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392 Health - Children and Kids Resources

Misc. - Numbers

1 in 7 Kids Under 9 Have a Psychological Disorder
Parents' mental health, lack of medical care contribute to disabilities, researchers say
March 18, 2016
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3D-printed models help shorten surgery time for common hip disorder in children
A team of engineers and pediatric orthopedic surgeons are using 3D printing to help train surgeons and shorten surgeries for the most common hip disorder found in children ages 9 to 16. In a recent study, researchers showed that allowing surgeons to prep on a 3D-printed model of the patient's hip joint cut by about 25 percent the amount of time needed for surgery when compared to a control group.
August 2, 2017
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5 Potentially Harmful Chemicals Now Banned From Kids' Products
Almost a decade after the Consumer Product Safety Commission was ordered to study the potential health affects of phthalates -- chemicals often used in plastic products for children -- and make recommendations on what further steps should be taken, the agency has voted to approve a final rule that prohibits manufacturers from selling items that have more than a minimal level of five of these chemicals.
October 18, 2017
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9 Parents of Twins Share Their best Advice
Finding out that you're pregnant is a huge step for any parent-to-be. But when your doctor delivers the news that you're carrying not one, but two babies, it can seem even more daunting to prepare for the years ahead.
February 24, 2017
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Misc. - A

ACL Tears on the Rise Among Kids, Especially Girls
Sports that involve cutting or pivoting are the riskiest, doctors say
February 22, 2017
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Activity levels of adolescents and children found to be lower than previously thought
Physical activity among children and teens is lower than previously thought, and, in another surprise finding, young adults after the age of 20 show the only increases in activity over the lifespan, suggests a study conducted by researchers from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. And, the study found, starting at age 35, activity levels declined through midlife and older adulthood.
June 15, 2017
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Adlerian Counselling & Consulting Group
for children, adolescents, adults, couples, and families.
Provides a Service
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Adolescents who prefer casual sex more often involved in sexual harassment, study finds
Adolescents who sexually harass others have had casual sex more often than those who do not harass others. they also fantasize more about casual sex and find it more acceptable to have sex without any commitment or emotional closeness.
March 16, 2017
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Advanced maternal age does not increase birth risks, study finds
A number of previous scientific studies have found that among mothers 35 or older, there is an elevated risk that their children are born preterm (less than 37 weeks of pregnancy) or with low birth weight (less than 2.5 kilograms).
June 1, 2017
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Advertisers and crib manufacturers fail to adhere to safe sleep recommendations for infants
A new study from the University of Alabama at Birmingham shows that national magazine advertisements and manufacturers of infant cribs continue to depict unsafe sleep environments, despite longtime guidelines established by the American Academy of Pediatrics to protect against SIDS and other sleep-related deaths.
December 19, 2016
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AI Reads Brainwaves to Assess Preterm Brain Maturity
Researchers at the University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital have created the first AI that is capable of estimating the functional brain maturity of pre-term babies. The software interprets electroencephalography (EEG) measurements taken from preterm infants to make calculations about the brain's functional maturity.
November 1, 2017
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Air Mattresses Linked to More Than 100 Infant Deaths
They can mold to a baby's face, leading to suffocation, researchers say
June 2, 2017
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Air pollution exposure on the way to school can have harmful effects on children's cognitive development
A study led by the Barcelona Institute for Global Health (ISGlobal), an institute supported by the "la Caixa" Banking Foundation, has demonstrated that exposure to air pollution on the way to school can have damaging effects on children's cognitive development. The study, published recently in Environmental Pollution, found an association between a reduction in working memory and exposure to fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and black carbon during the walking commute to and from school.
October 5, 2017
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Alabama Boy's Death Worries Food Allergy Parents
The death last month of a 3-year-old Alabama boy during an oral food challenge -- believed to be the first time a child died during the common allergy test -- has sparked worry and fear in families of children with food allergies.
August 8, 2017
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Anemia protects children against blood-stage malaria in Africa, UNC study finds
Iron deficiency is the most common nutritional deficiency in the world and causes long-term adverse consequences in children. However, concerns remain about the safety of iron supplements, particularly for children in malaria-endemic countries lacking adequate access to health services. Researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill have proven these concerns valid after finding iron deficiency anemia actually protects children against the blood-stage of Plasmodium falciparum malaria in Africa, and treating anemia with iron supplementation removes this protective effect.
January 5, 2017
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Another way for anti-vaxxers to skip shots for schoolkids: A doctor's note
Dr. Tara Zandvliet was inundated with calls and emails from parents last year, after California passed a law nixing personal beliefs as an exemption from school vaccinations. Suddenly, many parents sought exemptions for medical reasons.
September 5, 2017
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Anti-epilepsy medicine use during pregnancy does not harm overall health of children, study finds
Children whose mothers have taken anti-epilepsy medicine during pregnancy, do not visit the doctor more often than children who have not been exposed to this medicine in utero. this is the result of a new study from Aarhus.
February 21, 2017
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Antidepressant use during pregnancy not linked to newborn problems at 2-4 weeks after birth
Babies exposed to an antidepressant or a mood disorder during fetal life did not have any more signs of irritability, difficulty feeding, sleep disturbances and respiratory problems two to four weeks after birth than babies who were not exposed. Instead, the major factor associated with newborn problems was preterm birth, according to a new Northwestern Medicine study.
June 1, 2017
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Anxious moms may give clues about how anxiety develops
Moms may be notorious worriers, but babies of anxious mothers may also spend more time focusing on threats in their environment, according to a team of researchers.
September 27, 2017
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Are Bullies Getting Run Out of U.S. Schools?
Abuse rates dropped about 2 percent a year over a decade, survey finds
May 1, 2017
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Are Toys and Gadgets Good for your Baby?
The toy aisle of the average American retailer is a carnival of lights, color, and sound. Every shelf overflows with gadgets that flash, twirl, beep, spin, and play a symphony of kid-friendly tunes.
March 8, 2016
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Are your Kids Drinking Too Much Sugar?
If you're worried about how much sugar your kids are eating, it's time to take a second look at how much they're drinking. new research confirms that children and teens are downing far too much sugar from sweetened drinks.
January 27, 2017
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Article reports increase in health care spending on children
Health care spending on children grew 56 percent between 1996 and 2013, with the most money spent in 2013 on inpatient well-newborn care, attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and well-dental care, according to an article published online by JAMA Pediatrics.
December 28, 2016
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As Lead Poisons A Child, A Slow Response
Almost as soon as he could balance on his plump baby legs, Austin Poteet loved to pull himself up to look out of windows in the house his family was renting in Ashburn, GA.
September 6, 2017
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Avoid fruit juice up to the age of 1 year, say the AAP
Parents should avoid offering fruit juice to infants under the age of 1 year, unless advised by a doctor, as it provides "no nutritional benefit" and may harm their health. This is the according to new recommendations from the American Academy of Pediatrics.
May 22, 2017
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Misc. - B

Babies of anxious moms may spend more time focusing on threats in the environment
Moms may be notorious worriers, but babies of anxious mothers may also spend more time focusing on threats in their environment, according to a team of researchers.
September 27, 2017
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Babies recognize face-like patterns before birth
A new study, led by researchers at Lancaster University in the United Kingdom, reveals that babies show a preference for faces while still in the womb. This discovery opens up a new area of prenatal research, say researchers.
June 12, 2017
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'Baby Boxes' May Help Prevent SIDS in Newborns
The innovative take-home gift helped curb the dangerous practice of bed-sharing, study found
May 26, 2017
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Belladonna Found in Homeopathic Teething Products
Certain homeopathic teething products marketed by Hyland contain belladonna, also known as deadly nightshade, "sometimes far exceeding the amount claimed on the label," according to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.
January 27, 2017
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Benefit of caffeine on preemie lungs endures into childhood
It is common practice to give caffeine to babies born prematurely in order to prevent or overcome problems with breathing. Now, a new study shows that the short-term benefits to lung function persist into mid-childhood.
July 14, 2017
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Benefits of full breastfeeding in newborns could last through to early adulthood, research shows
Babies who are fed only breast milk for the first three months of life appear to be much more likely to maintain a healthy weight trajectory, with the benefits possibly lasting through to early adulthood, new research shows.
June 30, 2017
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Binge Drinking Rates Dropping on College Campuses
But study also shows those rates are rising for young adults who are not in school
July 27, 2017
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Bipolar disorder in children: Risk factors and symptoms
Bipolar disorder is a mental illness characterized by extreme swings in mood and thought. A person with bipolar disorder swings between periods of mania or less severe hypomania and depression.
September 1, 2017
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Birth complications associated with decreased dopamine levels in the brain, study reveals
A new study, published in eLife, shows that most people born prematurely, who also suffered small brain injuries during the time of birth, have lower levels of dopamine in the brain.
November 28, 2017
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Birth Defects in Kids May Shorten Moms' Lives
But the overall risk of early death is still quite low
December 20, 2016
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Birth of infant with major congenital anomaly linked to increased risk of death in mother
In Denmark, having a child with a major congenital anomaly was associated with a small but statistically significant increased risk of death in the mother compared with women without an affected child, according to a study appearing in the December 20 issue of JAMA. a major congenital anomaly is a structural change (such as cleft palate) that has significant medical, social or cosmetic consequences for the affected individual; this type of anomaly typically requires medical intervention.
December 20, 2016
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Blood of SIDS infants contains high levels of serotonin
Findings from NIH-funded study could provide basis for forensic SIDS test.
July 3, 2017
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Brain scans could improve prediction of problem drug use among teenagers
There's an idea out there of what a drug-addled teen is supposed to look like: impulsive, unconscientious, smart, perhaps - but not the most engaged. While personality traits like that could signal danger, not every adolescent who fits that description becomes a problem drug user. So how do you tell who's who?
February 22, 2017
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Brains of children with a better physical fitness possess a greater volume of gray matter
Physical fitness in children may affect their brain structure, which in turn may have an influence on their academic performance, new research indicates.
November 22, 2017
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Breast-Feeding May Guard Against Teen Eczema
Encouraging new mothers to stick with breast-feeding may halve the already small risk that infants will develop eczema when they hit their teens, new research suggests.
November 13, 2017
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Breast-feeding transfers beneficial bacteria to the baby's gut, new study finds
Mothers protect their babies and teach them habits to stay healthy and safe as they grow. a new UCLA-led study shows that beneficial bacteria from mothers do much the same thing.
May 8, 2017
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Breastfeeding for two months cuts baby's risk of SIDS almost in half, study finds
Breastfeeding for at least two months cuts a baby's risk of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome almost in half, a sweeping new international study has found.
October 30, 2017
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Breastfeeding May not Lead to Smarter Preschoolers
But study suggests that children who were nursed may be less hyperactive at age 3
March 27, 2017
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Breastfeeding may protect children from asthma exacerbations later in life
In a Pediatric Allergy and Immunology analysis of children with asthma, those who had been breastfed had a 45% lower risk of asthma exacerbations later in life compared with children who had not been breastfed.
September 1, 2017
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Breastfeeding rooms hidden in health care law
With her 5-week-old daughter crying in a bathroom at Nordstrom, and not knowing how to get the baby to latch on to her breast, Garima Nahar found herself surrounded by other women. some offered tips, but one woman told the new mother to cover up or turn the other way.
April 9, 2010
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Buckle fractures: Risk factors and recovery
Buckle fractures are compression fractures and are very common in children. They happen when one side of the bone buckles, or bends, but doesn't break all the way through.
June 2, 2017
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Bullying and cyberbullying top parents' list of worries, new report reveals
Parents may also experience some nerves as their children prepare to head back to school.
August 21, 2017
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Misc. - C

Can childhood cancer treatments affect survivors' sex lives in adulthood?
A recent analysis showed that although adult survivors of childhood cancer did not differ overall from their peers in terms of their satisfaction with their sex lives and romantic relationships, those who received cancer treatments that were especially toxic to the nervous system were least likely to have had intercourse, be in a relationship, or have children.
February 6, 2017
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Can Parents' Weight Hinder Toddlers' Development?
Study links -- but doesn't prove -- Moms', Dads' obesity tied to delayed social and problem-solving skills
January 3, 2017
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Can Vegetarian Food Fuel Your Kids?
About 8 million adults in the U.S. are vegetarians, and for good reason. Studies show that giving up meat for more plant-based foods can help you stay healthy.
July 7, 2017
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Caring about others can be reason behind choosing to get vaccinations, research shows
Since vaccines protect not only those who take them, but also the people who otherwise could have been infected, there are many plausible motives for choosing to get vaccinated. Apart from the most obvious - wanting to protect oneself or one's children from becoming ill - research shows that many also are affected by care for others.
March 29, 2017
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Chemical ocular injuries among children linked to laundry detergent pods
Between 2012 and 2015, the number of chemical burns to the eye associated with laundry detergent pods increased more than 30-fold among preschool-aged children in the U.S., according to a study published online by JAMA Ophthalmology.
February 2, 2017
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Chickenpoxinfo.com
consumer information site from Merck.
Provides Information
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Child Safety in the Home
In a world made by the point-of-view of grown-ups, there are inadvertent hazards to small children all over the place. Home is no exception. According to Safe Kids USA (an organization that educates parents, policy makers, and the general public in creating safe environments for children) a child dies every 101 minutes as a result of an unintentional injury, making iuse of accidental death and permanent disability for America's kids.
April 1, 2010
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Child's home learning environment predicts 5th grade academic skills
Children whose parents provide them with learning materials like books and toys and engage them in learning activities and meaningful conversations in infancy and toddlerhood are likely to develop early cognitive skills that can cascade into later academic success.
August 15, 2017
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Childhood Asthma May Encourage Obesity
Fear of flare-ups might spur kids to limit physical activity, specialists say
January 20, 2017
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Childhood Cancer Survivors and Later Sexual Health
Study finds especially toxic treatments were tied to later issues, but most rated sex lives as positive
February 6, 2017
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Childhood obesity rates rise 10-fold since the '70s
A new report has looked at worldwide obesity rate trends over the past four decades, and it found that obesity in children and teenagers is 10 times higher now than it was in 1975, and that 5 years from now, more will be obese than underweight.
October 11, 2017
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Childhood respiratory infections linked with celiac disease
With celiac disease on the rise, researchers are racing to pin down any factors that may play a part. Recent attention has turned to the role of respiratory infections in at-risk children.
October 13, 2017
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Children born to older mothers are at an advantage, report researchers
Children of older mothers experience fewer behavioral, social and emotional problems, according to a new study.
March 23, 2017
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Children born with small or missing eyes benefit from personalized treatment using 3D-printed implants
A new, personalized and noninvasive treatment using 3-D printed implants has been developed to help children born with abnormally small or missing eyes (microphthalmia/ anophthalmia, or MICA). the research is being presented at the 2017 Annual Meeting of the Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology (ARVO) this week in Baltimore, Md.
May 11, 2017
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Children can reliably self-report outcomes of experimental therapy in clinical trials, study suggests
Children as young as 8 years old with incurable cancer can reliably characterize the impact an experimental therapy has on their symptoms and quality of life - even at the earliest stages of drug development - making self-reported patient outcomes a potential new clinical trial endpoint, according to a longitudinal validity study led by Children's National Health System researchers.
June 15, 2017
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Children need to be up-to-date on immunizations before heading back-to-school
While we prepare our children to go back to school, parents should check and make sure their children are current on all vaccinations before the start of the school year or they may not be able to start on the first day. Pennsylvania recently enacted new state health rules stating that children without the required vaccinations or exemptions will not granted a grace period to see their doctors, as has been practice in the past.
August 17, 2017
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Children of older mothers have better upbringing
The result should be seen in conjunction with the widespread recommendation not to have children too late. this recommendation is based on knowledge about e.g. declining fertility and the health risks during pregnancy and while giving birth which are associated with advanced maternal age.
March 21, 2017
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Children shorter if they drink non-cow's milk, study suggests
A new study of more than 5,000 children has associated consumption of non-cow's milk with shorter height, raising concerns about the nutritional content of cow's milk alternatives.
June 9, 2017
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Children suffering from IBD not meeting daily recommended intake of calcium and vitamin D
A new study highlights that children suffering from inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are not meeting the daily recommended intake of calcium and vitamin D. The research, conducted at Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children in London, identified that only 26.6% and 21.3% of paediatric IBD patients were achieving the current recommended intake for calcium and vitamin D respectively.
May 29, 2017
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Children who sleep an hour less at higher risk of type 2 diabetes, says study
A study has found that children who slept on average one hour less a night had higher risk factors for type 2 diabetes, including higher levels of blood glucose and insulin resistance.
August 15, 2017
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Children with large birthweight have inceased odds of obesity in early school-age
In a recent study, babies who were large at birth had an increased likelihood of being obese when they were in kindergarten to second grade (age 5 to 8 years). At each grade level and for both preterm and term children, children who were heavy as infants remained heavier than children born at normal birthweight.
July 7, 2017
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Children's exposure to secondhand smoke may be vastly underestimated by parents
Smoking parents misperceive where and when their kids are exposed to cigarette smoke
November 15, 2017
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Children's inattentiveness linked to worse academic performance in later life
Researchers studied children with and without attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and found that inattentiveness was linked to worse academic performance up to 10 years later, regardless of ADHD, even when they accounted for the children's intellectual ability.
August 29, 2017
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CHLA Medical Group, Providence Saint John's to provide premium care for fragile newborns
Providence Saint John's Health Center is partnering with Children's Hospital Los Angeles Medical Group to raise the level of care for the most fragile newborns in the medical center's Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU), bringing world class neonatal care to Santa Monica and the surrounding Westside communities.
December 30, 2016
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Christina Aguilera Speaks Up for Childhood Hunger
The Grammy Award-winning pop star reveals how her past shaped her passion.
March 8, 2016
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Clear communication can make doctor visits successful for children with autism
Doctor visits can be a challenge for patients with autism, their families and health care providers. a new report offers several steps providers and families can take to make medical visits more successful. She says that all of them require good communication between the provider and parent before, during and after medical visits.
February 3, 2017
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Cleveland-based study to explore how childhood obesity can be prevented before conception
A Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine and MetroHealth System researcher, along with Cleveland Clinic's director of metabolic research, have received federal funding to determine if childhood obesity can be prevented before women become pregnant.
March 29, 2017
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Clinical trial discovers drug combination that could help children with arthritis
A clinical trial funded by Arthritis Research UK and the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) led by professors from the Universities of Liverpool and Bristol has discovered a drug combination that could help thousands of children with arthritis.
April 27, 2017
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Clinical trial finds no benefits of wearing silk for children with eczema
Eczema affects a large proportion of children and adolescents in the United States. new research investigates whether silk clothing improves health outcomes for children with eczema.
April 12, 2017
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Cognitive behavioral therapy also has long-lasting effect for children, adolescents with OCD
Some children and adolescents think that they will have an accident if they do not count all the lampposts on their way to school. Or cannot leave the house unless they have washed their hands precisely twenty-five times. They suffer from OCD, Obsessive Compulsive Disorder, which is an extremely stressful psychiatric disorder that affects between 0.25 and 4 percent of all children.
November 14, 2017
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Combination therapy with azithromycin found to be unnecessary in most children with pneumonia
A combination of two antibiotics is often prescribed to treat community-acquired pneumonia in children but a JAMA Pediatrics study is now showing that using just one of the two has the same benefit to patients in most cases.
November 2, 2017
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Cooling treatment for babies deprived of oxygen at birth can reduce childhood epilepsy
Cooling babies deprived of oxygen at birth (perinatal asphyxia) can reduce the number of children who develop epilepsy later in childhood, according to a new study published in the journal Epilepsia.
October 3, 2017
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Cot death risk halved with just 2 months of breast-feeding
A large study of more than 9,000 infants from different countries and cultures has found that breast-feeding for just 2 months may halve the risk of sudden infant death syndrome, or cot death.
November 1, 2017
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Could You Raise a 'No-Diaper' Baby?
Physician couple found it's possible, but daycare workers and babysitters may not want to give it a go
June 21, 2017
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Cyberbullying linked to suicidal behavior and self-harm among young victims
Children and young people under-25 who become victims of cyberbullying are more than twice as likely to enact self-harm and attempt suicide than non-victims.
August 17, 2017
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Misc. - D

Daily movement program has potential to boost children's learning
Following a daily movement program can improve children's physical development levels and has the potential to boost their chances in the classroom, researchers from Loughborough University have found.
July 4, 2017
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Dangerous anti-vaccine tweets have spiked--from rich people in just 5 states
Researchers suggest bots and local intervention to stymie misinformation online.
September 29, 2017
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Dating Violence Tied to Spankings in Childhood
Spanking your child may have unintended consequences as he or she forges adult romantic relationships years later, a new study suggests.
December 5, 2017
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Decline in Kids' Ear Infections Linked to Vaccine
The shots are effective in killing the main bacterial cause, but other germs are growing, researchers find
August 7, 2017
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Dehydration Monitoring System to Help Prevent Common Cause of Death in Young Children
Dehydration is so dangerous that in the developing world it is one of the most prevalent causes of mortality in young children. The summer heat can be particularly brutal, but preventing dehydration is fairly easy as long as parents and caretakers are aware that a child needs to be attended to. To help detect that a child may be dehydrated, researchers at ETH Zurich university in Switzerland have developed a relatively cheap and easy to use system that uses electrical impedance to measure changes in hydration.
August 7, 2017
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Delayed cord clamping after birth could save lives of preterm babies
Thousands of preterm babies could be saved by waiting 60 seconds before clamping the umbilical cord after birth instead of clamping it immediately - according to two international studies coordinated by the University of Sydney's National Health and Medical Research Council Clinical Trials Center.
October 30, 2017
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Delayed cord clamping prevents anaemia in infants up to six months of age
When clamping of the umbilical cord is delayed, iron deficiency up to six months of age can be prevented, according to a new study from Uppsala University, published in JAMA Pediatrics. the study was conducted in Nepal.
January 17, 2017
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Delaying marriage age of women has positive effects for children, study shows
Delaying the marriage age of young women in parts of the developing world has significant positive effects for their children, a new study shows.
April 4, 2017
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Despite Warnings, Kids Are Still Dying in Hot Cars
Even on a 60-degree day, a small child's body temperature can quickly rise
July 14, 2017
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Detergent Pods Tied to Kids' Eye Burn Danger
Nearly 500 such injuries occurred in 2015, study reports
February 2, 2017
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Developmental abnormality discovered in babies linked to SIDS
International research involving the University of Adelaide has uncovered a developmental abnormality in babies - especially in premature babies and in boys - that for the first time has been directly linked to cases of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS).
October 25, 2017
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Dmrta2 gene mutation can lead to abnormal brain development in unborn babies
Link between Dmrta2 gene and rare nervous system disorder
July 6, 2017
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Do Older Dads Produce Brainy Boys?
Study finds their sons score high in intelligence and focus
June 21, 2017
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Doctor in Nigeria and MSU professor join hands to reduce infant mortality
A doctor in Nigeria and a professor at Michigan State University have teamed up to reduce infant mortality in the African nation.
August 23, 2017
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Does Legalizing Pot Spur Kids to Try It?
In 2 states studied, teens downplayed harms after recreational pot legalized; use increased in 1 state
December 27, 2016
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Does my baby have psoriasis? Symptoms and treatment
Psoriasis is a chronic autoimmune disorder affecting the skin and anyone, including babies and young children, can develop it. Although psoriasis does occur in infants, it is uncommon.
April 5, 2017
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Does 'Room Sharing' With Baby Come With Risks?
Despite latest guidelines, odds of poorer sleep and SIDS are higher, study finds
June 5, 2017
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Does TV Hinder Kindergarten-Readiness?
Lower-income kids harmed more by excess screen time than affluent children, study finds
March 1, 2017
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Dread of roses: Neurobehavioral effects found in children exposed to flower pesticides
Ecuador exports a lot of Mother's day bouquets, leaving behind evidence of harm to children's mental functions due to pesticides used to boost harvest
May 10, 2017
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Drinking diet beverages during pregnancy linked to child obesity, NIH study suggests
Children born to women who had gestational diabetes and drank at least one artificially sweetened beverage per day during pregnancy were more likely to be overweight or obese at age 7, compared to children born to women who had gestational diabetes and drank water instead of artificially sweetened beverages, according to a study led by researchers at the National Institutes of Health. Childhood obesity is known to increase the risk for certain health problems later in life, such as diabetes, heart disease, stroke and some cancers. The study appears online in the International Journal of Epidemiology.
June 6, 2017
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Drinking diet beverages during pregnancy linked to child obesity, study suggests
Children born to women who had gestational diabetes and drank at least one artificially sweetened beverage per day during pregnancy were more likely to be overweight or obesared to children born to women who had gestational diabetes and drank water instead of artificially sweetened beverages, according to a study.
June 6, 2017
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Drinking non-dairy alternatives linked to shorter childhood height
Choosing dairy milk may make a difference when it comes to your child's growth, according to a new study from the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. Researchers found drinking non-dairy alternatives was associated with shorter childhood height compared to those who drank milk, among 5,000 Canadian children. In fact, children at age 3 who drank 3 cups of non-dairy milk alternatives each day were 1.5 centimeters shorter, on average, than their milk-drinking peers. The researchers suggest that the children drinking non-dairy alternatives may be shorter because they are not receiving enough protein or calories to support their growth.
August 4, 2017
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Drug Used for Preemie Eye Disease Tied to Problems
Babies given Avastin were far more likely to have neurological complications, study shows
March 18, 2016
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Misc. - E

Early babies more likely to have poor physical fitness throughout life
Babies born even a few weeks early are more likely to have poor physical fitness throughout life, University of Queensland researchers have found.
September 28, 2017
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Early childhood adversities linked to health problems in tweens, teens
Study is first to point to brain changes that underlie poor health in some children
October 30, 2017
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Early intervention can lead to better vocabulary in infants with hearing loss
Children with hearing loss who are diagnosed by 3 months of age and receive interventions by 6 months develop a far greater vocabulary than those whose diagnosis and treatment come later, according to a CU Boulder study published this week in the journal Pediatrics.
July 13, 2017
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Early signs of anxiety, depression may be evident in the brains of newborns
Brain scans at birth predict later symptoms
February 1, 2017
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Early stimulation can boost brain development of babies
Many new parents still think that babies should develop at their own pace, and that they shouldn't be challenged to do things that they're not yet ready for. Infants should learn to roll around under their own power, without any "helpful" nudges, and they shouldn't support their weight before they can stand or walk on their own. they mustn't be potty trained before they are ready for it.
January 1, 2017
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ER Rates Soar as Toddlers Ingest Pot, French Study Finds
Accidental intoxication rose 133 percent in a decade; U.S. experts call findings highly relevant
August 14, 2017
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EMDR and writing therapy found to be quick, effective in treating children with PTSD
Children and adolescents with posttraumatic stress syndrome (PTSD) can be successfully treated with only a few hours of EMDR or cognitive behavioral writing therapy (CBWT). This is the finding of a new research paper by the University of Amsterdam (UvA) and GGZ Rivierduinen (Trauma Center for Children and Youth).
June 29, 2017
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Epilepsy drug discovered in fish model shows promise in small pediatric clinical trial
NIH-funded research suggests zebrafish models may be efficient resource for identifying drugs for clinical use.
February 9, 2017
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Even Partial Breast-Feeding Lowers SIDS Risk
New research confirms that breast-feeding for two to four months of a newborn's life can significantly reduce the risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS).
October 31, 2017
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Even perfect hand hygiene practice can spread MRSA in NICU babies
Even if hospital workers practice perfect hand hygiene, MRSA can still spread among babies in the NICU, according to new research led by a Drexel University researcher.
June 29, 2017
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Excluding children from school may lead to long- term psychiatric problems, study shows
Excluding children from school may lead to long- term psychiatric problems and psychological distress, a study of thousands of children has shown.
August 29, 2017
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Experts express concerns over infant mental health assessment
Forty world experts on child development and mental health have released a joint statement calling for caution when applying an influential classification for assessing infant mental health and potential cases of abuse.
October 11, 2017
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Experts say new baby monitors may be harmful, should be avoided
Monitors lack regulation, are under studied, and could trigger false alarms.
January 24, 2017
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Exposure to antimicrobials during development may cause irreversible outcomes
Exposure to environmental levels of triclocarban (TCC), an antibacterial chemical common in personal care products like soaps and lotions as well as in the medical field, can transfer from mother to offspring and interfere with lipid metabolism, new research shows.
August 9, 2017
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Exposure to illegal substances during adolescence influences patterns of abuse in adulthood
Teenagers who have easy access to drugs and alcohol in the home are more likely to drink and do drugs in their early and late 20s. That's according to the one of the first studies to look at how adolescent exposure to illegal substances affects patterns of abuse in adulthood.
July 29, 2016
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Extreme temperatures may increase risk for low birth weight at term, NIH study suggests
Extreme hot or cold temperatures during pregnancy may increase the risk that infants born at term will be of low birth weight, according to a study of U.S. women by researchers at the National Institutes of Health. the study was published in Environmental Research.
February 27, 2017
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Misc. - F

Factors contributing to childhood adiposity begin before birth, study shows
A new article, published in the journal BMC Medicine, reports the largest epigenome-wide association study to date that provides evidence that factors contributing to childhood adiposity (level of body fat) begin before birth and are influenced by mother's lifestyle, and fetal genetic and epigenetic factors.
March 9, 2017
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FDA approves use of new Flourish device to treat infants born with esophageal atresia
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today authorized use of the Flourish Pediatric Esophageal Atresia Anastomosis, a first-of-its-kind medical device to treat infants up to one year old for a birth defect that causes a gap in their esophagus, called esophageal atresia.
May 12, 2017
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FDA grants approval for new magnetic device used to treat pediatric esophageal atresia
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has granted authorization for a magnetic device used to treat pediatric esophageal atresia, a birth defect that causes abnormal formation of the esophagus. The Flourish™ Pediatric Esophageal Atresia device was created by University of Chicago Medicine assistant professor of radiology Mario Zaritzky, MD, in collaboration with Cook Medical.
May 25, 2017
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FDA: don't Give Kids Meds with Codeine, Tramadol
Agency strengthens warning labels on these medications to address dangers
April 20, 2017
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Federal Safety Official Reminds Parents: Crib Bumpers Are Pointless, Possibly Dangerous
No one likes the idea of their baby's soft noggin getting caught in a crib's slats, but a federal safety official is reminding parents that crib bumpers don't really keep your child safe, and they could be hazardous.
May 17, 2017
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Fetal alcohol syndrome: Causes, treatment, and symptoms
Fetal alcohol syndrome is one of several conditions, known as fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASDs), that cause a wide range of different physical, behavioral, and learning symptoms.
August 2, 2017
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Fewer SIDS Deaths in U.S., But Racial Gaps Remain
Sudden infant deaths are twice as common for blacks as whites, study finds
May 15, 2017
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Fewer U.S. Kids Binge Drinking
But 1 in 7 still had excess alcohol at least once in past month, study finds
June 23, 2017
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Findings offer new approach for detecting dyslexia risk before children learn to read
Almost 10% of the world population suffers dyslexia. Establishing an early diagnosis would allow the development of training programs to palliate this disorder. We now may be nearer to reaching this goal thanks to a study carried out by the Basque Centre on Cognition, Brain and Language (BCBL), associating auditory processing in children to their reading skills.
October 31, 2017
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First baby given xenon gas to prevent brain injury
A newborn baby has become the first in the world to receive xenon gas treatment, pioneered in Bristol in a bid to prevent brain injury.
April 9, 2010
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Five tips for parents and guardians to protect children from household poisons
More than 2 million poisonings are reported each year to poison centers across the United States, according to the American Association of Poison Control Centers. Half of those calls involve children under 6 years old.
March 24, 2017
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Flat head syndrome does not have consequences beyond cosmetics
The number of infants who develop flat head syndrome -; deformational plagiocephaly -- has increased significantly since the start of the Back to Sleep campaign to combat Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) in the 1990s.
June 23, 2017
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FOI technique found to be effective in detecting joint inflammation in children
The results of a study presented today at the Annual European Congress of Rheumatology (EULAR) 2017 have confirmed that Fluorescence Optical Imaging (FOI), a technique used to visualize inflammation in arthritic joints, is as effective as ultrasound with Power Doppler (US / PD) at monitoring response to treatment in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). FOI was also found to be more effective than US / PD at detecting inflammation in the absence of symptoms and signs.
June 14, 2017
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Food allergies linked to childhood anxiety
Researchers studied the link between food allergy and childhood anxiety and depression among a sample of predominantly low socioeconomic status minority children and found that children with a food allergy had a significantly higher prevalence of childhood anxiety. Food allergies were not associated with symptoms of childhood depression or with symptoms of anxiety or depression among their caregivers.
June 29, 2017
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Food allergies linked to higher prevalence of childhood anxiety
Researchers at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health and Albert Einstein College of Medicine studied the link between food allergy and childhood anxiety and depression among a sample of predominantly low socioeconomic status minority children. The results showed that children with a food allergy had a significantly higher prevalence of childhood anxiety. Food allergies were not associated with symptoms of childhood depression or with symptoms of anxiety or depression among their caregivers.
June 29, 2017
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France looks to curb its growing anti-vaccination movement with a new law
Proposal would make 11 vaccines mandatory for children, but details on how it will be enforced remain unclear
July 13, 2017
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Full-term babies born early may suffer adverse health outcomes later in life
Researchers at the University of Queensland reported this week that full-term babies born just a few weeks early are more likely to have poor physical fitness throughout life compared with babies of longer gestation.
September 29, 2017
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Misc. - G

General anesthetic may disrupt brain development in children
A study carried out in mice finds that a common general anesthetic called isoflurane significantly interferes with the growth of neurons in the developing brain. These worrying findings back up a raft of earlier studies.
July 7, 2017
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Getting antibiotics as a baby may have lasting effects on brain, behavior
Mouse study backs up human observations showing long-term changes.
April 5, 2017
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Girls from low-income families in the U.S. unprepared for puberty, research finds
Girls from low-income families in the U.S. are unprepared for puberty and have largely negative experiences of this transition, according to researchers at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health and the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.
January 4, 2017
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Giving children a voice in clinical trials
Children as young as 8 years old with incurable cancer can reliably characterize the impact an experimental therapy has on their symptoms and quality of life -- even at the earliest stages of drug development -- making self-reported patient outcomes a potential new clinical trial endpoint.
June 15, 2017
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Going Vegan: Is It a Good Choice for Kids?
Have a child who declares that she no longer wants to eat animals? Chances are, you have a budding vegan in your home.
July 7, 2017
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Good Food Goals: Help Kids Eat Healthier
Are your family dinners usually coming out of take-out bags these days? Or can you not remember the last time you even had dinner together?
July 7, 2017
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Group Warns of Lead in Baby Food
Some baby food sold in the United States contains lead, an environmental group warns.
June 16, 2017
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Growth factors in cord blood may help identify preemies at risk for fatal lung disease
Findings published in the Journal of Pediatrics describe growth factors in cord blood that may identify premature infants at risk for bronchopulmonary dysplasia-associated pulmonary hypertension (BPD-PH) -- an often fatal lung disease in which the vessels carrying blood from the heart to the lungs become narrowed and dysfunctional. Identifying these babies at birth would allow earlier interventions to prevent the disease that manifests in some preemies two to three months after birth.
April 6, 2017
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Misc. - H

Handheld screen time linked with speech delays in young children
New research being presented at the 2017 Pediatric Academic Societies Meeting suggests the more time children under 2 years old spend playing with smartphones, tablets and other handheld screens, the more likely they are to begin talking later
May 4, 2017
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Harsh Parenting can Backfire in Teens
Early sex, stealing and dropping out of school are some of the consequences, study contends
February 8, 2017
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Health Care Spending for U.S. Kids Jumps
The cost of keeping American kids physically and mentally healthy increased 56 percent between 1996 and 2013, a new study finds.
December 27, 2016
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Heartbeats could hold the key to understanding babies' inner world
A novel new experiment to test how aware babies are of their bodies' internal signals has been developed by researchers. The ability to consciously sense signals from your body is called interoception, and some people are more aware of these signals than others. These differences between people can influence a wide range of psychological processes, including how strongly you feel emotions, your decision-making, and mental health.
August 9, 2017
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High birthweight babies have increased risk for childhood obesity
Infants born with a high birthweight are more likely to become obese as children, a new study from the University of Virginia School of Medicine suggests. The researchers say pediatricians may want to counsel parents of high birthweight babies early on to prevent the onset of obesity and the health problems it eventually brings.
July 12, 2017
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High levels of folate during pregnancy may decrease hypertension risk in children
A new article published in the American Journal of Hypertension finds that babies born to mothers with cardiometabolic risk factors were less likely to develop high blood pressure if their mothers had higher levels of folate during pregnancy.
March 8, 2017
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High levels of suPAR protein shown to be likely cause of kidney damage in children
High levels of a protein known as suPAR, which has been shown to be a marker and likely cause of kidney damage, is as reliably predictive in children as in adults, according to results of a study published online today in JAMA Pediatrics, a clinical publication of the American Medical Association.
September 5, 2017
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High-quality education at early age linked to better relationships with parents later in life
Children who are given high-quality education at an early age - starting at six weeks old and continuing through their first five years of life - are more likely to be employed full-time and have better relationships with their parents as adults, according to new results from a longitudinal study now entering its fifth decade.
April 6, 2017
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Holding infants -- or not -- can leave traces on their genes
Amount of close and comforting contact from caregivers changes children's molecular profile.
November 27, 2017
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Honey bees have better vision than previously known
Research conducted at the University of Adelaide has discovered that bees have much better vision than was previously known, offering new insights into the lives of honey bees, and new opportunities for translating this knowledge into fields such as robot vision.
April 6, 2017
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House cleaning chemicals may cause birth defects
New research finds that two chemical compounds commonly found in household cleaning and personal hygiene products cause birth defects in rodents.
June 19, 2017
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How Are Smartphones Affecting Kids' Mental Health?
More use is linked to attention and behavior problems, but also less anxiety, study finds
May 3, 2017
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How diabetes in pregnancy affects baby's heart
Scientists show that high levels of glucose keep heart cells from maturing normally
December 12, 2017
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HPV Vaccine May Prevent Rare Childhood Disease
The human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine, first developed to help guard against cervical cancer, also seems to protect against a rare, chronic childhood respiratory disease, a new study suggests.
November 9, 2017
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Human milk sugars may protect against group B strep
Human milk contains sugars that may protect against group B strep, which is a leading cause of severe infection in newborn babies. The scientists behind the discovery suggest that the sugars might also prevent biofilms, which are a particularly stubborn form of infection.
August 21, 2017
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Hydraulic fracturing is harmful to infants health, study states
A new study published in Science Advances reveals that infants born to mothers who live within 2 miles of a hydraulic fracturing site or fracking site have increased health risks.
December 14, 2017
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Misc. - I

Improved communication could help reduce unnecessary use of antibiotics for childhood illnesses
To help reduce unnecessary use of antibiotics for common childhood illnesses, parents would benefit from fuller communication from their health care providers, suggests new research published in the National Communication Association's Journal of Applied Communication Research.
June 5, 2017
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Increased inflammatory markers during pregnancy can lead to changes in fetal brain development
Researchers from Charite - Universitätsmedizin Berlin in collaboration with colleagues from the University of California Irvine, Oregon Health and Science University and the University of North Carolina in the USA have shown that increased levels of inflammatory markers during pregnancy can lead to changes in fetal brain development which, in turn, may increase the child's risk of developing psychiatric disorders.
August 9, 2017
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Infantile vitamin B1 deficiency affects motor function, balance in children
A new Tel Aviv University study published in Maternal and Child Nutrition found that infantile Vitamin B1 (thiamine) deficiency severely affected the motor function of preschoolers who were fed faulty formula in the first year of their lives. the conclusions were based on a retrospective study of children who received Remedia, an Israeli formula brand completely lacking in Vitamin B1, in 2004.
March 29, 2017
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Infants born preterm may lack key lung cells later in life
Mice born into an oxygen-rich environment respond worse to the flu once fully grown due to an absence of certain lung cells, a discovery that provides a potential explanation for preterm infants' added susceptibility to influenza and other lung diseases later in their lives.
June 9, 2017
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Infants' ethnicity influences quality of hospital care in California, study finds
Infants' ethnic identities influence the quality of medical care they receive in California's neonatal intensive care units, a study has found.
August 28, 2017
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Interactive website positively influences parents to vaccinate their children
Pregnant women who received vaccine information through an interactive website monitored by a clinical expert were more likely to vaccinate their children than those who did not use the web resource, according to a Kaiser Permanente study published today in the journal Pediatrics.
November 7, 2017
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Intestinal worms have influence on allergy and asthma risk in humans
While young people with parasite worms currently have a four times higher risk for developing allergies and asthma than others. Their parents are generally unaffected.
December 4, 2017
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Intestinal worms may solve allergy puzzle
While young people with parasite worms currently have a four times higher risk for developing allergies and asthma than others, their parents are generally unaffected. Researchers were surprised when they found that intestinal worms, so-called Helminths (Toxocara Canis) from animals, actually have an influence on allergy- and asthma risk in humans.
December 4, 2017
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Iron supplements for low birth weight babies can prevent behavioral problems at school age
Babies classified as low birth weight (under 2.500 grams) are at risk of iron deficiency, which is linked to impaired neurological development. A long-term randomized study now shows that providing such babies with iron supplements can prevent behavioral problems at school age.
September 27, 2017
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Is 10-Year-Old Youngest Victim of Opioid Crisis?
A 10-year-old boy is one of the youngest victims of Florida's opioid crisis, prosecutors say.
July 18, 2017
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Is Surgery Always Needed for Kids' Appendicitis?
Review found many with inflamed appendix were fine with antibiotics alone, but more research needed
February 17, 2017
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Is Your Child's 'Penicillin Allergy' Real?
Follow-up of 100 kids found none were allergic
July 3, 2017
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Misc. - K

Kids Should be Screened for Lazy Eye by Age 5
Waiting later could lead to permanent vision problems, U.S. panel says
February 28, 2017
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Kids Still Get Risky Painkiller Post-Tonsillectomy
Despite safety warnings from drug regulators, some U.S. children are still being given a risky painkiller after having their tonsils removed, a new study finds.
November 16, 2017
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Kids' Artificial Sweetener Use Up in Recent Years
Some studies suggest a link between the sugar substitutes and obesity, researcher says
January 13, 2017
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Kids' Sugary Drink Habits Start Early
Two-thirds of U.S. children consume one or more sweetened beverages daily, report finds
January 26, 2017
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Kids, cash, and snacks: What motivates a healthier food choice?
How branding and prices influence children's decisions about snack purchases
August 1, 2017
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Kids, Don't Touch the Toys at the Doctor's Office
Pediatricians' group updates infection-prevention guidelines for medical offices
October 23, 2017
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Misc. - L

Lack of sleep could cause mood disorders in teens
Chronic sleep deprivation -- which can involve staying up late, and waking up early for work or school -- has become a way of life for both kids and adults, especially with the increasing use of phones and tablets late into the night.
December 6, 2017
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Lactation hormone also helps establish nurturing link between mother and baby
The same hormone that stimulates milk production for lactation, also acts in the brain to help establish the nurturing link between mother and baby, researchers from New Zealand's University of Otago have revealed for the first time.
September 26, 2017
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Late adolescent years found to be key period for gaining bone mineral
The late adolescent years are an important period for gaining bone mineral, even after a teenager attains his or her adult height. Scientists analyzing a racially diverse, multicenter sample from a large, federally funded national study say their findings reinforce the importance of diet and physical activities during the late teen years, as a foundation for lifelong health.
July 6, 2017
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Later School Start Times Do Help Kids Feel Rested: Study
Later school start times could help teens get the amount of sleep they need, according to a new study.
December 5, 2017
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Lead Exposure as Child, Lower IQ as Adult?
Leaded gasoline in new Zealand may have stunted intellectual development, study suggests
March 28, 2017
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Length of stay in ICU may have impact on preterm babies' behavior
A study carried out at the Ribeirão Preto Medical School of the University of São Paulo (FMRP-USP), supported by FAPESP , indicates that the length of hospital stay in the neonatal ICU is the factor that best explains some of the behavioral problems related to the regulation axis emotional status of infants - regardless of the level of prematurity and the presence of pulmonary dysplasia and retinopathy of prematurity.
November 30, 2017
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Level of aerobic capacity determines future cardiovascular disease risk in children
Researchers from the CTS-158 GALENO group at the University of Cadiz, directed by professor Jose Castro Piñero, have been working for three years on an important multicenter study based on an analysis of the influence of physical activity on the development of cardiovascular disease, a study in which they have taken into account environmental, nutritional, emotional and genetic factors, among others.
November 30, 2017
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Lifestyle interventions can have impact on children's blood fatty acid composition, study reveals
Eating lots of sugary candy may strain the liver, alter the body's fatty acid metabolism and increase the risk of cardiometabolic diseases already in childhood. Children's blood fatty acid composition reflects their diet - but luckily this composition can be influenced by lifestyle interventions, say researchers from the University of Eastern Finland.
March 23, 2017
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Long-lasting effects of traumatic childhood experiences may be due to impaired neural connections
Researchers from the McGill Group for Suicide Studies, based at the Douglas Mental Health University Institute and McGill University's Department of Psychiatry, have just published research in the American Journal of Psychiatry that suggests that the long-lasting effects of traumatic childhood experiences, like severe abuse, may be due to an impaired structure and functioning of cells in the anterior cingulate cortex. This is a part of the brain which plays an important role in the regulation of emotions and mood.
September 25, 2017
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'Love Hormone' Helps Dads and Babies Bond
Brain scans show distinct response when fathers gaze at their kids
February 17, 2017
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Low back Pain Common Among Kids
Sports injuries are just one frequent cause, study finds
January 30, 2017
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Low birth weight babies more likely to experience mental health problems later in life, research finds
Babies born with extremely low birth weight are not only at risk for physical problems but are also more likely to experience mental health problems later in life, according to an analysis of research conducted over nearly 30 years.
February 13, 2017
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Low birthweight babies have poor survival despite advances in neonatal care, study shows
The study included 104 babies born over 15 years in North East England and North Cumbria, in the UK, who were ≥22 weeks gestation and ≤500 grams (approximately 1.1 lb), of which 49 were admitted for intensive care. Overall one-year survival was 11%, but survival for those receiving intensive care was 22%. There was significant short-term morbidity in surviving babies, in particular retinopathy of prematurity and chronic lung disease.
September 27, 2017
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Loyola Medicine otolaryngologist corrects sleep apnea symptoms with ENT procedure
For Jason Johnson, nights were anything but restful. The 16-year-old high school student would often wake up with difficulty breathing.
December 14, 2017
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Misc. - M

Many parents have limited understanding of concussions, study finds
Despite the large volume of information about sports-related concussions on the Internet, many parents and guardians of young athletes have a limited understanding of concussions, according to a study co-authored by a faculty member of UTA's College of Nursing and Health Innovation.
July 13, 2017
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Many Tanning Salons Defy Legal Age Limits on Users
Some also make false claims about the health effects of tanning, researchers find
June 16, 2017
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Marijuana use among pregnant women linked to low birth weight infants
In a new study, researchers in London, Ontario found that women who used marijuana while pregnant were almost three times more likely to have an infant with low birth weight than women who did not use marijuana.
April 27, 2017
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Massaging Bra Helps to Move More Milk Into Breast Pump, Alleviating Clogged Ducts
As our modern society pushes ever forward toward greater efficiency and productivity, even breast pump technology is getting the 21st century upgrade. The Lilu is a powered bra that has a built-in massager that does what women have been told to do for ages: compress your breasts to produce more milk and to prevent blocked milk ducts.
September 25, 2017
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Maternal depression across the first years of life impacts children's neural basis of empathy
Exposure to early and chronic maternal depression markedly increases a child's susceptibility to psychopathology and social-emotional problems, including social withdrawal, poor emotion regulation, and reduced empathy to others. Since 15-18% of women in industrial societies and up to 30% in developing countries suffer from maternal depression, it is of clinical and public health concern to understand the effects of maternal depression on children's development.
January 3, 2017
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Maternal exposure to air pollution early in pregnancy linked to preterm, low birth weight babies
The study, conducted in mice, found that exposure to air pollution during the equivalent of the first or second trimester in humans was linked to more negative birth outcomes than exposure later in pregnancy.
July 27, 2017
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Maternal smoking may lead to cerebral palsy in offspring
Smoking during pregnancy can be harmful for both mother and baby. Now, a new study provides further evidence that maternal smoking is a risk factor for cerebral palsy in offspring, and it has shed light on the mechanisms behind this association.
October 9, 2017
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MedCision announce program for companies undergoing early cell therapy trials
Limited-time program to help companies and investigators de-risk thawing of cell therapies in early stage clinical trials.
April 6, 2017
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Mindfulness may help mothers cope with stress when their babies have a heart condition
Working with mothers, nurse researchers form CHOP and Penn Nursing analyze coping techniques, including positive focus on here and now
November 2, 2017
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Mindfulness may offer coping mechanism for mothers of infants diagnosed with CHD
Mindfulness may offer an active coping mechanism for mothers faced with the stress of having a newborn diagnosed with congenital heart disease (CHD). Mindfulness, which aims to increase a person's awareness and acceptance of daily experiences, is currently used in a variety of healthcare settings as a potentially effective skill for stress reduction, emotion, affect and attention regulation.
November 2, 2017
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MIT study offers new approach to evaluate risk of preterm birth
Up to 18 percent of babies born worldwide arrive before they are full-term, defined as 37 weeks of gestation. About 1 million of those babies do not survive, and those who do can face developmental problems such as impaired vision or hearing, defects in the heart or lungs, or cognitive impairments.
September 5, 2017
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Mobile health app helps improve concussion symptoms in teenagers
Generally, after suffering a concussion, patients are encouraged to avoid reading, watching TV and using mobile devices to help their brains heal. But new research shows that teen-agers who used a mobile health app once a day in conjunction with medical care improved concussion symptoms and optimism more than with standard medical treatment alone.
August 16, 2017
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Mold Found in Baby Teething Toy
Several parents have reported finding mold inside a popular teething toy called Sophie the Giraffe.
January 17, 2017
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Mom's Vaccine Protects Babies from Whooping Cough
Benefit is dramatic for newborns who are too young to be vaccinated, researchers say
April 3, 2017
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More Kids Spending Lots of Time on Screens
Survey finds big jump over past 6 years in media availability, use for youngest Americans
October 19, 2017
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More screen time for kids isn't all that bad
Researcher says children should be allowed to delve into screen technology, as it is becoming an essential part of modern life
February 7, 2017
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Most U.S. Adults Support Routine Child Vaccine
Survey finds 80 percent have positive view of the shot against measles, mumps and rubella
February 2, 2017
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Most U.S. Kids Who Die from Flu Are Unvaccinated
Researchers estimate about two-thirds of pediatric deaths could be prevented by flu shot
April 3, 2017
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Most U.S. Teens Aren't 'Doing It'
By 18, more than half of adolescents were still virgins, new CDC survey reveals
June 22, 2017
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Mother's diet during pregnancy could affect brain reward circuitry of children
Researchers in France found that rats who ate a junk food diet during pregnancy had heavier pups that strongly preferred the taste of fat straight after weaning. While a balanced diet in childhood seemed to reduce the pups' desire for fat, they nevertheless showed altered brain reward circuitry into adulthood.
September 25, 2017
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Multiple adverse experiences in early childhood linked to poor health in teen, preteen years
Adverse experiences in childhood -; such as the death of a parent, growing up in poverty, physical or sexual abuse, or having a parent with a psychiatric illness - have been associated with physical and mental health problems later in life.
October 30, 2017
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Misc. - N

NanoVelcro microchips could someday noninvasively diagnose prenatal conditions
Many pregnant women undergo some form of prenatal testing before their children are born. The information that expectant mothers gain from these tests vary, from the baby's gender to genetic defects. But the tests are often invasive, which can potentially harm the fetus and the mother.
July 19, 2017
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Naptime could have beneficial effect on language learning in preschool-age children
Research has shown that naps play an important role in sustaining new learning in infants. a new study from the University of Arizona suggests naptime could have a similar effect on language learning in preschool-age children.
February 8, 2017
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Neighborhood's quality has long-term effects on child and adolescent problem behaviors
The quality of the neighborhood where a child grows up has a significant impact on the number of problem behaviors they display during elementary and teenage years, a study led by Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health researchers suggests.
November 9, 2017
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Neighborhood's quality influences children's behaviors through teens, study suggests
Findings could inform housing and community services policymaking
November 9, 2017
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Neonatal inflammatory pain may contribute to increased food consumption, obesity in females
Inflammatory pain at birth changes how the hippocampus, a part of the brain associated with memory and eating behavior, works later in life, and this pain also causes adult rats to eat more frequently and in larger amounts, according to a study by Georgia State University and the Charlie Norwood VA Medical Center.
July 6, 2017
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New analysis examines link beween sleep duration and cardiometabolic risk in young children
How many hours a day young children (1-3 years) sleep does not appear to affect their cardiometabolic risk (CMR) at ages 3-8, based on an assessment of factors including blood pressure and cholesterol and blood glucose levels. Most unexpectedly, less sleep was associated with increased levels of high density lipoprotein (HDL), the "good" form of cholesterol, as reported in a new study published in Childhood Obesity, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers.
May 15, 2017
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New approach to predict respiratory allergy in early childhood
A new study suggests that immune response in early childhood to a handful of allergen molecules can predict the onset of allergic rhinitis and asthma in adolescence. These findings could accelerate the development of preventive strategies and novel treatments for respiratory allergy in children.
December 4, 2017
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New clinical study aims to prevent onset of epilepsy in children with tuberous sclerosis
A clinical trial of a drug that researchers hope can prevent or delay the onset of epilepsy in children with tuberous sclerosis has begun at McGovern Medical School at the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth).
May 8, 2017
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New discovery provides explanation for preterm infants' susceptibility to lung diseases later in life
Mice born into an oxygen-rich environment respond worse to the flu once fully grown due to an absence of certain lung cells, a discovery that provides a potential explanation for preterm infants' added susceptibility to influenza and other lung diseases later in their lives, according to new research from the University of Rochester Medical Center (URMC).
June 9, 2017
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New Hope for Kids With Multiple Food Allergies
A treatment for kids with more than one dangerous food allergy shows promise in early trials, researchers say.
December 12, 2017
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New position paper provides guidance on radiation safety for children with CAHD
Newly released recommendations for pediatric radiation safety will be discussed during the Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions (SCAI) 2017 Scientific Sessions in new Orleans. the position paper, "Radiation Safety in Children with Congenital and Acquired Heart Disease: a Scientific Position Statement on Multimodality Dose Optimization from the Image Gently Alliance," provides cardiologists, radiologists, pediatricians and internal medicine physicians guidance for treating pediatric patients with congenital and acquired heart disease (CAHD).
May 9, 2017
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New study examines efficacy of extended-release guanfacine in children with chronic tic disorders
A new study assessed the safety, tolerability, and effectiveness of extended-release guanfacine in children 6-17 years of age who have chronic tic disorders including Tourette's disorder. Researchers designed the randomized trial to determine whether guanfacine would reduce tic severity compared to placebo and to identify the most common adverse effects of treatment, as described in an article published in Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychopharmacology, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers.
July 26, 2017
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New study examines high school principals' perceptions about concussion
When it comes to helping high school student athletes recover from concussion, support is needed beyond the athletic field. It is also essential when they return to the classroom. A new study examining principals' perceptions about concussion will be released today and presented at the American Academy of Neurology's Sports Concussion Conference in Jacksonville, Fla., July 14 to 16, 2017.
July 13, 2017
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New study explores biomechanics of head injury in pediatric patients
The biomechanics of head injury in youths (5 to 18 years of age) have been poorly understood. a new study reported in the Journal of Neurosurgery: Pediatrics set out to determine what biomechanical characteristics predispose youths with concussions to experience transient or persistent postconcussion symptoms.
March 28, 2017
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New study finds huge problem of multi-drug resistant infections among children
The adage that kids are growing up too fast these days has yet another locus of applicability.
February 24, 2017
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New study finds no link between pet ownership and children's health
Contrary to popular belief, having a dog or cat in the home does not improve the mental or physical health of children, according to a new RAND Corporation study.
August 7, 2017
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New study finds stark differences between dental health of kids in care and general child population
Children in care, including those in foster and residential care, have double the rates of urgent dental treatment and are half as likely to attend dental services as the general child population. Children in care are also twice as likely to have a tooth extraction under general anaesthetic.
September 1, 2017
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New study highlights exposure of infants to harmful pollutants during school drop-in hours
Babies in prams accompanying older siblings on the school run are twice as likely to be exposed to harmful air pollution in the morning than in the afternoon, a new study has found.
March 9, 2017
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New study identifies substantial unmet needs in Indigenous infant disease prevention, medical care
The study included 19 770 First Nations babies, 3930 Inuit and 225 380 non-Indigenous infants born between 1996 and 2010 in the province of Quebec. First Nations and Inuit mothers were much younger than non-Indigenous mothers, with 22% of First Nations and 27% of Inuit mothers under age 20 compared with non-Indigenous mothers (3.3%).
May 29, 2017
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Newborn baby's infection offers a cautionary tale about placenta pills
When I was pregnant, I spent a lot of time searching for good information about how to keep both my baby and myself healthy after birth. Googling "placenta" and "eat," I got a list of stories that reached nearly opposite conclusions about the practice.
July 28, 2017
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Newborn brain can distinguish between different kinds of caresses
The ability to distinguish between different kinds of caresses on the skin already exists at a very early age. This is evident from a study by the Sahlgrenska Academy, in which the blood supply in brains of infants 6 to 10 weeks old was investigated.
August 22, 2017
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Newborns in Pain Might Not Show It
Just because your newborn isn't a crybaby doesn't mean he doesn't feel pain, new research suggests.
November 30, 2017
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Newborns with congenital heart disease show signs of brain impairment even before cardiac surgery
High-risk newborns have weaker functional connectivity between key regions of their developing brains
October 5, 2017
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No Fruit Juice Before Age 1, Pediatricians Say
Plus, they support limits for older kids and doing away with sippy cups for toddlers
May 22, 2017
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No significant change seen in hearing loss among US teens
Although there was an increase in the percentage of US youth ages 12 to 19 reporting exposure to loud music through headphones from 1988-2010, researchers did not find significant changes in the prevalence of hearing loss among this group, according to a study.
July 27, 2017
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Non-physical sexual harassment can affect adolescents' psychological well-being
"Being exposed to non-physical sexual harassment can negatively affect symptoms of anxiety, depression, negative body image and low self-esteem," say Associate Professor Mons Bendixen and Professor Leif Edward Ottesen Kennair at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology's (NTNU) Department of Psychology.
November 9, 2017
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Misc. - O

Obesity in Early Pregnancy May Raise Child's Risk of Epilepsy
The heavier the mom, the greater the odds of the seizure disorder, study suggests
April 3, 2017
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Obesity in Pregnancy Tied to Cerebral Palsy Risk
But study authors stress that a cause-and-effect link wasn't proven
March 7, 2017
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Obesity rates among children and adolescents have increased ten-fold over the last four decades
The number of children and adolescents (aged 5 to 19 years) across the world who classify as obese has increased ten-fold over the last forty years, according to an analysis led by Imperial College London and the World Health Organization (WHO).
October 11, 2017
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OIST scientists use zebrafish model to unravel causes behind human LCA
Newborns babies can be at risk of congenital blindness, presenting sight defects due to lesions or to genetic mutations in their genome. Among the latter, Leber Congenital Amaurosis -- or LCA -- is one of the most widespread causes of child blindness and accounts for nearly 5% of vision impairments overall.
April 5, 2017
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Omega-3 fats fail to reduce risk of chronic lung disease in pre-term babies, study finds
The long-held belief that Omega-3 fats can help reduce chronic lung disease in pre-term babies has been debunked by researchers.
March 31, 2017
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Ondek raises capital to develop new treatment for childhood allergy
Ondek, the Australian biotechnology company founded by Nobel Laureate Professor Barry Marshall, today announced it raised A$3.59 million in equity funding from professional and high-net-worth investors to support his work to develop a new treatment for childhood allergy.
June 30, 2017
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One in 20 children still receiving codeine to treat pain despite warning from federal regulators
A new study shows as many as one in 20 children were still receiving codeine to treat pain after tonsil and adenoid surgery, two years after federal regulators warned doctors that prescribing the opioid to kids after the routine surgeries could be fatal.
November 16, 2017
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One more reason to focus on prenatal care -- Stronger muscles for newborn babies
Malnutrition and stress negatively affect muscle stem cells in the fetus, and this could have life-long consequences, outlines a new report.
February 3, 2017
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One-of-a-kind physician training blends family medicine with obstetrics
Unique UC Davis residency program celebrates its 20th anniversary
July 13, 2017
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One-shot vaccine passes key preclinical test in newborn monkey models
Newborns are highly vulnerable to infections and don't respond optimally to most vaccines because their young immune systems typically mount weak antibody responses. Now, researchers at Boston Children's Hospital report achieving strong vaccine responses in newborn animals, including monkeys -- the final preclinical model before human trials -- by adding compounds known as adjuvants that boost the immune response. In two simultaneous papers, they also describe improved adjuvant formulations that could reduce side effects.
March 24, 2017
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Overactive bladder in children: Causes, symptoms, and treatment
Bedwetting in children is often considered a normal part of growing up, and celebrated as a milestone when it stops. When it doesn't stop, it could be a sign of overactive bladder or urinary incontinence.
April 18, 2017
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Overweight, obese children at increased risk of developing surgical site infectios, study shows
Overweight and obese children are at the highest risk for the most common complications from surgery, an infection at the site of the surgical procedure.
January 4, 2017
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Misc. - P

Parent-involved therapies found to be effective in treating children with disruptive behavior disorders
Therapy that involves the parents in the treatment of children with disruptive behavior disorders shows the best results compared to more than 20 other therapeutic approaches, according to a new study published today in the Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology, a journal of the Society of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology. Disruptive behavior disorders (DBDs) are characterized by a range of challenging symptoms that put a child frequently at odds with peers, family members, and authority figures.
May 2, 2017
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Parent's Smartphone Use Can Affect Kids' Behavior
Little ones can feel snubbed by the devices and consequently act out, study suggests
June 15, 2017
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Parental attention can be protective factor to lower risk of drug abuse among adolescents
Parents who require children to follow rules and keep a constant eye on their activities, endeavoring to know where they are, who they are with and what they are doing, run less risk of facing problems when their children enter adolescence, such as abuse of alcohol and other drugs.
December 4, 2017
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Parental concerns about safety, side effects may negatively influence uptake of child flu vaccine
The first study investigating parental attitudes towards the UK's child flu vaccine has found concerns about safety and side effects may negatively influence uptake, and recommends that public health messages need to be reinforced.
March 8, 2017
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Parenting significantly impacts development of children with Fragile X Syndrome
A longitudinal study of children with Fragile X Syndrome, the leading genetic cause of autism, and their mothers found that sustained maternal responsivity had a significant positive impact on the children's development, even mitigating declines often reported in middle childhood.
February 14, 2017
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Parents can pass damaging effects of nighttime light exposure to offspring, study finds
Animals can pass the damaging effects of nighttime light exposure to their offspring, a new study has found, adding to a growing body of evidence that there's a health cost to our increasingly illuminated nights.
March 31, 2017
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Parents concerned about neighborhoods more likely to restrict children's outdoor play, study shows
A study conducted by LSU Health new Orleans School of Public Health is the first to demonstrate that parents who are concerned about their neighborhoods restrict their children's outdoor play.
January 10, 2017
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Parents' income and educational level linked to children's physical activity, screen time
Parents' income and educational level are associated with their children's physical activity and screen time, according to a new study from the University of Eastern Finland. Lower income and educational levels were associated with less supervised physical activity in particular. In boys, these were also associated with more screen time.
April 3, 2017
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Paternal diet affects cognitive skills of offspring, mice study shows
The father's lifestyle affects the cognitive skills of his offspring -- at least in mice. Scientists at the German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE) have now shown that if male rodents are fed a diet rich in folic acid, methionine and vitamin B12, their progeny do not perform well in memory tests.
April 4, 2017
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Pediatric clinic support boosts mental health for youth
Providing a brief behavioral therapy in the pediatric primary care setting is often better than referring to outpatient services for young people struggling with depression and anxiety, new research concludes. the brief intervention's benefits were especially noteworthy in Latino youth, more than three quarters of whom showed significant improvement.
April 24, 2017
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Pediatric dermatologist offers few tips to protect infants from the sun
Skin cancer is the most common cancer in the United States, and it only takes one blistering sunburn during childhood or adolescence to nearly double a person's chance of developing melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer, later in life. This is why it's imperative, say dermatologists from the American Academy of Dermatology, that parents do everything they can to protect their infants from the sun's harmful ultraviolet rays and teach their children healthy sun care habits -- starting at an early age.
June 13, 2017
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Pet Meds Sending Kids to the ER
It's not uncommon for toddlers to ingest drugs intended for dogs and cats, study finds
February 6, 2017
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Pets alter infants' microbiota to lower risk of allergies, obesity
New research highlights the benefits of having pets around the house during childhood, after finding that early-life exposure to furry animals may reduce the risk of developing allergies and obesity.
April 7, 2017
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Phthalate exposure linked to increased risk of allergies among children
Phthalates, which are used as plasticizers in plastics, can considerably increase the risk of allergies among children. this was demonstrated by UFZ researchers in conjunction with scientists from the University of Leipzig and the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) in a current study published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology. According to this study, an increased risk of children developing allergic asthma exists if the mother has been particularly heavily exposed to phthalates during pregnancy and breastfeeding. T
May 3, 2017
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Phthalates increase the risk of allergies among children
Phthalates, which are used as plasticizers in plastics, can considerably increase the risk of allergies among children, researchers show. According to this study, an increased risk of children developing allergic asthma exists if the mother has been particularly heavily exposed to phthalates during pregnancy and breastfeeding. the mother-child cohort from the LINA study was the starting and end point of this translational study.
May 3, 2017
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Physical stress to mother during pregnancy can influence growth of unborn child
If the mother is stressed over a longer period of time during pregnancy, the concentration of stress hormones in amniotic fluid rises, as proven by an interdisciplinary team of researchers from the University of Zurich. Short-term stress situations, however, do not seem to have an unfavorable effect on the development of the fetus.
May 29, 2017
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Physically active children are less depressed
Children, like adults, reap physical and mental benefits from being active
January 31, 2017
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Plan Ahead for Kids' Severe Allergic Reactions
First line of defense is an epinephrine auto-injector, pediatricians say
February 13, 2017
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Polluted Environments Kill 1.7M Kids Yearly: WHO
Unhealthy and polluted environments cause more than 1 in 4 deaths of children younger than age 5 worldwide, the World Health Organization says.
March 6, 2017
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PolyU researchers discover inadequate intakes of micronutrients among Hong Kong lactating women
While breastfeeding has become more common across the globe in recent years, lactating women may not be aware of the nutrient adequacy of their breast milk and how their daily diet affects their nutrition intakes. the research team at the Laboratory for Infant & Child of the Hong Kong Polytechnic University (PolyU)'s Food Safety and Technology Research Centre (FSTRC) has undertaken a study in breast milk to analyze the calcium, iron and iodine levels of breast milk of Hong Kong lactating women and their daily intakes of the respective micronutrients.
July 29, 2016
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Polyunsaturated fatty acids linked to reduced allergy risk
High levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids in children's blood are associated with a reduced risk of asthma or rhinitis at the age of 16 years, new research shows.
December 5, 2017
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Pot Use in Pregnancy on the Upswing, Study Finds
Researchers concerned about possible harm to fetus
December 19, 2016
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Potentially harmful nanoparticles found to be present in infant formula products
The study commissioned by Friends of the Earth (FoE) has found that six out of six infant formula samples tested contained nanoparticles, which are believed by FoE to be harmful. However the potential health risks of nanoparticles are disputed by others, who claim there is insufficient evidence to support this.
July 3, 2017
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Prebiotics may be new weapon in the fight against childhood obesity
There may soon be a new tool in the fight against childhood obesity. Prebiotics reduce body fat in children who are overweight or obese by altering their gut microbiota, according to new research published in Gastroenterology, the official journal of the American Gastroenterological Association (AGA).
June 7, 2017
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Preemies treated with caffeine have better lung function in mid-childhood, study finds
"Previous studies have shown that caffeine, which belongs to a group of drugs known as methylxanthines, reduces apnea of prematurity, a condition in which the baby stops breathing for many seconds," said lead study author Lex W. Doyle, MD, professor of neonatal pediatrics at the Royal Women's Hospital in Melbourne and head of the Australian National Health and Medical Research Council's Centre of Research Excellence in Newborn Medicine.
July 14, 2017
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Preterm infants have higher risk of heart failure than babies born at full term
Babies born preterm run a higher risk of heart failure during childhood and adolescence than those born at full term, researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden report. The registry-based study is published in The Journal of the American College of Cardiology (JACC).
May 22, 2017
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Preventing childhood asthma: Could gut bacteria be the key?
A study finds that asthma passing from mother to child may not solely be down to genetics; gut bacteria seem to play a pivotal role, too. Probiotics could, in the future, prevent some cases of infant asthma.
December 4, 2017
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Preventing, treating smoking in children and youth
Recommendations from the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care
February 27, 2017
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Problems at birth linked to long-lasting chemical changes in the brain
New King's College London research, published today in eLife, shows that adults born prematurely - who also suffered small brain injuries around the time of birth - have lower levels of dopamine in the brain.
November 28, 2017
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Psychological marks of spanking may last 10 years
The latest study to investigate spanking and its long-lasting effects again finds negative outcomes, particularly for African-American children.
August 2, 2017
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Misc. - R

Reasons Why Parents Should be Wary of '13 Reasons Why'
Netflix series is too explicit in depicting teen suicide while leaving out key elements, mental health experts warn
May 4, 2017
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Report reveals differences in non-Hispanic black and white infant mortality rates in the US
The JAMA Pediatrics recently published new research on non-Hispanic black and white infants, the report analyzed the trends in overall and cause-specific infant mortality rates in the US population.
July 4, 2017
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Research explores effect of alcohol on adolescent brain
Under 18, no alcohol. In spite of this slogan, adolescents still have access to alcohol. But how harmful is that one beer for the adolescent brain? Research, including in Leiden, may provide the answer.
May 11, 2017
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Research finds diagnostic tests to be less accurate for children with impaired kidney function
Breaking research published today in AACC's Journal of Applied Laboratory Medicine reveals that a number of diagnostic tests are less accurate when performed in pediatric patients with impaired kidney function. These findings show that healthcare providers should assess patient kidney function when interpreting clinical test results for certain conditions to ensure that patients receive the correct diagnoses and treatments.
April 17, 2017
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Research focuses on impact of natural disasters on youth
Children's mental state plays an important factor in their developmental growth. After recent storms devastated parts of the U.S. - Hurricane Harvey in Texas, Hurricane Irma in Florida and the Caribbean and Hurricane Maria in Puerto Rico -- all contributing to massive evacuations of children and families, which children need more attention or support services in the aftermath of these storms and the related stressors that come with surviving and witnessing the destructive power of a Category 4 or 5 hurricane?
September 26, 2017
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Research identifies main factors that influence low birth weight in Nepal
According to research, 27% of all children born in Nepal have low birth weight and over three-quarters of the newborn deaths in Nepal occur in these low birth weight babies.
July 3, 2017
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Research suggests a mother's brain is hard-wired to respond in a certain way to baby cries
A study has shown that specific regions of a mother's brain are activated in response to her baby crying, irrespective of which country she lives in and her culture.
October 24, 2017
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Research: Many UK parents unaware about detrimental effects of spouted baby food on child's development
Watch our video featuring health care experts giving their top tips and professional advice on how to marry the best convenience food with your baby's developmental needs.
July 28, 2017
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Researchers develop illuminated pajamas for babies being treated for jaundice
Alone, naked, and with their eyes covered for protection: this is how newborns lie in incubators when they are being treated for jaundice. Irradiation with blue light in an incubator is necessary because toxic decomposition products of the blood pigment hemoglobin are deposited in the skin in newborns with jaundice.
October 31, 2017
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Researchers develop new camera system to medically monitor premature babies
In the near future, premature babies kept warm in neonatal incubators could be medically monitored using cameras rather than with sensors attached to their skin. this system is about to be tested on preemies at University Hospital Zurich (USZ-CH).
April 10, 2017
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Researchers examine affected canines to help develop effective treatment for children with rare epilepsy
The research, published in PLOS ONE, has identified the progression of Lafora disease, a devastating form of epilepsy which affects up to 50 young children worldwide. Lafora's disease also affects dogs and the examination of affected canines will help develop effective treatment which can be used to treat children with the illness.
August 2, 2017
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Researchers explore how C-section, formula feeding, and antibiotics alter infant's gut microbiome
A new analytical approach, described in open-access journal Frontiers in Pediatrics, shows how different interventions - cesarean section, formula feeding, and antibiotics - can alter an infant's developing gut microbiome.
September 26, 2017
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Researchers explore how providers perceive fathers' role in early intervention services for children
Early intervention services for children with disabilities or developmental delays are focused on being family centered and are ideally conducted in the home setting. Even so, fathers--custodial or noncustodial--are often left out of the process.
August 1, 2017
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Researchers find increase in prescription of epipens for children with allergies
Researchers at the University of Birmingham have found that prescriptions of adrenaline autoinjectors (commonly called 'epipens') for children with allergies have increased markedly in the last decade, with nearly four devices a year provided per child.
March 15, 2017
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Researchers release the brakes on the immune system
Many tumors possess mechanisms to avoid destruction by the immune system. For instance, they misuse the natural "brakes" in the immune defense mechanism, which normally prevent an excessive immune response. Researchers have now been able to take off one of these brakes. The study could pave the way for more effective cancer therapies, they say.
October 18, 2017
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Rest May not be best for Kids After Concussion
Study suggests light activity may help speed recovery
December 20, 2016
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Risk of a Fatal Crash Triples for New Teen Drivers
Distractions, such as cell phones, and failure to buckle up are main causes
June 1, 2017
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Misc. - S

Scientists discover potential trigger for MDS in children with rare genetic disorder
Myelodysplastic syndrome is an umbrella term used to describe disorders characterized by the bone marrow's inability to produce normal blood cells. Researchers from Charite - Universitätsmedizin Berlin have found that a mutation in a specific tumor suppressor gene is one possible reason why children with a very rare genetic disorder develop myelodysplastic syndrome.
April 12, 2017
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Screen Time May not be So Bad for Teens After All
Those who spend hours on smartphones, computers, TV can still flourish, develop social skills, study finds
January 20, 2017
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Second-hand smoke exposures before conception affect fetal brain development
Exposure to second-hand tobacco smoke -- even before conception -- appears to have a lingering impact that can later impair the brain development of a fetus, researchers at Duke Health report.
January 5, 2017
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Secondhand Smoke Linked to Food Allergies in Kids
Passive exposure tied to more egg and peanut sensitivity in study
March 6, 2017
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See how bacterial blood infections in young kids plummeted after vaccines
To celebrate birthdays, my 2- and 4-year-old party animals got vaccinated. Measles, mumps, rubella, chicken pox, diphtheria, tetanus and whooping cough for the older one (thankfully combined into just two shots), and hepatitis a for the younger.
March 15, 2017
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Self-Harm on the Rise Among Teen Girls
Behavior was strongly linked to greater suicide risk, UK study found
October 19, 2017
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Shaming Overweight Kids Only Makes Things Worse
Overweight kids who are shamed or stigmatized are more likely to binge eat or isolate themselves than to make positive changes such as losing weight, a leading pediatricians' group says.
November 20, 2017
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Should More Kids Have Their Tonsils Out?
Research suggests looser surgical guidelines might be warranted for sore throat, sleep problems
January 17, 2017
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Silk garments unlikely to provide benefit for children with eczema
Wearing silk clothing offers no additional benefit for children who suffer from moderate to severe eczema, a study led by researchers at the University of Nottingham has found.
April 12, 2017
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Simple clinical test helps doctors exclude pathologic cardiac murmur in children
Although heart murmur in children is usually harmless (referred to as innocent murmur), in a small number of cases it is symptomatic of cardiac disease (referred to as pathologic murmur).
November 16, 2017
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Single dose of measles vaccine not sufficient to protect children against disease in Bangladesh
Research in Bangladesh has found that a quarter of children need more than single doses of the measles vaccine to be protected against the disease. This research supports the country's recent move to a double-dose approach.
November 6, 2017
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Sleep apnea in children impairs memory consolidation
A new study examined how obstructive sleep apnea in children may interfere with memory consolidation, and it also uncovered a potential method of predicting the level of disruption caused by the associated sleep loss.
November 9, 2017
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Smart baby monitors could put infants at risk, doctors say
A new editorial pushes for more regulation of smartphone-connected baby monitors
January 26, 2017
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Smartphones, Screens Sabotaging Teens' Sleep
Study found more adolescents getting less rest because of temptations of technology
October 20, 2017
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SnapType makes it easy for kids with learning disabilities to do their homework
Sometimes the simplest ideas make the biggest difference. Take SnapType, for example. Created by a husband and wife team -- Ben and Amberlynn Slavin -- this app lets kids take pictures of their homework and simply type in answers instead of having to hand-write them.
November 13, 2017
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Some Newborns Don't Get Heart, Hearing Loss Tests
Such screens are critical to early intervention efforts, CDC officials say
August 25, 2017
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Some parents may underestimate drowning risks of children, new poll suggests
As kids get ready to splash around in pools this summer, some parents may underestimate drowning risks, suggests a new national poll.
May 15, 2017
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Some Schools Shame Students When Their Parents Can't Pay for Lunch
Shaming a debtor may be an effective -- and potentially illegal or unethical -- way of getting them to pay up, but should children who have no control over their family finances be publicly shamed if it gets their parents to pay their outstanding school lunch bills?
May 1, 2017
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Spanking linked to increase in children's behavior problems
Children who have been spanked by their parents by age 5 show an increase in behavior problems at age 6 and age 8 relative to children who have never been spanked, according to new findings. The study, which uses a statistical technique to approximate random assignment, indicates that this increase in behavior problems cannot be attributed to various characteristics of the child, the parents, or the home environment - rather, it seems to be the specific result of spanking.
November 16, 2017
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Stimulating the brain in younger age can help people stay mentally healthy in later life
Stimulating the brain by taking on leadership roles at work or staying on in education help people stay mentally healthy in later life, according to new research.
April 20, 2017
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Stress in late pregnancy may fuel binge eating in female offspring
It is widely recognized that stress can trigger eating disorders such as binge eating, which is more common in females than in males. It was once thought that the link was purely psychological, but researchers are increasingly turning to genetics and biology for explanations. Now, a new study of mice shows that stress during late pregnancy rewires the brain and predisposes female offspring to demonstrate binge-like behavior. The study also suggests that binge eating may be prevented by changing the balance of certain nutrients in adolescence.
May 30, 2017
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Study discovers new genetic risk loci linked to children's food allergies
What role do genes play in egg, milk, and nut allergies? A study published in Nature Communications, led by the Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine (MDC) and Charite - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, has found five genetic risk loci that point to the importance of skin and mucous membrane barriers and the immune system in the development of food allergies.
October 24, 2017
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Study examines attainment of obesity prevention guidelines in preschool-age children
In a study of nearly 400 preschool children, only one child adhered to obesity prevention guidelines over the course of a single day at child care and at home.
August 29, 2017
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Study examines use of virtual reality to manage pain at pediatric hospital
Virtual reality has emerged into popular culture with an ever-widening array of applications including clinical use in a pediatric healthcare center. Children undergo necessary yet painful and distressing medical procedures every day, but very few non-pharmaceutical interventions have been found to successfully manage the pain and anxiety associated with these procedures.
November 7, 2017
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Study explores factors, patterns that predict use of restrictive feeding for children
In the preschool years, children begin to learn from their environment about self-regulation--both in regards to food choices and how to deal with their emotions. When children don't learn effective self-regulation skills during those early critical years, studies have shown they may be at a greater risk of becoming obese.
June 16, 2017
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Study finds altered blood flow in brains of preterm newborns
According to a new prospective and observational study published today in The Journal of Pediatrics, very premature infants suffer from an altered cerebral blood flow (CBF) of key regions of the brain which may help to warn of complications in brain maturation, far sooner than conventional imaging could visually reveal.
December 4, 2017
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Study finds decrease in sexual violence perpetration and victimization among high school students
University of Kentucky researchers have observed a significant reduction in sexual violence perpetration and victimization among Kentucky high school students, according to a recently published study on the "Green Dot" bystander intervention program.
March 9, 2017
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Study finds direct link between birth outcomes and placental oxygen transport
When a baby is born small, it's often attributed to genetic factors or maternal risk factors like poor nutrition or smoking. But a twin study led by researchers at Boston Children's Hospital now find that slower transport of oxygen from mother to baby across the placenta predicts slower fetal growth, as well as a smaller brain and liver.
June 16, 2017
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Study finds genetic basis for drug response in childhood absence epilepsy
NIH-funded research suggests genes may help determine optimal treatments.
April 11, 2017
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Study finds high levels of methylmercury in infant rice cereals
Eating large amounts of certain fish can expose consumers to methylmercury, which can potentially cause health problems. But recent research has shown that rice grown in polluted conditions can also have raised levels.
October 25, 2017
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Study finds lack of peer support for breastfeeding mothers in many areas of the UK
The researchers obtained data from almost every NHS organization in the UK that provides maternity services and found that peer support was only available in 56% of NHS Trust/NHS Health Board areas. They also found a variation in what was provided within and between areas.
July 7, 2017
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Study finds that 25% of children deliberately avoid sunscreen on holidays
Oliver's Travels polled over 400 families across the UK to lift the lid on Britain's holiday habits. When they asked parents what the naughtiest thing their children have done on holiday a staggering 25% responded with; "deliberately avoiding sunscreen".
July 6, 2017
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Study focuses on reduction of maternal morbidity from hemorrhage using perinatal collaborative
In a study to be presented Friday, Jan. 27, in the oral concurrent session at 1:15 p.m. PST, at the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine's annual meeting, the Pregnancy Meeting™, researchers with the California Maternal Quality Care Collaborative, based at Stanford University, Palo Alto, Ca., will present Reduction of Severe Maternal Morbidity from Hemorrhage (SMM-HEM) Using a State-Wide Perinatal Collaborative.
January 23, 2017
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Study focuses on sound exposure for premature babies in neonatal intensive care units
Premature babies often spend the first several weeks of life in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs), where, ideally, they are protected from too much noise stimulation. However, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have found that preemies may be exposed to noise levels higher than those deemed safe by the American Academy of Pediatrics.
February 8, 2017
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Study highlights impact of familial poverty on toddlers' brain development
A study carried out by the University of Granada (UGR) has revealed that familial poverty has an impact on the toddlers' brain functioning. Infants belonging to families with lower economic resources and a lower level of education present a more immature functioning and less ability to detect errors.
April 18, 2017
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Study looks at impact of mental health risk factors on extremely low birth weight survivors
Decreased exposure to bullying and family problems during childhood and adolescence could help reduce adult mental illness in extremely low birth weight preemies, according to a new study from McMaster University.
October 3, 2017
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Study shows effects of sex offender registration policies on children
A new study led by researchers from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health found that children who were legally required to register as sex offenders were at greater risk for harm, including suicide attempts and sexual assault, compared to a group of children who engaged in harmful or illegal sexual behavior but who were not required to register.
December 6, 2017
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Study shows how the amount that babies cry varies around the world
According to a new study by the University of Warwick, newborns cry the most in Britain, Canada, Italy, and the Netherlands compared with the rest of the countries in the world. In a study on how much a baby cries in the first three months, psychologists have for the first time, created a universal chart for the normal amount of crying in babies during that period.
April 3, 2017
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Study shows prevalence of sleep disturbances among adolescents exposed to terror attacks
Adolescents who have experienced terror attacks suffer from sleep disturbance for years after the event. Researchers believe there is a need for better assessment and treatment of sleep disturbance in adolescents who have been exposed to trauma.
September 26, 2017
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Study shows that HPV vaccine also prevents recurrent respiratory papillomatosis in children
The vaccine that protects against cancer-causing types of human papillomavirus (HPV) also prevents an uncommon but incurable childhood respiratory disease, according to a new study published in The Journal of Infectious Diseases. The findings suggest that the chronic and difficult-to-treat condition, recurrent respiratory papillomatosis, is disappearing in Australian children as a result of the nation's highly successful HPV vaccination program.
November 9, 2017
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Study suggests novel approach to predict respiratory allergy in children
A new study in EBioMedicine by researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden and the Medical University of Vienna, Austria suggests that immune response in early childhood to a handful of allergen molecules can predict the onset of allergic rhinitis and asthma in adolescence. These findings could accelerate the development of preventive strategies and novel treatments for respiratory allergy in children.
December 4, 2017
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Study reveals biological basis of severe neurological disorder in children
In a new study published today in The American Journal of Human Genetics, a multinational team of researchers describes, for the first time, the biological basis of a severe neurological disorder in children.
August 3, 2017
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Study tracks parents' unpaid time assisting children with special health care needs
About half of U.S. children with special health care needs -- 5.6 million children -- receive medical care from uncompensated family members worth billions of dollars, finds a large national study led by Boston Children's Hospital and the University of Southern California (USC).
December 27, 2016
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Study: Changes in the brain after childhood limb loss can be reversed
In a recent study, investigators found that certain changes in the brain that occurred after limb amputation in a child were reversible after restoring sensory input through bilateral hand transplantation. The findings are published in the Annals of Clinical and Translational Neurology.
December 6, 2017
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Study: Most adults believe today's children are not healthier than kids of their own generation
Ask adults of all ages if today's children are healthier than children of their own generation.
November 2, 2017
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Study: Playing smartphone app aids concussion recovery in teens
App helps teens improve their symptoms and optimism after suffering a concussion
August 16, 2017
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'Superbug' Infections Striking More U.S. Kids
Antibiotic-resistant germs no longer confined to hospitals, study warns
February 24, 2017
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Sureglide Cesarean, a Delivery Scalpel that Helps Prevent Injuries to Babies
Ecomed Solutions out of Mundelein, Illinois has introduced the Sureglide Cesarean scalpel. the device is designed to prevent any injury to both the baby or the clinical staff during incision of the uterus.
January 24, 2017
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Misc. - T

Teachers call for ban on sale of energy drinks to under-16s in schools
One of Britain's leading teaching unions is calling for schools to be banned from selling energy drinks to children aged under 16 due to the large amount of caffeine they contain.
December 11, 2017
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Teenagers' impulsive and risk taking behavior not related to brain deficit symptoms
A popular theory in recent neuroscience proposes that slow development of the prefrontal cortex - and its weak connectivity with brain reward regions - explains teenagers' seemingly impulsive and risky behavior.
August 17, 2017
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Teens exposed to violence have greater risk for obesity, study suggests
Teens consumed more unhealthy foods and beverages on days they were exposed to violence, and suffered from fatigue due to poor sleep the next day, according to a new study by Duke researchers. Those behaviors, especially increased soda consumption, are important predictors of weight gain.
July 31, 2017
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Teens' increased use of electronic devices linked to rise in insufficient sleep
The temptation to respond to social media notifications and text messages from friends is keeping more and more teens awake at night.
October 20, 2017
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Texas A&M professor shares tips to protect infants from RSV
Coughing, sneezing and a runny nose: you might think it is yet another cold, but if your baby is under 2 years old, it could very well be respiratory syncytial virus (RSV).
December 20, 2016
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The Lullaby Trust-led initiative identifies global priorities for tackling Sudden Unexpected Death in Infancy
Pediatrics, the journal of the American Academy of Pediatrics, today published a paper from The Lullaby Trust and partner international organizations, which sets out new global priorities for tackling Sudden Unexpected Death in Infancy (SUDI).
July 28, 2017
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There are more cases of measles in Minnesota now than in all of the US last year, thanks to anti-vaxxers
This doesn't look good
June 2, 2017
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This baby monitor uses radar to detect infant breathing patterns
I'll be honest, hearing about what Raybaby does made me happy I don't have kids. the mere thought of needing a device to monitor a child's breathing stresses me out. But it's a legitimate concern, and the Hax graduates are offering a solution that may well provide some extra peace of mind for concerned parents of newborns.
February 16, 2017
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Tiny Babies May Face Mental Health Problems Later
Review found greater likelihood of ADHD, anxiety and depression
February 13, 2017
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Toddlers Eat More French Fries Than Vegetablesn class="DS1">Federal stats show some don't eat any veggies at all, and some infants don't get any breast milk
May 1, 2017
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Toddlers Who Drink Milk Alternatives May Be Shorter
Difference is small, about a half inch at age 3, study finds
June 7, 2017
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Too Many Babies Still Placed on Stomach to Sleep: Study
Pediatric experts recommend infants always sleep on their backs to avoid SIDS
August 21, 2017
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Too much manganese may lower children's IQ
New research recently published in the journal NeuroToxicology suggests that excessive exposure to air manganese might have adverse neurodevelopmental effects; children exposed to the metal were found to have lower IQ scores.
September 25, 2017
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TPU researchers create 3D-printed models of children's hearts
Scientists from Tomsk Polytechnic University are creating 3D-printed models of children's hearts. They are printed based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of real patients. These models are used as simulators for cardiac surgeons to plan and pre-work forthcoming operations.
December 11, 2017
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Traffic pollution linked to low birth weight of unborn babies, study reveals
A new study published yesterday by The BMJ warns that air pollution caused by road traffic in London has a harmful impact on babies' health while still in the womb.
December 6, 2017
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Trauma Takes a Toll on Half of U.S. Kids
Consequences can include long-term health issues, emotional problems and troubles at school
October 24, 2017
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Traumatic childhood can lead to higher levels of health service use throughout adult life
Experiencing physical, sexual or emotional abuse as a child, or other stresses such as living in a household affected by domestic violence, substance abuse or mental illness, can lead to higher levels of health service use throughout adulthood.
July 13, 2017
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TV Ads Still Push Unhealthy Foods at Kids
The number of food ads targeting American children has declined, but most of the ads they do see are for unhealthy foods, a new study finds.
November 6, 2017
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Twin study finds genetics affects where children look, shaping mental development
A study that tracked the eye movement of twins has found that genetics plays a strong role in how people attend to their environment.
November 9, 2017
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Misc. - U

UAB pediatrician suggests ways to keep infants safe while traveling
Traveling with children can be stressful, but preparation can significantly improve the situation, according to University of Alabama at Birmingham pediatrician Candice Dye, M.D.
March 3, 2017
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UGR researchers prove trolleys to be more beneficial than backpacks for children's gait
Researchers at the University of Granada warn that 23 percent of the girls carry in their backpack or trolley a load over 20 percent of their body weight, well above what is recommended
March 3, 2017
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Unhappy relationships may lead to excessive crying in infants
While colic is common among infants, researchers remain unclear on what causes the condition. a new study suggests that a mother's relationship happiness and level of social support might play a role.
May 1, 2017
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Unique womb-like device could reduce mortality and disability for extremely premature babies
In animal studies, researchers design fluid-filled environment to bridge critical time from mother's womb to outside world
April 25, 2017
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Universal screening not enough to improve language skills of deaf and hard-of-hearing children
Universal screening of newborns for hearing loss before they leave the hospital is not enough to improve language skills of children who are deaf and hard of hearing, according to a new study.
September 26, 2017
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Urinary incontinence may affect learning and academic performance of teenagers
Continence problems are among the most common pediatric health problems. It's commonly believed that continence problems resolve with age in all children. However, severe incontinence in childhood can persist into adolescence.
December 12, 2017
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Use of handheld devices by infants can delay speech development
Recent research presented at the 2017 Pediatric Academic Societies Meeting indicates that the development of expressive speech is more likely to be delayed in young children who use handheld devices, such as smart phones and tablets.
May 5, 2017
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Use of non-invasive ventilation decreases mortality in children with respiratory distress, study finds
A study by researchers at Columbia University Medical Center and the Mailman School of Public Health found that applying continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), a form of non-invasive ventilation, decreased mortality in children with respiratory distress. Findings from the trial in Ghana indicated that the procedure especially benefitted children less than one year of age.
June 19, 2017
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UTHealth study reveals genetic markers linked to increased risk for bipolar disorder in children
Genetic alterations that can be modulated by stress have been identified in children at high risk for bipolar disorder, according to a recently published study by researchers at McGovern Medical School at the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston.
May 8, 2017
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Misc. - V

Vaccinating pregnant women protects newborns from whooping cough
When I was pregnant, my pronoun shifted automatically. My "I' turned into "we,' as in, "What are we going to eat for dinner?' and, "Should we sit in that hot tub?' I thought about that shift to the majestic plural as we got our Tdap shot in our third trimester.
April 12, 2017
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Vision Check Needed for Kids with Concussion
Lingering eye problems linked to poorer academic performance
January 5, 2017
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Vitamin D supplements in pregnancy could help protect children against asthma
The team of researchers from King's College London looked at the effect that taking a supplement of 4,400 IU vitamin D3 per day during the second and third trimesters of pregnancy versus the recommended daily intake (RDI) of 400 IU/day, had on the immune system of the newborn.
May 26, 2017
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Misc. - W

Watchdog report finds alarming 20% of baby food tested contains lead
Levels are below FDA's decades-old standards, but latest data says no level safe.
June 16, 2017
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Weather-forecast tool can help improve assessment and treatment of newborns with asphyxia
UT Southwestern Medical Center pediatric researchers have harnessed an analytical tool used to predict the weather to evaluate the effectiveness of therapies to reduce brain injury in newborns who suffer oxygen deprivation during birth.
April 10, 2017
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What causes genu valgum (knock-knees)?
Genu valgum, or knock-knees, is a condition where the knees touch but the ankles do not. It appears most frequently in young children and can be very concerning for parents who may know very little about the condition.
November 2, 2017
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Why Are Babies Sleeping in Boxes?
The reason? it's not just because babies look adorable sleeping in the cardboard containers (although they do). Turns out, the boxes are an effective way to reduce the risk of infant death due to sleep-related causes, such as SIDS (sudden infant death syndrome).
February 1, 2017
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Why is one twin smaller than the other? Answer could lie in the placenta
MRI study finds differences in prenatal oxygen transport from mother to baby
June 16, 2017
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Widening 'Race Gap' in U.S. Infant Deaths
After years of progress, there's been a recent rise in deaths for black babies, study finds
July 3, 2017
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Misc. - X

X-Ray Photo Shows Dangers of Eating Grapes for Kids
An Australian blogger recently posted a photo on Facebook that apparently shows an X-ray of a grape lodged in a child's airway. She says she shared the image to raise awareness of the choking dangers of certain foods such as grapes, due to the size of a child's airway. Choking is the fourth leading cause of accidental death for children under age 5.
April 7, 2017
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Misc. - Y

Year-round flu vaccinations promote healthier infants in subtropics
Nepal study shows benefits for babies of vaccinated pregnant mothers
May 15, 2017
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You Shouldn't Feed Poison to Babies, Even If it's In a Homeopathic Teething Tablet
Parents Are Still Giving Belladonna to Children, Despite Multiple FDA Warnings
January 30, 2017
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Young children experience better long-term kidney transplant success than adults, study finds
The success of kidney transplants has vastly improved for children over the past half-century, with young children now experiencing better long-term transplant success than adults, according to study results from a large pediatric transplant center.
February 27, 2017
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Young people not routinely asked about alcohol consumption, survey of A&E departments finds
A survey of 147 A&E departments, conducted by researchers from the University of Surrey, found that young people are not routinely asked about their alcohol consumption, a useful tool in detecting alcohol problems. The research also found that those over the age of 65 are not routinely asked about their drinking either.
June 19, 2017
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Your mother's diet may influence your liver's health
Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is a serious and growing problem. Previously linked with obesity, a new study also connects it to maternal obesity - meaning that what your mother ate during pregnancy may affect your future liver health.
April 24, 2017
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Youth who use several media simultaneously struggle with attention-related tasks, study reveals
The aim of Mona Moisala's doctoral dissertation was to study patterns of activity in cortical networks related to attention and working memory, as well as to investigate associations between performance in working memory and attention tasks and the extent of daily technology-mediated activities in 13-24-year-old subjects from Finland.
March 13, 2017
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