, researchers from Florida Atlantic University are working to develop a diagnostic tool to reduce the impact of the outbreak until a vaccine is identified.
February 22, 2017
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Researchers explore ways to tamper reproductive events in dengue- and Zika-spreading mosquito
The mosquito Aedes aegypti, which can spread dengue fever, chikungunya, Zika fever, and yellow fever virus, requires a blood meal to develop eggs. One way to control the spread of these diseases is to tamper with the reproductive events that follow this mosquito's blood meal.
February 22, 2017
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New computer model recommends intervention strategies to mitigate pandemics
The 2016 Zika virus outbreak, along with recent outbreaks of SARS, bird flu, H1N1 and Ebola, underscore the importance of being prepared for and responding quickly to infectious diseases. Zika, in particular, poses unique challenges, since its associated birth defects and lack of preventive treatment currently threaten over 60 countries.
February 17, 2017
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Research provides more evidence that mRNA vaccines can protect mice against Zika virus
Vaccine developers have successfully protected mice against Zika by injecting synthetic messenger RNA that encodes for virus proteins into the animals. the cells of the mice then build parts of the virus, training the immune system to recognize a future infection.
February 17, 2017
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UTMB researchers unravel mystery of how Zika virus causes birth defects
A multidisciplinary team from the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston has uncovered the mechanisms that the Zika virus uses to alter brain development.
February 17, 2017
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See how long Zika lasts in semen and other bodily fluids
Traces of Zika virus typically linger in semen no longer than three months after symptoms show up, a new study on the virus' staying power in bodily fluids reveals.
February 14, 2017
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New Zika vaccine candidate shows potential to protect against virus with single dose
A new Zika vaccine candidate has the potential to protect against the virus with a single dose, according to a research team led by scientists from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. as reported in Nature this week, preclinical tests showed promising immune responses in both mice and monkeys.
February 2, 2017
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Map of Zika virus reveals how it shifts as it matures
New look at the immature virus could hint at how Zika becomes infectious
January 31, 2017
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First Case of Local Zika in Pregnancy Described
Baby shows no signs of brain abnormalities, but report urges doctors to be alert
January 12, 2017
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Socioeconomic factorsin the U.S. make large-scale Zika outbreaks unlikely, new analysis suggests
Is the United States at risk for a large-scale outbreak of Zika or other mosquito-borne disease? While climate conditions in the U.S. are increasingly favorable to mosquitos, socioeconomic factors such as access to clean water and air conditioning make large-scale outbreaks unlikely, according to new analysis of existing research--but small-scale,localized outbreaks are an ongoing concern.
January 3, 2017
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