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512 Health - Double Helix - DNA - Genes - Genetics - Genome Resources

Misc. - Numbers

3D imaging technique maps migration of DNA-carrying material at the center of cells
Scientists have mapped the reorganization of genetic material that takes place when a stem cell matures into a nerve cell. Detailed 3-D visualizations show an unexpected connectivity in the genetic material in a cell's nucleus, and provide a new understanding of a cell's evolving architecture.
November 22, 2016
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3D packaging of DNA regulates cell identity
Study explains how mistakes in establishing cell identity may play a role in cancer, other diseases
October 12, 2017
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23andMe is finally allowed to tell you if you have the genes for Parkinson's
The Food and Drug Administration finally gave 23andMe a long sought-after green light today to sell to consumers genetic tests and their accompanying health risk reports for up to 10 diseases, including late-onset Alzheimer's and Parkinson's.
April 6, 2017
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23andMe President Andy Page is departing
He will remain on the board of the personal genomics company.
November 16, 2016
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23andMe reportedly no longer working on next-gen sequencing
23andMe won't continue with next-generation DNA sequencing and has reportedly laid off the lab working on the project.
October 26, 2016
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23andMe wins FDA approval to give customers health risk info
The gene testing company can now tell US customers who use its home DNA kit whether they have a genetic risk for any of 10 diseases and conditions.
April 6, 2017
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23andMe: a Medgadget Review
In 2007, Anne Wojcicki's 23andMe transformed personalized health with the unveiling of a direct to consumer genetic testing service in which subscribers would receive information about their ancestry, physical traits, and disease carriers by simply providing a saliva sample via mail to the company's labs.
May 11, 2017
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Misc. - A

A big-picture look at the world's worst Ebola epidemic
International team of scientists show how real-time sequencing and data-sharing can help stop the next outbreak
April 12, 2017
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A chicken-egg question: Where do baby genes come from?
New genes are more likely to emerge full-fledged from a genome's 'junk' DNA, according to scientists
April 26, 2017
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A chip-sized ultra-resolution microscope
Creating a new type of chip-sized optical microscope with high resolution capabilities is the challenge of ChipScope, a European project led by the University of Barcelona which counts with the participation of SMEs, universities and research institutes from five European countries. the objective is to develop the necessary science and technology to see extremely small structures such as viruses, DNA molecules or the inside of cells, in real time and without the disadvantages of the current high resolution techniques.
April 6, 2017
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A fresh look inside the protein nanomachines
Proteins perform vital functions of life, they digest food and fight infections and cancer. They are in fact nano-machines, each one of them designed to perform a specific task. But how did they evolve to match those needs, how did the genes encode the structure and function of proteins?
May 24, 2017
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A gene's journey from covert to celebrated
Unmasking a previously misunderstood gene, scientists discover an unlikely potential drug target for gastrointestinal cancers.
January 23, 2017
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A milestone in small RNA biology
piRNA biogenesis from start to finish
November 16, 2016
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A molecular garbage disposal complex has a role in packing the genome
New research has found that the proteasome, an essential protein complex that breaks down proteins in cells, has another unexpected function: directly regulating the packing of DNA in the nucleus.
October 10, 2017
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A new Flavor of CRISPR Could Tackle some of the Worst Genetic Diseases
Most of the time, when people talk about the cutting edge gene editing technology CRISPR, they are actually talking about CRISPR-Cas9. CRISPR, you see, is just one half of the genome editing tool, the programming that instructs where a DNA edit will actually be made. the other part consists of proteins that actually do the cutting. and one particular protein, called Cas9, has long been the snipping tool of choice. But now, there's a new protein on the block--and it may open the door to curing a devastating genetic disease.
April 12, 2017
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A new molecular scissors act like a GPS to improve genome editing
Researchers from the University of Copenhagen (Denmark), led by the Spanish researcher Guillermo Montoya, have discovered how Cpf1, a new molecular scissors unzip and cleave DNA.
July 6, 2017
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A new Lab-Built Fungus Eats Sugar and Burps Out Drugs
THERE MIGHT BE older fromances out there, but by most accounts the bond between humans and yeast has been the most prolific.
March 9, 2017
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A new tool for genetically engineering the oldest branch of life
CRISPR-Cas9 successfully used to modify an archaeal species for the first time
March 8, 2017
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A novel testing platform to assess, in real time, the efficacy of nanomaterials in regulating gene expression
Northwestern Medicine scientists have developed a novel testing platform to assess, in real time, the efficacy of nanomaterials in regulating gene expression. the findings, published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, could help to facilitate preclinical investigations and optimize nanotherapeutics for cancers before they reach clinical trials.
April 12, 2017
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A Personalized Nutrition Company will Use your DNA to Tell you what to Eat
Is a Diet Based on your Genome the Future of Nutrition?
October 25, 2016
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A three-dimensional map of the genome
Cells face a daunting task. they have to neatly pack a several meter-long thread of genetic material into a nucleus that measures only five micrometers across. this origami creates spatial interactions between genes and their switches, which can affect human health and disease. Now, an international team of scientists has devised a powerful new technique that 'maps' this three-dimensional geography of the entire genome.
March 10, 2017
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A three-dimensional map of the genome
Gene mapping technique promises to unlock the power of proximity to find genes implicated in diseases
March 8, 2017
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Aboriginal hair shows 50,000 year connection to Australia
DNA in hair samples collected from Aboriginal people across Australia in the early to mid-1900s has revealed that populations have been continuously present in the same regions for up to 50,000 years -- soon after the peopling of Australia.
March 8, 2017
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Accurately transcribing DNA overrides DNA repair, researchers find
Researchers found that in the model organism E. coli, the fidelity of transcribing DNA comes at the expense of DNA repair.
October 4, 2017
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Adaptive PCR, a new Powerful Technique to Speed Up Genetic Analysis
Researchers at Vanderbilt University have developed a new way of performing PCR (polymerase chain reaction), or amplifying DNA so there's enough of it to perform genetic analysis. the technique is called adaptive PCR and it relies on using only left-handed DNA (L-DNA), which is the mirror of normal DNA, to help regulate and monitor PCR. PCR is currently a fragile process that can be impeded by inexact sample preparation and environmental conditions. Having a way of continuously monitoring and guiding the process can lead to faster and cheaper results from genetic analysis and reduce the size of the machines used.
January 17, 2017
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After the epigenome: the epitranscriptome
After genetics, and epigenetics, the epitranscriptome might offer new answers to some diseases
March 22, 2017
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Aging process increases DNA mutations in important type of stem cell
Researchers say results should be considered when designing iPSC therapies
December 12, 2016
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Allen Institute for Cell Science releases gene edited, fluorescently tagged human iPS cells
The Allen Institute for Cell Science has released the Allen Cell Collection: the first publicly available collection of gene edited, fluorescently tagged human induced pluripotent stem cells that target key cellular structures with unprecedented clarity.
November 30, 2016
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Alterations in blood-based miRNA in veterans affected with combat-related PTSD
A small pilot study shows that Individuals affected with PTSD (post-traumatic stress disorder) demonstrate changes in microRNA (miRNA) molecules associated with gene regulation. A controlled study, involving military personnel on deployment to a combat zone in Afghanistan, provided evidence for the role of blood-based miRNAs as candidate biomarkers for symptoms of PTSD.
September 4, 2017
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An 'ignition key' revs up DNA shuffling to make antibodies
Researchers studying mouse proteins uncover part of 'choreography of immunity'
February 9, 2017
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Ancient DNA can both diminish and defend modern minds
A new study shows cognitive decline may be influenced by the interaction of genetics and ... worms?
December 30, 2016
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Ancient DNA evidence shows hunter-gatherers and farmers were intimately linked
In human history, the transition from hunting and gathering to farming is a significant one. As such, hunter-gatherers and farmers are usually thought about as two entirely different sets of people. But researchers reporting new ancient DNA evidence show that in the area we now recognize as Romania, at least, hunter-gatherers and farmers were living side by side, intermixing with each other, and having children.
May 25, 2017
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Ancient DNA offers clues to the Canaanites' fate
Modern Lebanese people descended from this ancient Levant group
July 27, 2017
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Ancient DNA reveals genetic 'continuity' between Stone Age, modern populations in East Asia
In contrast to Western Europeans, new research finds contemporary East Asians are genetically much closer to the ancient hunter-gatherers that lived in the same region eight thousand years previously.
February 1, 2017
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Ancient DNA reveals role of Near East and Egypt in cat domestication
DNA found at archaeological sites reveals that the origins of our domestic cat are in the Near East and ancient Egypt. Cats were domesticated by the first farmers some 10,000 years ago. They later spread across Europe and other parts of the world via trade hub Egypt. The DNA analysis also revealed that most of these ancient cats had stripes: spotted cats were uncommon until the Middle Ages.
June 19, 2017
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Ancient DNA showcases a war between our hominid ancestors and viruses
Viruses reproduce by infiltrating living cells and taking over the biological machinery inside. it's an insidious process that can leave the host with a life-threatening illness, a mild fever, or no ill effects at all. Recent advances in medical science have allowed humans to combat viruses like never before, but a new study from researchers at Rockefeller University shows how our primate ancestors may have waged war on a virus with only the weapon of evolution.
April 13, 2017
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Ancient hominid 'hanky panky' also influenced spread of STIs
With recent studies proving that almost everyone has a little bit of Neanderthal DNA in them ---- up to 5 percent of the human genome --- it's become clear our ancestors not only had some serious hominid 'hanky panky' going on, but with it, a potential downside: the spread of sexually transmitted infections, or STIs.
October 17, 2016
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Ancient humans may have been mothers to some Neanderthals earlier than we thought
The latest discovery adds another clue to the mystery of human and Neanderthal evolution
July 4, 2017
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Anorexia nervosa has a genetic basis
Anorexia nervosa is associated with genetic anomalies on chromosome 12, a large-scale, international whole-genome analysis has now revealed for the first time. This finding might lead to new, interdisciplinary approaches to its treatment.
June 12, 2017
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Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal communities exposed with new DNA sequencing approach
Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal systems play crucial roles in their environment, affecting the plants that can grow there and the nutrients in the soils. Researchers have developed a new DNA sequencing technique using barcoded primers that is capable of detecting rare fungal species in a community, paving the way for future insights into how they might vary in response to environmental changes.
September 29, 2017
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Are you a 'night owl'? you may have this genetic mutation
Few of us enjoy waking up early in the morning, but some people struggle more than most. According to a new study, if you fall asleep late and are finding it extremely hard to wake up early in the morning, you may have a genetic mutation that alters your circadian rhythm.
April 6, 2017
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Australia was colonized by a single group 50,000 years ago
Finding could help explain aspects of Aboriginal communities' belief systems.
March 8, 2017
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Misc. - B

Babies' DNA affects mothers' risk of pre-eclampsia in pregnancy, study finds
Some features in a baby's DNA can increase the risk of its mother developing pre-eclampsia -- a potentially dangerous condition in pregnancy -- a major new international study has revealed for the first time.
June 19, 2017
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Barley genome sequenced
Research could lead to better beer, single malt Scotch whiskey
April 26, 2017
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Best snacks for people with type 2 diabetes
Diabetes can lead to a wide range of symptoms including high blood pressure, circulation issues, kidney damage, blindness, and skin problems. But the right diet can help manage these symptoms.
April 24, 2017
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Biocomputing - DNA and gold nanorods give a logical solution
By adding strands of DNA to a solution containing gold nanorods, A*STAR researchers have created a remarkably simple system that can 'compute' basic logic operations like OR and NOT in response to specific molecular inputs. This has potential applications in rapid and complex diagnostic systems.
July 12, 2017
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Block copolymer micellization as a protection strategy for DNA origami
Scientists from the Center for Advancing Electronics Dresden (cfaed) / TU Dresden and the University of Tokyo led by Dr. Thorsten-Lars Schmidt developed a method to protect DNA origami structures from decomposition in biological media. this protection enables future applications in nanomedicine or cell biology.
March 16, 2017
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Brain mapping uncovers neuronal differences
Despite significant advances in neuroscience, we are far from knowing what each neuron in the human brain does and looks like. New research, however, brings us closer to such encyclopedic knowledge.
August 11, 2017
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Breakthrough: Gene editing repairs mutation in human embryos
In a world first, scientists have used gene editing to successfully repair a disease-causing mutation in human embryos, which is an achievement that marks a major step forward for the prevention of inherited diseases.
August 3, 2017
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Misc. - C

Caltech scientists develop simple way to visualize gene expression with MRI
Genes tell cells what to do -- for example, when to repair DNA mistakes or when to die--and can be turned on or off like a light switch. Knowing which genes are switched on, or expressed, is important for the treatment and monitoring of disease. Now, for the first time, Caltech scientists have developed a simple way to visualize gene expression in cells deep inside the body using a common imaging technology.
December 23, 2016
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Canadian researchers pinpoint new gene linked to peanut allergy
Canadian researchers have pinpointed a new gene associated with peanut allergy, offering further evidence that genes play a role in the development of food allergies and opening the door to future research, improved diagnostics and new treatment options.
October 11, 2017
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Captured on video: DNA nanotubes build a bridge between 2 molecular posts
In a microscopic feat that resembled a high-wire circus act, Johns Hopkins researchers have coaxed DNA nanotubes to assemble themselves into bridge-like structures arched between two molecular landmarks on the surface of a lab dish.
January 5, 2017
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CAR T cells more powerful when built with CRISPR, researchers find
Researchers have harnessed the power of CRISPR/Cas9 to create more-potent chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells that enhance tumor rejection in mice.
February 22, 2017
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Catching CRISPR in action
One of the most talked about biological breakthroughs in the past decade was the discovery of the genome editing tool CRISPR/Cas9, which can alter DNA and potentially remove the root causes of many hereditary diseases.
January 11, 2017
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Catching CRISPR in action: First all-atom simulation of genome editing in action
Scientists have performed the first all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of Cas9-catalyzed DNA cleavage in action. the simulations shed light on the process of Cas9 genome editing and helped resolve controversies about specific aspects of the cutting.
January 11, 2017
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Cautious but proactive approach to gene editing urged by multiple organizations
Medical, research, and counseling groups issue statement on germline genome editing
August 3, 2017
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Cell biology: Take the mRNA train
Messenger RNAs bearing the genetic information for the synthesis of proteins are delivered to defined sites in the cell cytoplasm by molecular motors. Researchers have elucidated how the motors recognize their mRNA freight.
January 17, 2017
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Cellular 'message in a bottle' may provide path to new way of treating disease
A newly discovered cellular messaging mechanism could lead to a new way to deliver therapeutics to tissues affected by disease, according to a new study. Researchers found a type of extracellular vesicle -- a sac secreted by cells that contains proteins and RNA molecules -- carries receptors that allow signaling without direct contact between cells.
September 27, 2017
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"Chemical surgery" on embryos to free them of a gene causing thalassemia
A team of Chinese researchers have for the first time "mended" defective embryos using chemical surgery to free them of a faulty gene that leads to beta thalassemia. Until now this defect was found to be incorrigible caused due to a single misspelling in the DNA code. Beta thalassemia is a dreaded blood disorder wherein the child is unable to make healthy blood needing blood transfusions on a regular basis.
October 2, 2017
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Chemists color world of 3-D crystals with advances in self-assembly
A team of New York University chemists has created self-assembled, three-dimensional DNA crystals that can bind a separate, dye-bearing strand--a breakthrough that enhances the functionality of these tiny building blocks. the advance, reported in the journal Nature Chemistry ("Self-assembled 3D DNA crystal device "), offers promise for the creation of enhanced synthetic chemistry.
March 13, 2017
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Chemists use modified DNA nucleotides to create new materials
DNA evolved to store genetic information, but in principle this special, chain-like molecule can also be adapted to make new materials. Chemists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have now published an important demonstration of this repurposing of DNA to create new substances with possible medical applications.
October 12, 2017
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Childhood obesity rates rise 10-fold since the '70s
A new report has looked at worldwide obesity rate trends over the past four decades, and it found that obesity in children and teenagers is 10 times higher now than it was in 1975, and that 5 years from now, more will be obese than underweight.
October 11, 2017
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China sides with Emmanulle Charpentier and Jennifer Doudna in CRISPR patent war
Continuing the patent dispute internationally, China has now given the Charpentier/Doudna side a patent to edit genes in the country.
June 19, 2017
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Chinese patient is first to be treated with CRISPR-edited cells
Chinese scientists have injected a person with CRISPR/Cas9-edited cells, marking the first time cells altered with the technique have been used in humans. Researchers used the powerful gene editor to alter immune cells to fight lung cancer, Nature reports November 15.
November 16, 2016
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CHOP researchers pinpoint WDR26 haploinsufficiency as cause for rare genetic syndrome
Researchers have identified a rare genetic syndrome characterized by intellectual disability, seizures, an abnormal gait and distinctive facial features. The scientists pinpointed variants in the WDR26 gene as causes for this distinctive, yet unnamed condition. Their early research provides initial information for counseling patients and families coping with uncertainties for children with the rare, poorly recognized condition.
July 6, 2017
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Chromatrap® kit shown to excel in DNA purification
Chromatrap® reports on the excellent results achieved by customers using their 96 well high throughput plates for ultra-pure DNA purification.
January 26, 2017
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Chromosome mechanics guide nuclear assembly
A protein that crosslinks the DNA to allow proper nuclear envelope reformation.
August 23, 2017
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Circular RNA linked to brain function
Circular RNA is linked to brain function, scientists have shown for the first time. When a RNA molecule called Cdr1as was deleted from the genome of mice, the animals had problems filtering out unnecessary information -- like patients suffering from neuropsychiatric disorders.
August 14, 2017
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CLAMP's dual duties may make it model for studies of protein function in context
New research on a crucial protein in fruit flies provides a clear model for a fundamental question in biology that's significant for drug development in particular: What influences the exact same protein to coordinate a vital molecular process on one chromosome but an entirely different one on another chromosome?
August 28, 2017
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Cloning thousands of genes for massive protein libraries
Scientists build technology that could lead to rapid discovery of new medicines and biomarkers hidden in genomes
June 26, 2017
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Cloning thousands of genes for massive protein libraries
Discovering the function of a gene requires cloning a DNA sequence and expressing it. Until now, this was performed on a one-gene-at-a-time basis, causing a bottleneck. Scientists at Rutgers University-New Brunswick in collaboration with Johns Hopkins University and Harvard Medical School have invented a technology to clone thousands of genes simultaneously and create massive libraries of proteins from DNA samples, potentially ushering in a new era of functional genomics.
June 26, 2017
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CNIO researchers find panoramic view of proteins that intervene in a cellular process
Three years ago, the research team directed by ҳcar Fern୤ez-Capetillo, head of the Genomic Instability Group at the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO), obtained, for the first time, a panoramic view of the proteins that intervene in one of the most important and delicate cellular processes: the copying of genetic material during cellular division. they observed that the parts of the genome where the DNA was copied were also very rich in the modification by some very particular proteins, SUMOylations, and poor in others, ubiquitinations, but they were unable to understand why.
March 8, 2016
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Cole-Parmer introduces Arcis Sample Prep Kit to extract DNA and RNA for downstream processes
Cole-Parmer, a leading supplier of laboratory equipment and reagents, is introducing the Arcis Sample Preparation System, which can extract DNA and RNA for downstream processes such as PCR/qPCR and sequencing in just three minutes. A study conducted by the Institute of Infection and Global Health, University of Liverpool, compared the preparation time, DNA yield, PCR and qPCR results of the Arcis Sample Prep Kit with three other kits.
June 30, 2017
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Common silver water treatments could damage DNA
Scientists are warning that a water treatment widely used in developing countries could be damaging the DNA of those drinking it.
June 21, 2017
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Common water treatments could damage DNA
A water treatment widely used in developing countries could be damaging the DNA of those drinking it, warn scientists. Despite poor evidence of their effectiveness as a water disinfectant, colloidal silver and silver nanoparticles are increasingly being promoted for treating potentially contaminated drinking water in low income countries.
June 21, 2017
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Computational biologists discover surprisingly strong effects from protein variation
Every human being has a unique DNA "fingerprint". In other words, the genetic material of any two individuals can be clearly distinguished. Computational biologists at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have now determined that the impact of these variations has been greatly underestimated.
June 19, 2017
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Computational modeling of genome mapping in nanochannels helps untangle the physics of DNA knots
While DNA sequencing provides precise, nucleotide-by-nucleotide genomic information, genome mapping provides a bigger-picture perspective of sequenced DNA that can provide valuable structural information. Like mapping roads to depict a city's structural information without needing to detail each home or business, genome mapping can be a powerful tool for understanding variations of large pieces of rearranged or altered DNA.
April 12, 2017
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Computer model unravels knotty problems in DNA
If you've ever tried to untangle a pair of earbuds, you'll understand how loops and cords can get twisted up. DNA can get tangled in the same way, and in some cases, has to be cut and reconnected to resolve the knots. Now a team of mathematicians, biologists and computer scientists has unraveled how E. coli bacteria can unlink tangled DNA by a local reconnection process. The math behind the research could have implications far beyond biology.
October 5, 2017
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Confirmed: Color Genomics is in the final stages of an $80 million Series C financing round
Genetic health screening startup Color Genomics is in the final stages of allocations for an $80 million Series C financing round, TechCrunch has confirmed with the company.
August 16, 2017
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Cortisol excess hits natural DNA process and mental health hard
High concentrations of the stress hormone cortisol in the body affect important DNA processes and increase the risk of long-term psychological consequences. These relationships are evident in a study on patients with Cushing's Syndrome, but the findings also open the door for new treatment strategies for other stress-related conditions such as anxiety, depression and post-traumatic stress.
March 28, 2017
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Could Shift Work Damage Your DNA?
Small study raises questions about daytime sleep and cell damage
June 27, 2017
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Could UV-absorbent DNA layer replace sunscreen?
Researchers have developed a DNA film that absorbs ultraviolet light more efficiently the longer it is exposed to it. This extra layer could be applied over the skin instead of sunscreen, potentially protecting it from the negative effects of sunburn, developers explain.
July 27, 2017
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CRISPR adds storing movies to its feats of molecular biology
Short film is alive and well. Using the current trendy gene-editing system CRISPR, a team from Harvard University has encoded images and a short movie into the DNA of living bacteria.
July 12, 2017
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Crispr creator Jennifer Doudna On the promises--and pitfalls--of easy genetic modification
For $150, you can buy a Crispr kit online and use it to engineer heartier gut bacteria in your kitchen. That's thrilling, but the technology is giving Jennifer Doudna, an inventor of the gene-�editing method, nightmares.
May 18, 2017
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CRISPR gene editing can cause hundreds of unintended mutations
As CRISPR-Cas9 starts to move into clinical trials, a new study published in Nature Methods ("Unexpected mutations after CRISPR-Cas9 editing in vivo") has found that the gene-editing technology can introduce hundreds of unintended mutations into the genome.
May 29, 2017
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CRISPR Gets More Precise, Will Be Used on More Diseases
We've written about CRISPR before. Namely how it is a coming genetic superweapon that we'll use to fight everything from cancer and infection to diabetes. In short, CRISPR allows scientists to cut out a section of DNA and replace it with whatever they choose. It works using hijacked bacterial machinery, so we've essentially hacked up a chunk of a bacterium and we're now using that to swap genes around... cool, right?
October 3, 2017
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CRISPR sheds light on rare pediatric bone marrow failure syndrome
Using the gene editing technology CRISPR, scientists have shed light on a rare, sometimes fatal syndrome that causes children to gradually lose the ability to manufacture vital blood cells. The research suggests new lines of investigation into how to treat this condition -- dyskeratosis congenita -- which is characterized by shortened telomeres. Short telomeres lead to progressive DNA damage that accumulates over time.
July 27, 2017
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CRISPR technology shows potential as a "molecular recorder" through DNA encoded movie
A study funded by the National Institute of Health, US, has for the first time encoded a primitive movie in the DNA of living bacteria cells that replayed it, using CRISPR technology.
July 14, 2017
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CRISPR: is It Possible to Remove Disease from DNA?
Can you roll your tongue? Do you have a widow's peak? Does peppermint make you sneeze? the answers are written in your DNA, along with a host of other assembly instructions that gave you certain traits, skills, and susceptibilities. your DNA also contains information about your health -- both your current status and your chances of developing certain diseases.
April 10, 2017
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Critical step in DNA repair, cellular aging pinpointed
The body's ability to repair DNA damage declines with age, which causes gradual cell demise, overall bodily degeneration and greater susceptibility to cancer. Now, research reveals a critical step in a molecular chain of events that allows cells to mend their broken DNA.
March 23, 2017
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Crystal structure reveals new details of nonstandard RNA transcription
By capturing the crystal structure of RNA polymerase during a nontraditional form of transcription -- reiterative transcription -- researchers have identified a new pathway used by RNA to exit an enzyme.
August 22, 2017
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Cultural differences may leave their mark on DNA
Signatures of ethnicity in the genome appear to reflect an ethnic group's shared culture and environment, rather than their common genetic ancestry, report scientists. Epigenetic signatures distinguishing Mexican and Puerto Rican children in this study cannot be explained by genetic ancestry alone, the researchers say.
January 10, 2017
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Cut the long story short, and stitch it back together
A species of unicellular ciliate has found a special trick to make use of the cellular machinery in seemingly impossible ways. Researchers have for the first time described a mechanism in detail how so called "junk"-DNA is transcribed before being degraded -- and this mechanism is remarkably clever.
March 19, 2017
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CWRU professor wins $3.9 million NIH grant to identify countermeasures against chemical hazards
Kurt Lu, MD, assistant professor of dermatology at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, has received a five year, $3.9 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to expand countermeasures against chemical threats, including mustard gas and mustard-related compounds. The molecular action of mustard on DNA leads to strand breaks and eventual cell death. The goal of the grant is to augment the body's immune system after exposure, reducing skin swelling and pain as well as enhancing tissue repair.
September 12, 2017
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Misc. - D

Dante Labs Full Genome Sequencing: A Medgadget Review
Dante Labs, a company with offices in Europe and United States, have partnered with a number of laboratories worldwide and are now using next generation sequencing technology to map an individual's complete genome--all three-billion base pairs--in around 8 weeks, and for under €1,000 ($1,175).
September 28, 2017
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Deciphering biological meaning from an atlas of gene expression across 42 tissue types
Geneticists mine genome-wide association studies with map of gene expression
October 11, 2017
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Defect in DNA repair machinery causes underdevelopment of neural network
DNA is the computer code that programs every event in the body. Despite the importance of DNA fidelity, as the body develops, cells grow and replicate, DNA is constantly turned over. This repeated process can compromise the DNA, which is why the body has many DNA repair machineries. Using mice, Osaka University scientists report a defect in one type of machinery, DNA polymerase β (Polβ), causes underdevelopment of the brain's cortices and axonal network. The findings could help explain cortical development disorders, such as autism and microcephaly.
August 30, 2017
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Defect in non-coding DNA could give rise to language impairments in children
The human genome is made up of ~3 billion letters of DNA and at each position it is possible to have different letters, called variants. some variants are harmless but others can be detrimental, making it a mammoth task to find out which variants cause a disorder. Researchers often choose to search only the 1-2% of the genome that carries the information to make proteins.
March 14, 2017
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Defect in non-coding DNA might trigger brain disorders such as severe language impairment
Genetic variation in the non-coding DNA could give rise to language impairments in children and other neurodevelopmental disorders including schizophrenia, autism, and bipolar disorder, scientists have found.
March 14, 2017
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Dental plaque DNA shows Neanderthals used 'aspirin'
Ancient DNA found in the dental plaque of Neandertals -- our nearest extinct relative -- has provided remarkable new insights into their behavior, diet and evolutionary history, including their use of plant-based medicine to treat pain and illness.
March 8, 2017
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Dentistry: new biotechnology to inhibit microRNA activity and novel applications
New biotechnology to inhibit microRNA activity and novel applications for craniofacial and dental research
March 18, 2016
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Designer proteins fold DNA: Biophysicists construct complex hybrid structures using DNA and proteins
Scientists have developed a new method that can be used to construct custom hybrid structures using DNA and proteins. the method opens new opportunities for fundamental research in cell biology and for applications in biotechnology and medicine.
March 23, 2017
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Detailed new genome for maize shows the plant has deep resources for continued adaptation
Maize's gene-regulatory flexibility bodes well for expanding the staple's growing range as the planet warms
June 12, 2017
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Discovery of chromosome motor supports DNA loop extrusion
It is one of the mysteries in biology: how does a cell neatly distribute its replicated DNA between two daughter cells? Scientists are split into two camps: the first argues that condensing works like a hook, tying DNA together. The other camp thinks that the ring-shaped protein pulls the DNA inwards to create a loop. Now researchers from give the 'loop-extrustion camp' a boost: condensin does indeed have the putative 'motor power' on board.
September 12, 2017
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Discovery of link between RNA quality control and longevity may shed light on mechanisms behind aging
The vigors of youth and the greener pastures of yesteryears. some might refer to these and other similar cliches as nothing more than rose-tinted literations of the past; a cognitive side effect of life. Romanticizing collective memories aside, however, it would be a challenge to find anyone who could argue against the physical degradations that accompany aging. One needs only to search for 'photos of aging' to realize that such yearnings are perhaps nothing more than ourselves giving form to the personal struggle with the byproducts of life.
March 10, 2017
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Discovery of new genes linked to Erdheim-Chester disease provides hope for improving diagnoses
National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) researchers have identified new genes associated with the Erdheim-Chester disease (ECD) and some possible new therapies. Findings on this ultra-rare disease, found in approximately 600 people in the world, were published in Blood Advances.
March 31, 2017
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Disease-associated genes routinely missed in some genetic studies
New research reveals two new ways to identify genes that routinely are missed in studies using a common gene-sequencing method. Many of these missed genes are associated with leukemia, psoriasis, heart failure, and other diseases. as part of their new research, the team of scientists have packaged their new methods into open-source software for other researchers to use.
April 24, 2017
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Disentangling chloroplast genetics
Scientists isolate a critical gene for plant health
May 11, 2017
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Dmrta2 gene mutation can lead to abnormal brain development in unborn babies
Link between Dmrta2 gene and rare nervous system disorder
July 6, 2017
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DNA + nanoparticles = self-assembled 'diamond'
The remarkable properties that diamonds possess result from their crystalline structure; similar structures in which nanoparticles substitute for carbon atoms could lead to materials with new and undiscovered properties.
December 5, 2016
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DNA 'barcoding' allows rapid testing of nanoparticles for therapeutic delivery
Using tiny snippets of DNA as 'barcodes,' researchers have developed a new technique for rapidly screening the ability of nanoparticles to selectively deliver therapeutic genes to specific organs of the body. the technique could accelerate the development and use of gene therapies for such killers as heart disease, cancer and Parkinson's disease.
February 7, 2017
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DNA computer brings 'intelligent drugs' a step closer
Researchers at Eindhoven University of Technology (TU/e) present a new method that should enable controlled drug delivery into the bloodstream using DNA computers.
February 17, 2017
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DNA computer brings 'intelligent drugs' a step closer
Researchers present a new method that should enable controlled drug delivery into the bloodstream using DNA computers. the team developed the first DNA computer capable of detecting several antibodies in the blood and performing subsequent calculations based on this input. this is an important step towards the development of smart, 'intelligent' drugs that may allow better control of medication with fewer side-effects and at lower cost.
February 17, 2017
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DNA Computer can Sense Multiple Antibody Inputs, with Potential for Smart Drug Delivery
Researchers at the University of Eindhoven in the Netherlands have developed a DNA computer that can respond to the presence of specific antibodies and make calculations, with the potential for intelligent drug delivery in the future. DNA computing involves using DNA molecules and other molecular biological components as molecular circuitry, instead of traditional silicon-based circuitry in computer devices. the DNA sequence dictates which other DNA molecules a DNA strand can interact with, allowing researchers to program DNA circuitry.
February 21, 2017
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DNA damage caused by cancer treatment reversed by ZATT protein
An international team led by scientists at the National Institutes of Health is the first to discover a new way that cells fix an important and dangerous type of DNA damage known as a DNA-protein crosslink (DPC). The researchers found that a protein named ZATT can eliminate DPCs with the help of another protein, TDP2.
October 6, 2017
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DNA delivery technology joins battle against drug-resistant bacteria
New tool is major milestone against lethal condition, researchers say
June 19, 2017
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DNA delivery technology joins battle against drug-resistant bacteria
Antimicrobial resistance is one of the biggest threats to global health, affecting anyone, at any age, in any country, according to the World Health Organization. Currently, 700,000 deaths each year are attributed to antimicrobial resistance, a figure which could increase to 10 million a year by 2050 save further intervention.
June 19, 2017
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DNA delivery technology joins battle against drug-resistant bacteria
Antimicrobial resistance is one of the biggest threats to global health, affecting anyone, at any age, in any country, according to the World Health Organization. Currently, 700,000 deaths each year are attributed to antimicrobial resistance, a figure which could increase to 10 million a year by 2050 save further intervention.
June 19, 2017
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DNA detectives crack the case on biothreat look-alikes
Distinguishing virulent from harmless bacteria could aid biological surveillance
August 23, 2017
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DNA Double Feature: Scientists Replay Movie Stored in Molecules
Scientists have successfully screened a movie recovered from the DNA of living cells.
July 14, 2017
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DNA double helix structures crystals
Method developed for DNA programmed material synthesis
April 4, 2017
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DNA duplicator small enough to hold in your hand
Engineers have developed a new method for duplicating DNA that makes devices small enough to hold in your hand that are capable of identifying infectious agents before symptoms appear.
January 11, 2017
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DNA evidence is rewriting domestication origin stories
Fresh ideas emerge about the origins of humans' relationships with their favorite species.
July 6, 2017
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DNA evidence shows the Soviets covered up an anthrax accident that killed dozens
The US intelligence community had long suspected the Soviet scientists were working on anthrax as a biological weapon, so the news of an outbreak of the disease in April of 1979 certainly looked like an accidental weapon release. a total of 66 people died in the city of Sverdlovsk (now renamed Yekaterinburg) and many more fell ill.
November 28, 2016
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DNA fingerprinting reveals how malaria hides from our immune system
DNA fingerprinting has revealed how the malaria parasite shuffles genes to create different strains and hide from our immune system. this trick allows the parasite to remain undetected and re-infect the same people, much like the flu.
May 2, 2017
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DNA from extinct humans discovered in cave sediments
Researchers have developed a new method to retrieve hominin DNA from cave sediments -- even in the absence of skeletal remains
April 27, 2017
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DNA influences selection of partners for educational achievement
People with genes for high educational achievement tend to marry, and have children with, people with similar DNA, new research shows.
November 23, 2016
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DNA is Being Collected to Protect Sex Workers, But It Could Also be Used Against Them
Nearly a decade ago, Dallas police proposed a new program designed to get sex workers off the streets. Rather than just send them to jail, police would set up shop at truck stops, accompanied by counselors, social workers and nurses, and give the sex workers a choice of either prison or talking to a counselor. But the program also had a grimmer, more ethically fraught component--collecting sex workers' DNA in hopes of identifying their bodies should they wind up dead.
March 28, 2017
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DNA labels predict mortality
Methyl labels in the DNA regulate the activity of our genes and, thus, have a great influence on health and disease. Scientists have now revealed that an altered methylation status at only 10 specific sites in the genome can indicate that mortality is increased by up to seven times. Smoking has a particularly unfavorable impact on the methylation status.
March 19, 2017
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DNA ladders: Inexpensive molecular rulers for DNA research
New license-free tools will allow researchers to estimate the size of DNA fragments for a fraction of the cost of currently available methods. The tools, called a DNA ladders, can gauge DNA fragments ranging from about 50 to 5,000 base pairs in length.
May 26, 2017
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DNA ladders: Inexpensive molecular rulers for DNA research
New, license-free DNA ladders will allow researchers to estimate the size of fragments of DNA for a fraction of the cost of currently available methods. A research team of undergraduate students led by Penn State Professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Song Tan and former undergraduate student Ryan C. Henrici developed two plasmids -- a circular form of DNA -- that can be cut by DNA scissors known as restriction enzymes to create the DNA ladders. T
May 26, 2017
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DNA links deadly germs, tainted heart surgery devices to German factory
Contamination at a German factory that makes crucial machines used during open-heart surgery is the likely source of a global outbreak of deadly infections tied to the devices, the largest analysis to date shows.
July 12, 2017
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DNA markers distinguish between harmless, deadly bacteria
Large genome study IDs potential virulence factors to discriminate new species
December 19, 2016
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DNA methods can help identify microbial hot spots in buildings
Genetic investigations are the latest tool for busting unsafe microorganisms and improving air quality in buildings
April 13, 2017
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DNA nanocapsules help scientists peek at how neurons work
A team of scientists from the University of Chicago designed a way to use microscopic capsules made out of DNA to deliver a payload of tiny molecules directly into a cell. The technique, detailed in Nature Nanotechnology ("Cell-targetable DNA nanocapsules for spatiotemporal release of caged bioactive small molecules"), gives scientists an opportunity to understand certain interactions among cells that have previously been hard to track.
August 29, 2017
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DNA "Nanoscopy" Enables High-Fidelity Recording of Molecular Geometry
Researchers are relentlessly expanding their cache of techniques to decode the spatial organization of biological structures. Using microscopes, they can currently visualize individual macromolecular components within protein, DNA or other complexes.
September 26, 2017
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DNA patterns can unlock how glucose metabolism drives cancer, study finds
Less aggressive cancers are known to have an intact genome--the complete set of genes in a cell--while the genome of more aggressive cancers tends to have a great deal of abnormalities. Now, a new multi-year study of DNA patterns in tumor cells suggests that these aberrant genetic signatures are not random but reflect selective forces in tumor evolution.
February 15, 2017
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DNA points to millennia of stability in East Asian hunter-fisher population
7,700-year-old remains show lack of influx from other groups
February 3, 2017
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DNA Self-Assembly Allows Control of the Optical Properties of Plasmonic Metamolecules
Plasmonic nanoparticles reveal properties based on their geometries and relative positions. Now, researchers have developed a simple way to control the optical properties of plasmonic nanostructures that strongly rely on their spatial arrangement.
April 25, 2017
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DNA sensor plays critical role in cancer immunotherapy via response to unexpected DNA form
Researchers report for the first time that tumors stressed by cancer immunotherapy release their mitochondrial DNA into nearby immune cells, triggering a host alert system.
August 23, 2017
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DNA sensor system developed for specific and sensitive measurement of cancer-relevant enzyme activity
The development of DNA sensor systems is of great importance for advances in medical science. Now another piece of the puzzle for the development of personalized medicine has been found with the results of a highly sensitive monitoring of cancer-related topoisomerase II enzymes (Nucleic Acids Research, "Interlinked DNA nano-circles for measuring topoisomerase II activity at the level of single decatenation events").
August 23, 2017
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DNA sensor system developed for specific and sensitive measurement of cancer-relevant enzyme activity
The development of DNA sensor systems is of great importance for advances in medical science. Now another piece of the puzzle for the development of personalized medicine has been found with the results of a highly sensitive monitoring of cancer-related topoisomerase II enzymes.
August 23, 2017
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DNA sent on sequential, and consequential, building mission
A team of scientists has developed a method to create structures whose building blocks are a millionth of a meter in size by encoding DNA with assembly instructions.
June 16, 2017
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DNA testing for jobs may be on its way, warns Gartner
There may be a future where genetics informs hiring and promotions
October 18, 2016
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DNA vaccine protects against toxic proteins linked to Alzheimer's
A new DNA vaccine, when delivered to the skin, prompts an immune response that produces antibodies to protect against toxic proteins associated with Alzheimer's disease -- without triggering severe brain swelling that earlier antibody treatments caused in some patients.
May 23, 2017
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DNA: The next hot material in photonics?
Using DNA from salmon, researchers in South Korea hope to make better biomedical and other photonic devices based on organic thin films. Often used in cancer treatments and health monitoring, thin films have all the capabilities of silicon-based devices with the possible added advantage of being more compatible with living tissue.
October 2, 2017
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DNA: The next hot material in photonics?
Scientists fine-tune organic thin films with an eye toward biomedical devices
October 2, 2017
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DNA's dynamic nature makes it well-suited to serve as the blueprint of life
A new study could explain why DNA and not RNA, its older chemical cousin, is the repository of genetic information. the DNA double helix is a more forgiving molecule that can contort itself into different shapes to absorb chemical damage to the basic building blocks -- A, G, C and T -- of genetic code. In contrast, when RNA is in the form of a double helix, it is so rigid that rather than accommodating damaged bases, it falls apart.
August 1, 2016
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DNA-based nano-tweezers measure the forces between nucleosomes
Every human cell contains some two meters of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), which encodes the genetic information that specifies the cellular structures and functions.
February 27, 2017
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DNA-functionalized graphene sensor for breath analysis
Reporting their findings in Advanced Functional Materials ("Humidity-Tolerant Single-Stranded DNA-Functionalized Graphene Probe for Medical Applications of Exhaled Breath Analysis"), researchers in Korea have demonstrated the enhanced sensing ability in a high humidity atmosphere of graphene sensors functionalized by single-stranded DNA, and proposed their novel sensing mechanism
July 11, 2017
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DNA-protein structure more diverse and flexible chain than previously thought, study reveals
How can six and half feet of DNA be folded into the tiny nucleus of a cell? Researchers funded by the National Institutes of Health have developed a new imaging method that visualizes a very different DNA structure, featuring small folds of DNA in close proximity. The study reveals that the DNA-protein structure, known as chromatin, is a much more diverse and flexible chain than previously thought. This provides exciting new insights into how chromatin directs a nimbler interaction between different genes to regulate gene expression, and provides a mechanism for chemical modifications of DNA to be maintained as cells divide.
July 27, 2017
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DNAe's article on semiconductor DNA analysis technology placed in Scientific Reports' top 100 read list for 2016
DNA Electronics ('DNAe'), the inventor of semiconductor DNA sequencing technology and developer of a new, revolutionary blood-to-result test for bloodstream infections, announces that an article on research utilizing the Company's patented semiconductor DNA analysis technology has achieved recognition as one of the top 100 read articles for 2016 in Scientific Reports, a peer reviewed journal from the publishers of Nature.
May 19, 2017
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Double-duty DNA plays a role in birth and death
Some gene versions stuck around because fertility advantage outweighs heart disease risk
July 4, 2017
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Drinking tea may alter women's gene expression
It seems that we can't get enough of tea; statistics show that almost 80 percent of households in the United States drink it. But do you know what this popular beverage does once it passes our lips? New research sheds some light on how tea affects gene expression.
June 1, 2017
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Misc. - E

Efficacy of innovative gene therapy can be tested quickly and cost-effectively using new cellular model
Using a new cellular model, innovative gene therapy approaches for the hereditary immunodeficiency Chronic Granulomatous Disease can be tested faster and cost-effectively in the lab for their efficacy. a team of researchers from the University of Zurich and the Children's Hospital Zurich successfully achieved this using the 'gene-scissor' CRISPR/Cas9 technology. the aim is to treat severely affected patients in the near future using novel approaches.
March 21, 2017
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Engineers make nanoscale 'muscles' powered by DNA
The base pairs found in DNA are key to its ability to store protein-coding information, but they also give the molecule useful structural properties. Getting two complementary strands of DNA to zip up into a double helix can serve as the basis of intricate physical mechanisms that can push and pull molecular-scale devices.
November 18, 2016
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Entire operating system written into DNA at 215 Pbytes/gram
High data density thanks to techniques developed for error-prone communication.
March 3, 2017
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Environmental DNA effectively monitors aquatic species populations
Environmental DNA (eDNA), the nuclear or mitochondrial DNA shed from an organism into its environment, is a rapidly evolving tool for monitoring the distribution of aquatic species. a new study discusses the ability of eDNA to accurately predict the presence, relative abundance, and biomass of wild Brook Trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) populations.
December 9, 2016
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Environmental DNA helps protect great crested newts
Research has revealed how tiny amounts of DNA (eDNA) released into water by great crested newts can be used to monitor the species. this can bring benefits for its conservation, and help protect great crested newts from major construction projects. It has also revealed, for the first time, how great crested newt eDNA varies throughout the year in relation to population size and environmental factors.
April 11, 2017
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Environmental 'memories' passed on for 14 generations
The impact of environmental change can be passed on in the genes of tiny nematode worms for at least 14 generations -- the most that has ever been seen in animals -- scientists have discovered.
April 20, 2017
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Epigenetic changes promote development of fatty liver in mouse and human
Mice with a strong tendency to obesity already exhibit epigenetic changes at six weeks of age, inducing the liver to amplify its production of the enzyme DPP4 and release it into the circulation. Over the long term, this favors the development of a fatty liver. Such changes in DNA methylation are also detectable in humans with fatty liver and suggest a similar causal chain.
January 9, 2017
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Epigenetic marks may help assess toxic exposure risk – someday
More work needed to understand what chemical tags on DNA, proteins mean
December 9, 2016
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Evolution Not Over for Humans
Study finds natural selection still happening, with gene variants linked to Alzheimer's, smoking fading
September 5, 2017
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Exercise can Overcome the 'Obesity Gene'
Physical activity appears to lower effects of key DNA linked to weight gain, study finds
April 27, 2017
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Expert outlines pros and cons of ordering various genetic tests
The amount of information gathered via next-generation sequencing has made the diagnosis of genetic disorders quicker and more accessible to clinicians than ever before, but with expanded testing options come questions about ordering the correct type of testing.
August 2, 2017
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Misc. - F

Far More People Than Thought Are Carrying Rare Genetic Diseases
Outside of evolutionary biology, the human body is often spoken of as a miracle of engineering. But those more familiar with its workings point out evolution is no perfectionist, often favoring clunky ad hoc solutions over those more elegant in design. In fact, the comparison of evolution to a gambler might be the most apt, and nowhere is this more evident than in reference to genetic diseases like hemophilia.
July 10, 2017
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Fast-forward aging due to DNA damage
In the course of time the DNA accumulates more and more damage -- aging is one of the results. The manifold effects of DNA damage have now been shown in unprecedented complexity.
August 30, 2017
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Faulty DNA repair depresses neural development
Researchers have discovered DNA polymerase ? (Pol?) deficiency in neural stem cells affects neuronal survival and neural network in the developing brain.
August 31, 2017
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FDA Panel Mulls Gene Therapy for Kids With Rare Eye Disease
If approved, it would be only the 2nd gene therapy OK'd in the United States
October 12, 2017
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First steps in human DNA replication dance captured at atomic resolution
It's a good thing we don't have to think about putting all the necessary pieces in place when one of our trillions of cells needs to duplicate its DNA and then divide to produce identical daughter cells.
March 17, 2017
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First steps in human DNA replication dance captured at atomic resolution
Human ORC complex captured in action in x-ray crystallography and cryo-EM
March 17, 2017
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First Use of Gene Editing Technique in Humans
The first use of a new gene-editing technique in humans has been reported by Chinese scientists.
November 16, 2016
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Five vascular diseases linked to one common genetic variant
Genome-wide association studies have implicated a common genetic variant in chromosome 6p24 in coronary artery disease, as well as four other vascular diseases: migraine headache, cervical artery dissection, fibromuscular dysplasia, and hypertension. However, it has not been clear how this polymorphism affects the risk for so many diseases. Researchers show how this DNA variant enhances the activity of a gene called endothelin-1, which is known to promote vasoconstriction and hardening of the arteries.
July 27, 2017
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Fly study shows RNA pathway plays major role in normal health and longevity
Humans and other animals carry rogue sequences of DNA in their genomes called transposable elements (TEs). to prevent passing TEs to their offspring, they employ the piRNA pathway in their reproductive organs to block the elements from being active in their sperm and eggs. with a new study in flies, Brown University biologists are the first to show that the anti-TE activity of the piRNA pathway also operates in a normal non-reproductive body tissue, the fly fat body, and that it helps to sustain the life of the animal.
December 21, 2016
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Food or fraud?
A smart universal tool based on a simplified DNA barcoding technique combined with nanotechnology enables food authentication with the naked eye
June 14, 2017
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For keeping X chromosomes active, chromosome 19 marks the spot
After nearly 40 years of searching, researchers report they have identified a part of the human genome that appears to block an RNA responsible for keeping only a single X chromosome active when new female embryos are formed, effectively allowing for the generally lethal activation of more than one X chromosome during development.
April 17, 2017
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Force employees to take DNA tests for bosses? We've got a new law to make that happen, beam House Republicans
Give us your genes or pay 50% more for company healthcare
March 10, 2017
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Forming a second line of plant defense: Capturing disease-resistant DNA
Scientists have developed a new improved method for capturing longer DNA fragments, doubling the size up to 7,000 DNA bases that can be analyzed for novel genes which provide plants with immunity to disease.
December 13, 2016
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From cancer to crop genomics -- using Research as a Service at the intersection of computers and biology
Ever since Nicola Bonzanni was a little boy playing in the tiny Italian village of Bonatte Sotto, just north of Milan, he was fascinated by nature and by building things. as he grew up, he wondered how computing and nature might be intertwined. "While I was studying computer science I was inspired by nature in building new algorithms. But then I thought perhaps you could do it the other way around, basically taking things that are being developed in computer science and apply them to biological problems.'
March 28, 2017
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From gene sequencing to genome mapping with nanopores and nanochannels
One reason why people are so excited about nanopore DNA sequencing is that the technology could possibly be used to create 'tricorder'-like devices for detecting pathogens or diagnosing genetic disorders rapidly and on-the-spot.
November 21, 2016
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Misc. - G

Gene editing technology shines light on rare dyskeratosis congenita
Using the gene editing technology CRISPR, scientists have shed light on a rare, sometimes fatal syndrome that causes children to gradually lose the ability to manufacture vital blood cells.
July 27, 2017
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Gene mutation appears to increase risk of Parkinson's disease in Caucasians
A defect in a gene that produces dopamine in the brain appears to accelerate the onset of Parkinson's disease, according to new research from Iowa State University. the effect is particularly dramatic for people under age 50.
November 28, 2016
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Gene mutation linked to early onset of Parkinson's disease in caucasians
A defect in a gene that produces dopamine in the brain appears to accelerate the onset of Parkinson's disease, according to new research. the effect is particularly dramatic for young-to-middle-age adults.
November 28, 2016
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Gene silencing shows promise for treating two fatal neurological disorders
NIH-funded preclinical studies suggest designer drug may treat ALS and spinocerebellar ataxia 2.
April 12, 2017
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Gene that helps form trauma-related memories can be manipulated to prevent PTSD, study finds
A specific gene that helps form memories from traumatic events can be manipulated -- and in doing so may actually help prevent post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), according to a new study led NYU Langone Medical Center that recently published in Neuropharmacology.
February 13, 2017
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Gene that influences nicotine dependence identified
Discovery creates the possibility for new research in addiction treatment
October 10, 2017
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Gene therapy shows promise for treating Niemann-Pick disease type C1
NIH mouse study could lead to human clinical trials.
October 26, 2016
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Gene therapy via skin could treat many diseases, even obesity
Using CRISPR and skin grafts, researchers boost insulin levels to reduce weight
August 3, 2017
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Gene therapy: what personalized medicine means for you
From CNET Magazine: what if the next pill you took were tailored to your genetic makeup? that day is almost here.
March 22, 2017
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Gene variant activity is surprisingly variable between tissues
Every tissue has its own pattern of active alleles, a large-scale study has found. Researchers were able to show that the differential allele activity is regulated by tissue-specific, regulatory DNA elements known as enhancers - a process that could also be involved in many diseases.
August 18, 2017
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Gene-therapy administered through skin transplants could enable treatment of many diseases
A research team based at the University of Chicago has overcome challenges that have limited gene therapy and demonstrated how their novel approach with skin transplantation could enable a wide range of gene-based therapies to treat many human diseases.
August 3, 2017
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'Gene therapy in a box' effective
A table-top device that enables medical staff to genetically manipulate a patient's blood to deliver potential new therapies for cancer, HIV and other diseases would eliminate the need for multi-million-dollar "clean rooms," making gene therapy more possible for even the poorest of countries.
October 20, 2016
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'Gene-silencing' technique is a game-changer for crop protection
Ground-breaking research based on nanotechnology promises to help conquer the greatest threat to global food crops -- pests and diseases in plants, report scientists who have developed a non-toxic, degradable spray which is capable of disabling specific genes in plant. 'BioClay' spray protects plants from disease-causing pathogens without altering their DNA, they report.
January 11, 2017
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Genes and the environment? Factors, patterns that lead to childhood obesity risk
A factor that has been linked to childhood obesity is restrictive feeding practices by primary caregivers, the implication being that it may interfere with a child's ability to learn to self-regulate food intake. When a child is overweight, parents tend to use more controlling, restrictive feeding practices. A new study is showing that a child's genetics, related to emotion and cognition, may also play a role in this pattern.
June 16, 2017
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Genes influence ability to read a person's mind from their eyes
Our DNA influences our ability to read a person's thoughts and emotions from looking at their eyes, suggests a new study.
June 7, 2017
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Genes May Govern your Risk for PTSD
Link with the psychiatric disorder is more apparent for women, study contends
April 26, 2017
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Genes, early environment sculpt the gut microbiome
Environment and genetics determine relative abundance of specific microbes in the gut, new research shows. the findings represent an attempt to untangle the forces that shape the gut microbiome, which plays an important role in keeping us healthy.
November 28, 2016
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Genes, ozone, and autism
Increased risk for autism when genetic variation and air pollution meet
June 23, 2017
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Genetic defects in tooth enamel conducive to development of cavities
Bacteria are not the sole cause of cavities; tooth resistance also plays an instrumental role. Researchers demonstrate that mutated genes lead to defects in the tooth enamel and can therefore encourage the development of cavities.
February 7, 2017
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Genetic discovery provides new insight into cognitive disorders
Findings could ultimately lead to new treatments for disorders such as schizophrenia, ADHD
January 17, 2017
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Genetic evidence from the South Caucasus region shows surprising long-term stability
The South Caucasus -- home to the countries of Georgia, Armenia, and Azerbaijan -- geographically links Europe and the Near East. The area has served for millennia as a major crossroads for human migration, with strong archaeological evidence for big cultural shifts over time. And yet, surprisingly, ancient mitochondrial DNA evidence finds no evidence of any upheaval over the last 8,000 years.
June 29, 2017
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Genetic 'fossils' reveal long-term viral partnerships in grass
Within host cells, partner viruses may exchange genetic material and evolve together over time
June 29, 2017
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Genetic proneness to illnesses may contribute to self-reported tiredness and low energy
Already feeling drained so early in the year? Genes might contribute in a small but significant way to whether people report being tired and low in energy. this is according to UK researchers led by Vincent Deary of Northumbria University, Newcastle, and Saskia Hagenaars of the University of Edinburgh, in a paper in Springer Nature's journal Molecular Psychiatry.
February 14, 2017
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Genetic study uncovers potential new treatments for inflammatory diseases
Researchers have studied over ten million DNA variations and found new links between the human genome and inflammation tracers. the study uncovered new possibilities for treatment of diseases such as multiple sclerosis, Crohn's disease and celiac disease.
February 1, 2017
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Genetic Sudoku is here, and it vastly speeds genomic analysis
Right now, the problems with DNA have nothing to do with DNA. the molecule itself, deoxyribonucleic acid, is extremely well characterized at this point. we can read it, write it, and manipulate it. we can edit it in living cells, and create alternate versions of it with special properties we need. we can use it to do computing or even fold it up to make simple little robots.
November 15, 2016
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Genetic testing benefits youngest epilepsy patients, study finds
Because of genetic testing, Orion Maynard's parents knew the cause of his epilepsy weeks after he was born. The results influenced his treatment, qualified him for immediate intervention services and led to the discovery that future siblings had a 50-percent chance of being born with the same condition.
August 3, 2017
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Genetic testing startup Color Genomics is switching CEOs
CEO Elad Gil is becoming the chairman and co-founder Othman Laraki is now CEO.
December 22, 2016
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Genetic variants linked to higher BMI may be protective against Parkinson disease
Genetic variants linked to higher body mass index (BMI) are associated with lower risk of Parkinson disease, according to a new study.
June 13, 2017
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Genetically engineered bacteria--spread by mosquito sex--could spell the end of malaria
Scientists spent ten years developing the special bug.
September 29, 2017
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Genetically Engineered Baker's Yeast Detects Variety of Fungal Pathogens
Researchers at Columbia University have developed a cheap and easy to use fungal pathogen sensor based on store bought baker's yeast. Currently available methods for detecting specific fungi involve expensive equipment, the use of refrigeration, and trained personnel. Using the team's technique may result in cheap, readily available testing for a variety of fungal pathogens that a layman can perform.
July 6, 2017
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Geneticists Get to the Roots of Hair Loss in Men
Researchers spot close to 300 genetic regions linked to baldness, which could provide targets for treatment
February 14, 2017
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Geneticists Repair Mutation in Human Embryo
In 'first-of-its kind' procedure, scientists converted to normal a mutant gene involved in heart threat
August 2, 2017
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Genetics reveal mysteries of hard-to-treat bacterial infection in cystic fibrosis
New research on bacteria that cause major problems for those with cystic fibrosis reveals clues as to how it proliferates for so long in the lungs and offers new ideas for treatments to explore.
March 27, 2017
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Genetics plays major role in how infants visually explore social world, twin study reveals
New research has uncovered compelling evidence that genetics plays a major role in how children look at the world and whether they have a preference for gazing at people's eyes and faces or at objects.
July 12, 2017
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Genetics startup Genos wants to pay you for your DNA data
The first whole human genome sequencing cost a whopping $2.7 billion. that didn't bode well for making any breakthroughs on genetic disorders. Luckily, the cost has dropped dramatically since then, leading to a new breed of consumer genetics startups taking a deeper dive into all the double helix's that make up you.
November 1, 2016
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Genome sequencing shows spiders, scorpions share ancestor
Researchers have discovered a whole genome duplication during the evolution of spiders and scorpions.
August 1, 2017
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Genomic analysis technologies: past, present and future
Can you please give a brief history of Illumina?
April 10, 2017
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Genomic sequencing illuminates recent Shigella outbreaks in California
Researchers identify genes associated with toxin production and antibiotic resistance
December 23, 2016
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Genomic sequencing reveals new insights into major shigellosis outbreaks in California
In a study that could have significant impact on how disease outbreaks are managed, researchers at UC Davis and the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) have sequenced and analyzed genomes from Shigella sonnei (S. sonnei) bacteria associated with major shigellosis outbreaks in California in 2014 and 2015.
December 23, 2016
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GIANT study finds rare, but influential, genetic changes related to height
International study of more than 750,000 people probes deeper into height than ever before
February 1, 2017
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Glowing mice could mark major step forward for new gene therapy
Timothy Blake, a postdoctoral fellow in the Waymouth lab, was hard at work on a fantastical interdisciplinary experiment. He and his fellow researchers were refining compounds that would carry instructions for assembling the protein that makes fireflies light up and deliver them into the cells of an anesthetized mouse. If their technique worked, the mouse would glow in the dark.
February 16, 2017
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Gunk from Neanderthals' teeth tells us they used medicine
And what they ate and what their mouth bacteria were like
March 8, 2017
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Gut's microbial community shown to influence host gene expression
New research is helping to tease out the mechanics of how the gut microbiome communicates with the cells of its host to switch genes on and off.
November 23, 2016
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GWAS identifies genomic locations linked to personality traits and psychiatric disorders
A meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) has identified six loci or regions of the human genome that are significantly linked to personality traits, report researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine in this week's advance online publication of Nature Genetics. the findings also show correlations with psychiatric disorders.
December 9, 2016
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Misc. - H

Have we Entered the Era of the $100 Genome?
At a San Francisco biotech conference on Monday, DNA sequencing giant Illumina announced the launch of a new DNA sequencer that could push the cost of decrypting the human genome from $1,000 to just $100.
January 9, 2017
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Here's the first 3D glimpse of how DNA is packaged up in a single cell
The balled structure reveals organization, which is critical for gene activity.
March 13, 2017
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Histone 1, the guardian of genome stability
Genomic instability is the main risk factor for tumor development in humans. Therefore understanding its origin and and exploring therapeutic targets is paramount. Histone 1 silences a region of the genome that causes irreparable DNA damage when translated and is lethal for the organism.
August 18, 2017
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HIV breakthrough: Scientists remove virus in animals using gene editing
Worldwide, tens of millions of people are living with HIV. While scientists and medical professionals do not yet have a permanent cure for the virus, researchers have just made a breakthrough: they managed to eliminate the HIV-1 infection in mice.
May 4, 2017
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How are long strands of DNA packed into tiny cells?
Scientists are a step closer to understanding how our DNA is squeezed into every cell in the body. They provide the first-ever detailed picture of the nucleosome, the most basic building block of chromosomes (the structures that house our DNA). This finding will inform research on all processes that involve chromosomes, such as gene expression and DNA repair, which are critical to the understanding of diseases such as cancer.
June 28, 2017
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How brain develops before birth is tightly controlled by RNA modification
Relating mistakes in this process to genes prevalent in psychiatric disorders may shed light on autism, schizophrenia
September 28, 2017
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How breaks in DNA are repaired
The results are significant for gene therapy procedures and for our understanding of cell transformation. a team of researchers has discovered that the processes for repairing DNA damage are far more complex than previously assumed.
February 2, 2017
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How cells hack their own genes
DNA in all organisms from yeast to humans encodes the genes that make it possible to live and reproduce. But these beneficial genes make up only 2% of our DNA. Now researchers have unveiled a novel mechanism for gene expression.
August 23, 2017
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How do metals interact with DNA?
Since a couple of decades, metal-containing drugs have been successfully used to fight against certain types of cancer. the lack of knowledge about the underlying molecular mechanisms slows down the search for new and more efficient chemotherapeutic agents. Scientists have now developed a protocol that is able to detect how metal-based drugs interact with DNA.
March 22, 2017
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How hibernating ribosomes wake up
Scientists have uncovered the way a bacterial ribosome moves from an inactive to an active form, and how that 'wake up call' is key to its survival.
September 12, 2017
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How molecular scissors cut in the right place
A research group has found out how CRISPR-Cas9 -- also known as 'molecular scissors' -- can search the genome for a specific DNA sequence. Cas9 already has many applications in biotechnology and is also expected to revolutionize medicine. The new research findings show how Cas9 can be improved to make the molecular scissors faster and more reliable.
September 28, 2017
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How molecular scissors cut in the right place
A research group at Uppsala University has found out how CRISPR-Cas9 -- also known as 'molecular scissors' -- can search the genome for a specific DNA sequence. Cas9 already has many applications in biotechnology and is also expected to revolutionise medicine
September 29, 2017
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How photosynthetic cells deal with a lack of iron
Researchers discovered a small RNA molecule in cyanobacteria that affects metabolic acclimation.
May 5, 2017
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How RNA formed at the origins of life
A single process for how a group of molecules called nucleotides were made on the early Earth, before life began, has been suggested by a team of researchers.
May 19, 2017
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How the genome sets its functional micro-architecture
Scientists now show how DNA is organized into specific regions, and that this depends on a combination of genomic distance and the presence of the CTCF protein.
August 17, 2017
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How to see living machines
It sounds like something out of the Borg in Star Trek. Nano-sized robots self-assemble to form biological machines that do the work that keeps one alive. and yet something like this really does go on.
November 23, 2016
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Human embryos edited for first time in the US using CRISPR
The scientists effectively corrected disease-causing genes
August 2, 2017
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Humans still evolving, large-scale study of genetic data shows
Researchers find a drop in some harmful genetic mutations in longer-lived people
September 5, 2017
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Misc. - I

Identifying species from a single caviar egg
A new tool enables identification of high-end caviar from Beluga sturgeons by analyzing DNA from a single caviar, a development that helps ensure the fair international trade of caviar and contributes to conservation of the species in the wild.
May 30, 2017
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Illumina introduces fast, highly accurate Veriseq NIPT Solution in the European Union
Illumina, Inc. today announced the launch of the VeriSeq™ NIPT Solution, a CE-IVD marked next-generation sequencing (NGS)-based approach to noninvasive prenatal testing (NIPT), including CE-IVD marked library prep and analysis software, which enables laboratories in the European Union to bring efficient, highly accurate NIPT in-house. the automated comprehensive solution allows laboratories to screen for certain fetal chromosomal abnormalities in approximately one day.
April 10, 2017
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Illumina wants to sequence your whole genome for $100
The first sequencing of the whole human genome in 2003 cost roughly $2.7 billion, but DNA sequencing giant Illumina has now unveiled a new machine that the company says is "expected one day" to order up your whole genome for less than $100.
January 10, 2017
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Imaging mRNA right where it is made - at the site of translation
Think of life as a house: if DNA molecules are blueprints, then messenger RNAs (mRNAs) are orders, describing the required parts (proteins) and when they should arrive. But putting in many orders doesn't always mean you'll get all of the parts on time -- maybe there's a delay with your vendor or delivery service. Similarly, mRNA levels alone do not dictate protein levels.
May 3, 2017
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Imaging mRNA right where it is made: at the site of translation
Think of life as a house: if DNA molecules are blueprints, then messenger RNAs (mRNAs) are orders, describing the required parts (proteins) and when they should arrive. But putting in many orders doesn't always mean you'll get all of the parts on time -- maybe there's a delay with your vendor or delivery service. Similarly, mRNA levels alone do not dictate protein levels. In a new article, researchers report a method to address that issue.
May 3, 2017
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Impact of genetics on human height is not increasing
The relative impact of genetics on height does not increase with improvements to the standard of living. These are the findings of an international research group that analyzed the impact of genetic and environmental factors on adult height over a span of more than a century. the research material comprised 40 twin cohorts, including more than 143,000 twin pairs from 20 countries.
January 27, 2017
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Improving DNA-detecting transistors with graphene
Researchers in India and Japan have developed an improved method for using graphene-based transistors to detect disease-causing genes.
February 24, 2017
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In a possible step forward for gene therapy, researchers made mice glow like fireflies
Timothy Blake, a postdoctoral fellow in the Waymouth lab, was hard at work on a fantastical interdisciplinary experiment. He and his fellow researchers were refining compounds that would carry instructions for assembling the protein that makes fireflies light up and deliver them into the cells of an anesthetized mouse. If their technique worked, the mouse would glow in the dark.
February 21, 2017
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In fruit fly and human genetics, timing is everything
Scientists show how DNA is accessed and used during the journey to maturation in fruit flies, and what this might mean to our understanding of how cancers arise
May 25, 2017
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Inflammation awakens sleepers
Gene transfer
March 29, 2017
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Introducing metallic ions within a DNA molecule will have many uses in bio- and nanotechnology
Researchers from the University of Granada have proven, for the first time, that introducing slight chemical modifications in DNA molecules may allow to introduce metallic ions in it, keeping its double-stranded structure and molecular recognition properties (for other DNA molecules, enzymes, proteins, etc.).
October 27, 2016
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It is easier for a DNA knot...
In an article published in PNAS, a research team from SISSA studied the passage of knotted DNA through nanopores, shedding light on an intriguing and underexplored phenomenon.
March 28, 2017
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Misc. - J

JAX wins NIGMS funding to decipher role of RNA structure in gene regulation
With new funding from the National Institute of General Medical Sciences totaling $2,059,618 over five years, JAX Assistant Professor Zhengqing Ouyang, Ph.D., will build a research program to reveal the roles of RNA structure in post-transcriptional regulation at the genome scale.
August 21, 2017
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Jellyfish fluorescence shines new light on DNA copying
Scientists have used florescent proteins from jellyfish to help shed new light on how DNA replicates.
June 27, 2017
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Jumping genes made us human, but can they cause disease?
What makes us human? Was it the discovery of fire, the industrial revolution, or the development of the Internet? Or are we human thanks to ancient bacterial and viral genes that are dotted throughout our DNA?
August 17, 2017
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'Junk RNA' molecule found to play key role in cellular response to stress
A new study has found a surprising role for what had been considered a nonfunctional 'junk' RNA molecule: controlling the cellular response to stress.
December 14, 2016
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Misc. - K

Key insight about mitochondrial replacement therapy
Mitochondrial donors should be carefully selected to avoid transmission of harmful mutations, outlines a new report. Mitochondrial replacement therapy offers hope for women genetically predisposed to pass on mutant mitochondria, the tiny powerhouses inside nearly every cell of the body. Mitochondrial DNA is passed only from mothers to their children. Mutations can cause a range of potentially fatal disorders affecting organs with high-energy demands such as the heart, muscle and brain.
November 30, 2016
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Kinky biology
A biological mystery lies at the center of each of our cells, namely: how one meter of DNA can be wadded up into the space of a micron (or one millionth of a meter) within each nucleus of our body.
July 6, 2017
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Misc. - L

Laboratory-on-a-chip technique simplifies detection of cancer DNA biomarkers
Cancer is the second leading cause of death in the U.S., making early, reliable diagnosis and treatment a priority. Miniaturized lab-on-chip approaches are prime candidates for developing viable diagnostic tests and instruments because they are small, need only limited test volumes, and can be cost-effective. Researchers have developed just such an approach capable of processing biomolecular samples from blood.
December 13, 2016
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Laboratory-on-a-chip technique simplifies detection of cancer DNA biomarkers
Cancer is the second leading cause of death in the U.S., making early, reliable diagnosis and treatment a priority for researchers. Genomic biomarkers offer great potential for diagnostics and new forms of treatment, such as immunotherapy. Miniaturized lab-on-chip approaches are prime candidates for developing viable diagnostic tests and instruments because they are small, need only limited test volumes, and can be cost-effective.
December 13, 2016
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Leaked Documents Reveal the NSA Spying on Scientists to Find 'Nefarious' Genetic Research
A new document made public this week via Edward Snowden's leak of NSA documents reveals a fascinating aim of signals intelligence program: the agency, it turns out, monitored international scientific developments in hopes of detecting "nefarious' genetic engineering projects more than a decade ago.
April 25, 2017
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Longstanding biological mystery of DNA organization now solved
Stretched out, the DNA from all the cells in our body would reach Pluto. So how does each tiny cell pack a two-meter length of DNA into its nucleus, which is just one-thousandth of a millimeter across? The answer to this daunting biological riddle is central to understanding how the three-dimensional organization of DNA in the nucleus influences our biology, from how our genome orchestrates our cellular activity to how genes are passed from parents to children.
July 27, 2017
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Low gene expression may raise susceptibility to depression
Researchers have taken an in-depth look at the function of a gene that may be linked to the development of major depression. Their findings show that its activity levels might determine our susceptibility to stress and negative stimuli.
July 10, 2017
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Low levels of simple chemical associated with aging, DNA damage
Treatment with a simple chemical restores DNA repair to aging mice.
March 24, 2017
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Misc. - M

Mathematical modeling can guide design and distribution of genetically modified genes
So, you've genetically engineered a malaria-resistant mosquito, now what? How many mosquitos would you need to replace the disease-carrying wild type? What is the most effective distribution pattern? How could you stop a premature release of the engineered mosquitos?
August 1, 2017
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Measuring the forces of biology
Biology, at the nitty-gritty level of motor proteins, DNA, and microtubules, takes its cue from physics. Consider, for example, the mitosis stage of cell division: two identical sets of DNA from the parent cell must be perfectly divided and separated into two new daughter cells. it's a physical act, and the cellular structure that does it, the mitotic spindle, is a machine that uses mechanical forces -- push, pull, and resistance -- to complete the task.
October 22, 2016
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MedCision announce participation at upcoming conference on cell and gene therapy
MedCision, a leader in the automation of pre-clinical and clinical processes, today announced the company's participation in Phacilitate Cell and Gene Therapy 2017, a conference with the most comprehensive cell and gene therapy agenda in the industry.
January 13, 2017
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Mercury is altering gene expression
The mercury found at very low concentrations in water is concentrated along the entire food chain, from algae via zooplankton to small fish and on to the largest fish -- the ones we eat. Mercury causes severe and irreversible neurological disorders in people who have consumed highly contaminated fish. Whereas we know about the element's extreme toxicity, what happens further down the food chain, all the way down to those microalgae that are the first level and the gateway for mercury?
August 15, 2017
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Methylation status of ten positions in genome correlates with all-cause mortality
Various chemical modifications in the genome determine whether genes are read or deactivated. Methyl labels in the DNA play a key role in this "epigenetic" regulation of gene activity. Life style and environmental factors influence the methylation in the genome. Scientists have already well documented links between the methylation status of specific positions in the genome and cancer as well as other diseases.
March 19, 2017
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Microbe, virus co-evolution: Model of CRISPR, phage co-evolution explains confusing experimental results
A new study suggests that researchers planning to use the CRISPR genome-editing system to produce designer gut bacteria may need to account for the dynamic evolution of the microbial immune system.
February 21, 2017
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Microbiology: Many forks make light work
New insights into the control of DNA replication and cell division in Corynebacterium glutamicum, a biotechnologically important microorganism, could help to optimize the industrial production of amino acids.
June 7, 2017
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Microchip Sorts DNA Fragments by Size in Minutes
At the University of Twente in The Netherlands, scientists have come up with a rapid and inexpensive way of separating out DNA fragments from a sample. The technology will help speed up DNA sequencing, which normally relies on using computers to virtually combine millions of DNA fragments into a single string.
June 1, 2017
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Micronic Univo Screw Cap Recapper could effectively seal valuable DNA samples
RadboudUMC, one of the largest and leading Academic Medical Centers in the Netherlands, has reported on its effective use of the Micronic Univo Screw Cap Recapper SR096 to securely seal its valuable DNA samples.
December 14, 2016
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Microparticles show potential to deliver DNA-based vaccines and gene therapies in pill form
A microscopic corn-and-shrimp cocktail could eventually make DNA-based vaccinations and cancer-treating gene therapies an easier pill to swallow, according to new research from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln.
April 12, 2017
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Microplate specifically for seed genomics designed by Porvair Sciences
Porvair Sciences launched their new Seed Genomics microplate at the recent Plant & Animal Genomics 2017 conference in San Diego (USA) and received an enthusiastic response from the assembled scientists.
February 27, 2017
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Millions of novel genetic variants found in 1000 Swedish individuals
An extensive exercise to map genetic variation in Sweden has found 33 million genetic variants, 10 million of which are novel. Large-scale DNA sequencing methods were used to analyse the whole genome of 1000 individuals from different parts of the country.
August 25, 2017
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Mimicking an impact on Earth's early atmosphere yields all 4 RNA bases
A big rock hitting the right atmosphere could make RNA building blocks.
April 12, 2017
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MIT Research Team Develops Innovative DNA Origami
The founding mission of MIT may seem like an unusual meal-time story for a child. But, when Mark Bathe was growing up, it was a regular topic of conversation around the dinner table.
June 5, 2017
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Molecular geometry with DNA nanoscopy
Researchers are constantly expanding their arsenal of methods to decipher the spatial organization of biological structures. Using microscopes, they can now visualize individual macromolecular components within DNA, protein, or other complexes. However, this resolution typically requires sophisticated equipment applied to specially-processed samples, and it is difficult to simultaneously watch many types of molecules, especially at high density and throughput, or dynamic interactions.
September 25, 2017
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Molecular selfie reveals how a chemical bond breaks: Proton is seen escaping the molecule
Imagine what it would be like to watch how the individual atoms of molecules rearrange during a chemical reaction to form a new substance, or to see the compounds of DNA move, rearrange and replicate. Such capability would give unprecedented insight to understand and potentially control the processes.
December 14, 2016
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Monoclonal antibody cures Marburg infection in monkeys
NIH-funded groups preparing for next filovirus outbreak.
April 5, 2017
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Move over Cas9, CRISPR-Cas3 might hold the key to solving the antibiotics crisis
Researchers at North Carolina-based Locus Biosciences think they have a potential cure for antibiotic resistance using CRISPR's lesser-known Cas3 enzyme.
December 21, 2016
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mRNA selective drug release from nanoparticles
Scientists from the University of Southampton designed an advanced type of nanoparticle, which is able to carry drugs directly into cells and release them only in the presence of an appropriate mRNA signature; in other words, the nanoparticle carriers release their payload only in specific -- metastatic cancer -- cells and remain inactive in healthy cells.
October 30, 2016
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MRSA survival chances predicted by DNA sequencing the superbug
Sequencing the DNA of the MRSA superbug can accurately identify patients most at risk of death and could help medics develop new treatments as we move towards personalised medicine, say scientists.
August 7, 2017
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MSK researchers publish new review that focuses on genome-driven oncology
Researchers from Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSK) today published a seminal review of the rapidly evolving field of precision oncology, which allows doctors to recommend therapies based on a genetic understanding of a person's cancer. Appearing in the special cancer-focused February 9 issue of Cell, the article " "Implementing Genome-Driven Oncology" " presents a critically self-reflective but solutions-focused perspective on this approach to cancer treatment.
February 9, 2017
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Multi-institutional collaboration uncovers how molecular machines assemble
Ribosomes -- macromolecular machines consisting of RNA and proteins that twist, fold and turn -- are responsible for making all of the protein within a cell and could hold the key to deciphering a range of diseases. Despite the intricacies of ribosomes, cells are able to churn out 100,000 of them every hour. But because they assemble so speedily, researchers haven't been able to figure out how they come together.
December 1, 2016
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Mummy DNA shows that the ancients don't have much in common with modern Egyptians
This will pave the way for more genetics studies
May 30, 2017
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Mummy DNA unveils the history of ancient Egyptian hookups
Egyptian mummies are back in style at the summer box office -- and in genetics labs. A study of genetic blueprints from 90 mummies repairs the frayed reputation of sarcophagus occupants as sources of ancient DNA. And it reveals evidence of a hookup history with foreigners from the east.
May 31, 2017
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Mutated genes lead to tooth enamel defects that increase risk of caries
Bacteria are not the sole cause of caries; tooth resistance also plays an instrumental role. Researchers from the University of Zurich demonstrate that mutated genes lead to defects in the tooth enamel and can therefore encourage the development of caries.
February 7, 2017
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Misc. - N

Nanocages Made of DNA Strands Release Small Molecules to Improve Challenging Studies Inside Body
Many of the activities happening within our bodies are incredibly difficult to study, as some happen in hard to reach places and their timespan is very short. The action of neurosteroids, chemicals that perform an important role in the lives of neurons, is one such topic. Neurosteroids take less than a second to act, and getting anywhere near them is hard. Now a team at the University of Chicago is reporting on the development of tiny cages that can ferry small molecules to be released precisely when and where the researchers want to.
September 5, 2017
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Nanoparticle-based method shows promise in DNA vaccine delivery
Researchers have developed a novel method for delivering therapeutic molecules into cells. the method harnesses gold nanoparticles that are electrically activated, causing them to oscillate and bore holes in cells' outer membranes and allowing key molecules -- such as DNA, RNA, and proteins -- to gain entry.
December 19, 2016
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Nanoparticle-based method shows promise in DNA vaccine delivery
Scientists at Brigham and Women's Hospital have developed a novel method for delivering therapeutic molecules into cells. the method harnesses gold nanoparticles that are electrically activated, causing them to oscillate and bore holes in cells' outer membranes and allowing key molecules -- such as DNA, RNA, and proteins -- to gain entry.
December 19, 2016
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Nanoparticles to Deliver mRNA: Just Add Water
Scientists at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle, Washington have developed a nanoparticle messenger RNA (mRNA) delivery system to temporarily change gene expression in treated cells.
September 5, 2017
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Nanopore technology makes leap from DNA sequencing to identifying proteins
In PLOS Computational Biology ("Single-molecule protein identification by sub-nanopore sensors"), scientists from UC San Diego and the University of Notre Dame report on a study that could open up the field for nanopore-based protein identification -- and eventually proteomic profiling of large numbers of proteins in complex mixtures of different types of molecules.
May 26, 2017
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Nanopores could map small changes in DNA that signal big shifts in cancer
Detecting cancer early, just as changes are beginning in DNA, could enhance diagnosis and treatment as well as further our understanding of the disease. a new study by University of Illinois researchers describes a method to detect, count and map tiny additions to DNA called methylations, which can be a warning sign of cancer, with unprecedented resolution.
April 13, 2017
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Nanopores could map small changes in DNA that signal big shifts in cancer
Detecting cancer early, just as changes are beginning in DNA, could enhance diagnosis and treatment as well as further our understanding of the disease. a new study describes a method to detect, count and map tiny additions to DNA called methylations, which can be a warning sign of cancer, with unprecedented resolution.
April 13, 2017
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Nature can beat back scientific tinkering with genes of entire species
Scientists have revealed daunting challenges to changing the DNA of entire populations of species via the most promising techniques available today to produce 'gene drive.'
March 1, 2017
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Neanderthal DNA suggests yet another wave of human migration out of Africa
Evidence for this migration is scant, but growing.
July 4, 2017
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'Neighbor maps' reveal the genome's 3-D shape
Genome sequencing is a milestone in modern biology as it allows access to the entire "list of instructions" (the chemical sequence of genetic makeup) for the development and function of organisms. Sequencing the genome is a bit like writing down the exact order of the colour of beads in a necklace: knowing how they are arranged along the thread gives us no indication as to the shape of the necklace.
October 27, 2016
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'Neighbour maps' reveal the genome's 3D shape
A three-dimensional computer model of the human genome has been created by researchers. the shape of DNA (as well as its sequence) significantly affects biological processes and is therefore crucial for understanding its function. this new study has provided a first three-dimensional, approximate but realistic, identikit of the human genome.
October 27, 2016
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Neanderthal teeth tell tales of diet and medicine
But interpreting rudimentary DNA evidence requires some leaps.
March 8, 2017
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New breakthrough technology facilitates DNA delivery into drug-resistant bacterial pathogens
Antimicrobial resistance is one of the biggest threats to global health, affecting anyone, at any age, in any country, according to the World Health Organization. Currently, 700,000 deaths each year are attributed to antimicrobial resistance, a figure which could increase to 10 million a year by 2050 save further intervention.
June 19, 2017
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New crispr-based diagnostic platform unveiled
New system adapts tool known for gene editing for rapid, inexpensive disease diagnosis
April 13, 2017
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New DNA coating gets better at protecting skin with more exposure to UV light
Why use regular sunscreen when you can apply a DNA film to your skin? Researchers at Binghamton University, State University of New York have developed a coating made out of DNA that gets better at protecting skin from ultraviolet light the more you expose it to the sun, and it also keeps your skin hydrated.
July 26, 2017
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New gene-editing technology partially restores vision in blind animals
Researchers have discovered a holy grail of gene editing -- the ability to, for the first time, insert DNA at a target location into the non-dividing cells that make up the majority of adult organs and tissues.
November 16, 2016
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New genetic roots for intelligence discovered
Scientists have made a major advance in understanding the genetic underpinnings of intelligence. Using a large dataset of more than 78,000 individuals with information on DNA genotypes and intelligence scores, the team discovered novel genes and biological routes for intelligence.
May 23, 2017
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New giant viruses suggest their genomes expanded like an accordion
More giant virus genomes suggest their DNA is mostly random scraps.
April 7, 2017
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New heart disease risk genes point to flaws in blood vessel walls
Study aims to identify targets for cardiovascular treatments
May 23, 2017
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New IDT webinar to highlight benefits of using RNP complexes for efficient genome modifications
IDT demonstrates how ribonucleoprotein delivery overcomes challenges in CRISPR-mediated genome editing
December 9, 2016
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New imaging technique overturns longstanding textbook model of DNA folding
NIH-funded study results suggest more complex gene interactions and regulation.
July 27, 2017
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New imaging technology catches DNA naturally fluorescing
Many of the secrets of cancer and other diseases lie in the cell's nucleus. But getting way down to that level -- to see and investigate the important genetic material housed there -- requires creative thinking and extremely powerful imaging techniques.
February 17, 2017
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New look at archaic DNA rewrites human evolution story
Contradicts convention on Denisovans, Neanderthals, modern humans
August 7, 2017
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New major gene expression regulator in fungi
Researchers report prevalent DNA base modification in the earliest fungal lineages
May 8, 2017
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New microchip speeds up DNA separation from hours to minutes
Researchers of the University of Twente developed a glass microchip for ultrafast separation and purification of DNA fragments. The chip, moreover, is easy to produce and cheap.
May 29, 2017
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New microcapsules to enhance the efficiency of genome-editing
Researchers from Tomsk Polytechnic University jointly with their colleagues from St. Petersburg, Hamburg and London have conducted a study in the course of which it was found out that polymer and hybrid silica-coated microcapsules are more efficient in genome-editing when applying CRISPR-Cas9 system.
October 6, 2017
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New molecular technique can clone thousands of long DNA sequences at the same time
Scientists at Johns Hopkins, Rutgers, the University of Trento in Italy, and Harvard Medical School report they have developed a new molecular technique called LASSO cloning, which can be used to isolate thousands of long DNA sequences at the same time, more than ever before possible. The new technology, they say, speeds up the creation of proteins, the final products of genes, and is likely to lead to far more rapid discovery of new medicines and biomarkers for scores of diseases.
July 4, 2017
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New NuGenius gel imaging system powered by Raspberry Pi computer offers accurate method to detect disease causing genes
Syngene, a world-leading manufacturer of image analysis solutions, is pleased to introduce its powerful, NuGenius gel imaging system, the first in the world to be run by a Raspberry Pi computer. this easy-to-use system quickly generates high quality images of DNA gels and is a sensitive, affordable routine imager for applications such as detecting disease causing genes.
March 17, 2017
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New protein regulated by cellular starvation
An unexpected role for a protein has been found, involved in the DNA repair mechanism. the protein SHPRH not only helps to fix mistakes generated during DNA replication, but also contributes to the generation of new ribosomes, the cell's "protein factories.' the newly discovered task depends on the nutritional state of the cell and might be associated with aging and anemia.
April 11, 2017
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New role for fragile X protein could offer clues for treatment
The protein behind fragile X syndrome, a leading cause of autism and intellectual disability, controls a suite of genetic regulators.
September 29, 2017
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New software tool enables quick, easy deletion of DNA in living cells
Until recently, genomics was a "read-only" science, but scientists have developed a tool for quick and easy deletion of DNA in living cells. this software, published in PLOS Computational Biology, will boost efforts to understand the vast regions of non-coding DNA, or "Dark Matter", in our DNA and may lead to discovery of new disease-causing genes and potential new drugs.
March 3, 2017
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New study helps solve a great mystery in the organization of our DNA
After decades of research aiming to understand how DNA is organized in human cells, scientists at the Gladstone Institutes have shed new light on this mysterious field by discovering how a key protein helps control gene organization.
May 18, 2017
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New study may shed light on diseases associated with mutations in aminoacyl tRNA synthetases
New research led by scientists at the Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) reveals that a human enzyme has changed little from its days as a bacterial enzyme. In fact, the enzyme appears to be unique in its ability to change its shape–and its job in cells–without overhauling its basic architecture.
December 14, 2016
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New type of nanosensor detects DNA building blocks
Researchers at Uppsala University and in Brazil have developed a new type of nanosensor that can detect single molecules. the nanosensor, comprising a combination of two different materials, has been used to identify the different building blocks in DNA.
February 15, 2017
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Newly discovered DNA sequences can protect chromosomes in rotifers
Findings may have implications for aging research
June 5, 2017
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Newly identified small RNA fragments defend the genome when it's 'naked'
Fragments snipped from tRNAs protect embryonic stem cells while they're being epigenetically reprogrammed
June 29, 2017
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Newly revealed autism-related genes include genes involved in cancer
Using a computational technique that accounts for how genes interact, scientists revealed genes that may be related to autism spectrum disorder
September 25, 2017
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NIH accelerates the use of genomics in clinical care
New funding awards focus on diverse and underserved populations.
August 8, 2017
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NIH and collaborators identify the genomic cause for Carey-Fineman-Ziter syndrome
Rare disease research uncovers new mechanism underlying muscle development.
July 6, 2017
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NIH researchers find potential genetic cause of Cushing syndrome
Finding may lead to therapies that prevent pituitary tumor recurrence.
June 1, 2017
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NIH scientists uncover genetic explanation for frustrating syndrome
Previously unexplained symptoms found associated with multiple copies of a single gene.
October 17, 2016
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NIH to expand critical catalog for genomics research
The National Institutes of Health plans to expand its Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) Project, a genomics resource used by many scientists to study human health and disease. Funded by the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI), part of NIH, the ENCODE Project is generating a catalog of all the genes and regulatory elements – the parts of the genome that control whether genes are active or not – in humans and select model organisms.
February 2, 2017
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NIH-funded scientists deploy CRISPR to preserve photoreceptors in mice
Silencing a gene called Nrl in mice prevents the loss of cells from degenerative diseases of the retina, according to a new study. the findings could lead to novel therapies for preventing vision loss from human diseases such as retinitis pigmentosa. the study was conducted by researchers at the National Eye Institute (NEI), part of the National Institutes of Health, and was published online today in Nature Communications.
March 14, 2017
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No amplification needed: Ultrasensitive DNA quantification by light scattering
Traces of biomolecules such as DNA can be detected with a new "dynamic" technique based on the observation of association and dissociation events of gold nanoparticles. If the desired DNA sequence is present, it can reversibly bind two nanoparticles together. This can be detected in real time through a change in light scattering.
July 18, 2017
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Nokia Lumia 1020 used as microscope in low-cost DNA sequencer
The Nokia Lumia 1020 was launched back in 2013, but with its large 41MP sensor and innovative down-scaling algorithms is by many still regarded as one of the best smartphone cameras today.
January 19, 2017
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Novel application of CRISPR/Cas9 in plants - Visualizing DNA in living cells
A research team around Andreas Houben from the Leibniz Institute of Plant Genetics and Crop Plant Research in Gatersleben and Holger Puchta from the Botanical Institute of the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology developed a method to visualize defined genomic sequences in living plant cells and demonstrated its ability to reveal dynamic movements of chromosome ends.
June 15, 2017
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Novel mechanism that detains mobile genes in plant genome
A team researchers has discovered a hitherto-unknown mechanism that detains transposable elements or "mobile genes" - which can move and insert into new positions in plant genomes.
March 10, 2017
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Novel, ultra-rare damaging genetic variants may contribute to eating disorders
By combining whole exome sequencing, machine learning, and network analysis, researchers have identified new, ultra-rare gene mutations within specific biological pathways that may contribute to eating disorders.
September 5, 2017
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Nuclease-resistant hybrid nanoflowers
An eco-friendly method to synthesize DNA-copper nanoflowers with high load efficiencies, low cytotoxicity, and strong resistance against nucleases has been developed by Professor Hyun Gyu Park in the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering and his collaborators.
April 17, 2017
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Misc. - O

Obesity-linked genetic variant changes brain's response to food cues
Genetic predisposition to obesity causes changes even in normal-weight children.
December 29, 2016
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Of mice and migrations: how a rodent's DNA maps to architectural complexity
Don't cloudify your IT infrastructure lightly
May 8, 2017
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OIST scientists use zebrafish model to unravel causes behind human LCA
Newborns babies can be at risk of congenital blindness, presenting sight defects due to lesions or to genetic mutations in their genome. Among the latter, Leber Congenital Amaurosis -- or LCA -- is one of the most widespread causes of child blindness and accounts for nearly 5% of vision impairments overall.
April 5, 2017
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On the other hand, the immune system can also cause cancer
A new study describes how immune response designed to scramble viral DNA can scramble human DNA as well, sometimes in ways that cause cancer.
August 23, 2017
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Online self-management program benefits parents with bipolar disorder
That is the finding of researchers from the Spectrum Centre for Mental Health Research at Lancaster University, who recruited 97 parents with Bipolar Disorder who have children aged between 3 and ten years old.
May 17, 2017
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Only half of a chromosome is DNA, 3-D imaging study shows
DNA makes up only half of the material inside chromosomes -- far less than was previously thought -- a study has revealed.
November 21, 2016
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ORC as loader of the rings: Study details ringed structure of ORC in DNA replication
An international collaboration of life scientists has described in exquisite detail the critical first steps of DNA replication, which allows cells to divide and most advanced life, including human, to propagate.
February 21, 2017
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Origin of human genus may have occurred by chance
Paper challenges the claim that the genus Homo originated in response to environmental changes
August 4, 2017
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Misc. - P

Penn researchers receive two new post-doctoral training grants for genomic science
Researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania have received two highly competitive post-doctoral Institutional Training Grants for genomic science from the National Human Genome Research Institute of the National Institutes of Health. The awards, known as T32 grants, are distributed in a variety of biomedical categories by divisions of the NIH and help institutions support training of pre- and post-doctoral fellows in basic, clinical, and behavioral research.
August 21, 2017
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People could be genetically predisposed to social media use
Social media use attributable to genetic traits
May 2, 2017
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Precision NanoSystems launches NanoAssemblr Scale-Up system to support production of novel medicines
Precision NanoSystems has launched the NanoAssemblr™ Scale-Up system to support the clinical development of nanomedicines. this latest addition to the NanoAssemblr range is designed for the manufacture of clinical trial material in GMP environments, and will support the production of novel medicines, including siRNA, mRNA and CRISPR/Cas9 therapeutics.
March 9, 2017
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'Protective' DNA strands are shorter in adults who had more infections as infants
People who had more infections as babies harbor a key marker of cellular aging as young adults: the protective stretches of DNA which "cap" the ends of their chromosomes are shorter than in adults who were healthier as infants, report researchers.
January 25, 2017
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Protein complex prevents genome instability
Structural and organizational roles for key protein complex in yeast model of DNA repair
January 19, 2017
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Protein synthesis: Ribosome recycling as a drug target
Researchers have elucidated a mechanism that recycles bacterial ribosomes stalled on messenger RNAs that lack termination codons. the protein involved provides a potential target for future antibiotics.
December 5, 2016
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Protein that kick-starts gene expression in developing embryos.
The formation of a human embryo starts with the fertilization of the oocyte by the sperm cell. this yields the zygote, the primordial cell that carries one copy each of the maternal and paternal genomes. However, this genetic information starts being expressed only after the zygote divides a couple of times. But what triggers this process, called "zygotic genome activation," was unknown until now. Scientists have just found that members of the DUX family of proteins are responsible for igniting the gene expression program of the nascent embryo.
May 1, 2017
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Misc. - R

Radiation-exposed corals may hold new clues to keeping DNA intact
More than 70 years after the U.S. tested atomic bombs on a ring of sand in the Pacific Ocean called Bikini Atoll, Stanford researchers are studying how long-term radiation exposure there has affected corals that normally grow for centuries without developing cancer.
June 28, 2017
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Radiocarbon dating and DNA show ancient Puebloan leadership in the maternal line
Discovering who was a leader, or even if leaders existed, from the ruins of archaeological sites is difficult, but now a team of archaeologists and biological anthropologists, using a powerful combination of radiocarbon dating and ancient DNA, have shown that a matrilineal dynasty likely ruled Pueblo Bonito in new Mexico for more than 300 years.
February 21, 2017
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Rare genetic disorders: New approach uses RNA in search for genetic triggers
In about half of all patients with rare hereditary disorders, it is still unclear what position of the genome is responsible for their condition. One reason for this is the quantity of information encoded in human genes. A team of researchers has developed a method that significantly increases the chances of a successful search. The new approach looks not only at DNA, but also at RNA.
June 13, 2017
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Readers ponder the randomness of DNA errors
John Day wondered if replication errors are truly random, not just unpredictable. And he questioned whether all cancers not known to be caused by inherited genes or the environment must be caused by replication errors. "Isn't it plausible that many or most of the cancers attributed to replication errors in this study involve genetic or environmental factors that are too ubiquitous to be identified as such?' Day asked.
May 17, 2017
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Regenerating tissues with gene-targeting molecules
A synthetic DNA-targeting molecule could pave the way for tissue regeneration
September 25, 2017
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Report: Human embryo edited for first time in US, pushes limits
The data is unpublished, but scientists say it advances effort to erase genetic diseases.
July 27, 2017
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Research on DNA Nanotubes Leads to new Means for Direct Communication with Cells
A remarkable microscopic feat resembling a high-wire circus act was achieved by Johns Hopkins researchers when they successfully managed to coax DNA nanotubes to arrange themselves into bridge-like structures arched between two molecular landmarks on the surface of a lab dish. Examples of this unusual nanoscale feat were captured on video.
January 6, 2017
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Research provides new insights into how telomeres regulate cellular senescence
Researchers at the Institute of Molecular Biology (IMB) and Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) have further uncovered the secrets of telomeres, the caps that protect the ends of our chromosomes. They discovered that an RNA molecule called TERRA helps to ensure that very short (or broken) telomeres get fixed again. The work, which was recently published in the journal Cell, provides new insights into cellular processes that regulate cell senescence and survival in ageing and cancer.
June 30, 2017
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Research reveals role of Rrm3 protein in repair of breaks that occur during DNA replication
Findings like this, which allow the physiological mechanisms that prevent genetic instability to be understood, have vital importance in the research against cancer
June 8, 2017
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Research shows how DNA molecules cross nanopores
Research presented in a new paper co-authored by Northwestern University associate professor of mechanical engineering Sandip Ghosal sheds new light on how polymers cross tiny pores ten thousand times smaller than a human hair.
September 5, 2017
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Research supports expanded use of cell free DNA prenatal testing
Non-invasive cell free DNA prenatal testing can be effectively and appropriately offered to all pregnant women, regardless of maternal age or risk factors, through primary obstetrical care providers, researchers have demonstrated.
February 3, 2017
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Research shows great potential of embryonic gene editing to prevent inherited diseases
Scientists have, for the first time, corrected a disease-causing mutation in early stage human embryos with gene editing. The technique, which uses the CRISPR-Cas9 system, corrected the mutation for a heart condition at the earliest stage of embryonic development so that the defect would not be passed on to future generations.
August 2, 2017
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Researchers are first to see DNA 'blink'
Many of the secrets of cancer and other diseases lie in the cell's nucleus. But getting way down to that level -- to see and investigate the important genetic material housed there -- requires creative thinking and extremely powerful imaging techniques.
February 17, 2017
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Researchers complete design phase for fully synthetic yeast genome
Working as part of an international research consortium, a multidisciplinary team at the Johns Hopkins University has completed the design phase for a fully synthetic yeast genome.
March 10, 2017
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Researchers discover how new molecular scissors unzip and cleave DNA with high accuracy
Researchers from the University of Copenhagen (Denmark), led by the Spanish researcher Guillermo Montoya, have discovered how Cpf1, new molecular scissors unzip and cleave DNA. This member of the CRISPR-Cas family displays a high accuracy, capable of acting like a GPS in order to identify its destination within the intricate map of the genome. The high precision of Cpf1 will improve the use of this type of technology in repairing genetic damage and in other medical and biotechnological applications.
July 6, 2017
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Researchers detect new gene mutation linked to Fanconi anemia
Fanconi anemia is a rare genetic disease characterized by bone marrow failure heralded by low platelet counts and unusually large red blood cells. Mutations in over 20 genes have been identified as causative for Fanconi anemia, which encode proteins commonly involved in DNA repair mechanisms.
July 14, 2017
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Researchers develop DNA sunscreen that gets better the longer you wear it
Why use regular sunscreen when you can apply a DNA film to your skin? Researchers at Binghamton University, State University of New York have developed a coating made out of DNA that gets better at protecting skin from ultraviolet light the more you expose it to the sun, and it also keeps your skin hydrated.
July 26, 2017
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Researchers develop new software tool to provide fast, accurate quantification of gene expression
A group of computational biological researchers, led by Stony Brook University's Rob Patro, an Assistant Professor in the Department of Computer Science in the College of Engineering and Applied Sciences, has developed a new software tool, Salmon -- a lightweight method to provide fast and bias-aware quantification from RNA-sequencing reads.
March 22, 2017
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Researchers develop new technique to locate pathogenic mutations in dark, non-coding genome
When doctors can't find a diagnosis for patient's disease, they turn to genetic detectives. Equipped with genomic sequencing technologies available for less than 10 years, these sleuths now routinely search through a patient's DNA looking for mutations responsible for mysterious diseases.
August 11, 2017
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Researchers develop new way to assemble genome of an organism from scratch
A team spanning Baylor College of Medicine, Rice University, Texas Children's Hospital and the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard has developed a new way to sequence genomes, which can assemble the genome of an organism, entirely from scratch, dramatically cheaper and faster. While there is much excitement about the so-called "$1000 genome" in medicine, when a doctor orders the DNA sequence of a patient, the test merely compares fragments of DNA from the patient to a reference genome.
March 24, 2017
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Researchers develop protocol to analyze many cells at once
The new FISH-Flow protocol could lead to faster, more accurate diagnoses
May 19, 2017
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Researchers discover genetic bases of Opitz C syndrome
Opitz C syndrome is a genetic disease that causes severe disabilities in patients and has been diagnosed in three people in the Iberian Peninsula, and sixty people in the world. a team led by the professors Daniel Grinberg and Susana Balcells, from the Group on Human Molecular Genetics of the University of Barcelona and the Biomedical Research Networking Center of Rare Diseases (CIBERER) has now identified a gene that causes the Opitz C syndrome in the only patient in Catalonia diagnosed with this severe congenital disease.
March 10, 2017
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Researchers discover mutations in CARD11 gene that lead to eczema
Researchers have identified mutations in a gene called CARD11 that lead to atopic dermatitis, or eczema, an allergic skin disease. Scientists from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health, and other institutions discovered the mutations in four unrelated families with severe atopic dermatitis and studied the resulting cell-signaling defects that contribute to allergic disease. Their findings, reported in Nature Genetics, also suggest that some of these defects potentially could be corrected by supplementation with the amino acid glutamine.
June 19, 2017
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Researchers discover new class of compounds that inhibit bacterial DNA gyrase
An international team of scientists have discovered a new class of compounds that inhibit bacterial DNA gyrase.
June 1, 2017
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Researchers discover new genes that help prevent prostate and other cancers
New genes which help prevent prostate, skin and breast cancer development in mice have been discovered by researchers at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute and their collaborators. the study identified genes that cooperate with the well-known tumour suppressor gene PTEN, and showed their relevance in human prostate tumours.
March 19, 2017
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Researchers discover novel colistin resistance gene mcr-3 in Escherichia coli
A new mobile colistin resistance gene, mcr-3, has been discovered in E. coli of pig origin. The novel mcr-3 gene was discovered when a colistin-resistant Escherichia coli isolate tested negative for both mcr-1 and mcr-2. This novel mobile colistin resistance gene may already be widely disseminated. Screening for the mcr-3 gene should be urgently included in the surveillance of colistin-resistant Gram-negative pathogens from animals, humans, and the environment.
June 27, 2017
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Researchers find dozens of genes associated with measures of intelligence
Lots of genes, but a cumulatively small impact.
May 23, 2017
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Researchers find new mechanism for genome regulation
The same mechanisms that quickly separate mixtures of oil and water are at play when controlling the organization in an unusual part of our DNA called heterochromatin, according to a new study by researchers at the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab).
June 21, 2017
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Researchers identify 26 novel genes linked to intellectual disability
Researchers at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH) and Queen's University have identified 26 new genes linked to intellectual disability. Currently most patients with intellectual disability receive no molecular diagnosis, which significantly affects their health and shortens their lifespan.
April 11, 2017
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Researchers identify genetic cause of rare neurological movement disorder
Researchers at the University of Liverpool have identified the basis for how a single gene mutation can cause a rare neurological movement disorder known as dystonia.
April 10, 2017
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Researchers identify microRNA biomarker linked to incidence of atrial fibrillation
Researchers have identified a microRNA biomarker that demonstrates a strong association with the incidence of atrial fibrillation, the most common abnormal heart rhythm that affects more than 2.7 million Americans.
May 11, 2017
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Researchers pull off DNA-based malicious code injection attack
Researchers have demonstrated that it's possible to create synthetic DNA strands containing malicious computer code that, if sequenced and analyzed, could compromise a computer.
August 11, 2017
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Researchers send DNA on sequential, and consequential, building mission
A team of scientists has developed a method to create structures whose building blocks are a millionth of a meter in size by encoding DNA with assembly instructions.
June 16, 2017
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Researchers solve medical mystery through genetics
Researchers have identified the genetic mutation responsible for one patient's serious health problems, finally solving a medical mystery that has endured for over 30 years. Thanks to this discovery, the researcher developed a therapy that could also help a lot of people who have problems related to the immune system, whether they are genetic or due to a transplant or an illness.
April 6, 2017
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Researchers take significant step forward in genetic sex reprogramming research
An international team of researchers, led by the University of Granada (UGR), has taken a significant step forward on the research on 'genetic sex reprogramming', which is closer now, although it's still an utopia.
October 26, 2016
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Researchers uncover 16 genetic markers linked to decreased lifespan
The answer to how long each of us will live is partly encoded in our genome. Researchers have identified 16 genetic markers associated with a decreased lifespan, including 14 new to science. This is the largest set of markers of lifespan uncovered to date. About 10% of the population carries some configurations of these markers that shorten their life by over a year compared with the population average. Spearheaded by scientists from the SIB Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics, the Lausanne University Hospital (CHUV), the University of Lausanne and the EPFL, the study provides a powerful computational framework to uncover the genetics of our time of death, and ultimately of any disease.
July 27, 2017
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Researchers uncover first 'off-switches' for better control of CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing
CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing is quickly revolutionizing biomedical research, but the new technology is not yet exact. the technique can inadvertently make excessive or unwanted changes in the genome and create off-target mutations, limiting safety and efficacy in therapeutic applications.
December 9, 2016
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Researchers uncover global regulator that 'switches on' silent biosynthetic gene clusters
Bacteria have supplied some of today's most indispensable anti-cancer and anti-bacterial drugs. Yet these compounds comprise only a fraction of their possible offerings. Now, researchers have found a way to unleash their full potential as natural product dispensers.
April 13, 2017
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Researchers used CRISPR to encode a movie into DNA
Genome GIFs.
July 12, 2017
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Researchers Write Malicious Code Into DNA, Infect the Computer That Reads It
From the what-could-possibly-go-wrong department: Scientists have now managed to write executable code into DNA that is theoretically capable of infecting the computer that reads it. It was only a matter of time. This is bound to result in trolling law enforcement, �a Rick Sanchez trolling the galactic government with his three lines of code.
August 11, 2017
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Rise in direct-to-consumer DNA testing brings new 'threat' to people involved in donor conception, social scientist warns
The rise in direct-to-consumer DNA testing has increased the likelihood of individuals unexpectedly finding out they are donor-conceived, raising important ethical questions, warns social scientist Dr Marilyn Crawshaw from the University of York.
July 13, 2017
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RNA pathway plays key role in health, lifespan, fly study shows
The piRNA pathway was thought to be most active in the reproductive organs of animals, but researchers have discovered in the common fruit fly that the pathway also operates in a non-reproductive body tissue, playing a vital role in maintaining health and lifespan.
December 21, 2016
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RNAi multiplies its effect in repressing gene expression, structural view suggests
RNAi is a mainstay of contemporary biological research. But how exactly this crucial mechanism functions in humans remains a partial mystery that we are now one step closer to solving. Structural biologists have now published atomic-resolution pictures and a comprehensive analysis of the workings of a part of the RNAi machinery in Molecular Cell.
August 3, 2017
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Misc. - S

Safe Delivery of Therapeutic Genes by DNA Barcoding
Researchers used small snippets of DNA as barcodes to develop a new technique for rapidly screening the capability of nanoparticles to selectively deliver therapeutic genes to particular organs of the body. this new technique succeeded in accelerating the development and use of gene therapies for Parkinson™ disease, cancer and heart disease.
February 8, 2017
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Safety in darkness: Team lays bare melanin's DNA guarding mechanism
With a little help from chickens and video cameras, scientists have captured live the moment when skin gets darker. In a new study, a team has filmed and demystified the process by which melanin -- molecules that give skin its color -- are carried to the epidermis.
December 6, 2016
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Same genes, same environment, different personality: Is individuality unavoidable?
Genetically identical Amazon mollies raised individually and under identical environmental conditions, nevertheless develop different personality types. Additionally, increasing the opportunity for social interactions early in life appears to have no influence of the magnitude of personality variation. These results of a recent study shed a new light on the question of which factors are responsible for the individuality of vertebrate animals.
May 17, 2017
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Sat nav for bread wheat uncovers hidden genes
Most comprehensive analysis yet will enhance food security
April 18, 2017
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Scientists aim is to better understand effects of DNA damage on aging process
The heredity substance DNA is the blueprint of our life. Like an instruction manual it contains all the information needed for cells and the body to function properly. In the process, the DNA is always exposed to threats like UV light, pollutants and damage by metabolic byproducts. Many of those damages can be undone by sophisticated repair mechanisms. Nevertheless, the accumulation of DNA damage is a cause of aging.
August 30, 2017
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Scientists can now Sequence DNA with a Smartphone
It was not so long ago that sequencing even tiny snippets of DNA was a costly, cumbersome process that required access to a state-the-art lab. Today, we are inching close to putting a DNA sequencer in every pocket.
January 17, 2017
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Scientists characterize regulatory DNA sequences responsible for human diseases
Scientists have developed an innovative system to identify and characterize the molecular components that control the activities of regulatory DNA sequences in the human genome.
August 23, 2017
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Scientists create first stable semisynthetic organism
Life's genetic code has only ever contained four natural bases. These bases pair up to form two "base pairs"--the rungs of the DNA ladder--and they have simply been rearranged to create bacteria and butterflies, penguins and people. Four bases make up all life as we know it.
January 23, 2017
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Scientists Crispr the first human embryos in the us (maybe)
AS the gene-editing technique Crispr is turning out to be--researchers are using it to make malaria-proof mosquitoes, disease-resistant tomatoes, live bacteria thumb drives, and all kinds of other crazy stuff--so far US scientists have had one bright line: no heritable modifications of human beings.
July 27, 2017
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Scientists build DNA from scratch using yeast
Researchers are rewriting the yeast genome from scratch as part of a controversial project aiming to create custom-made chunks of DNA codes.
July 26, 2017
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Scientists de-bug pig genome in preparation for farming organ donors
Researchers used flashy gene editing tools to inactivate old, lingering pig retroviruses.
August 11, 2017
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Scientists Develop New Method for Detecting Extremely Small Amounts of DNA
It is now possible to detect traces of biomolecules such as DNA with the help of a new "dynamic" technique based on the observation of association and dissociation events of gold nanoparticles.
July 19, 2017
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Scientists devise new approaches to personalized medicines
Scientists on the Florida campus of the Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have developed broad methods to design precision medicines against currently incurable diseases caused by RNA.
December 12, 2016
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Scientists discover a way to sequence DNA of rare animals
Rare and extinct animals are preserved in jars of alcohol in natural history museum collections around the world, which provide a wealth of information on the changing biodiversity of the planet. But, scientists have not been able to effectively sequence DNA from these specimens until now.
January 25, 2017
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Scientists Edit Human Embryos to Curb Disease
US scientists successfully edited human embryos to remove faulty DNA that causes hereditary heart disease.
August 7, 2017
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Scientists find common genes involved in muscle strength
For the first time, scientists have discovered common genetic factors that influence muscle strength. The discovery offers new insights into the biology of muscle strength and its role in age-related conditions such as bone frailty.
July 13, 2017
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Scientists find evidence for gene to be linked to social phobia
People with social anxiety avoid situations in which they are exposed to judgment by others. Those affected also lead a withdrawn life and maintain contact above all on the Internet. Around one in ten people is affected by this anxiety disorder over the course of their life.
March 9, 2017
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Scientists find new genetic locations for type 2 diabetes
Scientists from University College London and Imperial College London in the United Kingdom have identified new genetic locations that might make some people more prone to developing type 2 diabetes.
May 4, 2017
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Scientists find RNA with special role in nerve healing process
The discovery in lab mice that an 'anti-sense' RNA is expressed after nerve injury to regulate the repair of damage to the nerve's myelin coating could lead to a treatment that improves healing in people.
August 22, 2017
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Scientists find seven genes for insomnia
Many of us have had insomnia at some point in our lives and know how difficult it is to overcome. The more we think about going to sleep, the harder it is to actually fall asleep; insomnia is often a battle with our own minds. But beyond the psychological struggle, are there also genetic causes? New research suggests so.
June 16, 2017
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Scientists Hack a Human Cell and Reprogram It Like a Computer
CELLS ARE BASICALLY tiny computers: they send and receive inputs and output accordingly. If you chug a Frappuccino, your blood sugar spikes, and your pancreatic cells get the message. Output: more insulin.
March 27, 2017
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Scientists identify commonly affected genes sets among people with three mental disorders
Studying brain tissue from deceased donors, Johns Hopkins scientists have found common groups of genes disrupted among people with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and major depression. the commonly affected genes sets, identified with RNA sequencing methods, engage in making proteins, controlling brain cell communications and mounting an immune system response, the researchers say.
October 26, 2016
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Scientists identify essential enzymes for efficient and precise repair of damaged DNA
Scientists at the Australian National University (ANU) and Heidelberg University in Germany have found an essential component in the DNA repair process which could open the door to the development of new cancer drugs.
October 30, 2016
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Scientists identify genetic cause and biological mechanisms linked to new human immunodeficiency
A multi-institutional, international team of scientists has discovered the genetic cause and biological mechanisms linked to a new human immunodeficiency.
October 22, 2016
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Scientists identify key gene in 22q11.2 that contributes to genitourinary birth defects
The 22q11.2 region of human chromosome 22 is a hotspot for a variety of birth defects. Scientists learned about this region because it is deleted in about 1 in 4,000 births, causing the loss or duplication of up to 40 genes. This chromosome microdeletion or microduplication can result in a number of developmental abnormalities that vary greatly in severity among affected individuals.
May 25, 2017
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Scientists identify single-gene mutations that lead to atopic dermatitis
NIH-supported research suggests potential treatment strategy.
June 19, 2017
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Scientists Just Took a Major Step Toward the First Complex Artificial Life
In 2008, researchers built the first artificial genome, a wonder of synthetic biology in which scientists generated all 582,970 base pairs of the bacterium Mycoplasma genitalium's genome entirely from scratch. It was an unparalleled scientific achievement, requiring scientists to carefully design 101 unique DNA fragments so that their codes would overlap and stick together, then bind those fragments piece by piece.
March 9, 2017
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Scientists overcome inaccessibility of caves through molecular genetic approach
An international group of scientists has used a novel highly sensitive method for detection of environmental DNA in groundwater to extend the poorly known range of the rare subterranean amphibian from the Dinaric Karst. with this highly sensitive non-invasive method they discovered 12 new localities of the olm (Proteus anguinus).
March 27, 2017
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Scientists predict reading ability from DNA analysis alone
Researchers have used a genetic scoring technique to predict reading performance throughout school years from DNA alone.
March 29, 2017
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Scientists prove they can store 215 petabytes in a single gram of DNA, retrieve it error free
Researchers at Columbia University have managed to push forward the limits of data storage on DNA, and bring the exciting bio-technology closer to being a reality. by utilizing new techniques, they were able to store a movie, an operating system, and other data in DNA strands and retrieve them error-free.
March 3, 2017
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Scientists reveal new mRNA method to deliver safe, cost-effective therapeutic antibodies
Using antibodies to treat disease has been one of the great success stories of early 21st-century medicine. Already five of the ten top-selling pharmaceuticals in the United States are antibody products.
March 2, 2017
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Scientists try to unwrap the secrets of Egyptian mummy DNA
They might not have much in common with modern Egyptians.
May 31, 2017
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Scientists uncover genetic evidence that 'we are what we eat'
Researchers have demonstrated that the diets of organisms can affect the DNA sequences of their genes.
November 15, 2016
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Scientists uncover new gene therapy treatment routes for motor neurone disease
Scientists investigating the genetic causes and altered functioning of nerve cells in motor neurone disease (MND) have discovered a new mechanism that could lead to fresh treatment approaches for one of the most common forms of the disease.
July 14, 2017
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Scientists uncover new group of Treg cells and DNA features linked to juvenile idiopathic arthritis
A team of scientists and doctors from the SingHealth Duke-NUS Academic Medical Centre (AMC) has uncovered a new group of regulatory T (Treg) cells and DNA features associated with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), the most common form of arthritis among children under the age of 16. Their findings could potentially enhance diagnosis of the disease and prediction of therapy outcomes for improved treatment successes.
July 14, 2017
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Scientists uncover thousands of human genes that are expressed differently in the two sexes
Men and women differ in obvious and less obvious ways -- for example, in the prevalence of certain diseases or reactions to drugs. how are these connected to one's sex? Weizmann Institute of Science researchers recently uncovered thousands of human genes that are expressed -- copied out to make proteins -- differently in the two sexes. Their findings showed that harmful mutations in these particular genes tend to accumulate in the population in relatively high frequencies, and the study explains why. the detailed map of these genes, reported in BMC Biology, provides evidence that males and females undergo a sort of separate, but interconnected evolution.
May 4, 2017
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Scientists: Malware-Infused DNA Not Present Threat
Scientists have successfully infected a computer with malicious code stored on a strand of DNA.
August 11, 2017
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Screening the dark genome for disease
Researchers have developed a method to swiftly screen the non-coding DNA of the human genome for links to diseases that are driven by changes in gene regulation. the technique could revolutionize modern medicine's understanding of the genetically inherited risks of developing heart disease, diabetes, cancer, neurological disorders and others, and lead to new treatments.
April 3, 2017
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Secrets of the amazing tardigrades revealed by their DNA
New genome sequences shed light on both the origins of the tardigrades (also known as water bears or moss piglets), and the genes that underlie their extraordinary ability to survive in extreme conditions.
July 27, 2017
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SETD8 enzyme protects against cellular senescence, research reveals
An enzyme that blocks cellular senescence and its mechanisms has been discovered by a research team from Kumamoto University, Japan. they found that a reduction of the enzyme SETD8, which regulates cell proliferation and gene function, results in the promotion of cell aging features.
March 8, 2017
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Self-assembled nanostructures can be selectively controlled
DNA self-assembly allows the unprecedented control of the optical properties of plasmonic metamolecules.
April 24, 2017
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Self-assembled nanostructures can be selectively controlled
DNA self-assembly allows the unprecedented control of the optical properties of plasmonic metamolecules, report scientists.
April 24, 2017
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Sequencing all 24 human chromosomes uncovers rare disorders
Study from NIH and other institutions may help improve prenatal genetic screening
August 30, 2017
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Serum microRNAs could serve as promising biomarkers for monitoring progression of MS
MicroRNAs are small RNA molecules that influence basic cellular processes and have been proposed as biomarkers for the diagnosis, progression and treatment of multiple sclerosis. In a new study conducted at the Ann Romney Center of Neurologic Diseases at Brigham and Women's Hospital, researchers have found that serum microRNAs are linked to MRI findings in the brain and spinal cord in patients with MS.
January 23, 2017
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Separating DNA: From hours to minutes
Researchers have developed a glass microchip for ultrafast separation and purification of DNA fragments. The chip, moreover, is easy to produce and cheap.
May 29, 2017
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Shape-shifting molecular robots respond to DNA signals
A molecular robot consisting of biomolecules, such as DNA and protein, has now been developed by a team of scientists.
March 2, 2017
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Single-nucleus RNA sequencing, droplet by droplet
Last year Broad researchers described a single-nucleus RNA sequencing method called sNuc-Seq. This system enabled researchers to study the gene expression profiles of difficult-to-isolate cell types as well as cells from archived tissues. Now a Broad-led team has overcome a key stumbling block to sNuc-Seq's widespread use: scale.
August 28, 2017
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Skin disease caused by sperm cell transmission of keratin mutation
Nagoya University research identified a patient with the whole-body skin disease epidermolytic ichthyosis that had been inherited as a germline mutation from her father with the milder epidermolytic nevus. Analysis of genomic DNA from the patient revealed a mutation in the keratin 10 gene, which was identical to that observed in cells taken from patches of thickened skin on the father's body. Assessing transmission risk of such diseases allows affected couples to receive genetic counseling.
June 16, 2017
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SMiLE-seq: a new technique speeds up genetics
Scientists at Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL) have developed a technique that can be a game-changer for genetics by making the characterization of DNA-binding proteins much faster, more accurate, and efficient.
January 16, 2017
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Social interaction affects cancer patients' response to treatment
Biological basis is unknown but may be related to stress response, NIH researchers say.
July 19, 2017
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Social networking for the proteome, upgraded
New study maps protein interactions for a quarter of the human genome
May 17, 2017
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Some genetic disorders may be caused by defects we couldn't detect
Chromosome rearrangements may be behind more human disorders than we thought.
November 17, 2016
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Spatial reasoning is only partly explained by general intelligence
Genetics seems to play a role.
February 24, 2017
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Spelling mutations and evolutionary advantages
DNA codes carrying instructions for creating a protein can sometimes be 'spelt' differently, although they specify the exact same sequence information to create that protein. Scientists have now shown that such mutations, called 'synonymous' mutations can have large effects on the evolution of organisms.
March 18, 2016
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Spiky nanostructures capture life's fine details
Optical microscopes that use lenses to bounce photons off objects have trouble distinguishing nanometer-scale objects smaller than the imaging beam's wavelength, such as proteins and DNA.
February 22, 2017
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Squeezing life from DNA's double helix
Recipe for replication: Two DNA strands, one ring of proteins. Melt.
December 13, 2016
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Store and supply: how the brain saves time
Neurons in the brain store RNA molecules -- DNA gene copies -- in order to rapidly react to stimuli. this storage dramatically accelerates the production of proteins. this is one of the reasons why neurons in the brain can adapt quickly during learning processes.
December 21, 2016
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Structure of key DNA replication protein solved
A research team has solved the three-dimensional structure of a key protein that helps damaged cellular DNA repair itself. Investigators say that knowing the chemical structure of the protein will likely help drug designers build novel anti-cancer agents.
October 25, 2016
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Studies reveal link between rotator cuff disease and genetics
Rotator cuff disease is a common disorder that affects 30 to 50 percent of people over the age of 50. the disease often leads to shoulder pain and loss of function. While many think of this as a 'tear' due to an injury or sustained over/misuse, some studies suggest genetics might play a role.
February 6, 2017
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Study characterizes key molecular tool in DNA repair enzymes
Oxidative damage to a cell's DNA is constant and destructive and a complex suite of enzymes have evolved to repair and maintain it. In an important new step in teasing out these complex processes, an enzyme component known as Zf-GRF, which is highly conserved in several enzymes and across species, has been shown to be a key molecular tools that binds and orients repair enzymes to DNA.
January 6, 2017
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Study identifies African-specific genomic variant associated with obesity
Findings highlight the importance of genomic studies in diverse populations.
March 13, 2017
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Study identifies new gene involved in Fanconi anemia
Researchers from the group led by UAB Chair Professor Dr Jordi Surralles at the Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Barcelona, the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona and the CIBER of Rare Diseases (CIBERER) participated in a study which has led to the identification of a new gene involved in Fanconi anemia, a rare genetic disease.
July 17, 2017
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Study indicates new element involved in genome instability
Genome instability is the main risk factor in the development of tumors in humans. Understanding how, where, when and why these mutations are produced in DNA is one of the great objectives of the global scientific community. Therefore, a group of experts from the University of Seville and the Andalusian Center for Molecular Biology and Regenerative Medicine (Cabimer) has published a study that indicates a new element involved in this process: chromatin.
June 30, 2017
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Study reveals key role of mRNA's 'fifth nucleotide' in determining sex in fruit flies
A team of scientists has shown how a common mRNA modification, N6-methyladenosine (m6A), regulates gene expression to determine the sex of fruit flies. the function of m6A, an mRNA modification known as the 'fifth nucleotide', has long been a mystery. But a new study has revealed that m6A plays a key role in the regulation of the Sex-lethal (Sxl) gene, which controls sex determination of the fruit fly Drosophila.
November 30, 2016
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Study shines new light on genetic makeup of river blindness parasite
The parasite that causes river blindness infects about 37 million people in parts of Africa and Latin America, causing blindness and other major eye and skin diseases in about 5 million of them. a study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis sheds light on the genetic makeup of the parasite, a step toward the goal of eradication.
November 22, 2016
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Study shows how errors in specific gene can cause growth defects linked to dwarfism
A new study shows how errors in a specific gene can cause growth defects associated with a rare type of dwarfism.
February 13, 2017
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Study Shows 'Nano Footballs' Control Gene Behavior
A research team at the University of York has discovered that genes are regulated by unique structures called 'nano footballs'. Although these structures have similar appearance like footballs, they are 10 million times smaller than the average ball.
September 26, 2017
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Successful use of DNA as a computer in artificial cells
A group of Associate Professor Ryuji Kawano of Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Division of Biotechnology and Life Science, Institute of Engineering, and Associate Professor Masahiro Takinoue of Tokyo Institute of Technology, School of Computing succeeded in detecting output molecules that are the calculation results of DNA computing using DNA molecules as electric information through a nanopore1 membrane protein (ACS Synthetic Biology, "Nanopore Logic Operation with DNA to RNA Transcription in a Droplet System").
May 25, 2017
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Suppressed vaginal immune response makes women more susceptible to RNA viruses
Scientists at the Gladstone Institutes discovered that the vaginal immune system is suppressed in response to RNA viruses, such as Zika. the delayed antiviral immune response allows the virus to remain undetected in the vagina, which can increase the risk of fetal infection during pregnancy.
November 16, 2016
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Super-resolution system reveals mechanics of tiny 'DNA walker'
Researchers have introduced a new type of "super-resolution" microscopy and used it to discover the precise walking mechanism behind tiny structures made of DNA that could find biomedical and industrial applications.
February 10, 2017
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Switchable DNA Machines for Storing Information
Biomedical Engineers have developed simple machines out of DNA, consisting of arrays whose units switch reversibly between two types of shapes.
June 23, 2017
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Switchable DNA mini-machines store information
Biomedical engineers have built simple machines out of DNA, consisting of arrays whose units switch reversibly between two different shapes.
June 22, 2017
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Switchable DNA mini-machines store information
They look like security gates, but change shape in a cascade
June 22, 2017
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Syngene introduces easy-to-use powerful NuGenius gel imaging system
Syngene, a world-leading manufacturer of image analysis solutions, is pleased to introduce the powerful, NuGenius gel imaging system. this easy-to-use system quickly generates high quality images of DNA gels and will suit laboratories looking for a sensitive, affordable routine gel imager.
March 17, 2017
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Syngene introduces new Dynamic Fielding feature in GeneSys image capture software
Syngene, a world-leading manufacturer of image analysis solutions, is pleased to introduce a new Dynamic Fielding feature in its GeneSys image capture software. this powerful feature autocorrects for edge effects caused by all lens and lighting in image analysers, providing a consistent image for scientists to accurately quantify DNA and proteins on their gels.
March 17, 2017
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Synthetic compound that reads mitochondrial DNA could lead to treatments for nerve, muscle diseases
For the first time, a synthetic compound has been made that can bind to DNA in the cells' energy powerhouses, suppressing a gene associated with nerve and muscle disease.
July 11, 2017
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Misc. - T

Tea tree genome contains clues about how one leaf produces so many flavors
The most popular varieties of tea -- including black tea, green tea, Oolong tea, white tea, and chai -- all come from the leaves of the evergreen shrub Camellia sinensis, otherwise known as the tea tree. Despite tea's cultural and economic significance, relatively little is known about the shrub behind the tea leaves. However, the first draft of the tea tree genome may help explain why tea leaves are so rich in antioxidants and caffeine.
May 1, 2017
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Team nebulizes aphids to knock down gene expression
Researchers are nebulizing soybean aphids with RNA to speed the process of discovering the function of many mystery genes.
March 19, 2017
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The FDA Just Greenlit the First Consumer DNA Tests for Disease Risk
At times, DNA testing can feel more like horoscopes than science. In many cases, we just don't know enough about a gene to say what it means for our health. for this reason, the Food and Drug Administration has sought to protect consumers by preventing DNA testing companies from telling them whether or not they're are at risk for a certain disease. Until now.
April 6, 2017
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The First App Store For Your DNA Is Here
DNA testing is not new to consumers, but it's a one-shot deal. You send in your sample, then you get to see ancestry and health data provided by the company you chose to use for testing. Some new insights might be added over time, but there's not much else you can do with that genetic data. A startup called Helix is counting on people being curious enough to drop cash in its DNA app store on a regular basis.
July 25, 2017
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The first genome data from ancient Egyptian mummies
Ancient Egyptians were most closely related to ancient populations from the Near East
May 30, 2017
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The science of fluoride flipping
A new imaging technique helps researchers study tiny, time-sensitive biological processes, the crucial underpinnings of human health, disease
August 23, 2017
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The quinoa genome could help scientists get it out of the health food aisle
It's the first step to bringing the super grain to the masses
February 8, 2017
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Therapy flags DNA typos to rev cancer-fighting T cells
Disabled spell-checker identifies patients who may benefit from immune therapy
June 9, 2017
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Thousands of genes influence most diseases, researchers report
In a provocative new perspective piece, researchers say that disease genes are spread uniformly across the genome, not clustered in specific molecular pathways, as has been thought.
June 19, 2017
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Thousands of rare cancer-related gene mutations found
Innovative research, published in PLOS Computational Biology this week, explains how thousands of "previously ignored genetic mutations" may contribute to the growth of malignant tumors. Using a new statistical approach, scientists find new patterns in proteins.
April 21, 2017
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'Three-parent baby' boy healthy so far
Three other embryos created by technique had wrong chromosome count
October 19, 2016
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This DNA-mimicking protein can make gene editing more precise and safe
It switches off CRISPR-Cas9's molecular scissors
July 12, 2017
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This Machine Lets your Smartphone Analyze Dna
There's An App for That?
January 19, 2017
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Tiny nanopackages built out of DNA help scientists peek at how neurons work
Scientists have designed a way to use microscopic capsules made out of DNA to deliver a payload of tiny molecules directly into a cell. The technique gives scientists an opportunity to understand certain interactions among cells that have previously been hard to track.
August 29, 2017
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To Protect Genetic Privacy, Encrypt Your DNA
IN 2007, DNA pioneer James Watson became the first person to have his entire genome sequenced--making all of his 6 billion base pairs publicly available for research. Well, almost all of them. He left one spot blank, on the long arm of chromosome 19, where a gene called APOE lives. Certain variations in APOE increase your chances of developing Alzheimer's, and Watson wanted to keep that information private.
August 23, 2017
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Today's East Asians are very genetically similar to their ancient ancestors
This tells us more about ancient culture
February 1, 2017
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Tracking down water pollution through DNA of algae
The degree of pollution of rivers resulting from human activities is assessed using different biotic indices. the latter reflect the ecological status of a river based on the quantity and diversity of organisms selected as bioindicators, due to their ecological preferences and tolerance to pollution. this is the case of diatoms, algae consisting of a single cell surrounded by a silica skeleton, recommended by researchers as one of the ideal bioindicators for rivers and lakes.
April 18, 2017
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Trigger for fatty liver in obesity
Morbid obesity affects the liver: almost one-third of all adults suffer from chronic fatty liver disease, which can lead to infections and even trigger cancer. Researchers have now found a signaling pathway in cells that play an important role in the development of fatty liver disease.
September 12, 2017
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Misc. - U

U.S. researchers have used gene editing to combat heart disease in human embryos
The effort was strictly for practice, but represent a major first step in its potential future clinical use.
August 2, 2017
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Uncovering a 'smoking gun' in age-related disease
For the first time, researchers reveal a causal link between RNA splicing and aging
December 5, 2016
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Understanding X-chromosome silencing in humans
Researchers have discovered new insights into how one of the two X-chromosomes is silenced during the development of female human embryos and also in lab-grown stem cells. X-chromosome silencing is essential for proper development and these findings are important for understanding how the activity of the X-chromosome is regulated to ensure the healthy development of human embryos.
December 14, 2016
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Unknown virus discovered in 'throwaway' DNA
A chance discovery has opened up a new method of finding unknown viruses. Researchers have revealed that Next-Generation Sequencing and its associated online DNA databases could be used in the field of viral discovery. They have developed algorithms that detect DNA from viruses that happen to be in fish blood or tissue samples, and could be used to identify viruses in a range of different species.
August 4, 2017
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US scientists make advances in modifying human embryos
American Scientists have managed to edit and improve the DNA of human embryos in an effort to correct the gene defects that cause inherited diseases.
July 27, 2017
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Using DNA to predict schizophrenia, autism
A single amino acid substitution in the protein CX3CR1 may act as predictor for schizophrenia and autism, a multi-institute collaboration demonstrates.
August 31, 2017
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UVA researcher develops new way to track genes inside living cells
For Mazhar Adli, the little glowing dots dancing about on the computer screen are nothing less than the fulfillment of a dream. Those fluorescent dots, moving in real time, are set to illuminate our understanding of the human genome, cancer and other genetic diseases in a way never before possible.
April 13, 2017
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Misc. - V

Vanderbilt researchers unravel how bacterial toxin prevents DNA replication
One of the most potent toxins known acts by welding the two strands of the famous double helix together in a unique fashion which foils the standard repair mechanisms cells use to protect their DNA.
August 2, 2017
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Viral protein transforms as it measures out DNA
To generate swarms of new viral particles, a virus hijacks a cell into producing masses of self-assembling cages that are then loaded with the genetic blueprint for the next infection. But the picture of how that DNA is loaded into those viral cages, or capsids, was blurry, especially for two of the most common types of DNA virus on earth, bacterial viruses and human herpesvirus.
January 31, 2017
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Viral RNAs make use of cell's transportation system, study finds
Flaviviruses are a significant threat to public health worldwide, and some infected patients develop severe -- potentially fatal -- neurological diseases. Tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV), a member of the genus Flavivirus, causes encephalic diseases resulting in photophobia, irritability and sleep disorders. However, little is known about their pathogenic mechanisms and no effective treatment is available at present.
September 1, 2017
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Visualizing the genome: First 3-D structures of active DNA created
Scientists have determined the first 3-D structures of intact mammalian genomes from individual cells, showing how the DNA from all the chromosomes intricately folds to fit together inside the cell nuclei.
March 13, 2017
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Vitamin B12 fuels microbial growth
Vitamin B12, a substance produced by a few organisms but needed by nearly all of them, wields great power in the microbial world. It regulates the production of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and vital proteins.
September 5, 2017
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Misc. - W

Watching the passage of knotted DNA slip through nanopores
How can long DNA filaments, which have convoluted and highly knotted structure, manage to pass through the tiny pores of biological systems? Scientists used computer simulations to investigate the options available to the genetic material in such situations.
March 28, 2017
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Water forms 'spine of hydration' around DNA
Water is the Earth's most abundant natural resource, but it's also something of a mystery due to its unique solvation characteristics -- that is, how things dissolve in it.
May 25, 2017
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Watching RNA fold
New technology takes a nucleotide-resolution snapshot of RNA folding during synthesis
November 1, 2016
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What's a knot -- and what's not -- in genomic mapping
Computational modeling of genome mapping in nanochannels helps untangle the physics of DNA knots
April 11, 2017
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Whole-exome sequencing may routinely miss detecting some disease-causing genes, say researchers
Whole-exome DNA sequencing -- a technology that saves time and money by sequencing only protein-coding regions and not the entire genome -- may routinely miss detecting some genetic variations associated with disease, according to Penn State researchers who have developed new ways to identify such omissions.
April 24, 2017
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Working at night may interfere with DNA repair
Night shift work has been associated with a variety of adverse health effects. New research adds to these, suggesting that the body's ability to repair DNA damage may be inhibited by night shifts.
June 27, 2017
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Wurzburg researchers discover long-suspected third RNA binding protein
Small regulatory RNA molecules are vital for salmonella and other bacteria potentially harmful to humans: this RNA type controls gene activity and allows bacteria to quickly adjust to changing conditions of living and stress as are typical during an infection, for example, when entering the blood stream or inside human cells.
October 17, 2016
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Misc. - Y

You can get your whole genome sequenced. but should you?
There are 3 billion ways for something to go wrong with your DNA. But diseases caused by an error to a single gene--what geneticists call "big ticket" mutations--are quite rare. That's why doctors don't routinely recommend whole genome sequencing. But as the cost of sequencing continues to plummet and companies offer more and more ways for consumers to peer into their DNA, physicians are trying to figure out how genetic data might work into your next check-up.
June 26, 2017
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