The MerchantStoreDirectoryAbout UsAdd-siteLink to Us

 

433 Health - Children and Kids Resources

Misc. - Numbers

1 in 7 Kids Under 9 Have a Psychological Disorder
Parents' mental health, lack of medical care contribute to disabilities, researchers say
March 18, 2016
Read More


2 Kids an Hour Hurt in Strollers, Infant Carriers
About one-third of these were more serious injuries, study finds
August 17, 2016
Read More


5 Ways to Deal with Teen Angst
If you're the parent of a teen, you may already have witnessed it: hair-trigger moods and drama worthy of a midday soap opera. the frustration and anxiety kids feel about life at this age bubbles up as teen angst.
July 7, 2016
Read More


6 Ways to Get Any Kid to Exercise
Maybe your child hates sports, or gets more excited about video games than the kickball field. Or maybe he feels too out of shape to keep up with other kids his age. Whatever the reason, it can be tough to motivate a kid to exercise when he just isn't interested.
July 7, 2016
Read More


7 Mistakes Parents Make with Grade-Schoolers
You may not be able to avoid all parenting pitfalls, but looking before you leap may help you miss the big ones.
June 27, 2016
Read More


8 Mistakes Parents Make with Preschoolers
Find out how you can avoid these common parenting missteps.
June 27, 2016
Read More


9 of 10 U.S. Teens don't Get Enough Exercise
And bad habits continue after high school for most, study shows
September 23, 2016
Read More


9 Parents of Twins Share Their best Advice
Finding out that you're pregnant is a huge step for any parent-to-be. But when your doctor delivers the news that you're carrying not one, but two babies, it can seem even more daunting to prepare for the years ahead.
February 24, 2017
Read More


Misc. - A

AASM release pediatric sleep recommendations
The American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM), an organization that supports and promotes better sleep health, has released guidelines on the number of hours of sleep that children and teenagers need to minimize sleep related health problems.
June 14, 2016
Read More


Acetaminophen and Pregnancy: Bad Mix?
Another report that links taking acetaminophen while pregnant with behavior problems in children may leave some pregnant women wondering whether they should use the pain reliever.
August 17, 2016
Read More


ACL Tears on the Rise Among Kids, Especially Girls
Sports that involve cutting or pivoting are the riskiest, doctors say
February 22, 2017
Read More


Acupuncture may be viable option to manage pain in children with complex medical conditions
It appears that acupuncture may be a viable option for pain management when it comes to pediatric patients who have complex medical conditions, according to new research published by Gillette Children's Specialty Healthcare in St. Paul, Minnesota
August 24, 2016
Read More


Acute Flaccid Myelitis Cases Rising in Kids: FAQ
A rare but serious illness that causes paralysis in children appears to be on the rise this year, the CDC has warned.
October 10, 2016
Read More


Adlerian Counselling & Consulting Group
for children, adolescents, adults, couples, and families.
Provides a Service
Read More


Adolescents who prefer casual sex more often involved in sexual harassment, study finds
Adolescents who sexually harass others have had casual sex more often than those who do not harass others. they also fantasize more about casual sex and find it more acceptable to have sex without any commitment or emotional closeness.
March 16, 2017
Read More


Advanced maternal age does not increase birth risks, study finds
A number of previous scientific studies have found that among mothers 35 or older, there is an elevated risk that their children are born preterm (less than 37 weeks of pregnancy) or with low birth weight (less than 2.5 kilograms).
June 1, 2017
Read More


Advertisers and crib manufacturers fail to adhere to safe sleep recommendations for infants
A new study from the University of Alabama at Birmingham shows that national magazine advertisements and manufacturers of infant cribs continue to depict unsafe sleep environments, despite longtime guidelines established by the American Academy of Pediatrics to protect against SIDS and other sleep-related deaths.
December 19, 2016
Read More


Air Mattresses Linked to More Than 100 Infant Deaths
They can mold to a baby's face, leading to suffocation, researchers say
June 2, 2017
Read More


Anemia protects children against blood-stage malaria in Africa, UNC study finds
Iron deficiency is the most common nutritional deficiency in the world and causes long-term adverse consequences in children. However, concerns remain about the safety of iron supplements, particularly for children in malaria-endemic countries lacking adequate access to health services. Researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill have proven these concerns valid after finding iron deficiency anemia actually protects children against the blood-stage of Plasmodium falciparum malaria in Africa, and treating anemia with iron supplementation removes this protective effect.
January 5, 2017
Read More


Anesthesia Before 4 May Slightly Affect Academics
The low 'overall difference in academic performance' is reassuring, researchers say
November 7, 2016
Read More


Anti-epilepsy medicine use during pregnancy does not harm overall health of children, study finds
Children whose mothers have taken anti-epilepsy medicine during pregnancy, do not visit the doctor more often than children who have not been exposed to this medicine in utero. this is the result of a new study from Aarhus.
February 21, 2017
Read More


Antidepressants in Pregnancy and Kids' Speech
Study shows a link but can't prove cause and effect, and experts stress that overall risk is small
October 12, 2016
Read More


Antidepressant use during pregnancy not linked to newborn problems at 2-4 weeks after birth
Babies exposed to an antidepressant or a mood disorder during fetal life did not have any more signs of irritability, difficulty feeding, sleep disturbances and respiratory problems two to four weeks after birth than babies who were not exposed. Instead, the major factor associated with newborn problems was preterm birth, according to a new Northwestern Medicine study.
June 1, 2017
Read More


Antidepressive treatment during pregnancy can affect newborn brain activity
Fetal exposure to commonly used SRI drugs may affect brain activity in newborns, new research shows. the researchers suggest that the effects of drugs on fetal brain function should be assessed more carefully. Furthermore, indications for preventive medication should be critically evaluated, and non-pharmacological interventions should be the first-line treatment for depression and anxiety during pregnancy.
June 15, 2016
Read More


Are Bullies Getting Run Out of U.S. Schools?
Abuse rates dropped about 2 percent a year over a decade, survey finds
May 1, 2017
Read More


Are Tea Tree and Lavender Oils Safe for Kids?
Tea tree and lavender essential oils are popular ingredients in personal care and household products, including many aimed at children.
September 6, 2016
Read More


Are Toys and Gadgets Good for your Baby?
The toy aisle of the average American retailer is a carnival of lights, color, and sound. Every shelf overflows with gadgets that flash, twirl, beep, spin, and play a symphony of kid-friendly tunes.
March 8, 2016
Read More


Are your Kids Drinking Too Much Sugar?
If you're worried about how much sugar your kids are eating, it's time to take a second look at how much they're drinking. new research confirms that children and teens are downing far too much sugar from sweetened drinks.
January 27, 2017
Read More


Article reports increase in health care spending on children
Health care spending on children grew 56 percent between 1996 and 2013, with the most money spent in 2013 on inpatient well-newborn care, attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and well-dental care, according to an article published online by JAMA Pediatrics.
December 28, 2016
Read More


ASA recommends parents to ask seven questions to child's physician anesthesiologist prior to surgery
Millions of children have surgery every year - for everything from tonsil removal to correction of a heart defect - and understandably parents are often anxious about their child's safety and comfort. the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) wants parents to know that anesthesia is extremely safe and effective at managing pain and discomfort surgery or a procedure may cause.
July 12, 2016
Read More


Avoid fruit juice up to the age of 1 year, say the AAP
Parents should avoid offering fruit juice to infants under the age of 1 year, unless advised by a doctor, as it provides "no nutritional benefit" and may harm their health. This is the according to new recommendations from the American Academy of Pediatrics.
May 22, 2017
Read More


Misc. - B

Babies in Canada's north face alarming rates of respiratory infection, study shows
Infants in Canada's north are facing alarming rates of respiratory infection, but providing an antibody to all infants will prevent hundreds of hospitalizations of babies in the Arctic and save hundreds of thousands of dollars a year.
October 18, 2016
Read More


Babies Often Put to Sleep in Unsafe Positions
About 3,500 U.S. infants still succumb to sudden infant death syndrome each year: CDC
August 15, 2016
Read More


Babies Sharing Parents' Room Reduces SIDS Risk
Sleeping nearby -- but not in same bed -- advised for first year, pediatricians' group says
October 22, 2016
Read More


'Baby Boxes' May Help Prevent SIDS in Newborns
The innovative take-home gift helped curb the dangerous practice of bed-sharing, study found
May 26, 2017
Read More


'Baby-Led' Weaning Doesn't Raise Choking Risk
But only give softened 'finger foods' to infants and watch them while they eat, researcher says
September 19, 2016
Read More


Behavior Woes Hamper More Boys versus Girls in School
They were more likely to be held back, punished, although they also were more likely to have issues
June 22, 2016
Read More


Belladonna Found in Homeopathic Teething Products
Certain homeopathic teething products marketed by Hyland contain belladonna, also known as deadly nightshade, "sometimes far exceeding the amount claimed on the label," according to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.
January 27, 2017
Read More


Birth Defects in Kids May Shorten Moms' Lives
But the overall risk of early death is still quite low
December 20, 2016
Read More


Birth of infant with major congenital anomaly linked to increased risk of death in mother
In Denmark, having a child with a major congenital anomaly was associated with a small but statistically significant increased risk of death in the mother compared with women without an affected child, according to a study appearing in the December 20 issue of JAMA. a major congenital anomaly is a structural change (such as cleft palate) that has significant medical, social or cosmetic consequences for the affected individual; this type of anomaly typically requires medical intervention.
December 20, 2016
Read More


Boy babies more likely to experience complications at birth than girls
New research led by the University of Adelaide has confirmed that boy babies are much more likely to experience potentially life-threatening outcomes at birth than girls.
July 11, 2016
Read More


Brain Changes Seen in Kids After 1 Football Season
Not yet clear if those changes are lasting or meaningful
October 22, 2016
Read More


Brain scans could improve prediction of problem drug use among teenagers
There's an idea out there of what a drug-addled teen is supposed to look like: impulsive, unconscientious, smart, perhaps - but not the most engaged. While personality traits like that could signal danger, not every adolescent who fits that description becomes a problem drug user. So how do you tell who's who?
February 22, 2017
Read More


Breakthrough research shows cellular stress could be key to variety of birth defects
For the first time, scientists believe they've discovered a cause of multiple types of birth defects triggered by environmental stresses.
July 20, 2016
Read More


Breast milk sugar may protect babies against deadly infection
A type of sugar found naturally in some women's breast milk may protect newborn babies from infection with a potentially life threatening bacterium called Group B streptococcus, according to a new study. These bacteria are a common cause of meningitis in newborns and the leading cause of infection in the first three months of life globally.
August 26, 2016
Read More


Breast-Feeding Rates Up, But Many Moms Quit Early
American Academy of Pediatrics recommends babies get only breast milk for the first 6 months of life
August 23, 2016
Read More


Breast-feeding transfers beneficial bacteria to the baby's gut, new study finds
Mothers protect their babies and teach them habits to stay healthy and safe as they grow. a new UCLA-led study shows that beneficial bacteria from mothers do much the same thing.
May 8, 2017
Read More


Breastfed infants born to obese women gain less weight than babies fed with formula milk
An international study coordinated by professor Cristina Campoy from the department of Paediatrics at the University of Granada (UGR) has showed that breastfed infants born to obese women keep a lower weight over the first 6 months of life in comparison with those who weren't fed with breast milk.
October 26, 2016
Read More


Breastfeeding a Boon to Preemies' Hearts: Study
Improvements seen in function and size 20 years later
June 14, 2016
Read More


Breastfeeding may improve heart development in premature babies
Breastfeeding premature babies improves long-term heart structure and function, an Oxford University study has found.
June 14, 2016
Read More


Breastfeeding May not Lead to Smarter Preschoolers
But study suggests that children who were nursed may be less hyperactive at age 3
March 27, 2017
Read More


Breastfeeding rooms hidden in health care law
With her 5-week-old daughter crying in a bathroom at Nordstrom, and not knowing how to get the baby to latch on to her breast, Garima Nahar found herself surrounded by other women. some offered tips, but one woman told the new mother to cover up or turn the other way.
April 9, 2010
Read More


Buckle fractures: Risk factors and recovery
Buckle fractures are compression fractures and are very common in children. They happen when one side of the bone buckles, or bends, but doesn't break all the way through.
June 2, 2017
Read More


Misc. - C

Can childhood cancer treatments affect survivors' sex lives in adulthood?
A recent analysis showed that although adult survivors of childhood cancer did not differ overall from their peers in terms of their satisfaction with their sex lives and romantic relationships, those who received cancer treatments that were especially toxic to the nervous system were least likely to have had intercourse, be in a relationship, or have children.
February 6, 2017
Read More


Can Kids Exercise Too Much?
Sometimes it seems like kids have endless energy. they can bounce from school to practice and still want to play outside when they get home. But between organized sports and time to just play, how do you know if they're getting too much exercise?
July 7, 2016
Read More


Can Parents' Weight Hinder Toddlers' Development?
Study links -- but doesn't prove -- Moms', Dads' obesity tied to delayed social and problem-solving skills
January 3, 2017
Read More


Can Teens' Heart Rate, Blood Pressure Show Ties to Mental Ills?
Indicators of schizophrenia, obsessive-compulsive disorder, anxiety might be spotted in physical at 18
October 26, 2016
Read More


Caring about others can be reason behind choosing to get vaccinations, research shows
Since vaccines protect not only those who take them, but also the people who otherwise could have been infected, there are many plausible motives for choosing to get vaccinated. Apart from the most obvious - wanting to protect oneself or one's children from becoming ill - research shows that many also are affected by care for others.
March 29, 2017
Read More


Celiac Disease Risk and Birth Time, Place
Swedish study finds lower risk of the digestive disorder in babies born in winter or cooler climates
August 16, 2016
Read More


Cell phone conversations hinder child pedestrian crossing abilities
Cellphone safety should be part of back- to-school preparation
August 30, 2016
Read More


Certain Parents More Likely to Skip Kids' Flu Shot
Those who favor alternative therapies often bypass the annual vaccine, study says
October 3, 2016
Read More


Chemical ocular injuries among children linked to laundry detergent pods
Between 2012 and 2015, the number of chemical burns to the eye associated with laundry detergent pods increased more than 30-fold among preschool-aged children in the U.S., according to a study published online by JAMA Ophthalmology.
February 2, 2017
Read More


Chickenpoxinfo.com
consumer information site from Merck.
Provides Information
Read More


Child Safety in the Home
In a world made by the point-of-view of grown-ups, there are inadvertent hazards to small children all over the place. Home is no exception. According to Safe Kids USA (an organization that educates parents, policy makers, and the general public in creating safe environments for children) a child dies every 101 minutes as a result of an unintentional injury, making it the leading cause of accidental death and permanent disability for America's kids.
April 1, 2010
Read More


Childhood Asthma May Encourage Obesity
Fear of flare-ups might spur kids to limit physical activity, specialists say
January 20, 2017
Read More


Childhood brain injury increases chances of mental illness, poor school attainment and premature death
Childhood brain injuries, including concussions, are associated with an increased risk of subsequent mental illness, poor school attainment and premature death, according to a study published today in PLOS Medicine.
August 24, 2016
Read More


Childhood bullying linked to long-term use of mental health services
New research shows that childhood bullying has a strong link to mental health service use throughout a person's life, putting additional strain on an "already overstretched" UK healthcare system.
October 27, 2016
Read More


Childhood Cancer Death Rates Continue to Fall: CDC
Brain cancer supplants leukemia as the leading killer
September 16, 2016
Read More


Childhood Cancer Survivors and Later Sexual Health
Study finds especially toxic treatments were tied to later issues, but most rated sex lives as positive
February 6, 2017
Read More


Childhood cancer survivors have poor dietary quality in adulthood, new study finds
Survivors of childhood cancer have poor adherence to federal dietary guidelines in adulthood, a new study finds. Diets lacking essential nutrients may exacerbate the chronic disease burden in a group already at an elevated risk for developing new conditions.
October 19, 2016
Read More


Children acquire bacterium linked to tooth decay from intra- and extra-familial sources
Research presented at the ASM Microbe research meeting provides compelling evidence that children acquire Streptococcus mutans, the bacterium most frequently associated with dental caries, from intra- and extra-familial sources besides their mother.
June 22, 2016
Read More


Children acquire quantifiers in same order irrespective of language properties
We can assume that children learn to count starting with one and followed by the lists of numbers in ascending order of cardinality (one, two, three). But besides numbers, in languages there are more words that express quantity such as all, some, most, none, etc., the so-called quantifiers.
September 13, 2016
Read More


Children born to mothers with rheumatoid arthritis may have increased risk of developing epilepsy
A new study shows a link between mothers with rheumatoid arthritis and children with epilepsy. the study is published in the November 16, 2016, online issue of Neurology®, a medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease that causes the body's own immune system to attack the joints. It differs from osteoarthritis, which is caused by wear and tear on the joints.
November 16, 2016
Read More


Children born to older mothers are at an advantage, report researchers
Children of older mothers experience fewer behavioral, social and emotional problems, according to a new study.
March 23, 2017
Read More


Children born with small or missing eyes benefit from personalized treatment using 3D-printed implants
A new, personalized and noninvasive treatment using 3-D printed implants has been developed to help children born with abnormally small or missing eyes (microphthalmia/ anophthalmia, or MICA). the research is being presented at the 2017 Annual Meeting of the Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology (ARVO) this week in Baltimore, Md.
May 11, 2017
Read More


Children living in poor communities less likely to receive diagnosis for strabismus, study shows
Children are less likely to be diagnosed with crossed eyes, a condition known as strabismus, if they live in poor communities, according to an analysis led by researchers at the University of Michigan's Kellogg Eye Center.
August 16, 2016
Read More


Children of older mothers have better upbringing
The result should be seen in conjunction with the widespread recommendation not to have children too late. this recommendation is based on knowledge about e.g. declining fertility and the health risks during pregnancy and while giving birth which are associated with advanced maternal age.
March 21, 2017
Read More


Children starting school at 4 years of age less physically ready, research reveals
New research from Loughborough University has revealed many four-year-olds are not physically ready to start school.
September 2, 2016
Read More


Children suffering from IBD not meeting daily recommended intake of calcium and vitamin D
A new study highlights that children suffering from inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are not meeting the daily recommended intake of calcium and vitamin D. The research, conducted at Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children in London, identified that only 26.6% and 21.3% of paediatric IBD patients were achieving the current recommended intake for calcium and vitamin D respectively.
May 29, 2017
Read More


Children who watch lots of TV may have poor bone health later in life
Consistently watching high levels of television during childhood and adolescence were linked with lower peak bone mass at age 20 years in a recent study. Hours of television watching per week were recorded by parental or self-report at 5, 8, 10, 14, 17 and 20 years of age in 1181 participants.
July 7, 2016
Read More


Children with epilepsy experience major long-term socioeconomic, health consequences
Children and adolescents with epilepsy experience significant long-term socioeconomic consequences and higher personal health care costs. the findings come from a study that followed young epilepsy patients until 30 years of age.
June 22, 2016
Read More


Children with existing food allergy at increased risk of developing asthma and rhinitis
Children with a history of food allergy have a high risk of developing asthma and allergic rhinitis during childhood as well. the risk increases with the number of food allergies a child might have, say researchers from the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) in a new study recently published in BMC Pediatrics.
August 25, 2016
Read More


Children with intrusive parents may develop tendency to be overly self-critical
Parents may have high expectations of their children's academic performance and some may demonstrate this by urging the child to achieve good grades, while others may over-react when the child makes mistakes. However, parents should be mindful of their behaviour and not push their children too far, as their actions may lead to unintended consequences.
June 22, 2016
Read More


Children's consumption levels of sugary drinks linked to combo meals at fast-food restaurants
A new survey of children's and teenagers' eating habits at fast-food restaurants suggests that consumption levels of sugary drinks are closely tied to their automatic inclusion in "combo meal" packages.
October 7, 2016
Read More


CHLA Medical Group, Providence Saint John's to provide premium care for fragile newborns
Providence Saint John's Health Center is partnering with Children's Hospital Los Angeles Medical Group to raise the level of care for the most fragile newborns in the medical center's Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU), bringing world class neonatal care to Santa Monica and the surrounding Westside communities.
December 30, 2016
Read More


CHLA receives grant to study effects of chemoimmunotherapy in childhood neuroblastoma
A team of investigators at Children's Hospital Los Angeles has received a major, three-year grant from the V Foundation for Cancer Research to study the effects of chemoimmunotherapy in children with neuroblastoma.
October 18, 2016
Read More


Christina Aguilera Speaks Up for Childhood Hunger
The Grammy Award-winning pop star reveals how her past shaped her passion.
March 8, 2016
Read More


Clear communication can make doctor visits successful for children with autism
Doctor visits can be a challenge for patients with autism, their families and health care providers. a new report offers several steps providers and families can take to make medical visits more successful. She says that all of them require good communication between the provider and parent before, during and after medical visits.
February 3, 2017
Read More


Cleveland-based study to explore how childhood obesity can be prevented before conception
A Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine and MetroHealth System researcher, along with Cleveland Clinic's director of metabolic research, have received federal funding to determine if childhood obesity can be prevented before women become pregnant.
March 29, 2017
Read More


Clinical trial discovers drug combination that could help children with arthritis
A clinical trial funded by Arthritis Research UK and the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) led by professors from the Universities of Liverpool and Bristol has discovered a drug combination that could help thousands of children with arthritis.
April 27, 2017
Read More


Clinical trial finds no benefits of wearing silk for children with eczema
Eczema affects a large proportion of children and adolescents in the United States. new research investigates whether silk clothing improves health outcomes for children with eczema.
April 12, 2017
Read More


Clinics with comprehensive care for premature infants alleviate concerns for parents
That's the day she gave birth to her twin girls, Iris and Geraldine. the twins were monoamniotic-monochorionic, meaning they shared one amniotic sack and one placenta in the womb. These rare pregnancies are considered high risk because of the uneven blood flow that occurs between the infants through the placenta.
August 08, 2016
Read More


Codeine not Safe for Kids, Pediatricians Warn
How it is metabolized is too unpredictable, could cause death, report finds
September 19, 2016
Read More


Common Products that can Harm your Baby
Many common household items contain hazardous substances, some of which can interfere with the body's hormones. These chemicals might not pose a problem for you, but they could affect your baby's health.
July 15, 2016
Read More


Conception Season May Affect Fetal Brain Growth
Babies conceived in winter more apt to have learning problems and vitamin D might play a role, study finds
August 24, 2016
Read More


Cost effective moisturizers could help prevent eczema in high-risk newborns
What if it was possible to prevent your child from getting eczema -- a costly, inflammatory skin disorder -- just by applying something as inexpensive as petroleum jelly every day for the first six months of his or her life?
December 5, 2016
Read More


Misc. - D

Daatrics answers the call from over-anxious new parents
Call me flippant, but sometimes nature is the best thing. Daatrics provides an answer for those who disagree.
December 6, 2016
Read More


Day Care Doesn't Encourage Weight Gain in Kids
After other factors were weighed, analysis found no link
October 10, 2016
Read More


DCRI named coordinating center for research initiative on child health
The Duke Clinical Research Institute (DCRI) has been named the coordinating center as part of a $157-million federal initiative involved in studying how environmental factors affect childhood health.
September 22, 2016
Read More


Delayed cord clamping prevents anaemia in infants up to six months of age
When clamping of the umbilical cord is delayed, iron deficiency up to six months of age can be prevented, according to a new study from Uppsala University, published in JAMA Pediatrics. the study was conducted in Nepal.
January 17, 2017
Read More


Delaying marriage age of women has positive effects for children, study shows
Delaying the marriage age of young women in parts of the developing world has significant positive effects for their children, a new study shows.
April 4, 2017
Read More


Dermatologist offers tips to help parents figure out how often children need to bathe
For many families, bath time is a struggle. for this reason, many parents will be glad to know that a daily bath may not be necessary for their kids, according to dermatologists from the American Academy of Dermatology.
September 14, 2016
Read More


Detergent Pods Tied to Kids' Eye Burn Danger
Nearly 500 such injuries occurred in 2015, study reports
February 2, 2017
Read More


Devastating floods can have major impact on unborn babies, study shows
New results of an NDSU study indicate devastating floods can have an effect on the next generation. the big question is, "why?"
August 05, 2016
Read More


Diabetes During Pregnancy Could Pose Harm to Baby
Study highlights links to numerous complications, but experts say many can be prevented
September 13, 2016
Read More


Diamond publishes milestone paper that reveals discovery of genetic triggers behind birth defects
Researchers at the UK's national synchrotron facility, Diamond Light Source, have just published the 5000th scientific paper using data from the facility. this milestone marks a significant step for the synchrotron that is used by over 8,000 scientists each year.
October 7, 2016
Read More


Disordered airway microbiome at birth may be linked to severe neonatal lung disease
In contrast to the general belief that the airways of an infant are sterile until after birth, University of Alabama at Birmingham researchers and colleagues have found that the infant airway is already colonized with bacteria or bacterial DNA when a baby is born -- and this is true for infants born as early as 24 weeks gestation.
August 05, 2016
Read More


Distraction techniques can help calm children from shot-related anxiety during flu season
A typical visit to the pediatrician when it is time for a child to get a shot can include tears, tantrums and might not seem worth the trouble. But with the FluMist not being offered by many physicians this year due to ineffectiveness, doctors at Nationwide Children's Hospital recommend your child still get the flu shot. to calm shot-related anxiety, parents can ask their pediatrician about distraction techniques to help comfort their child when receiving a shot.
August 10, 2016
Read More


Doctors can 'Fire' Families Who don't Vaccinate
Pediatricians can dismiss families for refusing to vaccinate their children, but only as a last resort, the American Academy of Pediatrics says.
August 30, 2016
Read More


Doctors need better ways to figure out fevers in newborns
To prevent fast-moving bacterial infections, determining the cause of an infant's fever is key
September 2, 2016
Read More


Does Legalizing Pot Spur Kids to Try It?
In 2 states studied, teens downplayed harms after recreational pot legalized; use increased in 1 state
December 27, 2016
Read More


Does music improve child brain development?
Can you please give an overview of your recent five-year study? what techniques did you use to monitor changes in the childrens' brains?
October 13, 2016
Read More


Does my baby have psoriasis? Symptoms and treatment
Psoriasis is a chronic autoimmune disorder affecting the skin and anyone, including babies and young children, can develop it. Although psoriasis does occur in infants, it is uncommon.
April 5, 2017
Read More


Does 'Room Sharing' With Baby Come With Risks?
Despite latest guidelines, odds of poorer sleep and SIDS are higher, study finds
June 5, 2017
Read More


Does TV Hinder Kindergarten-Readiness?
Lower-income kids harmed more by excess screen time than affluent children, study finds
March 1, 2017
Read More


Does your Kid Reach for Cookies or Fruit First?
For school-age kids, maintaining a healthy weight is as important as earning good grades -- maybe more so. That's because overweight children and teens may struggle with issues that are more stressful than pop quizzes and too much homework. Many develop poor self-esteem, negative body image, depression, and a lifetime of serious health problems, says Jill Castle, a registered dietitian, author, and childhood nutrition expert.
September 15, 2016
Read More


Dread of roses: Neurobehavioral effects found in children exposed to flower pesticides
Ecuador exports a lot of Mother's day bouquets, leaving behind evidence of harm to children's mental functions due to pesticides used to boost harvest
May 10, 2017
Read More


Drug Use by U.S. Teens Drops to All-Time Low
Use of tobacco and alcohol down significantly, too, federal report finds
December 13, 2016
Read More


Drug Used for Preemie Eye Disease Tied to Problems
Babies given Avastin were far more likely to have neurological complications, study shows
March 18, 2016
Read More


Misc. - E

E. coli K1 inhibits glucose transporters during meningitis, report scientists
Escherichia coli K1 (E. coli K1) continues to be a major threat to the health of young infants. Affecting the central nervous system, it causes neonatal meningitis by multiplying in immune cells, such as macrophages, and then disseminating into the bloodstream to subsequently invade the blood-brain barrier. Neonatal and childhood meningitis in particular results in long-term neurological problems such as seizures or ADHD in up to half of the survivors.
August 03, 2016
Read More


Early signs of anxiety, depression may be evident in the brains of newborns
Brain scans at birth predict later symptoms
February 1, 2017
Read More


Early stimulation can boost brain development of babies
Many new parents still think that babies should develop at their own pace, and that they shouldn't be challenged to do things that they're not yet ready for. Infants should learn to roll around under their own power, without any "helpful" nudges, and they shouldn't support their weight before they can stand or walk on their own. they mustn't be potty trained before they are ready for it.
January 1, 2017
Read More


Early Virus Raises Asthma Risk in Certain Kids: Study
Infants with a particular gene variant appear more vulnerable after infection
August 26, 2016
Read More


Early-life infections may be risk factor for developmental disorders later in life
The Zika virus now active in numerous countries, and the severe birth defects associated with it, makes it clear that infection in pregnant women can have immediate and devastating effects on the developing baby.
August 19, 2016
Read More


Educating parents on healthy infant sleep-related behaviors may help prevent childhood obesity
Teaching parents bedtime techniques to encourage healthy sleep habits in their infants may help prevent obesity, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers. Strong links exist between inadequate sleep and childhood obesity.
June 29, 2016
Read More


Epilepsy drug discovered in fish model shows promise in small pediatric clinical trial
NIH-funded research suggests zebrafish models may be efficient resource for identifying drugs for clinical use.
February 9, 2017
Read More


Even partial steroid treatment can benefit extremely preterm infants, NIH study suggests
Infants exposed to partial treatment in the womb healthier than those not exposed.
October 11, 2016
Read More


Exact magnitude of stillbirths, maternal and neonatal mortality underreported, WHO reveals
The day of birth is potentially the most dangerous time for mothers and babies. Every year, worldwide, 303 000 women die during pregnancy and childbirth, 2.7 million babies die during the first 28 days of life and 2.6 million babies are stillborn.
August 16, 2016
Read More


Experts provide safety tips for children and parents to help prevent child-pedestrian injuries
The start of the school year is the most dangerous time on neighborhood streets and in school zones for child-pedestrians and bus riders. as schools welcome students back to the classroom, experts at Monroe Carell Jr. Children's Hospital at Vanderbilt are offering safety tips for children and their parents to help prevent child-pedestrian injuries, which often increase as routines change from summer to school year.
August 05, 2016
Read More


Experts say new baby monitors may be harmful, should be avoided
Monitors lack regulation, are under studied, and could trigger false alarms.
January 24, 2017
Read More


Experts: Screen Kids 6 and Older for Obesity
Guideline fine-tunes 2010 recommendation
November 1, 2016
Read More


Exposure to illegal substances during adolescence influences patterns of abuse in adulthood
Teenagers who have easy access to drugs and alcohol in the home are more likely to drink and do drugs in their early and late 20s. That's according to the one of the first studies to look at how adolescent exposure to illegal substances affects patterns of abuse in adulthood.
July 29, 2016
Read More


Extreme temperatures may increase risk for low birth weight at term, NIH study suggests
Extreme hot or cold temperatures during pregnancy may increase the risk that infants born at term will be of low birth weight, according to a study of U.S. women by researchers at the National Institutes of Health. the study was published in Environmental Research.
February 27, 2017
Read More


Misc. - F

Factors contributing to childhood adiposity begin before birth, study shows
A new article, published in the journal BMC Medicine, reports the largest epigenome-wide association study to date that provides evidence that factors contributing to childhood adiposity (level of body fat) begin before birth and are influenced by mother's lifestyle, and fetal genetic and epigenetic factors.
March 9, 2017
Read More


FDA approves use of new Flourish device to treat infants born with esophageal atresia
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today authorized use of the Flourish Pediatric Esophageal Atresia Anastomosis, a first-of-its-kind medical device to treat infants up to one year old for a birth defect that causes a gap in their esophagus, called esophageal atresia.
May 12, 2017
Read More


FDA grants approval for new magnetic device used to treat pediatric esophageal atresia
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has granted authorization for a magnetic device used to treat pediatric esophageal atresia, a birth defect that causes abnormal formation of the esophagus. The Flourish™ Pediatric Esophageal Atresia device was created by University of Chicago Medicine assistant professor of radiology Mario Zaritzky, MD, in collaboration with Cook Medical.
May 25, 2017
Read More


FDA: don't Give Kids Meds with Codeine, Tramadol
Agency strengthens warning labels on these medications to address dangers
April 20, 2017
Read More


Federal agencies express support for updated safe infant sleep recommendations
Revised recommendations incorporate latest research on sleep-related risks to infants.
October 22, 2016
Read More


Federal Safety Official Reminds Parents: Crib Bumpers Are Pointless, Possibly Dangerous
No one likes the idea of their baby's soft noggin getting caught in a crib's slats, but a federal safety official is reminding parents that crib bumpers don't really keep your child safe, and they could be hazardous.
May 17, 2017
Read More


Feeding Babies Peanuts -- how to Do It
Parents are learning that the old advice to wait to give babies peanuts until they're at least a year old was wrong.
November 14, 2016
Read More


Fetal limb movements can help neuron development, rat study shows
A newborn rat's brain development stage is close to that of a human embryo in the second half of pregnancy, so this discovery allows to hypothesize that the same movement patterns can help neuron development in humans.
November 14, 2016
Read More


Few States Have Post-Concussion Class Return Plans
Students need an appropriate return to mental work, doctors say
November 7, 2016
Read More


Fewer American Parents Are Spanking Their Kids
More are relying on timeouts to discipline children, study shows
November 14, 2016
Read More


Fewer SIDS Deaths in U.S., But Racial Gaps Remain
Sudden infant deaths are twice as common for blacks as whites, study finds
May 15, 2017
Read More


First baby given xenon gas to prevent brain injury
A newborn baby has become the first in the world to receive xenon gas treatment, pioneered in Bristol in a bid to prevent brain injury.
April 9, 2010
Read More


Five tips for parents and guardians to protect children from household poisons
More than 2 million poisonings are reported each year to poison centers across the United States, according to the American Association of Poison Control Centers. Half of those calls involve children under 6 years old.
March 24, 2017
Read More


Flu Vaccines and Kids
A CDC expert explains why your child needs the flu vaccine, how many doses to get, and when.
August 18, 2016
Read More


Fluorescent protein from Japanese eel muscles used to detect bilirubin in newborns
A fluorescent protein sourced from Japanese eel muscles can be used to accurately detect unconjugated bilirubin in newborns. this detection method is ideal for newborn patients who can only give limited blood samples, and could revolutionize ways of monitoring jaundice in newborn infants, say researchers.
July 5, 2016
Read More


Food chemists find garlic aroma in breast milk of women who have consumed garlic
Food chemists at Friedrich-Alexander-Universitat Erlangen-Nurnberg (FAU) have found that garlic aroma is evident in the breast milk of women who have consumed garlic. this is caused by allyl methyl sulfide (AMS) - a metabolite which is first formed in a strong concentration during breastfeeding. Whether the aroma has an impact on which food preferences children develop and whether they like garlic in later life needs to be clarified by further research.
July 15, 2016
Read More


Foster care children at much greater risk of physical, mental health problems
Children who have been in the U.S. foster care system are at a significantly higher risk of mental and physical health problems -- ranging from learning disabilities, developmental delays and depression to behavioral issues, asthma and obesity -- than children who haven't been in foster care, according to a sociologist.
October 17, 2016
Read More


Misc. - G

Garmin wants your kids to get off the couch with its $80 Vivofit Jr tracker
The kids' tracker is a playful motivator, but also reminds them to do chores.
September 29, 2016
Read More


Gastric Bypass May bring Infant Nutrition Deficits
Infants born to women who've had a Roux-en-Y gastric bypass are more likely to be small for their gestational age and have nutritional deficiencies at birth, even if the mother takes supplements during pregnancy, a study suggests.
September 23, 2016
Read More


Getting antibiotics as a baby may have lasting effects on brain, behavior
Mouse study backs up human observations showing long-term changes.
April 5, 2017
Read More


Girls from low-income families in the U.S. unprepared for puberty, research finds
Girls from low-income families in the U.S. are unprepared for puberty and have largely negative experiences of this transition, according to researchers at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health and the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.
January 4, 2017
Read More


Global pregnancy and obstetrics researchers to work together on health opportunities in China
A new project that will twin the expertise of pregnancy and obstetrics researchers across the world with their counterparts in China has been announced with funding from the Chinese government.
October 13, 2016
Read More


Graded aerobic treadmill testing useful in evaluating sports-related concussion in children
Graded aerobic treadmill testing is safe, tolerable, and useful in evaluating and managing cases of sports-related concussion in children and adolescents. this is the finding of a new study reported in the Journal of Neurosurgery: Pediatrics.
September 13, 2016
Read More


Growth factors in cord blood may help identify preemies at risk for fatal lung disease
Findings published in the Journal of Pediatrics describe growth factors in cord blood that may identify premature infants at risk for bronchopulmonary dysplasia-associated pulmonary hypertension (BPD-PH) -- an often fatal lung disease in which the vessels carrying blood from the heart to the lungs become narrowed and dysfunctional. Identifying these babies at birth would allow earlier interventions to prevent the disease that manifests in some preemies two to three months after birth.
April 6, 2017
Read More


Misc. - H

Handheld screen time linked with speech delays in young children
New research being presented at the 2017 Pediatric Academic Societies Meeting suggests the more time children under 2 years old spend playing with smartphones, tablets and other handheld screens, the more likely they are to begin talking later
May 4, 2017
Read More


Harsh Parenting can Backfire in Teens
Early sex, stealing and dropping out of school are some of the consequences, study contends
February 8, 2017
Read More


Health Care Spending for U.S. Kids Jumps
The cost of keeping American kids physically and mentally healthy increased 56 percent between 1996 and 2013, a new study finds.
December 27, 2016
Read More


Healthy diet linked to improved reading skills in children
The study involved 161 children aged 6-8 years old, and followed up on them from the first grade to the third grade in school. the quality of their diet was analysed using food diaries, and their academic skills with the help of standardised tests. the closer the diet followed the Baltic Sea Diet and Finnish nutrition recommendations - i.e. high in vegetables, fruit and berries, fish, whole grain, and unsaturated fats and low in red meat, sugary products, and saturated fat - the healthier it was considered.
September 13, 2016
Read More


Helicopter parents: Hovering may have effect as kids transition to adulthood
Parental involvement is crucial to a child's development into an adult, but researchers are finding that crossing the line between supportive and too involved could indirectly lead to issues such as depression and anxiety for young adults.
June 28, 2016
Read More


High levels of childhood muscular fitness may protect against metabolic syndrome in adult life
About 20-25 percent of adults have the metabolic syndrome and have increased risk of developing both cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. In this longitudinal study, investigators examined associations between childhood muscular fitness (strength, endurance, and power) and metabolic syndrome - the latter assessed once they reached adulthood.
September 23, 2016
Read More


High levels of folate during pregnancy may decrease hypertension risk in children
A new article published in the American Journal of Hypertension finds that babies born to mothers with cardiometabolic risk factors were less likely to develop high blood pressure if their mothers had higher levels of folate during pregnancy.
March 8, 2017
Read More


High profile Facebook post provides insights into pro- and anti-vaccination beliefs
One of the challenges to understanding the concerns behind vaccine hesitancy is that very seldom are people with worries about vaccines and vaccine advocates brought together in the same space, especially online.
October 22, 2016
Read More


High-quality education at early age linked to better relationships with parents later in life
Children who are given high-quality education at an early age - starting at six weeks old and continuing through their first five years of life - are more likely to be employed full-time and have better relationships with their parents as adults, according to new results from a longitudinal study now entering its fifth decade.
April 6, 2017
Read More


Hiro Baby's personal assistant for new parents helps you survive baby's first year
During pregnancy, soon-to-be first-time parents will often devour manuals, like "What to Expect When You're Expecting," to get clued into all the changes taking place in mom's body, along with details on the baby's development. But after the baby arrives, it's often fly-by-the-seat-of-your-pants time with 3 AM Google searches and teary phone calls to mom, dad, doctors and friends.
October 5, 2016
Read More


HIV therapy for breastfeeding mothers can virtually eliminate transmission to babies
For HIV-infected mothers whose immune system is in good health, taking a three-drug antiretroviral regimen during breastfeeding essentially eliminates HIV transmission by breast milk to their infants, according to results from a large clinical trial conducted in sub-Saharan Africa and India.
July 18, 2016
Read More


Honey bees have better vision than previously known
Research conducted at the University of Adelaide has discovered that bees have much better vision than was previously known, offering new insights into the lives of honey bees, and new opportunities for translating this knowledge into fields such as robot vision.
April 6, 2017
Read More


How Are Smartphones Affecting Kids' Mental Health?
More use is linked to attention and behavior problems, but also less anxiety, study finds
May 3, 2017
Read More


How to Boost your Kid's Body Image
Your child probably thinks about the way her body looks -- a lot. Even if she doesn't tell you about it.
July 7, 2016
Read More


How to Find Help for your Anxious Child
Does your 8-year-old daughter worry that you'll get into a car crash when you drive to work? Does your 10-year-old son become upset and panicky at the thought of meeting new kids at a birthday party?
July 15, 2016
Read More


How to Teach Empathy to Selfie-Loving Kids
You probably do it. If your children are preteens or older, they surely do it, too: take endless "selfies" to document life's moments, however inconsequential. Fuss with filters to display an enhanced version of reality. and then post these curated shots to an array of social networks, chasing after new followers and "likes" for positive affirmation.
July 18, 2016
Read More


Misc. - I

Immersive Virtual Reality Gaming Helps Kids with Hemophilia Get Through Infusions
At Nationwide Children's Hospital in Columbus, Ohio children with hemophilia that have to undergo regular procedures involving needles, such as infusions, now have something better to look forward to.
October 7, 2016
Read More


Improved communication could help reduce unnecessary use of antibiotics for childhood illnesses
To help reduce unnecessary use of antibiotics for common childhood illnesses, parents would benefit from fuller communication from their health care providers, suggests new research published in the National Communication Association's Journal of Applied Communication Research.
June 5, 2017
Read More


Improvements in modifiable risk factors could help avoid preterm births
A significant portion of preterm births might be avoided by reducing or eliminating three major risk factors.
August 17, 2016
Read More


In-hospital formula introduction and family history may help explain racial, ethnic breastfeeding disparities
A national research collaboration funded by the National Institutes of Health has found significant racial and ethnic disparities in breastfeeding outcomes, according to a study published online this week in Pediatrics.
July 19, 2016
Read More


Infantile vitamin B1 deficiency affects motor function, balance in children
A new Tel Aviv University study published in Maternal and Child Nutrition found that infantile Vitamin B1 (thiamine) deficiency severely affected the motor function of preschoolers who were fed faulty formula in the first year of their lives. the conclusions were based on a retrospective study of children who received Remedia, an Israeli formula brand completely lacking in Vitamin B1, in 2004.
March 29, 2017
Read More


Innovative board game helps improve nutrition, health in young children
An innovative board game for Early Years professionals and the families of young children has been developed by Focus Games Ltd and Foodtalk CIC (Paediatric Dietitians).
August 17, 2016
Read More


Intensive multidisciplinary intervention holds benefit for children with pediatric feeding disorders
A new study finds positive outcomes associated with intensive multidisciplinary treatment for children with pediatric feeding disorder who may require a feeding tube to support growth and development. the results are reported in the early edition of the Journal of Pediatrics, from researchers at the Marcus Autism Center, Children's Healthcare of Atlanta and Emory University School of Medicine.
November 11, 2016
Read More


Introducing egg and peanut at early age may prevent development of childhood allergy
Feeding babies egg and peanut may reduce their risk of developing an allergy to the foods, finds a new study.
September 20, 2016
Read More


iPads as effective as sedatives for children before operations
New research shows that allowing children to use iPads to distract them before surgery requiring general anesthesia is as effective at lowering their anxiety as conventional sedatives.
August 29, 2016
Read More


iPads Calm Surgery-Bound Kids as Well as Sedatives
Study found equal benefits in easing anxiety
August 30, 2016
Read More


Is Screen Time OK for Preschoolers?
When you have little kids, it's easy to hand them a smartphone or tablet to soothe or entertain them. Sometimes, it's just what you need to buy a few minutes of distraction while you're waiting in line or on the phone. Screen time limits, however, are especially important for younger kids.
July 26, 2016
Read More


Is Surgery Always Needed for Kids' Appendicitis?
Review found many with inflamed appendix were fine with antibiotics alone, but more research needed
February 17, 2017
Read More


Is your Kid Sick or Just Faking It?
From a runny nose to belly woes, it can sometimes be tough to tell if your kid is truly stay-at-home sick or feigning illness to get a free pass from class. Do you need to call the doctor or could your child be pulling a "Bueller" on you -- a reference to Ferris Bueller's day Off, the 1986 movie where a teen fakes the flu, only to head out for a day of mischief once his parents have left the house?
August 18, 2016
Read More


Misc. - J

Japanese researchers discover new method for predicting congenital CMV infection in fetuses
Congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection can cause serious complications such as hearing difficulties and mental retardation in affected infants. a Japanese research team has discovered a new method for predicting congenital CMV infection during the prenatal period. this method is safe for both mothers and fetuses, and could potentially be adopted for general use. the findings were published on October 20 in the online version of Clinical Infectious Diseases.
November 24, 2016
Read More


Jarvik Heart's new Tiny Pediatric Pump Cleared by FDA for Clinical Trial
Jarvik Heart has announced that its new pediatric heart pump is going on a clinical trial thanks to an FDA Investigational Device Exemption. the Jarvik 15mm left ventricular assist device (LVAD), being about the size of a AA battery, is small enough even for implantation into infants.
October 28, 2016
Read More


Junk Food Ads Sway Kids' Preferences
Children under 8 most vulnerable to marketing's effects, study says
July 5, 2016
Read More


Misc. - K

'Kangaroo Care' May Help Preemies Into Adulthood
Skin-to-skin nurturing linked to increased survival, better social and behavio
December 12, 2016
Read More


Kids Should be Screened for Lazy Eye by Age 5
Waiting later could lead to permanent vision problems, U.S. panel says
February 28, 2017
Read More


Kids in College Drink More, Smoke Less
Full-time students aged 18 to 22 also have higher rates of binge-drinking, survey finds
August 16, 2016
Read More


Kids' Artificial Sweetener Use Up in Recent Years
Some studies suggest a link between the sugar substitutes and obesity, researcher says
January 13, 2017
Read More


Kids' Mild Brain Injury can Have Long-Term Effect
Early head trauma linked to psychiatric, financial issues as adults, study finds
August 24, 2016
Read More


Kids' restaurant menus exceed calorie counts recommended by nutrition experts, study finds
Most kids' menu items offered by the nation's top 200 restaurant chains exceed the calorie counts recommended by nutrition experts, a new RAND Corporation study has found.
December 5, 2016
Read More


Kids' Sugary Drink Habits Start Early
Two-thirds of U.S. children consume one or more sweetened beverages daily, report finds
January 26, 2017
Read More


Kitchen Cooking Burns a Real Danger for Kids
Establish a 'no kid' zone in part of your kitchen to keep little ones safe
August 19, 2016
Read More


Misc. - L

Lack of Alix protein leads to occurrence of hydrocephalus in the brain
A team led by researchers at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital report that mice lacking the protein Alix develop hydrocephalus or "water on the brain." Alix ensures that epithelial cells of the choroid plexus are oriented correctly with respect to one another to prevent compromise of the epithelial barrier. the research appears online today in the scientific journal Nature Communications.
June 23, 2016
Read More


Lack of sleep increases a child's risk for emotional disorders later
NIH-funded study reveals long-term emotional effects of poor sleep
July 22, 2016
Read More


Language barriers can complicate treatment for children with special health care needs
Language barriers can have dangerous consequences for children with special health care needs, according to a paper by authors including pediatric specialists at McGovern Medical School at the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth).
September 16, 2016
Read More


Later high school start times linked to positive outcomes among teens
A review of the scientific literature by a workgroup composed of representatives from the American Academy of Sleep Medicine, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Sleep Research Society, and American Academy of Dental Sleep Medicine found that later high school start times are associated with positive outcomes among teens, including longer weekday sleep durations and reduced vehicular accident rates.
December 14, 2016
Read More


Laundry pods more likely to cause poisoning injuries in small children than nonpod detergents
Laundry pod detergents are far more likely to cause poisoning injuries in young children than are nonpod laundry detergents, and are four times more likely to lead to hospitalization, according to findings published today from researchers at the University of Alabama at Birmingham.
June 28, 2016
Read More


Lazy Summer Days Mean Weight Gain for Young Kids
Children from kindergarten through second grade put on weight when school's out, study found
November 2, 2016
Read More


Lead Exposure as Child, Lower IQ as Adult?
Leaded gasoline in new Zealand may have stunted intellectual development, study suggests
March 28, 2017
Read More


Lifestyle interventions can have impact on children's blood fatty acid composition, study reveals
Eating lots of sugary candy may strain the liver, alter the body's fatty acid metabolism and increase the risk of cardiometabolic diseases already in childhood. Children's blood fatty acid composition reflects their diet - but luckily this composition can be influenced by lifestyle interventions, say researchers from the University of Eastern Finland.
March 23, 2017
Read More


Limit Kids' Exposure to Media Violence, Docs Say
Parents need to tighten the reins, while media needs to stop glorifying aggression, statement says
July 18, 2016
Read More


'Love Hormone' Helps Dads and Babies Bond
Brain scans show distinct response when fathers gaze at their kids
February 17, 2017
Read More


Low back Pain Common Among Kids
Sports injuries are just one frequent cause, study finds
January 30, 2017
Read More


Low birth weight babies more likely to experience mental health problems later in life, research finds
Babies born with extremely low birth weight are not only at risk for physical problems but are also more likely to experience mental health problems later in life, according to an analysis of research conducted over nearly 30 years.
February 13, 2017
Read More


Low blood lead levels can have negative impact on academic performance
A decrease in the average level of lead in a preschooler's blood reduces the probability of that child being substantially below proficient in reading by the third grade, a new National Bureau of Economics Research working paper reports. and because poor and minority children are more likely to be exposed to lead, the study suggests that lead poisoning may be one of the causes of continuing gaps in test scores between children from different socioeconomic groups.
October 5, 2016
Read More


Misc. - M

mOm raises £630,000 in seed funding to develop revolutionary infant incubator
mOm has raised £630,000 in seed funding from a prominent set of investors to further develop its revolutionary baby incubator. Led by MaSa Partners (a US-based impact fund), investors include Holly Branson (as part of the Virgin Group), Lord Rumi Verjee (as part of the The Rumi Foundation), Continuity Capital, Dr. Joshua Boger, Johannes Heine, Rockspring, and the London Co Investment Fund.
August 24, 2016
Read More


Make Shots Less Painful for your Baby
By the time your baby is a year old, she'll need at least 16 vaccinations. the pain of each needle stick is fleeting for her, but the stress of seeing your baby cry can stick with you.
October 28, 2016
Read More


Many medical specialists accept shaken baby syndrome as valid medical diagnosis
A University of Colorado School of Medicine researcher and colleagues have conducted the first-ever survey of physicians on the validity of "abusive head trauma" as a medical diagnosis.
August 16, 2016
Read More


Marijuana use among pregnant women linked to low birth weight infants
In a new study, researchers in London, Ontario found that women who used marijuana while pregnant were almost three times more likely to have an infant with low birth weight than women who did not use marijuana.
April 27, 2017
Read More


Maternal antiretroviral treatment eliminates HIV transmission to infants during breastfeeding
For HIV-infected mothers whose immune system is in good health, taking a three-drug antiretroviral regimen during breastfeeding essentially eliminates HIV transmission by breast milk to their infants, according to results from a large clinical trial conducted in sub-Saharan Africa and India.
July 19, 2016
Read More


Maternal GDM linked to increased risk of childhood obesity among children aged 9-11 years
New research published in Diabetologia shows an increased risk of childhood obesity at age 9-11 years when the mother has had gestational Diabetes during pregnancy.
August 11, 2016
Read More


Maternal depression across the first years of life impacts children's neural basis of empathy
Exposure to early and chronic maternal depression markedly increases a child's susceptibility to psychopathology and social-emotional problems, including social withdrawal, poor emotion regulation, and reduced empathy to others. Since 15-18% of women in industrial societies and up to 30% in developing countries suffer from maternal depression, it is of clinical and public health concern to understand the effects of maternal depression on children's development.
January 3, 2017
Read More


Maternal language influences first cry of newborn babies
The very first cry of neonates is marked by their maternal language. this seems to be especially apparent in tonal languages, where pitch and pitch fluctuation determine the meaning of words. Chinese and German scientists under leadership of the University of Wurzburg have demonstrated this phenomenon for the first time by with newborn babies from China and Cameroon.
August 19, 2016
Read More


Maternal smoking could lead to an increased risk for Tourette syndrome, tic disorders
An association between maternal smoking during pregnancy and an increased risk for Tourette syndrome and other chronic tic disorders has been uncovered by researchers. the link seems especially strong for complex presentations of Tourette syndrome in which two or more psychiatric disorders are present.
September 7, 2016
Read More


Maternal SRI treatment may cause microscopic changes in fetal brain structure
A new Finnish study shows that fetal exposure to commonly used SRI drugs may affect brain activity in newborns. the researchers suggest that the effects of drugs on fetal brain function should be assessed more carefully. Furthermore, indications for preventive medication should be critically evaluated, and non-pharmacological interventions should be the first-line treatment for depression and anxiety during pregnancy.
June 15, 2016
Read More


MedCision announce program for companies undergoing early cell therapy trials
Limited-time program to help companies and investigators de-risk thawing of cell therapies in early stage clinical trials.
April 6, 2017
Read More


Mechanism identified through which lead may harm neural cells, children's neurodevelopment
Researchers have identified a potential molecular mechanism through which lead, a pervasive environmental toxin, may harm neural stem cells and neurodevelopment in children.
August 26, 2016
Read More


Meet Snugb Tulip, a smart baby cam to monitor your little one's health
Tulip, a cute little gumdrop-shaped baby monitor from Snugb is outfitted with a versatile camera that gathers data on room temperature, humidity and air quality around your baby's crib.
September 16, 2016
Read More


Mexican scientists develop micro valve to decrease microcephaly effects in developing fetus
Microcephaly is a condition in which a decreased size in the skull of fetuses or babies occurs, preventing the full development of his brain.
August 17, 2016
Read More


Moderately high TSH concentrations in infants linked to neurodevelopmental outcomes at school age
Babies born with moderately high concentrations of thyroid stimulating hormone have a higher risk of poor educational and development outcomes at school age, a world-first University of Sydney study reveals.
July 28, 2016
Read More


Mold Found in Baby Teething Toy
Several parents have reported finding mold inside a popular teething toy called Sophie the Giraffe.
January 17, 2017
Read More


Mom's Vaccine Protects Babies from Whooping Cough
Benefit is dramatic for newborns who are too young to be vaccinated, researchers say
April 3, 2017
Read More


Mondevices MonBaby Smart Button review:
Monbaby uses motion-tracking to monitor your child
June 22, 2016
Read More


Moody Teen? Lack of Sleep May not be the Culprit
Rather, adolescents' nocturnal tendencies a mismatch for early school start times, sleep specialist says
November 3, 2016
Read More


More screen time for kids isn't all that bad
Researcher says children should be allowed to delve into screen technology, as it is becoming an essential part of modern life
February 7, 2017
Read More


More U.S. Kids Getting Drug-Resistant Infections
Finding highlights growing problem of antibiotic resistance
November 17, 2016
Read More


Most U.S. Adults Support Routine Child Vaccine
Survey finds 80 percent have positive view of the shot against measles, mumps and rubella
February 2, 2017
Read More


Most U.S. Kids Who Die from Flu Are Unvaccinated
Researchers estimate about two-thirds of pediatric deaths could be prevented by flu shot
April 3, 2017
Read More


Music instruction improves cognitive, socio-emotional development in young children
Music instruction appears to accelerate brain development in young children, particularly in the areas of the brain that are responsible for processing sound, language development, speech perception and reading skills, according to initial results of a five-year study by USC neuroscientists.
June 16, 2016
Read More


Music Therapy Helps Preemie Babies Thrive
Mom's singing helps stabilize infant breathing
August 25, 2016
Read More


Misc. - N

Naptime could have beneficial effect on language learning in preschool-age children
Research has shown that naps play an important role in sustaining new learning in infants. a new study from the University of Arizona suggests naptime could have a similar effect on language learning in preschool-age children.
February 8, 2017
Read More


Nest has filed a patent for a 'smart' baby crib
Is this the long-awaited fourth product?
June 30, 2016
Read More


Neural features can help predict initiation of adolescent alcohol use
Underage drinking is a major public health and social problem in the U.S. the ability to identify at-risk children before they initiate heavy alcohol use has immense clinical and public health implications. a new study has found that demographic factors, cognitive functioning, and brain features during the early-adolescence ages of 12 to 14 years can predict which youth eventually initiate alcohol use during later adolescence around the age of 18.
June 27, 2016
Read More


Neurotherapeutic video game may help improve cognitive abilities in children with genetic disorders
A UC Davis researcher has created a video game for children who experience cognitive impairments from genetic disorders with the hope that that it will improve their ability to mentally process information about space and time.
June 23, 2016
Read More


New 3-D printed biomaterial could be effective in treating children with bone defects
A Northwestern University research team has developed a 3-D printable ink that produces a synthetic bone implant that rapidly induces bone regeneration and growth. this hyperelastic "bone" material, whose shape can be easily customized, one day could be especially useful for the treatment of bone defects in children.
September 29, 2016
Read More


New analysis examines link beween sleep duration and cardiometabolic risk in young children
How many hours a day young children (1-3 years) sleep does not appear to affect their cardiometabolic risk (CMR) at ages 3-8, based on an assessment of factors including blood pressure and cholesterol and blood glucose levels. Most unexpectedly, less sleep was associated with increased levels of high density lipoprotein (HDL), the "good" form of cholesterol, as reported in a new study published in Childhood Obesity, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers.
May 15, 2017
Read More


New article highlights positive impact of the BFHI on breastfeeding outcomes
The 10-step Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative (BFHI), aimed at promoting breastfeeding initiation and exclusivity to improve early infant health in the U.S. is having a positive impact on some measures, but others have proven more challenging to influence or assess.
August 17, 2016
Read More


New article outlines how school nurses can help teens experiencing digital dating abuse
Many teens experience physical or sexual abuse within their romantic relationships and now dating violence can also be perpetrated digitally by harassing, stalking or controlling a romantic partner via technology and social media.
August 26, 2016
Read More


New clinical study aims to prevent onset of epilepsy in children with tuberous sclerosis
A clinical trial of a drug that researchers hope can prevent or delay the onset of epilepsy in children with tuberous sclerosis has begun at McGovern Medical School at the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth).
May 8, 2017
Read More


New lab-on-a-chip system can detect effects of toxic substances on hemoglobin in blood
A new lab-on-a-chip system, developed by the University of Twente in the Netherlands, is capable of fast analysis of the effects of toxic substances on hemoglobin, for example. It mimicks human metabolism.
October 4, 2016
Read More


New position paper provides guidance on radiation safety for children with CAHD
Newly released recommendations for pediatric radiation safety will be discussed during the Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions (SCAI) 2017 Scientific Sessions in new Orleans. the position paper, "Radiation Safety in Children with Congenital and Acquired Heart Disease: a Scientific Position Statement on Multimodality Dose Optimization from the Image Gently Alliance," provides cardiologists, radiologists, pediatricians and internal medicine physicians guidance for treating pediatric patients with congenital and acquired heart disease (CAHD).
May 9, 2017
Read More


New research reveals increase in fatalities linked to adolescent abuse and neglect
New research from the University of Warwick reveals an increase in the number of adolescents who died or were seriously harmed as a result of abuse or neglect.
July 5, 2016
Read More


New research shows kids may harbor oral microbes from other nonrelative children
New ongoing research from the University of Alabama at Birmingham Department of Biology and School of Dentistry is showing more evidence that children may receive oral microbes from other, nonrelative children.
July 26, 2016
Read More


New study explores biomechanics of head injury in pediatric patients
The biomechanics of head injury in youths (5 to 18 years of age) have been poorly understood. a new study reported in the Journal of Neurosurgery: Pediatrics set out to determine what biomechanical characteristics predispose youths with concussions to experience transient or persistent postconcussion symptoms.
March 28, 2017
Read More


New study finds huge problem of multi-drug resistant infections among children
The adage that kids are growing up too fast these days has yet another locus of applicability.
February 24, 2017
Read More


New study highlights exposure of infants to harmful pollutants during school drop-in hours
Babies in prams accompanying older siblings on the school run are twice as likely to be exposed to harmful air pollution in the morning than in the afternoon, a new study has found.
March 9, 2017
Read More


New study identifies substantial unmet needs in Indigenous infant disease prevention, medical care
The study included 19 770 First Nations babies, 3930 Inuit and 225 380 non-Indigenous infants born between 1996 and 2010 in the province of Quebec. First Nations and Inuit mothers were much younger than non-Indigenous mothers, with 22% of First Nations and 27% of Inuit mothers under age 20 compared with non-Indigenous mothers (3.3%).
May 29, 2017
Read More


New study shows link between metabolic syndrome and cognitive abilities in U.S. adolescents
A new study of U.S. adolescents shows an association between metabolic syndrome and impairments in reading, attention, and working memory. Treatment can control and perhaps even reverse metabolic syndrome, which affects about 9% of teens in the U.S. and 12%-44% of obese adolescents, and may help reduce the cognitive effects described in the study published in Metabolic Syndrome and Related Disorders, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers.
November 30, 2016
Read More


New study to look at impact of common antidepressants on pregnant women
Northwestern Medicine Prentice Women's Hospital and the Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine Department of Psychiatry is home to a landmark study that will, for the first time, take a close look at the impact of certain common antidepressants on pregnant women.
September 13, 2016
Read More


New study tracks developmental differences between late preterm babies and full term infants
Developmental differences in babies born 4 to 6 weeks early may not show up until after they turn two, a new study suggests.
July 25, 2016
Read More


New virtual reality games create better patient-experience for kids during infusions
As a nurse clinician in the comprehensive hemophilia treatment center at Nationwide Children's Hospital for nearly 30 years, Charmaine Biega, RN, has watched her patients endure hundreds of needle sticks for infusions and other procedures which can mean tears, frustration, wiggling and - in some cases - lifelong anxiety about the medical system and treatments that patients with hemophilia need to survive.
October 5, 2016
Read More


Newborn's Gut Bacteria and Allergy, Asthma Risk
Study finds abnormality present in 10 percent of kids seems to undermine immune function
September 13, 2016
Read More


Nigerian Government reports 2 children paralyzed by wild poliovirus
After more than two years without wild poliovirus in Nigeria, the Government reported today that 2 children have been paralyzed by the disease in the northern Borno state.
August 12, 2016
Read More


NIH awards more than $150 million for research on environmental influences on child health
ECHO program to investigate exposures from conception through early childhood.
September 21, 2016
Read More


NIH researchers discover otulipenia, a new inflammatory disease
Rare and sometimes lethal disease affects young children
August 22, 2016
Read More


No Fruit Juice Before Age 1, Pediatricians Say
Plus, they support limits for older kids and doing away with sippy cups for toddlers
May 22, 2017
Read More


Noisy Homes can Slow a Toddler's Vocabulary
Limit background chatter when teaching new words, study says
July 21, 2016
Read More


Novel technology LifeVest can help newborns breathe
LifeVest, a technology being developed at St. Michael's Hospital to help newborns breathe, won the Global Healthcare Innovation Academy's international competition in Calgary.
August 30, 2016
Read More


NPS MedicineWise urges child care centres to increase awareness around misuse of antibiotics in young children
NPS MedicineWise has written to child care centres across Australia to enlist their support in responding to the growing problem of antibiotic resistance. Child care staff are well placed to help with education and increase awareness around the misuse of antibiotics in young children.
July 7, 2016
Read More


Misc. - O

Obese Preschoolers More Likely to be Hospitalized
Study also found health care costs about 60 percent higher for these kids
July 8, 2016
Read More


Obesity in Early Pregnancy May Raise Child's Risk of Epilepsy
The heavier the mom, the greater the odds of the seizure disorder, study suggests
April 3, 2017
Read More


Obesity in Pregnancy Tied to Cerebral Palsy Risk
But study authors stress that a cause-and-effect link wasn't proven
March 7, 2017
Read More


Obstructive sleep apnea and hypoxia linked to progression of NAFLD in obese adolescents
Researchers from the University of Colorado School of Medicine have published a new study showing that sleep apnea worsens non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in obese adolescents.
August 16, 2016
Read More


OIST scientists use zebrafish model to unravel causes behind human LCA
Newborns babies can be at risk of congenital blindness, presenting sight defects due to lesions or to genetic mutations in their genome. Among the latter, Leber Congenital Amaurosis -- or LCA -- is one of the most widespread causes of child blindness and accounts for nearly 5% of vision impairments overall.
April 5, 2017
Read More


Omega-3 fats fail to reduce risk of chronic lung disease in pre-term babies, study finds
The long-held belief that Omega-3 fats can help reduce chronic lung disease in pre-term babies has been debunked by researchers.
March 31, 2017
Read More


One more reason to focus on prenatal care -- Stronger muscles for newborn babies
Malnutrition and stress negatively affect muscle stem cells in the fetus, and this could have life-long consequences, outlines a new report.
February 3, 2017
Read More


One-shot vaccine passes key preclinical test in newborn monkey models
Newborns are highly vulnerable to infections and don't respond optimally to most vaccines because their young immune systems typically mount weak antibody responses. Now, researchers at Boston Children's Hospital report achieving strong vaccine responses in newborn animals, including monkeys -- the final preclinical model before human trials -- by adding compounds known as adjuvants that boost the immune response. In two simultaneous papers, they also describe improved adjuvant formulations that could reduce side effects.
March 24, 2017
Read More


Opioid Overdoses Nearly Triple Among Kids, Teens
Younger children 'eating them like candy,' while teens overdose while trying to get high, researcher says
October 30, 2016
Read More


Outpatient bloodstream infections costly for pediatric transplant and cancer patients
Median charge for central-line associated bloodstream infection is $37,000 for six-day hospitalization
August 29, 2016
Read More


Overactive bladder in children: Causes, symptoms, and treatment
Bedwetting in children is often considered a normal part of growing up, and celebrated as a milestone when it stops. When it doesn't stop, it could be a sign of overactive bladder or urinary incontinence.
April 18, 2017
Read More


Overweight, obese children at increased risk of developing surgical site infectios, study shows
Overweight and obese children are at the highest risk for the most common complications from surgery, an infection at the site of the surgical procedure.
January 4, 2017
Read More


Misc. - P

Parent-involved therapies found to be effective in treating children with disruptive behavior disorders
Therapy that involves the parents in the treatment of children with disruptive behavior disorders shows the best results compared to more than 20 other therapeutic approaches, according to a new study published today in the Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology, a journal of the Society of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology. Disruptive behavior disorders (DBDs) are characterized by a range of challenging symptoms that put a child frequently at odds with peers, family members, and authority figures.
May 2, 2017
Read More


Parental behaviors and practices linked to children's sleep duration
A new study indicates that children's sleep duration may be influenced by parental sleep duration and confidence, which suggests that efforts to address insufficient sleep among children may require family-based interventions.
November 23, 2016
Read More


Parental concerns about safety, side effects may negatively influence uptake of child flu vaccine
The first study investigating parental attitudes towards the UK's child flu vaccine has found concerns about safety and side effects may negatively influence uptake, and recommends that public health messages need to be reinforced.
March 8, 2017
Read More


Parental psychiatric diseases may lead to risk for suicide attempts and violent offending by children
Risk for suicide attempts and violent offending by children appears to be associated with their parents' psychiatric disorders, according to an article published online by JAMA Psychiatry.
August 31, 2016
Read More


Parental substance use increases health risks among children
Children whose parents or caregivers misuse alcohol or use, produce or distribute drugs face an increased risk of medical and behavioral problems. According to a new clinical report by experts at Beth Israel Medical Center (BIDMC) and Boston Children's Hospital, pediatricians are in a unique position to assess risk and intervene to protect children.
July 18, 2016
Read More


Parenting education benefits all, mainly families from underserved populations
Parenting education can improve the skills of every mom and dad and the behavior of all children, and it particularly benefits families from low-income or otherwise underserved populations, a new study from Oregon State University suggests.
December 5, 2016
Read More


Parenting significantly impacts development of children with Fragile X Syndrome
A longitudinal study of children with Fragile X Syndrome, the leading genetic cause of autism, and their mothers found that sustained maternal responsivity had a significant positive impact on the children's development, even mitigating declines often reported in middle childhood.
February 14, 2017
Read More


Parents can pass damaging effects of nighttime light exposure to offspring, study finds
Animals can pass the damaging effects of nighttime light exposure to their offspring, a new study has found, adding to a growing body of evidence that there's a health cost to our increasingly illuminated nights.
March 31, 2017
Read More


Parents concerned about neighborhoods more likely to restrict children's outdoor play, study shows
A study conducted by LSU Health new Orleans School of Public Health is the first to demonstrate that parents who are concerned about their neighborhoods restrict their children's outdoor play.
January 10, 2017
Read More


Parents' income and educational level linked to children's physical activity, screen time
Parents' income and educational level are associated with their children's physical activity and screen time, according to a new study from the University of Eastern Finland. Lower income and educational levels were associated with less supervised physical activity in particular. In boys, these were also associated with more screen time.
April 3, 2017
Read More


Paternal diet affects cognitive skills of offspring, mice study shows
The father's lifestyle affects the cognitive skills of his offspring -- at least in mice. Scientists at the German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE) have now shown that if male rodents are fed a diet rich in folic acid, methionine and vitamin B12, their progeny do not perform well in memory tests.
April 4, 2017
Read More


Pediatric clinic support boosts mental health for youth
Providing a brief behavioral therapy in the pediatric primary care setting is often better than referring to outpatient services for young people struggling with depression and anxiety, new research concludes. the brief intervention's benefits were especially noteworthy in Latino youth, more than three quarters of whom showed significant improvement.
April 24, 2017
Read More


Pediatric diseases and treatment could have greater impact on intestinal microbial diversity
Tracy C. Grikscheit, MD, pediatric surgeon and principal investigator at the Saban Research Institute of Children's Hospital Los Angeles, treats a large number of young patients who require surgery for various intestinal diseases. Since the intestinal microbiome is an important regulator of gut health and immune function, Grikscheit and her team investigated how surgical treatment of certain pediatric intestinal diseases have a long-term impact on intestinal flora.
June 14, 2016
Read More


Penn State radiologists propose ways to improve safe, effective imaging of children worldwide
When a doctor recommends medical imaging for a child, parents may find themselves confused and concerned.
September 16, 2016
Read More


Pet Meds Sending Kids to the ER
It's not uncommon for toddlers to ingest drugs intended for dogs and cats, study finds
February 6, 2017
Read More


Pets alter infants' microbiota to lower risk of allergies, obesity
New research highlights the benefits of having pets around the house during childhood, after finding that early-life exposure to furry animals may reduce the risk of developing allergies and obesity.
April 7, 2017
Read More


Phthalate exposure linked to increased risk of allergies among children
Phthalates, which are used as plasticizers in plastics, can considerably increase the risk of allergies among children. this was demonstrated by UFZ researchers in conjunction with scientists from the University of Leipzig and the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) in a current study published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology. According to this study, an increased risk of children developing allergic asthma exists if the mother has been particularly heavily exposed to phthalates during pregnancy and breastfeeding. T
May 3, 2017
Read More


Phthalates increase the risk of allergies among children
Phthalates, which are used as plasticizers in plastics, can considerably increase the risk of allergies among children, researchers show. According to this study, an increased risk of children developing allergic asthma exists if the mother has been particularly heavily exposed to phthalates during pregnancy and breastfeeding. the mother-child cohort from the LINA study was the starting and end point of this translational study.
May 3, 2017
Read More


Physical activity can counteract genetic risk linked to bone fragility in childhood
Exercise, particularly high-impact activity, builds stronger bones in children, even for those who carry genetic variants that predispose them to bone weakness, according to new research. the scientists say their findings underscore that genetics does not necessarily equate to destiny, and reinforce the importance of physical activity as a key factor to improve the bone health of children in the present and into later life.
June 14, 2016
Read More


Physical stress to mother during pregnancy can influence growth of unborn child
If the mother is stressed over a longer period of time during pregnancy, the concentration of stress hormones in amniotic fluid rises, as proven by an interdisciplinary team of researchers from the University of Zurich. Short-term stress situations, however, do not seem to have an unfavorable effect on the development of the fetus.
May 29, 2017
Read More


Physically active children are less depressed
Children, like adults, reap physical and mental benefits from being active
January 31, 2017
Read More


Physicians use social media to identify cutaneous leishmaniasis in teen travelers
A new report details how physicians and patients used social media to help diagnose cutaneous leishmaniasis in a group of teens who traveled on a youth adventure trip to Israel. Their posts quickly brought the cluster to the attention of the teens and their parents, leading to prompt recognition of the cause of their skin lesions and appropriate treatment.
August 02, 2016
Read More


Plan Ahead for Kids' Severe Allergic Reactions
First line of defense is an epinephrine auto-injector, pediatricians say
February 13, 2017
Read More


PleuraFlow for Pediatric CT Surgery Clears Chest Tubes of Clots
ClearFlow, an Anaheim, CA firm, has developed and now making available a pediatric version of its PleuraFlow Active Tube Clearance device. Designed for use post cardiothoracic surgery, the PleuraFlow makes sure that chest tubes don't clog up.
August 02, 2016
Read More


Plugged-in parenting: how parental smartphone use may affect kids
Parents' use of mobile technology around young children may be causing internal tension, conflicts and negative interactions with their kids, suggests a small qualitative study.
October 12, 2016
Read More


Polluted Environments Kill 1.7M Kids Yearly: WHO
Unhealthy and polluted environments cause more than 1 in 4 deaths of children younger than age 5 worldwide, the World Health Organization says.
March 6, 2017
Read More


PolyU researchers discover inadequate intakes of micronutrients among Hong Kong lactating women
While breastfeeding has become more common across the globe in recent years, lactating women may not be aware of the nutrient adequacy of their breast milk and how their daily diet affects their nutrition intakes. the research team at the Laboratory for Infant & Child of the Hong Kong Polytechnic University (PolyU)'s Food Safety and Technology Research Centre (FSTRC) has undertaken a study in breast milk to analyze the calcium, iron and iodine levels of breast milk of Hong Kong lactating women and their daily intakes of the respective micronutrients.
July 29, 2016
Read More


Poor physical fitness, passive hobbies may increase pain conditions in children
Poor physical fitness and sedentary behaviour are linked to increased pain conditions in children as young as 6-8 years old, according to the Physical Activity and Nutrition in Children Study ongoing at the University of Eastern Finland. the findings were published in the Journal of Pain.
June 14, 2016
Read More


Popular pain and fever reliever does not worsen asthma in children, study shows
WIn a study of children with mild, persistent asthma, scientists found that acetaminophen was tolerated without the worsening of asthma, when compared with ibuprofen use.
August 18, 2016
Read More


Pot Use in Pregnancy on the Upswing, Study Finds
Researchers concerned about possible harm to fetus
December 19, 2016
Read More


Pre-Pregnancy Weight and Cerebral Palsy Risk
But, study found overall odds remain quite low
September 12, 2016
Read More


Pregnancy Flu Shot Protects Newborn for 8 Weeks
Effectiveness drops dramatically after that
July 5, 2016
Read More


Premature Births Rise for First Time in 8 Years
March of Dimes' report finds significant geographic and racial disparities
November 1, 2016
Read More


Preschool-aged children monitor and self-repair speech errors when talking aloud
One of the differences between adults and preschoolers when it comes to private speech is that adults typically talk to themselves in their heads, while preschoolers talk to themselves aloud, particularly while playing or working on a task.
November 21, 2016
Read More


Preterm infants have higher risk of heart failure than babies born at full term
Babies born preterm run a higher risk of heart failure during childhood and adolescence than those born at full term, researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden report. The registry-based study is published in The Journal of the American College of Cardiology (JACC).
May 22, 2017
Read More


Preventing, treating smoking in children and youth
Recommendations from the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care
February 27, 2017
Read More


Preventive interventions for adolescent alcohol and drug use may need to begin in early childhood
Research from the University at Buffalo Research Institute on Addictions suggests the approach to preventing alcohol and drug use by some adolescents should begin in early childhood.
November 15, 2016
Read More


Protein in breast milk reduces infection risk in premature infants
Study shows need for large-scale trial of lactoferrin's role in immune system development
July 25, 2016
Read More


Misc. - R

Rare Infant Seizure Disorder Often Missed
Parents, doctors may not recognize infantile spasms early enough to prevent brain damage, study finds
December 6, 2016
Read More


Rate of Youth Soccer Injuries More Than Doubles
Concussion rate jumped almost 1,600 percent in same time period, study found
September 12, 2016
Read More


Reasons Why Parents Should be Wary of '13 Reasons Why'
Netflix series is too explicit in depicting teen suicide while leaving out key elements, mental health experts warn
May 4, 2017
Read More


Recruitment begins for landmark study of adolescent brain development
More than 10,000 children will participate in study of brain, social, emotional, and cognitive development.
September 13, 2016
Read More


Reducing cholesterol to level of newborn baby lowers cardiovascular disease risk, research finds
Reducing our cholesterol levels to those of a new-born baby significantly lowers the risk of cardiovascular disease, according to new research.
December 16, 2016
Read More


Regular family meals create positive outcomes in children
Juggling jobs, kids and the demands of a busy, modern life often comes at the expense of family mealtime at home. Even though life never seems to slow down, now is the perfect time to renew your commitment to creating and serving meals at home that nourish your kids' brains and help them flourish.
August 19, 2016
Read More


Regular physical activity improves brain power, academic prowess in children
A consensus statement which includes a University of Exeter researcher says exercise boosts kids' and young people's brain power and academic prowess.
June 29, 2016
Read More


Replacing screen time with other sedentary behavior can improve obesity risk in children
High amounts of screen-based activity, such as TV viewing, is known to be associated with higher risk of being obese in youth. In this study, the investigators examined whether replacing screen-based behavior with the same amount of other types of behavior had different impact on obesity risk.
December 2, 2016
Read More


Research explores effect of alcohol on adolescent brain
Under 18, no alcohol. In spite of this slogan, adolescents still have access to alcohol. But how harmful is that one beer for the adolescent brain? Research, including in Leiden, may provide the answer.
May 11, 2017
Read More


Research finds barriers to breast feeding exist for working mothers in rural areas
Research has shown that for working mothers, the ability to breastfeed their babies is critical to their physical, mental and economic health as well as to their babies' cognitive and physical development.
September 23, 2016
Read More


Research finds diagnostic tests to be less accurate for children with impaired kidney function
Breaking research published today in AACC's Journal of Applied Laboratory Medicine reveals that a number of diagnostic tests are less accurate when performed in pediatric patients with impaired kidney function. These findings show that healthcare providers should assess patient kidney function when interpreting clinical test results for certain conditions to ensure that patients receive the correct diagnoses and treatments.
April 17, 2017
Read More


Research highlights need to improve post mortem techniques to better detect cause of stillbirth
Analysis by a Great Ormond Street Hospital led team looking at the effectiveness of different elements of the post mortem process shows that, despite full standard investigation, in the majority of cases of stillbirth the cause remains unknown. the papers highlight the need for further research to improve post mortem techniques to better detect a cause of death.
October 26, 2016
Read More


Researchers awarded grant to develop safer cancer therapies for children
Two Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine researchers are receiving new funding from California-based St. Baldrick's Foundation for promising childhood cancer research.
October 5, 2016
Read More


Researchers detect high levels of arsenic, chromium and kidney injury biomarker in children of Mexico
Water supply contamination has become a global issue, affecting communities in both the United States and around the world. Exposure to environmental toxins - such as arsenic, cadmium, chromium, lead and other heavy metals - early in life via contaminated water or other sources can have long-term health consequences as children grow.
July 19, 2016
Read More


Researchers develop new camera system to medically monitor premature babies
In the near future, premature babies kept warm in neonatal incubators could be medically monitored using cameras rather than with sensors attached to their skin. this system is about to be tested on preemies at University Hospital Zurich (USZ-CH).
April 10, 2017
Read More


Researchers find increase in prescription of epipens for children with allergies
Researchers at the University of Birmingham have found that prescriptions of adrenaline autoinjectors (commonly called 'epipens') for children with allergies have increased markedly in the last decade, with nearly four devices a year provided per child.
March 15, 2017
Read More


Researchers identify crucial innate immunity role for gene linked to ARC syndrome in children
UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers have found an important innate immunity role for a gene linked to a rare, fatal syndrome in children. Their study has implications for a much more common disease: tuberculosis.
August 02, 2016
Read More


Researchers look into ways of getting best help for overweight children and teens
Researchers at SINTEF are looking into how best to help overweight children and teenagers.
September 21, 2016
Read More


Rest May not be best for Kids After Concussion
Study suggests light activity may help speed recovery
December 20, 2016
Read More


Risk of a Fatal Crash Triples for New Teen Drivers
Distractions, such as cell phones, and failure to buckle up are main causes
June 1, 2017
Read More


Misc. - S

Scientists discover potential trigger for MDS in children with rare genetic disorder
Myelodysplastic syndrome is an umbrella term used to describe disorders characterized by the bone marrow's inability to produce normal blood cells. Researchers from Charite - Universitätsmedizin Berlin have found that a mutation in a specific tumor suppressor gene is one possible reason why children with a very rare genetic disorder develop myelodysplastic syndrome.
April 12, 2017
Read More


Scientists uncover genetic cause of rare pediatric progressive neuropathy
Researchers from the National Institutes of Health and their colleagues identified the genetic cause and a possible therapeutic target for a rare form of pediatric progressive neuropathy. Neuropathy, damage or disease affecting the peripheral nervous system, can range from rare conditions linked to a patient's exome to more common causes like Diabetes and viral infections.
August 03, 2016
Read More


Screen Time May not be So Bad for Teens After All
Those who spend hours on smartphones, computers, TV can still flourish, develop social skills, study finds
January 20, 2017
Read More


Second-hand smoke exposures before conception affect fetal brain development
Exposure to second-hand tobacco smoke -- even before conception -- appears to have a lingering impact that can later impair the brain development of a fetus, researchers at Duke Health report.
January 5, 2017
Read More


Secondhand Smoke Linked to Food Allergies in Kids
Passive exposure tied to more egg and peanut sensitivity in study
March 6, 2017
Read More


See how bacterial blood infections in young kids plummeted after vaccines
To celebrate birthdays, my 2- and 4-year-old party animals got vaccinated. Measles, mumps, rubella, chicken pox, diphtheria, tetanus and whooping cough for the older one (thankfully combined into just two shots), and hepatitis a for the younger.
March 15, 2017
Read More


Sexual harassment prevalent among adolescent students, study finds
The recent suicide of Brandy Vela, a teen in Texas City, Texas, was a potent reminder of the sometimes tragic consequences of bullying. According to Vela's parents, the teen fatally shot herself Nov. 29 following months of bullying and sexual harassment, perpetrated in part through text messages and social media.
December 9, 2016
Read More


Should More Kids Have Their Tonsils Out?
Research suggests looser surgical guidelines might be warranted for sore throat, sleep problems
January 17, 2017
Read More


Skin patch to treat peanut allergy shows benefit in children
NIH-funded study suggests patch is safe, convenient mode of treatment.
October 26, 2016
Read More


Silk garments unlikely to provide benefit for children with eczema
Wearing silk clothing offers no additional benefit for children who suffer from moderate to severe eczema, a study led by researchers at the University of Nottingham has found.
April 12, 2017
Read More


Sleep-disordered breathing promotes progression of pediatric NAFLD to NASH
Studies have shown that obstructive sleep apnea and low nighttime oxygen, which result in oxidative stress, are associated with the progression of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in adults. Investigators have now established that these factors may also be important triggers in the progression of pediatric NAFLD to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis.
August 05, 2016
Read More


Smart baby monitors could put infants at risk, doctors say
A new editorial pushes for more regulation of smartphone-connected baby monitors
January 26, 2017
Read More


Smartphone app may increase discharge preparedness for parents of VLBW infants
A smartphone app specifically designed to support parents of very low birth weight (VLBW) premature infants as they transition home from the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) may increase parenting self-efficacy and discharge preparedness, according to a pilot randomized controlled trial at Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago that was published in the journal Internet Interventions.
June 24, 2016
Read More


Smartphones, Tablets and Weight Gain in Teens
Study found obesity risk up 43 percent if kids used screen devices more than 5 hours a day
December 14, 2016
Read More


Smartphones, Tablets Keep Kids Buzzing at Bedtime
Children with access to these devices don't get enough sleep, study finds
October 30, 2016
Read More


Soledad O'Brien Talks Kids' Health and Self-Help
When Soledad O'Brien's son Jackson, now 11, was in kindergarten, his teacher asked the class to write a story about something that had happened to them after school the day before. But for some reason, Jackson instead wrote a vivid tale about aliens coming down from space. "Everyone in the class was laughing at him," O'Brien recalls.
September 12, 2016
Read More


Solid cooking fuels linked to pneumonia among young children in developing countries
Solid fuels used for cooking are the prevailing source of indoor pollution in developing countries. now a worldwide ecological assessment has found that rates of pneumonia among young children in different countries are linked with the use of solid fuels.
September 19, 2016
Read More


Solo Teen 'Choking Game' Points to Suicide Risks
Kids who tried this game alone were almost 5 times more likely to think of killing themselves, study finds
November 21, 2016
Read More


Some Ads Push Not-So-Healthy Baby, Toddler Foods
Of concern are liquid supplements, toddler milk and sweetened snacks, researcher says
November 1, 2016
Read More


Some children with asthma may need different treatment approach, study finds
A new study by Henry Ford Health System in collaboration with eight other health systems in large U.S. cities, has identified a group of children with asthma that may require a different treatment approach.
October 5, 2016
Read More


Some parents may underestimate drowning risks of children, new poll suggests
As kids get ready to splash around in pools this summer, some parents may underestimate drowning risks, suggests a new national poll.
May 15, 2017
Read More


Some Schools Shame Students When Their Parents Can't Pay for Lunch
Shaming a debtor may be an effective -- and potentially illegal or unethical -- way of getting them to pay up, but should children who have no control over their family finances be publicly shamed if it gets their parents to pay their outstanding school lunch bills?
May 1, 2017
Read More


Steroid treatment linked to increased risk of retinopathy in very low birth weight infants
Modest but significantly increased risk of retinopathy in very premature infants is associated with steroid treatment, according to a new study published in the Journal of AAPOS
August 16, 2016
Read More


Stimulating the brain in younger age can help people stay mentally healthy in later life
Stimulating the brain by taking on leadership roles at work or staying on in education help people stay mentally healthy in later life, according to new research.
April 20, 2017
Read More


Stress in late pregnancy may fuel binge eating in female offspring
It is widely recognized that stress can trigger eating disorders such as binge eating, which is more common in females than in males. It was once thought that the link was purely psychological, but researchers are increasingly turning to genetics and biology for explanations. Now, a new study of mice shows that stress during late pregnancy rewires the brain and predisposes female offspring to demonstrate binge-like behavior. The study also suggests that binge eating may be prevented by changing the balance of certain nutrients in adolescence.
May 30, 2017
Read More


Studies reveal how parents can help develop smart, social kids
A pair of new studies further strengthen scientific understanding of the links between what a child experiences in the first years of life and later childhood behaviour and abilities.
June 22, 2016
Read More


Study evaluates long-term safety of infants after maternal MRI exposure
In an analysis that included more than 1.4 million births, exposure to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) during the first trimester of pregnancy compared with nonexposure was not associated with increased risk of harm to the fetus or in early childhood, although gadolinium MRI at any time during pregnancy was associated with an increased risk of a broad set of rheumatological, inflammatory, or skin conditions and, possibly, for stillbirth or neonatal death.
September 6, 2016
Read More


Study finds decrease in sexual violence perpetration and victimization among high school students
University of Kentucky researchers have observed a significant reduction in sexual violence perpetration and victimization among Kentucky high school students, according to a recently published study on the "Green Dot" bystander intervention program.
March 9, 2017
Read More


Study finds genetic basis for drug response in childhood absence epilepsy
NIH-funded research suggests genes may help determine optimal treatments.
April 11, 2017
Read More


Study finds half of children spend time in homes with firearms
A survey of parents in Missouri and Illinois reveals that about half of the children in the families queried spent time in homes that have firearms. However, few reported talking about gun safety with their children's pediatricians.
September 14, 2016
Read More


Study finds link between childhood manganese exposure and attentional dysfunction in rodent model
Researchers using a rodent model of childhood manganese exposure have found that too much manganese early in development causes lasting attention deficits and other impairments.
August 23, 2016
Read More


Study finds sleep habits during late childhood predict alcohol and cannabis use in adolescence
A study led by researchers from the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine and Pitt Department of Psychology has identified a possible link between adolescent sleep habits and early substance abuse.
September 19, 2016
Read More


Study focuses on reduction of maternal morbidity from hemorrhage using perinatal collaborative
In a study to be presented Friday, Jan. 27, in the oral concurrent session at 1:15 p.m. PST, at the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine's annual meeting, the Pregnancy Meeting™, researchers with the California Maternal Quality Care Collaborative, based at Stanford University, Palo Alto, Ca., will present Reduction of Severe Maternal Morbidity from Hemorrhage (SMM-HEM) Using a State-Wide Perinatal Collaborative.
January 23, 2017
Read More


Study focuses on sound exposure for premature babies in neonatal intensive care units
Premature babies often spend the first several weeks of life in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs), where, ideally, they are protected from too much noise stimulation. However, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have found that preemies may be exposed to noise levels higher than those deemed safe by the American Academy of Pediatrics.
February 8, 2017
Read More


Study highlights impact of familial poverty on toddlers' brain development
A study carried out by the University of Granada (UGR) has revealed that familial poverty has an impact on the toddlers' brain functioning. Infants belonging to families with lower economic resources and a lower level of education present a more immature functioning and less ability to detect errors.
April 18, 2017
Read More


Study provides more insights into abusive head injury in small children
Abusive head injury, sometimes referred to as shaken baby syndrome or non-accidental trauma (NAT), is the third leading cause of head injuries in small children in the US. for children under the age of 1 year, it is the cause of the majority of serious head injuries. Outcomes often result in severe, permanent disability and sometimes death.
July 12, 2016
Read More


Study provides unprecedented insights into causes of childhood diarrhea
New research offers unprecedented insights into the causes of childhood diarrhea, the second-leading cause of death of children worldwide, and suggests that the role of pathogens such as bacteria, viruses and parasites has been vastly underestimated.
October 13, 2016
Read More


Study recommends LISA ventilation strategy to prevent chronic lung disease in preterm infants
Researchers from McMaster University have evaluated and determined the best ventilation strategy to prevent chronic lung disease, one of the most significant complications in preterm infants.
August 09, 2016
Read More


Study reveals insights into survival, surgical interventions for children with trisomy 13 and 18
Among children born with the chromosome disorders trisomy 13 or 18 in Ontario, Canada, early death was the most common outcome, but 10 percent to 13 percent survived for 10 years, according to a study appearing in the July 26 issue of JAMA.
July 27, 2016
Read More


Study shows how the amount that babies cry varies around the world
According to a new study by the University of Warwick, newborns cry the most in Britain, Canada, Italy, and the Netherlands compared with the rest of the countries in the world. In a study on how much a baby cries in the first three months, psychologists have for the first time, created a universal chart for the normal amount of crying in babies during that period.
April 3, 2017
Read More


Study shows twice daily exercise intervention improves bone strength in VLBW pre-term infants
Because of their low weight and premature birth, very low birth weight (VLBW) pre-term infants have lower bone mineral mass and a greater need for bone nutrients compared to most new-born infants. this places them at greater risk of osteopenia (low bone density) and fractures in later life.
July 7, 2016
Read More


Study tracks parents' unpaid time assisting children with special health care needs
About half of U.S. children with special health care needs -- 5.6 million children -- receive medical care from uncompensated family members worth billions of dollars, finds a large national study led by Boston Children's Hospital and the University of Southern California (USC).
December 27, 2016
Read More


Suicide can Strike Children as Young as 5: Study
Overall numbers are low, but researchers say prevention efforts are needed
September 19, 2016
Read More


Suicide Kills More Middle Schoolers Than Crashes
Middle school students in the United States are now just as or more likely to die from suicide as from traffic crashes, a federal government study says.
November 7, 2016
Read More


'Superbug' Infections Striking More U.S. Kids
Antibiotic-resistant germs no longer confined to hospitals, study warns
February 24, 2017
Read More


Supplement of polyunsaturated fatty acids may improve reading skills in children
Supplement of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids may improve reading skills of mainstream schoolchildren, according to a new study from Sahlgrenska Academy, at the University of Gothenburg, Sweden. Children with attention problems, in particular, may be helped in their reading with the addition of these fatty acids.
September 14, 2016
Read More


Sureglide Cesarean, a Delivery Scalpel that Helps Prevent Injuries to Babies
Ecomed Solutions out of Mundelein, Illinois has introduced the Sureglide Cesarean scalpel. the device is designed to prevent any injury to both the baby or the clinical staff during incision of the uterus.
January 24, 2017
Read More


Misc. - T

Targeted intervention helps improve effectiveness of newborn hearing screening programs
Researchers at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center found that targeted intervention helps improve follow-up rates by more than 70 percent for newborns who fail initial hearing screenings at birth hospitals.
June 16, 2016
Read More


Teen substance use shows promising decline
NIH Monitoring the Future survey shows use of most illicit substances down, but past year marijuana use relatively stable.
December 13, 2016
Read More


Teenage binge drinking can affect brain function of future offspring
Repeated binge drinking during adolescence can affect brain functions in future generations, potentially putting offspring at risk for such conditions as depression, anxiety, and metabolic disorders, a study has found.
November 14, 2016
Read More


Teenagers influenced by video games with alcohol, smoking content
Images and references to alcohol and tobacco in popular video games may be influencing UK teens who play the games and the age restriction system is not working, according to a new study.
October 25, 2016
Read More


Texas A&M professor shares tips to protect infants from RSV
Coughing, sneezing and a runny nose: you might think it is yet another cold, but if your baby is under 2 years old, it could very well be respiratory syncytial virus (RSV).
December 20, 2016
Read More


There are more cases of measles in Minnesota now than in all of the US last year, thanks to anti-vaxxers
This doesn't look good
June 2, 2017
Read More


This baby monitor uses radar to detect infant breathing patterns
I'll be honest, hearing about what Raybaby does made me happy I don't have kids. the mere thought of needing a device to monitor a child's breathing stresses me out. But it's a legitimate concern, and the Hax graduates are offering a solution that may well provide some extra peace of mind for concerned parents of newborns.
February 16, 2017
Read More


'Three-parent baby' boy healthy so far
Three other embryos created by technique had wrong chromosome count
October 19, 2016
Read More


Tiny Babies May Face Mental Health Problems Later
Review found greater likelihood of ADHD, anxiety and depression
February 13, 2017
Read More


To Keep Teens Slim, Focus on Health, not Weight
New American Academy of Pediatrics guidelines cover preventing obesity and eating disorders
August 22, 2016
Read More


Toddler robots help solve how children learn
Children may learn new words using the same method as robots. new research suggests that early learning is based not on conscious thought but on an automatic ability to associate objects, which enables babies to quickly make sense of their environment.
November 28, 2016
Read More


Toddlers at High Risk of Chemical Eye Burns: Study
Access to household cleaning products to blame, experts say
August 04, 2016
Read More


Toddlers Eat More French Fries Than Vegetables
Federal stats show some don't eat any veggies at all, and some infants don't get any breast milk
May 1, 2017
Read More


Too Many Kids Still Eating Too Much Salt
9 out of 10 exceed daily recommendations, CDC researchers find
November 3, 2016
Read More


TV Snack Ads Make Preschoolers Snack More: Study
This happened even with kids who weren't hungry, researchers found
November 21, 2016
Read More


Twitches during rapid eye movement sleep may be linked to sensorimotor development in newborns
When her daughter was born two-and-a-half years ago, Mary Goldsberry-Troyer eagerly watched for the typical developmental milestones in her firstborn. She noted when Vivi smiled, rolled over, and took her first step.
July 27, 2016
Read More


Tyto for At-Home Visits with your Kids' Doctor
Neither kids nor their parents really like going to the doctor's office, but the days of at-home doctor visits are already long gone. Modern technology can help to overcome this by allowing doctors to examine kids remotely, as long as the right device is available. TytoCare, an Israeli firm, just received FDA clearance to introduce its digital stethoscope for the Tyto telehealth system.
November 2, 2016
Read More


Misc. - U

U.S. Kids Are Eating Healthier Now, But ...
Their salt intake has risen and veggies are still shunned, study finds
November 23, 2016
Read More


UAB pediatrician suggests ways to keep infants safe while traveling
Traveling with children can be stressful, but preparation can significantly improve the situation, according to University of Alabama at Birmingham pediatrician Candice Dye, M.D.
March 3, 2017
Read More


UAB receives NIH grants in three perinatal networks to improve maternal and infant health
The University of Alabama at Birmingham is the only university to be awarded grants in all three perinatal networks from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development to improve maternal and infant health.
July 20, 2016
Read More


UBC study reveals many parents less confident about increasing children's activity levels
If Canadian parents are going to get their kids to exercise more, they need more than just public awareness campaigns.
September 12, 2016
Read More


UCM REACT program receives $2 million federal grant to support children affected by violence
The University of Chicago Medicine Comer Children's Hospital will provide screening and mental health care for hundreds of children and families that have been affected by violence in many of Chicago's South and West side neighborhoods.
September 23, 2016
Read More


UGR researchers prove trolleys to be more beneficial than backpacks for children's gait
Researchers at the University of Granada warn that 23 percent of the girls carry in their backpack or trolley a load over 20 percent of their body weight, well above what is recommended
March 3, 2017
Read More


Umbilical cells from babies of obese mothers show impaired expression of vital genes regulating metabolism
Scientists have long known that infants born to women who are obese show higher risks of obesity, but they don't fully understand what boosts those risks. Researchers at Joslin Diabetes Center now have demonstrated that umbilical cells from children of obese or overweight mothers show impaired expression of key genes regulating cell energy and metabolism, compared to similar cells from babies of non-obese mothers.
August 23, 2016
Read More


Unhappy relationships may lead to excessive crying in infants
While colic is common among infants, researchers remain unclear on what causes the condition. a new study suggests that a mother's relationship happiness and level of social support might play a role.
May 1, 2017
Read More


Unique womb-like device could reduce mortality and disability for extremely premature babies
In animal studies, researchers design fluid-filled environment to bridge critical time from mother's womb to outside world
April 25, 2017
Read More


University of Melbourne ethicist encourages doctors to respect parents' opinions on treatment decisions for children
A University of Melbourne ethicist is encouraging doctors to recognise the autonomy of parents, even if this could mean "less than optimal" treatment decisions for their children.
September 13, 2016
Read More


Use of handheld devices by infants can delay speech development
Recent research presented at the 2017 Pediatric Academic Societies Meeting indicates that the development of expressive speech is more likely to be delayed in young children who use handheld devices, such as smart phones and tablets.
May 5, 2017
Read More


UTHealth study reveals genetic markers linked to increased risk for bipolar disorder in children
Genetic alterations that can be modulated by stress have been identified in children at high risk for bipolar disorder, according to a recently published study by researchers at McGovern Medical School at the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston.
May 8, 2017
Read More


Misc. - V

Vaccinating pregnant women protects newborns from whooping cough
When I was pregnant, my pronoun shifted automatically. My "I' turned into "we,' as in, "What are we going to eat for dinner?' and, "Should we sit in that hot tub?' I thought about that shift to the majestic plural as we got our Tdap shot in our third trimester.
April 12, 2017
Read More


Vigilant monitoring by parents, caregivers could help prevent drowning among children
More children are coming to hospital emergency departments this summer for drownings or near-drownings, including at Penn State Children's Hospital, where staff members say they have seen more cases recently than they can recall in several years.
August 04, 2016
Read More


Vision Check Needed for Kids with Concussion
Lingering eye problems linked to poorer academic performance
January 5, 2017
Read More


Vitamin A-biofortified orange maize improves visual functions in kids
A new study has found that vitamin A-biofortified orange maize significantly improves visual functions in children.
October 22, 2016
Read More


Vitamin D supplements in pregnancy could help protect children against asthma
The team of researchers from King's College London looked at the effect that taking a supplement of 4,400 IU vitamin D3 per day during the second and third trimesters of pregnancy versus the recommended daily intake (RDI) of 400 IU/day, had on the immune system of the newborn.
May 26, 2017
Read More


Misc. - W

Watching cartoons during dental treatment could help reduce anxiety and distress in children
Watching cartoons through video glasses during dental treatment could help lessen children's anxiety and distress as well as reducing disruptive behaviour, according to a randomized controlled trial published in Acta Odontologia Scandinavica.
August 08, 2016
Read More


Watching TV for long hours during childhood linked to lower bone mineral content
Consistently watching high levels of television during childhood and adolescence were linked with lower peak bone mass at age 20 years in a recent study.
July 7, 2016
Read More


Weather-forecast tool can help improve assessment and treatment of newborns with asphyxia
UT Southwestern Medical Center pediatric researchers have harnessed an analytical tool used to predict the weather to evaluate the effectiveness of therapies to reduce brain injury in newborns who suffer oxygen deprivation during birth.
April 10, 2017
Read More


Weight-Loss Surgery can Help Severely Obese Teens
Boosts kids' health and self-esteem, and appears to be cost-effective over time, study finds
October 26, 2016
Read More


Western diet during pregnancy may increase obesity risk in offspring
Diet composition around the time of pregnancy may influence whether offspring become obese, according to a new study using animal models at the Scripps Research Institute (TSRI).
December 14, 2016
Read More


When Parenting Styles Differ
Your husband is strict, but you're more relaxed. how can you get your styles in sync?
June 27, 2016
Read More


Why Are Babies Sleeping in Boxes?
The reason? it's not just because babies look adorable sleeping in the cardboard containers (although they do). Turns out, the boxes are an effective way to reduce the risk of infant death due to sleep-related causes, such as SIDS (sudden infant death syndrome).
February 1, 2017
Read More


Why I don't Use a Baby Monitor
Like any person scared shitless about the prospect of keeping a fragile new human alive, as soon as I found out I was pregnant I started googling the important questions. Among them: "What is the best baby monitor?"
July 1, 2016
Read More


Why the Teen Years May not be Lean Years
Adolescents burn about 450 fewer calories daily than 10-year-olds, study finds
September 21, 2016
Read More


Withings releases Touchless Temporal Smartphone Connected Thermometer
Withings has announced a new touchless temporal thermometer that also connects to smartphones to keep track of the temperature trends. the user of the Withings Thermo simply holds down its sole button and scans the thermometer across a person's forehead around the temporal artery. as that is done, an array of sensors on the tip of the device takes hundreds of measurements, identifying the hottest temperature during the scan.
July 20, 2016
Read More


Misc. - X

X-Ray Photo Shows Dangers of Eating Grapes for Kids
An Australian blogger recently posted a photo on Facebook that apparently shows an X-ray of a grape lodged in a child's airway. She says she shared the image to raise awareness of the choking dangers of certain foods such as grapes, due to the size of a child's airway. Choking is the fourth leading cause of accidental death for children under age 5.
April 7, 2017
Read More


Misc. - Y

Year-round flu vaccinations promote healthier infants in subtropics
Nepal study shows benefits for babies of vaccinated pregnant mothers
May 15, 2017
Read More


You Shouldn't Feed Poison to Babies, Even If it's In a Homeopathic Teething Tablet
Parents Are Still Giving Belladonna to Children, Despite Multiple FDA Warnings
January 30, 2017
Read More


Young children experience better long-term kidney transplant success than adults, study finds
The success of kidney transplants has vastly improved for children over the past half-century, with young children now experiencing better long-term transplant success than adults, according to study results from a large pediatric transplant center.
February 27, 2017
Read More


Young children form body images but parents may miss opportunity to find them
Preschoolers may express awareness about body-image issues - but their parents may miss opportunities to promote positive body-image formation in their children because parents believe them to be too young to have these concerns, new research suggests.
October 5, 2016
Read More


Young physician-scientists win Harry Winston Fellowships for innovative pediatric research
Dr. Claire Baldauf, Dr. Marjorie-Anne Guerra and Dr. Manal Habib have been named the recipients of the 2016-2017 Harry Winston Fellowships. the Children's Discovery and Innovation Institute at Mattel Children's Hospital UCLA announced the fellowships, which support young physician-scientists in their work to prevent, treat and cure pediatric disease and illness.
October 14, 2016
Read More


Your mother's diet may influence your liver's health
Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is a serious and growing problem. Previously linked with obesity, a new study also connects it to maternal obesity - meaning that what your mother ate during pregnancy may affect your future liver health.
April 24, 2017
Read More


Youth who use several media simultaneously struggle with attention-related tasks, study reveals
The aim of Mona Moisala's doctoral dissertation was to study patterns of activity in cortical networks related to attention and working memory, as well as to investigate associations between performance in working memory and attention tasks and the extent of daily technology-mediated activities in 13-24-year-old subjects from Finland.
March 13, 2017
Read More


The MerchantStore © 1997 - 2017