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528 Health - Heart Disease Resources

Misc. - Numbers

5 Factors Can Predict Your Heart Health
Five simple health indicators can evaluate a healthy person's risk of heart damage from clogged arteries without drawing blood for medical tests, a new study finds. The new method may be an effective way to predict risk and possibly help patients make lifestyle changes that lower their chances of heart disease and strokes.
November 15, 2017
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3D-printed models could transform heart valve replacements
Researchers may have found a way to boost the success of transcatheter aortic valve replacements, thanks to advances in 3-D printing technology.
July 4, 2017
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3D Printed Patient Cardiovascular Anatomy to Guide Replacement Heart Valves
In cases of heart valve replacements, surgeons have different sizes and options to choose from, each prosthetic device having its unique qualities and limitations. Predicting the best replacement heart valve for patient's specific morphology may soon be easier to figure out thanks to the use of 3D printing. Researchers at Georgia Tech are printing models of patient valve anatomy on which to test and practice the placement of man-made valves.
July 4, 2017
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3D Printed Pediatric Stents That Grow With Patient's Vessels
Sadly, it is not only old people that receive cardiac stent implants. Often young children with certain cardiovascular conditions can benefit significantly from stent implantations and conduits, but because vasculature grows along with the rest of the body, the stents' benefits can be short lived and not fully realized. Now researchers at Eindhoven University of Technology in The Netherlands have developed 3D printing technology that can generate stents that grow along with the patient's growth, and eventually biodegrade and leave the body.
May 31, 2017
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3D Printed Silicone Heart Mimics Anatomy, Dynamics of Real One
At ETH Zurich in Switzerland a team of engineers has been working to develop an artificial heart that mimics the anatomy and functionality of the real one as closely as possible. Their current prototype is 3D printed out of silicone, making it soft and pliable, and it is similarly sized to an average adult human heart. It has two ventricles and a pump that is powered externally using pneumatics.
July 14, 2017
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465K People Need A Pacemaker Security Update To Protect Their Hearts From Hacking
If you need more evidence that we are living in an increasingly internet-connected world, look no further than a recent software update aimed at making sure 465,000 people with pacemakers don't have hearts that are vulnerable to hackers.
August 31, 2017
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Misc. - A

A-fib and exercise: Health benefits and risks
Atrial fibrillation is an irregular heartbeat caused by faulty electrical signals in the upper chambers of the heart. In people with atrial fibrillation, the heart beats irregularly and often too quickly.
March 21, 2017
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A-fib patients at lower stroke, death risk with early cardiology care
Patients who receive cardiology care within 3 months of being diagnosed with atrial fibrillation may be at much lower risk of stroke and premature death, compared with patients who receive primary care, a new study finds.
June 27, 2017
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A-fib with RVR: Information, treatment, and management
A-fib with RVR is the common term for atrial fibrillation with rapid ventricular response. a common disorder that involves a rapid heart rate, it requires medical attention and, in many cases, hospitalization.
March 22, 2017
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Abbott™ Assurity MRI Pacemaker and Tendril MRI Lead now Labeled by FDA for Use During MR Scans
ABBOTT, having recently purchased St. Jude Medical, is already reaping rewards. the FDA has issued MR-conditional labeling for the Assurity MRI pacemaker and the matching Tendril MRI lead.
February 7, 2017
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Abbott™ releases First Insertable Cardiac Monitor that Works with your Smartphone
Abbott received the European CE Mark and is introducing its Confirm Rx Insertable Cardiac Monitor (ICM). Still sporting St. Jude Medical's logo, now part of Abbott, the Confirm Rx features wireless Bluetooth connectivity to a paired app on the patient's smartphone. this allows for transmission of cardiac event data to the patient's cardiologist from just about anywhere there is cellular connectivity.
May 10, 2017
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Abbott's Confirm Rx Implantable Cardiac Monitor Connects to Smartphones, FDA Cleared
The folks at Abbott received FDA clearance for the Confirm Rx implantable cardiac monitoring device that wirelessly connects to the patient's smartphone. Cardiac recordings pass from the device to the smartphone and then onto the company's online portal where cardiologists can view the data at any time.
October 31, 2017
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Abbott's New XIENCE Sierra Drug-Eluting Coronary Stent Released in Europe
Abbott is introducing in Europe its XIENCE Sierra stent following receipt of the CE Mark of approval. The device is based on the popular XIENCE everolimus-eluting stent platform.
October 30, 2017
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Abiomed's Impella RP First Percutaneous Heart Pump Indicated for Right Heart Failure
Abiomed won FDA approval for its Impella RP heart pump, the first percutaneous temporary ventricular support device indicated for right heart failure. The device moves blood from the inferior vena cava into the pulmonary artery, doing the work of the right ventricle. It's inserted via the femoral vein and pushed up and through the right ventricle, with the inlet positioned before the heart and the outlet outside of it. Once activated, it is able to augment at least four liters of blood per minute, providing considerable assistance to patients that would otherwise face a grim outcome.
September 25, 2017
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Ablation Procedure Helps 3 out of 4 AFib Patients
But results may not be lasting, and patients may still need to take medications
January 25, 2017
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ACC launches educational forums to address growing burden of valvular heart disease in China
The American College of Cardiology (ACC), working with prominent hospitals in central and eastern China, is launching a series of educational forums for physicians on valvular heart disease prevention, diagnosis and management. The educational forums will address the growing burden of valvular heart disease in China, particularly for underserved patients that face barriers to health care services.
July 25, 2017
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ACLS during transport not linked to increased survival for patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest
There is no association between prehospital advanced cardiac life support (ACLS) and survival to hospital discharge in patients suffering from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). ACLS is, however, associated with an improvement in prehospital return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC), but with longer delays to hospital arrival.
September 25, 2017
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Acute heart failure: What you need to know
Acute heart failure is an illness that hits suddenly and without any earlier symptoms.
June 2, 2017
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Adolescents with BMI at high-normal range have greater risk of death from cardiovascular diseases
While there is solid evidence that adolescent overweight and obesity are associated with coronary heart disease (CHD) and stroke, less is known about the association between body mass index (BMI) and rarer cardiovascular diseases. A new large-scale, 45-year Israeli study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism found that higher BMI as well as BMI in the accepted normal range in late adolescence may be related to a higher risk of death in mid-adulthood from non-coronary non-stroke cardiovascular diseases such as fatal arrhythmia, hypertensive heart disease, cardiomyopathy, arterial disease, heart failure and pulmonary embolism.
June 28, 2017
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AFib surgery: Types, risks, and what to expect
A trial fibrillation is a serious medical condition characteristic of an abnormal heartbeat. the irregular response is due to erratic electrical impulses in the heart's upper chambers.
March 15, 2017
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African Americans have shorter lifespan because of heart disease and stroke
The average lifespan of African Americans is significantly shorter than white Americans, mostly because of heart disease and stroke, which contributed to more than two million years of life lost among African Americans between 1999 and 2010, according to a new scientific statement published in the American Heart Association's journal Circulation.
October 23, 2017
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After heart attack, people with depression twice as likely to die
Researchers have known for a while that heart disease and depression influence each other. However, a new study investigates the impact of depression on heart disease over a long period of time, and finds the psychological disorder to increase mortality risk.
March 9, 2017
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Aging does not necessarily preclude healthy arteries
Research tells us that living in a Western culture makes it unlikely that people in their 70s can have arteries as healthy as those of people in their 20s and 30s. However, a new study suggests that this is not impossible, especially for people whose diet and lifestyle are in keeping with those recommended by the American Heart Association.
May 31, 2017
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Americans with High BP Still Eating Too Much Salt
Average sodium intake more than double the recommended daily limit for these patients, study finds
March 8, 2017
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Amphetamine Abuse Abuses the Heart
Study finds arteries of recreational users look older than their years
February 10, 2017
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Angioplasty Outcomes Almost Equal Among Hospitals
'Safety-net' facilities do as well as other hospitals with the artery procedure, researchers find
August 7, 2017
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Apple and Stanford team up to monitor irregular heart rhythms with the Apple Watch
Apple has been quite determined to make the Apple Watch more than just an accessory or iPhone companion -- it wants its readings to be able to help with healthcare in any way they can. As part of that mission, the company has teamed up with Stanford scientists to observe and study irregular heart rhythms.
November 29, 2017
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Apple launched a study to look for irregular heart rhythms on the Apple Watch
Apple and Stanford have teamed up for a new heart health study. Using a new Apple Watch app and the Apple Watch's built-in sensor, researchers will work to identify irregular heart rhythms and notify users who may be experiencing atrial fibrillation (AFib).
November 29, 2017
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Apple launches revolutionary Heart Study app in the U.S.
Apple Watch will help detect heart abnormalities responsible for 130,000 deaths a year in the U.S.
November 29, 2017
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Apple launches study to identify irregular heart rhythms with the Apple Watch
It's partnering with Stanford University
November 29, 2017
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Apple's Heart Study app can identify irregular heart rhythms
The app uses Apple Watch's sensor to calculate heart rate and rhythm, and can notify users who might be experiencing atrial fibrillation.
November 29, 2017
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Are Artery-Opening Stents for Chest Pain a Waste of Time?
With findings that some experts believe could change cardiovascular care, a new study suggests that the placebo effect of stents in heart patients with chest pain may be far more pronounced than thought.
November 2, 2017
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Are Herbal Medicines Safe for Heart Problems?
While popular among patients, they haven't been proven safe or effective in clinical trials, study says
February 27, 2017
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Are Many A-Fib Patients Getting the Wrong Dose?
Study of newer blood thinners finds 16 percent receive too much or too little medication
June 5, 2017
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Ascending aortic aneurysm: Symptoms, causes, and treatments
Ascending aortic aneurysms affect thousands of Americans annually and can be life-threatening if not monitored.
September 27, 2017
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Atherosclerosis: Skipping breakfast may double risk
A study led by researchers in Spain has suggested that skipping breakfast doubles the risk of "subclinical atherosclerosis."
October 3, 2017
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Atrial fibrillation triggers: what can lead to an A-fib attack?
Atrial fibrillation is an irregular, rapid heartbeat. During an atrial fibrillation attack, the heart might not pump enough oxygen-rich blood to the rest of the body, leading to symptoms including weakness, light-headedness, and dizziness.
March 21, 2017
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Atrial fibrillation: List of medications for treatment
When people develop atrial fibrillation, the normal, healthy rhythm of the heart is disrupted with an irregular and rapid beating of its upper chambers.
March 28, 2017
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Atrial fibrillation: Natural treatments, remedies, and tips
The heart's upper chambers normally beat in a regular, coordinated rhythm with the heart's lower chambers. In atrial fibrillation, the heart's upper chambers can quiver out of rhythm.
March 24, 2017
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Artery-clogging saturated fat myth debunked
Among doctors and the public alike, there is a popular belief that dietary saturated fat clogs up the arteries and results in coronary heart disease. a new editorial published in the British Journal of Sports Medicine says that this notion of saturated fat clogging a pipe is "just plain wrong."
April 26, 2017
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Artificial sweeteners: Weight loss friend or foe?
Researchers from the University of Manitoba's George and Fay Yee Centre for Healthcare Innovation in Canada find that non-nutritive sweeteners may be linked to risk of weight gain and a greater risk of obesity, high blood pressure, diabetes, and heart disease.
July 17, 2017
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Asthma history linked to risk factor for heart failure
A new study has become the first to uncover a link between a history of asthma and an increased likelihood of left ventricular hypertrophy, a risk factor for heart failure.
June 28, 2017
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Aspirin can prevent heart attacks after noncardiac surgery in patients with prior PCI
The results of the largest randomized trial of patients with PCI will inform clinical practice.
November 14, 2017
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Aspirin not an effective treatment for atrial fibrillation, study suggests
New research suggests that aspirin may not be as effective as previously believed for treating patients with atrial fibrillation. In fact, for patients who had a catheter ablation to lower their risk of stroke, the risks of using aspirin may outweigh the benefits.
May 15, 2017
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Assessing heart disease risk is within arm's reach
Researchers may have just discovered a potential new method to diagnose and monitor atherosclerosis: the radial artery.
April 14, 2017
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Automatic Heart Analyzing CADence System Cleared by FDA
AUM Cardiovascular, a company out of Northfield, Minnesota, won FDA clearance for its CADence system, which is a novel combination of a stethoscope and ECG in one device. The CADence is intended to be used by primary care physicians to help spot suspicious cardiac murmurs that should be referred to cardiologists.
August 11, 2017
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Avocado seed husk may help to treat heart disease, cancer
From lowering cholesterol to aiding weight loss, the potential benefits of avocado consumption have been well documented. A new study, however, suggests that further rewards could be reaped from a part of the fruit that we normally discard: the husk of the seed.
August 21, 2017
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Avoiding Alcohol Helps the Heart Beat Better
Each decade of teetotaling lowers risk of atrial fibrillation, study finds
October 18, 2017
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Azotemia: Symptoms, types, and treatment
Azotemia is a build up of nitrogen waste products in the blood.
August 15, 2017
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Misc. - B

Bacterial fats, not dietary ones, may deserve the blame for heart disease
Research could explain why gum disease is associated with atherosclerosis
November 1, 2017
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Belly Size Genes Also Linked to Heart Disease
Large study found association, but did not prove cause and effect
February 14, 2017
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Benefit of ICDs may be uncertain with cumulative use of effective medications, study shows
Medication, including beta-blockers, may be so effective in reducing the risk of sudden death in heart failure that the overall benefit of implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) may be uncertain.
July 7, 2017
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Best external heart rate monitors for iPhone and Apple Watch
What external heart rate monitor should you get for your Apple Watch or iPhone?
June 23, 2017
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Beta-blockers may reverse genetic changes from heart disease
Researchers have discovered that beta-blockers - a class of drug that is widely used to treat high blood pressure and other heart conditions - can reverse many of the potentially harmful changes in gene expression that are associated with heart disease.
July 3, 2017
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Beta blockers reverse potentially detrimental genetic changes linked to heart disease
Beta blockers are commonly used world-wide to treat a variety of cardiovascular conditions, such as arrhythmias and heart failure. Scientists have known for decades that the medications work by slowing the heart rate and reducing the force of contraction - lessening the burden of work carried out by the heart. However, new research out of York University has now shown that these drugs also reverse a number of potentially detrimental genetic changes associated with heart disease.
June 30, 2017
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Better AFib Treatment Might Prevent Strokes
Study says too many people aren't getting meds to fight atrial fibrillation, a major cause of these attacks
May 15, 2017
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Biological bypass found safe for patients with coronary artery disease
A new gene therapy that targets the heart and requires only one treatment session has been found safe for patients with coronary artery disease, according to a successful trial carried out in Finland. Enhancing circulation in the oxygen-deficient heart muscle, the effects were visible even one year after the treatment.
August 8, 2017
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BioSig's Pure EP System Detects Deadly Cardiac Arrhythmia Cells (Interview)
BioSig Technologies, a company out of Minneapolis, Minnesota, touts its PURE EP technology as superior electrophysiology (EP) signal recording and processing system compared to conventional devices, and is positioned to shake-up the EP market when it is launched in 2018.
June 8, 2017
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BIOTRONIK Introduces Its First Stent in U.S.
BIOTRONIK, a company known best for its implantable pacemakers and defibrillators, has just landed its first FDA approval for a coronary stent. the PRO-Kinetic Energy Cobalt Chromium (CoCr) metal stent is intended for placement within narrow arteries, only between 2.25 and 4 mm in diameter, and features struts that are nearly microscopic at 60 µm in width.
February 16, 2017
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BIOTRONIK Releases in U.S. Its Compact Edora Line of MR Conditional Pacemakers
BIOTRONIK is releasing in the U.S. its Edora line of pacemakers that come with the firm's MRI AutoDetect technology. MRI AutoDetect, which makes the Edora SR-T the smallest MR conditional device on the market, is a setting that is enabled by a physician up to fourteen days prior to an MRI scan. When the patient wearing the pacemaker gets close to the magnet, the implant switches into a special safe mode to prevent any abnormal events.
June 9, 2017
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BIOTRONIK's New CRT-ICDs Alleviate Atrial Lead Without Sacrificing Diagnostics
BIOTRONIK won FDA approval and is releasing in the U.S. its Intica DX and Intica cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT)-DX implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICD). The DX indicator refers to BIOTRONIK's technology that obviates the necessity of having an atrial lead to monitor the electrical activity in the atrium, a way that cardiologists use to spot atrial fibrillation and other more serious arrhythmic events.
July 19, 2017
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BIOTRONIK's Pacemakers Get 3 Tesla MR-Conditional Approval in Europe
BIOTRONIK won European regulatory approval allowing its Edora, Evity, and Enitra series of pacemakers to be safe for 3 Tesla full body scans, as long as certain precautionary measures are taken. This approval will allow more patients to take advantage of the high quality imaging that the more powerful MRI scanners offer, as previously these implants had MR-conditional approval up to only 1.5 Tesla. Full body scanning, on the other hand, opens up scanning of the chest, heart, and other organs close to the pacemaker and its leads.
June 14, 2017
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BIOTRONIK's Pulsar-18 Stent with Thin Delivery System for Superficial Femoral Arteries Now Available
BIOTRONIK is releasing its new Pulsar-18, a self-expanding stent designed for placement within the superficial femoral artery (SFA). This is the only FDA approved device of its kind to fit inside a 4 French sized delivery catheter, making it easier to get it through difficult lesions and place it accurately at the target location.
July 4, 2017
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Biotronik's Tiny Quadripolar Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy Pacemaker FDA Approved
BIOTRONIK has obtained an FDA approval for its Edora HF-T QP MR conditional quadripolar cardiac resynchronization therapy pacemaker (CRT-P). It's tiny, by comparison to similar devices, and features the BIOTRONIK's MR AutoDetect technology that allows a physician to tell the implant that an MRI exam is coming up and for the device to automatically engage its MRI safety mode during a scan.
August 22, 2017
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Blood group may affect heart attack risk
What blood group are you? According to a new study, the answer to this question may affect your heart health.
May 2, 2017
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Blood Pressure Swings Can Pose Long-Term Dangers
Everyone knows that sustained high blood pressure does no favors for your heart or life span.
November 14, 2017
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Blue maize may help protect against metabolic syndrome, rat study shows
A new study shows that a rat model of metabolic syndrome fed a high-sugar and high-cholesterol diet and given blue maize extract showed significant improvement in systolic blood pressure, high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, and triglyceride levels compared to those not given the extract.
January 11, 2017
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Brain patterns hold key to stress-related cardiovascular risk
The relationship between stress, cardiovascular health, and the brain is complex. A new study uses brain imaging and computer-learning to uncover which individuals are most at risk of stress-related cardiovascular disease.
August 23, 2017
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Breast implants may cause false ECG diagnosis of heart attack
Electrocardiogram recordings are often used to diagnose heart attacks and other conditions. But a new study suggests that in the case of patients with breast implants, the recordings can often be misleading. It recommends that doctors use other tests to confirm any indications.
June 22, 2017
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Breast-feeding mothers at lower risk of heart disease, stroke
It is not only babies who benefit from breast-feeding; a new study finds that the practice may lower a mother's risk of heart disease and stroke.
June 22, 2017
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Bruker showcases innovative high-performance systems and high-value analytical solutions at Pittcon 2017
Bruker is showcasing a selection of innovative high-performance systems and high-value analytical solutions at Pittcon 2017, with an emphasis on pharma and applied markets, as well as on nano-materials research and microscopy. Frank H. Laukien, Ph.D., the Bruker President and CEO, commented:
March 7, 2017
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BU scientist wins $231,000 AHA award to improve cardiovascular therapies
Vijaya B. Kolachalama, PhD, assistant professor of medicine at Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM), has received a Scientist Development grant from the American Heart Association (AHA).
August 16, 2017
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Bystander CPR Saves Lives and Lessens Disability
Good Samaritans can help prevent brain damage, nursing home care for cardiac arrest victims
May 4, 2017
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Misc. - C

Caffeine may be able to block inflammation, new research says
This could help explain why caffeine is correlated with health benefits
January 16, 2017
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Calcium in Young Arteries and Heart Attack Risk
Even small amount in 30s, 40s appears to boost the odds, study finds
February 8, 2017
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Can my HDL be too high?
Many people think of cholesterol as something that should be as low as possible. After all, high cholesterol is a well-documented risk factor for heart disease.
September 6, 2017
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Can shingles raise the risk of heart attack?
Research finds that shingles increases the risk of heart attack and stroke in the months and years after diagnosis. Although the reasons for this connection are not clear, the authors hope to raise awareness among clinicians.
July 4, 2017
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Cancer drug could promote regeneration of heart tissue
An anticancer agent in development promotes regeneration of damaged heart muscle -- an unexpected research finding that may help prevent congestive heart failure in the future.
February 3, 2017
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Cancer drugs may offer new way to control high blood pressure
Drugs designed to halt cancer growth may offer a new way to control high blood pressure (hypertension), say Georgetown University Medical Center investigators. The finding could offer a real advance in hypertension treatment because although a number of high blood pressure drugs are now available, they work by different mechanisms that are not suited for all patients.
November 20, 2017
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Cancer-cardiac connection illuminates promising new drug for heart failure
Scientists show that a cancer drug is effective in treating common causes of heart failure
May 17, 2017
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Cardiac stem cells from heart disease patients may be harmful
Researchers discover molecular pathway involved in toxic interaction between host cells and immune system
June 15, 2017
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CardioInsight ECG Vest for Non-Invasive, Precise Heart Maps
Medtronic landed FDA clearance for its CardioInsight 3D cardiac mapping system that's used to locate sources of arrhythmias. the system consists of an ECG vest with a whopping 252 electrodes. it's used to collect highly detailed skin surface electric signal data while the patient is inside a CT scanner.
February 3, 2017
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Cardiologs Cloud-Based Software FDA Cleared to Spot Arrhythmias in ECGs
Cardiologs, a company based in Paris, France, won FDA clearance for its software that analyzes electrocardiograms (ECG) for signs of cardiac arrhythmias. The system is based on a neural network, an artificial intelligence technique, that was trained by feeding it more than half a million previously gathered ECG recordings.
July 13, 2017
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Cardiologs raises $6.4M to bring image recognition to EKG analysis
You'll find image recognition technology in almost every kind of consumer service you would use today -- like Facebook, Google, or any number of other apps -- but Yann Fleureau is hoping that he can build a whole business off of its increasing success in healthcare.
October 5, 2017
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Carrot Weather's Apple Watch app is everything it should be and more
Looking for a perfect Apple Watch app? Carrot Weather just made one.
November 29, 2017
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Catheter ablation for A-fib: what to expect
Catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation is a procedure that involves using radiofrequency energy to destroy areas of heart tissue that are causing the heart to beat with an irregular rhythm.
March 24, 2017
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CathVision: A Smoother Look at Cardiac Electrograms
CathVision is a Danish company that aims to reduce noisy electrogram signals during cardiac arrhythmia ablation procedures. With cleaner signals, cardiologists can better locate the areas that generate arrhythmias and ablate them. For example, with a higher signal-to-noise ratio, cardiologists can have higher confidence when probing the low-voltage areas of the heart. This is important because cardiac arrhythmias, which affect 2% of the world, remain an untreatable challenge in about 50% of ablation procedures.
July 7, 2017
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Cedars-Sinai researchers develop new risk assessment tool to predict sudden cardiac arrest
A Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute investigator and his team have developed a new risk assessment tool that brings physicians closer to predicting who is most likely to suffer a sudden cardiac arrest, a condition that is fatal in more than 90 percent of patients.
June 27, 2017
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Childhood Poverty May Predict Heart Failure Later
Income inequalities when young appear to have lifelong effects, research suggests
June 26, 2017
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Cholesterol-lowering statins linked to increased risk of Diabetes in older women
Older Australian women taking cholesterol-lowering statins face a significantly increased risk of developing diabetes, according to a University of Queensland study.
March 15, 2017
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Chocolate may cut risk of irregular heartbeat by a fifth
Succumbed to that bar of chocolate? New research suggests that you shouldn't feel too guilty. Eaten in moderation, chocolate could reduce your risk of irregular heartbeat by a fifth.
May 24, 2017
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Clinical trial results could lead to treatment of heart disease in Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients
After boys and young men with Duchenne muscular dystrophy received cardiac progenitor cell infusions, medical tests indicated that the patients' hearts appeared improved, results from a new study show. Patients in the study also scored higher on arm strength tests after receiving the cell infusions.
November 15, 2017
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Coffee drinkers at lower risk of heart failure, stroke
If you simply can't live without coffee, then we've got good news for you: drinking coffee has been linked to a lowered risk of both heart failure and stroke.
November 14, 2017
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Coloring the heartbeat
Heart disease is one of the leading causes of death around the world. Now researchers assert that easy, early ways to screen for good drugs is vital.
November 6, 2017
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Common blood pressure drug raises skin cancer risk
A new study, led by Danish-based researchers, shows that one of the most popular drugs used worldwide in the treatment of hypertension raises the risk of skin cancer by seven times.
December 6, 2017
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Common chemicals in plastic linked to chronic disease
A research team from Australia has recently investigated some chemicals commonly found in plastics. They demonstrated a link between higher levels of these chemicals in urine and increases in cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, and hypertension in men.
July 14, 2017
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Conflicting Statin Guidelines Create Confusion
Doctors, patients often confused by differing advisories on the cholesterol-lowering drugs
April 18, 2017
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Congestive heart failure: Symptoms, treatment, and prevention
Congestive heart failure undermines the heart's job of pumping blood around the body. This can occur when the heart muscle is too weak, or when another defect prevents it from circulating blood properly.
June 9, 2017
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Connecting the dots between insulin resistance, unhealthy blood vessels and cancer
Animal studies examine risk factors that may overlap between colorectal cancer and cardiovascular disease
May 1, 2017
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CORolla, a New Device to Treat Diastolic Heart Failure
At the Rambam Health Care Campus in Israel, a new device has just been implanted for the first time in a patient with diastolic heart failure. The CORolla device from CorAssist Cardiovascular, a company based in Haifa, Israel, is designed to help the left ventricle open up to a greater volume during the diastolic filling than it would otherwise.
August 29, 2017
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Coronary angioplasty, 40 years on and millions of lives saved
While heart disease remains the leading cause of death for both men and women in the U.S., according to the Centers for Disease Control, advances in medicine over the past 40 years have led to a substantial reduction in cardiovascular-related deaths.
April 14, 2017
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Coronary artery bypass surgery can effectively treat diabetes patients with multivessel disease
Coronary artery bypass surgery (CABG) is the best method of treating artherosclerotic coronary arteries in diabetes patients with multivessel disease, even in the presence of type 1 diabetes, a new study from Karolinska Institutet reports, clearing up a question in the current recommendation.
August 28, 2017
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Could a cholesterol-lowering vaccine replace statins?
Daily statin use to lower cholesterol may soon be a thing of the past. A new study reveals how a vaccine successfully lowered "bad" cholesterol in mice and reduced atherosclerosis, which is a narrowing of the arteries caused by a buildup of plaque.
June 19, 2017
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Could a magnesium cream be used as an alternative to tablets for deficiency?
A new study by the University of Hertfordshire has revealed that a magnesium cream could be used as an alternative to tablets to combat major health problems including high blood pressure which are linked with deficiency.
May 1, 2017
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Could new markers identify patients at high risk of AFib recurrence after ablation?
If medication or resetting the heartbeat do not work as treatments for atrial fibrillation, which is a dangerous type of abnormal heart rhythm, doctors may try ablation. However, the procedure - which involves scarring tissue in the heart - is expensive, not without risk, and does not work for all patients. Now, a new study suggests that the presence of three microRNA molecules in the blood may serve as markers of whether erratic heartbeats are likely to recur following ablation.
March 19, 2017
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Could Skipping Breakfast Feed Heart Disease?
Forgoing morning meal may reduce cardiac health and boost odds for diabetes, study suggests
October 2, 2017
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Could tai chi encourage more patients to take up cardiac rehab?
Preliminary research suggests that tai chi, with its slow, gentle approach, might offer a safe and attractive option for patients who do not take up conventional cardiac rehabilitation.
October 11, 2017
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Could Too Much Exercise Be Bad for Men's Hearts?
Maybe, but only for white men, study suggests
October 19, 2017
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CRCHUM receives NIH grant to study ways to prevent mortality after myocardial infarction
The University of Montreal Hospital Research Centre (CRCHUM) has been awarded a grant of US$2 million from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to pilot the Canadian component of a study to determine the optimal amount of blood to transfuse in anemic patients who have suffered a myocardial infarction.
January 4, 2017
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Misc. - D

DABRA Laser Ablates Blocked Arteries
Ra Medical, a company out of Carlsbad, California, received FDA clearance and is reporting the first commercial use of its DABRA laser-based arterial blockage ablation system. Unlike most other intravascular tools used for removing arterial plaque that rely on mechanical methods, the DABRA is an excimer laser that emits at a wavelength of 308 nm, in the UVB range. The laser essentially cooks down calcium, thrombi, and atheroma that narrow the artery into simpler components, reducing the material that ends up going through the vessel as it's cleared.
June 6, 2017
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Data from landmark NIH blood pressure study supports important part of new AHA/ACC hypertension guidelines
Findings from a landmark study funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) support a key component of the new 2017 Hypertension Clinical Practice Guidelines announced by the American Heart Association (AHA) and the American College of Cardiology (ACC) at the annual AHA meeting in Anaheim, California.
November 13, 2017
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Deadly heart rhythm halted by noninvasive radiation therapy
Radiation therapy often is used to treat cancer patients. Now, doctors have shown that radiation therapy -- aimed directly at the heart -- can be used to treat patients with a life-threatening heart rhythm. They treated five patients with irregular heart rhythms, called ventricular tachycardia, who had not responded to standard treatments. The therapy resulted in a dramatic reduction in the number of ventricular tachycardia episodes.
December 14, 2017
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Delayed diagnosis, not gender, affects women's treatment for heart disease
Women with heart disease typically receive less complete surgical revascularization with arterial grafts than men do, but not because of gender bias. Instead, factors such as delayed diagnosis of coronary artery disease (CAD) in women may contribute to the differences in treatment, according to a new study.
September 28, 2017
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Delays in Diagnosis Hurt Women With Heart Disease
Study found they were less likely to receive surgeries involving multiple artery grafts
September 28, 2017
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Desk-bound jobs linked to bigger waists and increased risk of heart disease
A new study shows further evidence for the view that spending too much time sitting down is bad for our health and our waistline.
March 1, 2017
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Diabetes: Heart attack risk due to loss of small blood vessels around the heart
People with Diabetes have a significantly higher risk for heart attack. Now, new research suggests that Diabetes damages the small blood vessels around the heart, and this might explain the link to heart attack.
March 24, 2017
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Discontinuation of hormone therapy linked to increased risk of cardiac, stroke death
Hormone therapy (HT) continues to be a hotly debated topic. The benefits of estrogen to the heart, however, appear to be universally accepted. A new study demonstrates that the risk of cardiac and stroke death actually increases in the first year after discontinuation of HT.
November 8, 2017
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DNA 'barcoding' allows rapid testing of nanoparticles for therapeutic delivery
Using tiny snippets of DNA as 'barcodes,' researchers have developed a new technique for rapidly screening the ability of nanoparticles to selectively deliver therapeutic genes to specific organs of the body. the technique could accelerate the development and use of gene therapies for such killers as heart disease, cancer and Parkinson's disease.
February 7, 2017
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DNA links deadly germs, tainted heart surgery devices to German factory
Contamination at a German factory that makes crucial machines used during open-heart surgery is the likely source of a global outbreak of deadly infections tied to the devices, the largest analysis to date shows.
July 12, 2017
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Do you have high blood pressure? You might, based on new guidelines
Almost half of adults in the United States could now be classified as having high blood pressure, after new guidelines from the American Heart Association and the American College of Cardiology have redefined the condition.
November 14, 2017
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Does moderate drinking really protect against heart disease?
When studies first suggested that alcohol, in moderation, may improve health, many of us were delighted at the news. But a new, in-depth review of these studies suggests that believing the health benefits of alcohol may be wishful thinking.
May 22, 2017
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Does the sound of airplanes raise blood pressure risk?
New research examines the effect of living next to an airport - specifically, of being exposed to the noise of aircrafts flying by - on the risk of developing high blood pressure, medically diagnosed heart flutter, and stroke.
June 14, 2017
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Dog's Death Gave Her A 'Broken Heart'
When Joanie Simpson woke up with chest and shoulder pains one morning, she feared it was a heart attack.
October 25, 2017
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Don't worry, sex is unlikely to trigger cardiac arrest
New research finds that sexual intercourse is only rarely tied to cardiac arrest, a condition that causes the heart to stop beating suddenly.
November 13, 2017
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Drug May Fight Heart Disease in Whole New Way
Study of injected medication suggests reductions in inflammation could be treatment target
August 28, 2017
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Duke University Heart Patch Shows Promise in Repairing Cardiac Tissue Damage
Researchers at Duke University have developed an artificially-engineered patch consisting of fully functional human heart muscle tissue that can be used to repair damaged areas of the heart. While it's not the first cardiac tissue to be artificially engineered, it's significant in that it's the first that is large enough to be clinically useful to cover an affected area of the heart while being strong enough and as electrically active as native heart tissue.
November 29, 2017
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DynamX, a Novel Stent That Turns from Rigid to Flexible While Inside Vessel
With every heart beat, our blood vessels expand and contract, something known as pulsatile motion. When commonly used metal stents are placed within vessels, they prevent those vessels from exhibiting pulsatile motion. This may be a cause of or a compounding factor for restenosis and may even lead to a cardiovascular disease to develop faster.
November 8, 2017
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Misc. - E

E-cigarette flavorings may impair heart muscle function
Vaping might be a more healthful alternative to smoking, but this does not mean that it is harmless. This is the takeaway message from a new study, which found that some flavorings added to e-cigarette liquids could be damaging for the heart.
November 20, 2017
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E-cigarettes may slow down your heart rate
The results of some new research, to be presented at the 2017 American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions, reveal how electronic cigarettes affect heart rhythm and function in mice.
November 13, 2017
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Early intervention provides survival benefit for NSTEMI patients
An analysis of NSTEMI patients who undergo coronary revascularization within 24 hours of hospitalization showed an increased reduction in mortality, marking the first time this difference has been demonstrated. Results from "Outcomes of Early versus Late Revascularization in Low and High-Risk Patients Hospitalized with Non-ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction: the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Surveillance Study" were presented today as a late-breaking clinical trial at the Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions (SCAI) 2017 Scientific Sessions in new Orleans.
May 12, 2017
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Early Onset Hot Flashes May Signal Heart Risks
Study found link between menopausal symptoms in younger women and reduced blood vessel function
April 13, 2017
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Eat more leafy greens and whole grains to lower heart failure risk
New research suggests that people who eat plant-based diets -- including leafy greens, fruits, beans, whole grains, and also fish -- are less likely to develop heart failure.
November 15, 2017
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Eating at night could increase risk of heart disease and diabetes
Eating during the night is associated with higher risk of heart disease and diabetes, and the body's 24-hour cycle is to blame, according to recent research.
November 9, 2017
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Eating cheese every day may help to protect heart health
If you're a cheese lover, you will welcome the results of this new study with open arms. Researchers suggest that eating around 40 grams (or 1.41 ounces) of cheese every day could help to reduce the risk of heart disease and stroke.
December 4, 2017
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Eating potassium-rich foods could be key to lowering blood pressure
Eating potassium-rich foods like sweet potatoes, avocados, spinach, beans, bananas -; and even coffee -; could be key to lowering blood pressure, according to Alicia McDonough, PhD, professor of cell and neurobiology at the Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California (USC).
April 5, 2017
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Eating too fast may lead to weight gain, heart disease
Eating too quickly may add an extra size to your waistline, as well as raise your risk of heart disease, diabetes, and stroke, according to new research.
November 14, 2017
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Echocardiography Videos: the Latest from EchoJournal
We are very proud of EchoJournal, our echocardiography video website. If you are a cardiologist, anesthesiologist, radiologist, medical student, or just a person interested in cardiac ultrasounds, EchoJournal is the place for you.
January 4, 2017
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EchoPixel Lets Surgeons See CT, MRI, and Ultrasound Scans in 3D
Since the invention of the X-ray machine in 1895, medical imaging technology has improved dramatically, but the visualization of those images hasn't changed enough to keep up. Even though CTs and MRIs capture 3D data, the consumption of that data by physicians is still almost entirely in 2D formats.
October 13, 2017
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Edwards INSPIRIS RESILIA Aortic Valve Now Approved in U.S.A.
Edwards Lifesciences has announced that the FDA has issued approval for its INSPIRIS RESILIA prosthetic aortic valve, which is based on the popular Carpentier-Edwards PERIMOUNT device. Cleared in Europe just under a year ago, the INSPIRIS RESILIA features flaps made from RESILIA material, a tissue developed by Edwards that helps maintain the integrity of the valve while minimizing calcification. The additional advantage of RESILIA is that it comes ready to use, which means the valve is packaged dry and prepped for implantation.
July 6, 2017
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Edwards SAPIEN 3 Cardiac Valve FDA Approved for Mitral and Aortic Valve-in-Valve Procedures
Edwards Lifesciences received FDA approval for its SAPIEN 3 transcatheter prosthetic heart valve to be used for valve-in-valve procedures. Indicated for placement within both the aortic and mitral valves in patients at risk of undergoing open heart surgery to remove an existing valve, the SAPIEN 3 can reside within a previously implanted bioprosthetic valve that has begun to fail.
June 6, 2017
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EKG results for A-fib: what do they look like?
Atrial fibrillation is a heart condition that causes the heart to beat in irregular time. the heart's beat is the result of an electrical conduction system that sends message from one part of the heart to another in a chain-like reaction.
March 30, 2017
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Eko DUO, a Novel Mobile Stethoscope with ECG Capability Unveiled
Eko, the company that's responsible for the Eko CORE digital stethoscope we highly praised, is now releasing an interesting new device that provides ECG and auscultation capabilities in a mobile package. The Eko DUO looks a bit like a cell phone from the 1990's, but with only three buttons on its body. When held against the chest, it provides both a 1-lead ECG and auscultation comparable to a standard stethoscope.
June 9, 2017
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Elevated calcium levels raise heart attack risk
Higher calcium levels in the bloodstream determine a person's increased risk of developing coronary artery disease and heart attack, a new study suggests.
July 25, 2017
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EluNIR Drug-Eluting Coronary Stent from Medinol Wins European Clearance
Medinol, a company based in Tel Aviv, Israel, has announced that its EluNIR drug eluting stent received the CE Mark of approval in Europe. The device is coated with ridaforolimus to help prevent restenosis and is designed be both highly flexible while maintaining flexibility, making it easier to reach and penetrate difficult lesions.
October 30, 2017
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Emory researchers reveal 'matchmaker' role for protein linked to SMA
A puzzling question has lurked behind SMA (spinal muscular atrophy), the leading genetic cause of death in infants.
February 14, 2017
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Engineering nanomaterials to deliver precise treatments for heart disease
Northwestern University researchers have demonstrated an enhanced approach to using nanomaterials to target inflammatory cells involved in atherosclerosis. the findings, published in the journal ACS Nano, could lead to improved diagnosis and treatment of atherosclerosis, a leading cause of heart disease.
January 12, 2017
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Erectile dysfunction drug may be used to coat stents in future heart surgeries
Coating stents with an erectile dysfunction drug may be the way forwards in treating stent patients, say researchers.
July 12, 2017
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Estrogens and changes in heart physiology linked
This link suggests that pollutants in the environment that mimic estrogens may have a deleterious effect on heart function
December 5, 2017
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Eustachian tube dysfunction: Causes, symptoms, and treatment
The eustachian tube runs from the middle ear to the back of the nose and throat. If this tube becomes plugged or infected, it can cause eustachian tube dysfunction.
October 3, 2017
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European scientists develop new handheld scanner for early-stage heart disease diagnosis
With worldwide cardiovascular deaths at an all-time high, European scientists have developed a new handheld scanner that can read your heart's vital signs like a supermarket barcode reader can scan items at the checkout, allowing a GP to diagnose even preclinical patients for the early onset of a disease.
July 6, 2017
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Exercise and Vitamin D: a Heart-Healthy Combo
Together, the two offer more protection against disease than either does alone, study suggests
May 1, 2017
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Exercise at high levels increases risk of hardening of the arteries
A study comparing exercise patterns and indicators of heart disease over 25-years, has shown that white men who exercise at high levels were 86% more likely to develop plaques in the coronary arteries than men who exercise at lower levels.
October 18, 2017
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Exercise does not prevent blocked arteries, study finds
A long-term study including more than 3,000 participants made an unexpected find: white men who spend more than 7 hours exercising each week are most at risk of developing coronary artery calcification.
October 18, 2017
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Exercise May Help the Heart Survive a Heart Attack
Researchers suggest that people who work out might develop 'collateral' blood vessels in the heart
April 12, 2017
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Exercise, Weight Loss May Cut Heart Failure Risk
Link was stronger for common but difficult-to-treat type of heart failure
February 27, 2017
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Exposure to cardiovascular risk factors in childhood linked to poorer learning, memory in midlife
A Finnish study coordinated by the Research Centre of Applied and Preventive Cardiovascular Medicine at the University of Turku shows that exposure to cardiovascular risk factors, such as high blood pressure, elevated serum LDL-cholesterol and smoking in childhood and adolescence, is associated with poorer learning ability and memory in middle age.
May 3, 2017
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Extensive surgical repair of type A aortic dissection results in better long-term outcomes
Cardiac surgeons are successfully performing more extensive surgical repairs of type A aortic dissection -- one of the highest risk operations in cardiothoracic surgery. These new surgical techniques, along with improved postoperative care, are resulting in better long-term outcomes and lower rates of complications, according to an article published online today in The Annals of Thoracic Surgery.
June 6, 2017
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Misc. - F

Face cooling may temporarily prevent cardiovascular shutdown following blood loss
Applying ice water to the face may be a simple and quick method for first responders to temporarily prevent cardiovascular shutdown in casualties who have lost a lot of blood. Such a tool could be an effective way to buy time until the patient - whether in a civilian or combat setting - receives proper medical care.
April 27, 2017
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'Fat but fit' are at increased risk of heart disease
Carrying extra weight could raise your risk of heart attack by more than a quarter, even if you are otherwise healthy.
August 15, 2017
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Fat distribution in women and men provides clues to heart attack risk
It's not the amount of fat in your body but where it's stored that may increase your risk for heart attack, stroke and diabetes, according to a new study. The study looked at the differences in fat distribution patterns among overweight and obese men and women and their associated cardiometabolic risk.
November 28, 2017
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Fat metabolism in live fish: Real-time lipid biochemistry observed
Studying how our bodies metabolize lipids such as fatty acids, triglycerides, and cholesterol can teach us about cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and other health problems, as well as reveal basic cellular functions. But the process of studying what happens to lipids after being consumed has been both technologically difficult and expensive to accomplish until now.
May 8, 2017
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Fat Near Heart a Hazard for Postmenopausal Women
Study ties 'paracardial' fat to raised risk of hardening of the arteries
January 31, 2017
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FDA Cleared: Medtronic's Reveal LINQ Insertable Cardiac Monitor with TruRhythm Detection
Medtronic won FDA clearance for its Reveal LINQ Insertable Cardiac Monitor with TruRhythm Detection. the device is used to spot and analyze difficult to diagnose arrhythmias over periods as long as three years. It is an upgrade of the original Reveal LINQ, now sporting algorithms that significantly reduce the number of false positive cases of atrial fibrillation, bradycardia, and false pause episodes.
March 14, 2017
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FDA clears AliveCor's Kardiaband as the first medical device accessory for the Apple Watch
The Food and Drug Administration has just cleared AliveCor's Kardiaband EKG reader as the first medical device accessory for the Apple Watch.
November 29, 2017
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FDA clears first EKG reader for Apple Watch
Former Google+ boss Vic Gundotra returns with FDA cleared KardiaBand
November 29, 2017
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FDA clears first medical accessory for the Apple Watch--an EKG sensor
KardiaBand uses a neural network and the Apple Watch to detect abnormal heart rate.
November 29, 2017
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Fertility treatment failure may harm women's heart health
Researchers found that women who did not become pregnant after undergoing gonadotropin-based fertility therapy - treatment often used in preparation for in vitro fertilization (IVF) and other assisted reproductive technologies - were at greater risk of heart failure and stroke than those whose fertility therapy was successful.
March 13, 2017
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First look at Omron Evolv: Smart blood pressure tracking on Android
Second in a series of how Phil is trying to not die of high blood pressure after years and years of running Android Central. (And doing other unhealthy things.)
February 10, 2017
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First-Born Children More Intelligent: Study
First-born children tend to be more intelligent than their siblings, perhaps because they get extra parental attention in early life compared to siblings, a new study finds.
February 9, 2017
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Fitbit adds heart rate monitoring to its Alta line and improves sleep tracking
Fitbit's big smartwatch announcement is, it seems, still a ways off. But the company's got a pair of announcements this week, including an update to its popular Alta tracker and changes to the way it gathers sleep tracking.
March 6, 2017
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Fitbit proves heart rate monitors can be slim with new Alta HR
This might be the tracker you want to wear both day and night.
March 6, 2017
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Fitbit's new Alta HR tracks heart rate and sleep for a week
There's a new Fitbit coming, and it's got a week's worth of battery life, a stylish look, and a heart rate monitor.
March 6, 2017
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Five simple tests provide more accurate assessment of heart-disease risk
Five simple medical tests together provide a broader and more accurate assessment of heart-disease risk than currently used methods, cardiologists at UT Southwestern Medical Center found.
March 31, 2017
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Five vascular diseases linked to one common genetic variant
Genome-wide association studies have implicated a common genetic variant in chromosome 6p24 in coronary artery disease, as well as four other vascular diseases: migraine headache, cervical artery dissection, fibromuscular dysplasia, and hypertension. However, it has not been clear how this polymorphism affects the risk for so many diseases. Researchers show how this DNA variant enhances the activity of a gene called endothelin-1, which is known to promote vasoconstriction and hardening of the arteries.
July 27, 2017
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For adults younger than 78, risk for heart disease linked to risk for problems walking
A team of researchers examined the factors that put older adults at higher risk for developing physical limitations as they age. Findings suggest that reducing heart disease risk factors with appropriate treatments might help 'younger' older adults maintain their physical function.
November 21, 2017
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Function of olfactory receptor in the human heart identified
The new findings may be relevant in the long term for diabetic patients and patients with increased heart rates
February 8, 2017
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Funxim's wireless charger to take on AirPower, top up iPhones and Apple Watches at low price
Apple's AirPower wireless charger is still a pie in the sky, postponed for early 2018 release, but there are already a few good options on the market to top off your new iPhones or Apple Watches sans cables. How about both? Yes, there is now a Kickstarter project called Funxim that is building a wireless charger which mimics the AirPower's featured ability to charge two Apple devices at once.
November 29, 2017
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Misc. - G

Genetic engineering tool generates antioxidant-rich purple rice
Researchers in China have developed a genetic engineering approach capable of delivering many genes at once and used it to make rice endosperm -- seed tissue that provides nutrients to the developing plant embryo -- produce high levels of antioxidant-boosting pigments called anthocyanins. The resulting purple endosperm rice holds potential for decreasing the risk of certain cancers, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and other chronic disorders.
June 27, 2017
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Genetics may put a person at risk of high triglycerides, but adopting a healthy diet can help
Triglycerides, a type of fat in the blood, are important for good health. But having high triglycerides might increase a person's risk of heart disease, and may be a sign of metabolic syndrome.
October 24, 2017
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Gestational exposure to diesel exhaust could increase susceptibility to adult heart failure
According to a study published online in The FASEB Journal, involving mice, gestational exposure to airborne particles derived from diesel exhaust can modify DNA in utero and alter the expression of genes that potentially increase susceptibility to adult heart failure. Although an association between gestational exposure to diesel exhaust and heart failure susceptibility had previously been reported, this is the first study that identifies specific DNA methylation (a chemical modification of DNA that changes its action) and gene expression effects in the heart that result from gestational exposure.
August 7, 2017
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Getting rid of belly fat the natural way
Belly fat is more than just a superficial concern. It is also a significant risk factor for serious health problems such as diabetes and cardiovascular disease.
November 8, 2017
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'Good' cholesterol levels reduced with high air pollution exposure
A wealth of studies have suggested a link between exposure to air pollution and a greater risk of cardiovascular disease. new research suggests that the effects of such pollution on levels of "good" cholesterol may be to blame.
April 14, 2017
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'Good' cholesterol might actually be bad
Traditionally, we have been told by physicians not to worry about "good" cholesterol, which is scientifically known as high-density lipoprotein. New research, however, finds an alarming association between high levels of this cholesterol type and excessive mortality.
August 23, 2017
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Google's AI subsidiary turns to blockchain technology to track UK health data
Forays by Google subsidiary DeepMind Health into the UK's medical institutions have been characterized by two major themes. First, amazing results powered by cutting-edge AI; and second, a lack of transparency over the handling of the UK's public-funded data. with the science going swimmingly, DeepMind Health is focusing more than ever on reassuring UK citizens that their medical records are in safe hands. Its latest plan is a public ledger that shows which bits of data it's using; when; and for what purposes.
March 10, 2017
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Got the night munchies? Beware diabetes and heart disease
How many of us can honestly say that we've never raided the fridge at 3 a.m., egged on by an uncontrollable hunger for ice-cream? Doing this once or twice is fine, but new research says that if you make this a habit, you could be in trouble.
November 8, 2017
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Gut colonization linked to development and progress of heart failure
In the gut of patients with heart failure, important groups of bacteria are found less frequently and the gut flora is not as diverse as in healthy individuals. Data obtained by scientists of the German Centre for Cardiovascular Research (DZHK) provide valuable points of departure for understanding how gut colonization is associated with the development and progress of heart failure.
July 11, 2017
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Misc. - H

HAART 200 Aortic Annuloplasty Device for Bicuspid Valve Repair FDA Cleared
BioStable Science & Engineering out of Austin, Texas won FDA clearance for its HAART 200 aortic annuloplasty device indicated for repair of congenital bicuspid aortic valve in patients with aortic valve insufficiency. A similar device, the HAART 300 for people with all three aortic valve leaflets, was cleared by the FDA earlier this year.
August 15, 2017
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Having depression and heart disease could double death risk
While the mechanism behind the association is unknown, a new study finds that depression after being diagnosed with coronary artery disease doubles the risk of mortality.
July 31, 2017
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Heart attack patients more likely to use emotion-focused coping strategies for stress
Patients with a history of heart attack were more likely to use emotion-focused coping strategies for stress such as eating more or drinking alcohol, while patients without a history of heart attack or heart disease used problem-focused coping strategies, according to research to be presented at the 8th Emirates Cardiac Society Congress in collaboration with the American College of Cardiology Middle East Conference October 19-21, 2017 in Dubai.
October 19, 2017
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Heart attack: Blood vessel growth may improve treatment
Scientists have discovered a cell mechanism involving the hormone leptin that plays a key role in the formation of new blood vessels. The discovery may help to develop treatments that stimulate tissue repair following a heart attack, as well as treatments that stop abnormal tissue growth, such as in cancer.
July 27, 2017
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Heart Attack? Drones Could Come to Your Rescue
Like something from a science fiction movie, the machines can fly in carrying life-saving equipment
June 13, 2017
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Heart attacks more likely in those with low blood phosphate levels
Low phosphate in the blood is linked to the risk of heart attack and coronary artery disease, a new study reports.
November 9, 2017
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Heart disease patients could benefit from practicing both yoga and aerobic exercise
Heart disease patients who practice yoga in addition to aerobic exercise saw twice the reduction in blood pressure, body mass index and cholesterol levels when compared to patients who practiced either Indian yoga or aerobic exercise alone, according to research to be presented at the 8th Emirates Cardiac Society Congress in collaboration with the American College of Cardiology Middle East Conference October 19-21, 2017 in Dubai.
October 19, 2017
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Heart disease risk increased fivefold for bald and graying men
New findings show that male pattern baldness and getting gray hair prematurely puts men under 40 at risk of heart disease. In fact, these men are five times likelier to develop the condition, representing a risk higher than the one posed by obesity.
November 30, 2017
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Heart Disease, Stroke Cutting Black Lives Short
Life span about three years less than for whites, heart association statement says
October 23, 2017
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Heart failure could be treated using umbilical cord stem cells
Using stem cells derived from the umbilical cord, researchers have improved the heart muscle and function of heart failure patients, paving the way for noninvasive therapies.
September 27, 2017
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Heart Failure Drug Shows Promise in Human Trial
Cimaglermin appears to strengthen cells and improve heart function, researchers report
December 27, 2016
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Heart failure more fatal than common cancers
A new study shows that men and women suffering from heart failure have a higher risk of death than people with most common types of cancer.
May 4, 2017
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Heart Failure Patients Living Longer
Researchers chock it up to better meds, as patients live longer and better
July 6, 2017
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Heart failure: Stem cell therapy may worsen heart damage
Stem cell therapy is often a "last resort" treatment for patients with end-stage heart failure. A new study, however, finds that the treatment could be more harmful than helpful if cardiac stem cells are involved.
June 16, 2017
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'Heart Harm' In Middle Age Can Lead To Dementia
Of greatest importance are diabetes, blood pressure and smoking, researchers say
August 7, 2017
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Heart Health Might be a Matter of Geography
U.S. counties where cardiovascular death rates are high or low sometimes sit side-by-side, study finds
May 16, 2017
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Heart hormones protect against obesity and insulin resistance
Elevated levels of natriuretic peptides in adipose tissue protect against effects of high-fat diet
August 25, 2017
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Heart Pump Powered by Electric Cable Routed Through Head
Left ventricular assist devices (LVADs), popularized most famously by Dick Cheney, have become somewhat common in the past few years. They augment the cardiac output, and in many cases they have significantly extended the lifespans of heart failure patients.
December 11, 2017
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Heart-healthy middle age tied to lower risk of dementia
The chance of developing dementia is tied to a number of factors, including some that can also influence cardiovascular health, such as diabetes, high blood pressure, and smoking. A new study shows that having these risk factors in middle age might increase the likelihood of having dementia later in life.
August 7, 2017
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'Heart-on-chip' technology could ensure potentially lifesaving new drugs
Prescription drugs have enabled millions of Americans with chronic medical conditions to live longer and more fulfilling lives, but many promising new drugs never make it to the human trials stage due to the potential for cardiac toxicity.
May 11, 2017
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HeartIn, a Workout T-Shirt With ECG Built Right In
HeartIn, a company with offices in Silicon Valley and Kyiv, Ukraine, recently launched a Kickstarter campaign to help bring to market a t-shirt with built-in electrocardiography (ECG) capabilities. The technology is aimed at helping athletes optimize their workout routines by having a better idea of how the heart is doing during various exercise regimens.
June 1, 2017
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HeartSciences MyoVista High Sensitivity ECG Now Available in Europe
HeartSciences, a firm based outside of Dallas, Texas, is releasing in Europe its MyoVista high sensitivity electrocardiograph (hsECG) device that helps to screen patients for cardiac disease. It relies on a mathematical method known as continuous wavelet transform to process ECG data in a manner very different than conventional ECG.
August 31, 2017
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HeartyPatch, an Open-Source ECG for Heart Rate and Heart Rate Variability Tracking
Team Protocentral, an open source hardware firm from Bangalore, India, is raising crowdfunds to release its HeartyPatch device. The HeartyPatch is a single lead ECG patch that can track the heart rate and heart rate variability (HRV) when stuck to the chest. Similar devices have been developed and commercialized previously, but the HeartyPatch provides open source access to the software running it, allowing anyone to implement it for unique use cases.
October 12, 2017
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High blood pressure linked to racial segregation in neighborhoods
Living in racially segregated neighborhoods is associated with a rise in the blood pressure of black adults, while moving away from segregated areas is associated with a decrease -- and significant enough to lead to reductions in heart attacks and strokes, a National Institutes of Health-funded study has found.
May 15, 2017
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High Blood Pressure May not be all Bad in Elderly
Developing it after 80 might help prevent mental decline, research suggests
January 17, 2017
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High blood pressure: Sodium may not be the culprit
Salt has long been vilified as the harbinger of hypertension. However, as research into the condition has delved deeper, it is becoming clear that the story is more complex. the latest study in this arena goes some way toward absolving sodium.
April 25, 2017
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High degree of mental health issues in women veterans linked to increased risk for CAD
Women Veterans exhibit a high degree of mental health issues that are associated with an increased risk for coronary artery disease (CAD).
October 11, 2017
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High levels of two biomarkers can predict risk for adverse cardiac events, research suggests
New research suggests that GlycA, a newly identified blood marker, and C-reactive protein both independently predict major adverse cardiac events, including heart failure and death. Patients who have high levels of both biomarkers are at especially high risk.
March 17, 2017
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High systolic blood pressure increases risk of mitral regurgitation, study reveals
A new study, published by Kazem Rahimi of The George Institute for Global Health at the University of Oxford, UK and colleagues, indicates that high blood pressure increases the risk of mitral regurgitation, a condition where leakage occurs in one of the heart valves.
October 19, 2017
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High Thyroid Hormone Levels and Stiffer Arteries
Measuring these levels might help identify people at risk of heart disease, researcher says
April 4, 2017
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High-fat, low-sugar diet prior to imaging can help reduce uncertainty in diagnosing cardiac sarcoidosis
Researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago were able to reduce uncertainty in diagnosing cardiac sarcoidosis by having patients consume a high-fat, low-sugar diet for 72 hours prior to diagnostic imaging.
December 20, 2016
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Home Blood Pressure Monitors Wrong 7 of 10 Times
Checking your device against ones used at your doctor's office may be advised, experts say
June 14, 2017
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Hormone replacement therapy linked to lower risk of atherosclerosis and death in women
Hormone replacement therapy has long been controversial as studies have associated it with health benefits and risks. While some studies suggest that it lowers the risk of osteoporosis and improves some aspects of heart health, others link it to higher risk of cancer and stroke.
March 9, 2017
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How and why blood clots shrink
Blood clotting is the "Jekyll and Hyde" of biological processes. It's a lifesaver when you're bleeding, but gone awry, it causes heart attacks, strokes and other serious medical problems. If a clot grows too big, pieces dislodged by blood flow (emboli) can block downstream blood vessels in the lungs or brain, leading to life-threatening complications such as pulmonary embolism or ischemic stroke.
November 9, 2017
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How diabetes in pregnancy affects baby's heart
Scientists show that high levels of glucose keep heart cells from maturing normally
December 12, 2017
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How I Keep Tabs on My Heart Health While on the Go
While the $99 KardiaMobile helps me monitor my heart activity, it is another thing I have to carry around. So I was intrigued to hear that AliveCor had an Apple Watch band.
December 12, 2017
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How receptors for medicines work inside cells
The human genome encodes hundreds of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). These form the largest group of receptors through which hormones and neurotransmitters exert their functions on our cells. Therefore, they are of highest importance as drug targets: around half of all prescribed drugs act on these receptors - and thus GPCRs help in the treatment of widespread diseases such as hypertension, asthma or Parkinson.
September 5, 2017
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How the sugar industry tried to hide the health effects of its product 50 years ago
About 50 years ago, the sugar industry stopped funding research that began to show something they wanted to hide: that eating lots of sugar is linked to heart disease. A new study exposes the sugar industry's decades-old effort to stifle that critical research.
November 21, 2017
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How Your Thyroid May Be Working Against Your Heart
The tiny thyroid gland could have a big impact on heart health, new research suggests.
October 31, 2017
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HSE researchers uncover new brain mechanism that generates cognitive dissonance
A new study by HSE researchers has uncovered a new brain mechanism that generates cognitive dissonance - a mental discomfort experienced by a person who simultaneously holds two or more contradictory beliefs or values, or experiences difficulties in making decisions. The results of the study have been published in the paper 'Open Access Neural Mechanisms of Cognitive Dissonance (Revised): an EEG Study' in The Journal of Neuroscience.
May 17, 2017
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Hydraulic forces aid to fill the heart's chambers with blood, research finds
Researchers at Karolinska Institutet and KTH Royal Institute of Technology in Sweden have contributed to a recent discovery that the heart is filled with the aid of hydraulic forces, the same as those involved in hydraulic brakes in cars.
February 23, 2017
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Hypertension during pregnancy may affect women's long-term cardiovascular health
Women who experience hypertension during pregnancy face an increased risk of heart disease and hypertension later in life, according to a new study.
August 18, 2017
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Misc. - I

Ibuprofen associated with blood pressure rise in arthritis patients at cardiovascular risk
Ibuprofen is associated with increased blood pressure and hypertension compared to celecoxib in patients with osteoarthritis or rheumatoid arthritis and increased risk of cardiovascular disease, according to new research.
August 28, 2017
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ICNC 2017 to unveil future applications of nuclear cardiology and cardiac CT imaging
Future applications of nuclear cardiology and cardiac computed tomography (CT) imaging are set to be revealed at the International Conference on Nuclear Cardiology and Cardiac CT (ICNC) 2017.
April 10, 2017
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Identifying early markers of cardiac dysfunction in pregnancy
Study looks at women with and without preeclampsia
January 23, 2017
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iHealth Clear Wireless Blood Pressure Monitor: A Quick Look and Interview
iHealth Labs recently launched iHealth Clear, its newest addition to the growing product line of mHealth devices. With five other blood pressure cuffs on its line (iHealth Sense, View, Feel, Ease, and the Blood Pressure Dock), this sixth product is unique in that it offers a voice-supported smart blood pressure monitor (BPM) that uses a stand-alone display to show results and comparison charts, thereby eliminating the need to rely on a smartphone app. The iHealth Clear still has matching smartphone app, so all the advanced options such as historic tracking are available.
July 6, 2017
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Immune cell may turn heart inflammation into heart failure
Heart inflammation, or myocarditis, is a disorder usually caused by an infection reaching the heart. Although the condition is rare, it can sometimes lead to dilated cardiomyopathy - a leading cause of heart failure in younger adults. new research helps to explain why this happens in some cases and not others, by examining an immune cell that appears to cause heart failure in mice.
March 16, 2017
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Immune cells play surprising role in steady heartbeat
Macrophages boost electrical jolt that causes mouse heart muscle cells to contract
April 20, 2017
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Important things that women need to know about heart disease
Did you know that heart disease impacts men and women differently? Research has shown that gender differences exist not only in the way disease affects the heart, but also in the symptoms and the way it is diagnosed. And, in combating this No. 1 killer of women, we must educate women on their individual risk factors and the importance of early diagnosis.
July 25, 2017
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In utero exposure to diesel exhaust could be linked to adult heart failure
Toxic effects of air pollution can cross generations through unanticipated effects on DNA in the heart of the developing embryo, new study reveals
August 7, 2017
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Indefinite NHS England 'evaluation process' denies access to life-saving treatment for high risk patients
Arrhythmia Alliance is calling on NHS England to reconsider its 'Commissioning through Evaluation' (CtE) process, which has left hundreds of patients with AF (Atrial Fibrillation) at serious risk of suffering a debilitating or life-threatening AF-related stroke. The evaluation process has meant patients being denied access to potentially life-saving treatment with no guarantee when the process will be completed to allow access.
July 28, 2017
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Injectable Tissue Patch to Fix Broken Hearts
Scientists at the University of Toronto have developed a bandage-like patch that can be delivered into the heart through a needle, in combination with stem cells allowing for minimally invasive cardiac tissue repair, currently an impossible task.
August 15, 2017
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Increased arterial stiffness linked to restrictive spirometry pattern and reduced forced vital capacity
The association was present in both men and women, according to a new study
September 27, 2017
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Increased risk of atrial fibrillation with congenital heart disease
Patients with congenital heart disease are up to 85 times more likely to suffer from atrial fibrillation as adults. The researchers behind a study are now advocating more frequent screenings of the most vulnerable groups.
December 5, 2017
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Iron deficiency may raise heart disease risk
Recent research suggests that iron may have a protective effect against heart disease. These promising findings could pave the way for new treatments.
July 12, 2017
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Irregular Heartbeat Therapy: Harmful to Brain?
Small study shows higher rate of brain lesions in people receiving ablation for ventricular arrhythmias
January 24, 2017
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Is a Low-Salt Diet Always Healthy?
Study claims current guidelines are too restrictive when there's sufficient potassium intake
April 25, 2017
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Is there a link between A-fib and time spent working?
A study conducted on a very large population sample from four different countries suggests that people with long working hours are at increased risk of developing atrial fibrillation.
July 14, 2017
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IVF, ICSI pregnancies lead to increased risk of congenital heart defects in newborns
A new analysis of published studies found a 45% increased risk of congenital heart defects in newborns when women become pregnant via in vitro fertilization (IVF)/intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) than through spontaneous conception. The Ultrasound in Obstetrics and Gynecology analysis included 8 studies with 25,856 children obtained from IVF techniques and 287,995 children spontaneously conceived and a total of 2289 congenital heart defects.
November 22, 2017
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Misc. - J

Just 14 days of physical inactivity can raise risk of chronic disease
It is well established that a lack of exercise can raise the risk of chronic disease, including type 2 Diabetes and heart disease. New research, however, finds that the risk of such conditions could increase with as little as 2 weeks of inactivity.
May 17, 2017
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Misc. - K

KardiaBand for The Apple Watch Records ECG, Detects Atrial Fibrillation
Watching the rhythm of your heart is getting quite a bit easier. AliveCor, the originators of the to-go ECG smartphone market, have announced FDA clearance of the KardiaBand single-lead ECG device for the Apple Watch.
November 29, 2017
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Knocking out lipid-modifying enzyme can boost post-heart attack healing, study shows
Two immune responses are important for recovery after a heart attack -; an acute inflammatory response that attracts leukocyte immune cells to remove dead tissue, followed by a resolving response that allows healing.
May 2, 2017
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Misc. - L

Larger women almost three times more likely to have atrial fibrillation
Atrial fibrillation affects millions of people worldwide and in the United States. new research suggests that women with a larger body surface area may have an increased risk of atrial fibrillation - a type of arrhythmia that can have serious cardiovascular consequences if left untreated.
April 7, 2017
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Leafy greens may contribute to a healthy heart
Kale, parsley, broccoli, and spinach: according to new research, these leafy green vegetables may hold even more health benefits than previously thought, as vitamin K - found in abundance in all four - may contribute to a healthy heart.
October 6, 2017
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Level of aerobic capacity determines future cardiovascular disease risk in children
Researchers from the CTS-158 GALENO group at the University of Cadiz, directed by professor Jose Castro Piñero, have been working for three years on an important multicenter study based on an analysis of the influence of physical activity on the development of cardiovascular disease, a study in which they have taken into account environmental, nutritional, emotional and genetic factors, among others.
November 30, 2017
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Lipid nanodisks provide a new way of producing hydrogen fuel
A U.S.-based team of researchers featuring MIPT scientists has assembled a nanoscale biological structure capable of producing hydrogen from water using light. They inserted a photosensitive protein into nanodiscs -- circular fragments of cell membrane composed of a lipid bilayer -- and enhanced the resultant structure with particles of titanium dioxide, a photocatalyst.
September 5, 2017
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Living at high altitudes linked to lower risk of developing Metabolic Syndrome
Could something as simple as the geographic area in which you live contribute to your risk of developing heart disease and diabetes, or suffering a stroke?
January 30, 2017
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Local anesthesia before inserting venous cannula clearly reduces sensation of pain
Patients who are given a local anesthetic before having a venous cannula inserted have a clearly reduced sensation of pain when larger gauge cannulas are used. Compared with intradermal lidocaine infusion, the use of vapocoolant spray has the advantage that the rate of venepuncture failures is lower.
October 13, 2017
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Long-term diabetes complication: Liver inflammation raises cholesterol levels
Inflammatory processes in the liver lead to elevated cholesterol levels in people with diabetes, thus promoting subsequent vascular diseases. The new research presents a previously unknown mechanism.
August 14, 2017
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Long-term use of testosterone therapy in hypogonadal men may reduce risk of death from CV disease
Despite the continued controversy surrounding the use of testosterone in men who have testosterone deficiency (hypogonadism), a new study has found that long-term use of testosterone therapy not only improves vigor and vitality, but may reduce the risk of death due to cardiovascular (CV) disease.
February 13, 2017
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Low serum calcium levels linked to increased risk of sudden cardiac arrest
Sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) is fatal for over 90% of patients, and more than half of men and close to 70% of women who die of SCA have no clinical history of heart disease prior to this cardiac event. It is one of the leading causes of death in the United States and kills more people than any single cancer.
October 5, 2017
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Low-income childhood may affect adult heart health
New research reveals that a low-income family background in childhood is linked to two heart problems in middle age. The two heart problems are increased left ventricular mass and diastolic dysfunction, which are both known to be associated with heart failure.
June 27, 2017
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Misc. - M

Magnets and Nanoparticles for On-Demand Leaky Vessels
Scientists at Rice University have developed a method to open gaps between the endothelial cells that line blood vessels using a magnetic field and iron oxide nanoparticles. The gaps close by themselves after the researchers remove the magnets. They hope that the concept could be used to help deliver larger therapeutic molecules like proteins to specific sites in the body.
June 9, 2017
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Male Triathletes May Be Harming Their Hearts
Men who compete in triathlons could be putting their hearts at risk, a new study contends.
November 21, 2017
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Male-pattern baldness and premature graying associated with risk of early heart disease
Both were stronger risk factors than obesity
November 30, 2017
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Many don't Know how to Handle High Cholesterol
Survey found they know it raises heart risks, but are confused, discouraged about how to lower it
April 11, 2017
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Many good years after heart bypass surgery, but something happens after ten years
The probability of continuing your life following bypass surgery is close to being the same as for the population in general - once a patient has completed the procedure. But a study from Aarhus, Denmark, shows that mortality increases after 8-10 years.
June 7, 2017
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Many NFL Players Found to Have Enlarged Aortas
Former professional football players are at increased risk for an enlarged aorta, which can lead to a life-threatening bulge in the artery, a new study reports.
November 29, 2017
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Many older adults may not be receiving AED treatment after potential epilepsy diagnosis
Many older adults with newly diagnosed epilepsy in the United States are being prescribed older anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs), and only half begin treatment with AEDs within the first 30 days of a potential epilepsy diagnosis.
February 8, 2017
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Many Young Adults not Treating High Cholesterol
Guidelines suggest statins could help ward off heart trouble, but too many people are missing out, study finds
January 4, 2017
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Marijuana 'may be worse than cigarettes for cardiovascular health'
People who use marijuana may be three times more likely to die from high blood pressure than non-users of the drug, a new study finds.
August 9, 2017
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Marijuana use associated with increased risk of stroke, heart failure
As marijuana legalization spreads, better understanding of side effects is needed
March 9, 2017
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Marijuana use may raise stroke, heart failure risk
In the United States, marijuana is becoming increasingly legalized for medicinal or recreational purposes. However, new research warns of the harms of marijuana use after finding that the drug may have negative implications for cardiovascular health.
March 10, 2017
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Married patients with heart disease have better survival rates
Marriage is a vital factor affecting the survival of patients who have had a heart attack, as well as the survival of patients with the most important risk factors.
August 28, 2017
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Marital ups and downs may impact men's heart health
Recently published research concludes that risk factors for heart health are impacted by ebbs and flows in the quality of marital relationships--at least in men.
October 10, 2017
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Meat-Linked Chemical Levels Tied to Heart Risks
Produced when meat, eggs and dairy are digested, TMAO may trigger plaque buildup in vessels, researchers explain
January 11, 2017
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Mechanical heart valves lead to fewer infections than biological prosthesis
Infections in surgically implanted heart valves are more common in patients who have been given a biological prosthetic valve than in those with a mechanical one, a study from Karolinska Institutet published today in the journal Circulation shows.
July 18, 2017
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Meditation may help to lower heart disease risk
A new scientific statement from the American Heart Association has concluded that meditation may help to lower heart disease risk, but that adopting a heart-healthy lifestyle and adhering to medical advice should remain the primary prevention strategies.
September 29, 2017
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Medications, PCI equally beneficial for treating complete blockage in heart's arteries
In patients with a complete blockage in the heart's arteries that persists over time, treatment with medications alone was found to be equal to percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), a procedure to open blocked arteries, in terms of major adverse events over three years, according to a study presented at the American College of Cardiology's 66th Annual Scientific Session.
March 19, 2017
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Meds Rooted in Ancient China May Help Heart
But U.S. experts greet report with caution, urge further research
June 12, 2017
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Medtronic's Attain Stability Quad MRI SureScan Cardiac Lead Cleared in Europe
Medtronic won CE Mark approval to introduce its Attain Stability Quad MRI SureScan left heart lead in Europe. The device works with the company's quadripolar cardiac resynchronization therapy-defibrillators (CRT-D) and CRT-pacemakers (CRT-P) and is not only a conduit for electric current, but also a tool for the electricity to better target cardiac tissue.
August 23, 2017
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Medtronic's CoreValve Evolut Transcatheter Aortic Valves Now Approved for Intermediate Risk Patients
Medtronic has announced that its CoreValve Evolut transcatheter aortic valve replacement platform, consisting of CoreValve, CoreValve Evolut R, CoreValve Evolut PRO, is now FDA approved for patients with "symptomatic severe aortic stenosis who are at an intermediate risk for open-heart surgery." Previously, the products were only approved for high and extremely risky patients that are not good candidates for an open-heart surgery.
July 11, 2017
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Medtronic's HeartWare HVAD Heart Pump Approved for Rest of Life Use
Medtronic's HeartWare HVAD system, a left ventricular assist device, has been approved by the FDA as a "destination therapy" for those with advanced heart failure that cannot receive a transplanted heart.
September 29, 2017
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Medtronic's Micra Pacemaker Survives Flight to Space
This is an update to a recent story of ours on the first pacemaker in space. The Medtronic Micra is the smallest pacemaker currently available. It's so small that it's delivered via a catheter and attached to the endocardium of the heart, where its internal battery paces the heart for years. It's certainly an incredible piece of technology, but a high school student had a wild idea of testing whether such a fine piece of electronics can withstand a flight into space.
July 6, 2017
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Medtronics New Avalus Pericardial Aortic Surgical Valve Approved in U.S. and Europe
Medtronic today announced FDA approval and European CE marking of the company's Avalus pericardial aortic surgical valve. The device is currently the only stented surgical aortic valve that does not limit patients' ability to undergo MRI scans, and whole body scans are allowed as there are absolutely no restrictions and no related safety concerns.
August 2, 2017
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'Metabolically healthy obese' at twice the risk of heart disease
A new study suggests that overweight and obese people who have been deemed otherwise healthy are actually at an increased risk of developing coronary heart disease.
August 15, 2017
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Midlife cardiovascular risk factors may increase chances of dementia
NIH funded study supports link between cognition and vascular health.
August 7, 2017
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Midlife cardiovascular risk factors may increase chances of dementia
Study supports link between cognition and vascular health
August 7, 2017
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Mildly obese people more likely to survive, fare better after major heart attack
People who survive a major heart attack often do better in the years afterward if they're mildly obese, a study by UT Southwestern Medical Center cardiologists showed.
June 29, 2017
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Mindfulness may help mothers cope with stress when their babies have a heart condition
Working with mothers, nurse researchers form CHOP and Penn Nursing analyze coping techniques, including positive focus on here and now
November 2, 2017
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Mitral valve prolapse: What you need to know
Mitral valve prolapse occurs when the mitral valve of the heart doesn't work properly. Rather than closing tightly, the flaps of the valve billow into the left atrium of the heart.
July 18, 2017
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Mitochondrial DNA copy number appears to be predictive of sudden cardiac death, heart attacks
Johns Hopkins researchers report that the level, or "copy number," of mitochondrial DNA--genetic information stored not in a cell's nucleus but in the body's energy-creating mitochondria--is a novel and distinct biomarker that is able to predict the risk of heart attacks and sudden cardiac deaths a decade or more before they happen. In the future, testing blood for this genetic information could not only help physicians more accurately predict a risk for life-threatening cardiac events, but also inform decisions to begin--or avoid--treatment with statins and other drugs.
October 11, 2017
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Modifying gene expression may provide path to preventive treatments for heart failure, study suggests
Heart failure refers to a condition in which heart muscle becomes weakened over time, making it increasingly difficult for the heart to pump blood through the body like it should.
August 4, 2017
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Monitoring your blood pressure? Careful, 70% of home devices may be inaccurate
The error range is enough to sway decisions about taking or stopping medication.
June 9, 2017
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Multivitamins May not Help Men's Hearts
Study found no preventive benefit, but more research might still be warranted
April 7, 2017
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Muscles out of a spray can
An artificial heart would be an absolute lifesaver for people with cardiac failure. However, to recreate the complex organ in the laboratory, one would first need to work out how to grow multi-layered, living tissues.
November 7, 2017
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Misc. - N

Nanocoated stent could revolutionize cardiovascular disease treatment
It is common for blockages to develop in arteries that carry blood to the heart, which can lead to heart attack and other serious heart diseases. Stents are small, expandable metal mesh tubes that are inserted in blocked heart arteries during a heart catheterization procedure to improve blood flow to the heart muscle.
December 14, 2017
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Nanoparticle-Loaded Cells Could Help Improve Heart Function Following Myocardial Infarction
How can damaged cardiac tissue following a heart attack best be treated with replacement muscle cells? A team of researchers under the guidance of the University of Bonn is now presenting a novel approach on mice: muscle replacement cells loaded with magnetic nanoparticles will take over the function of the damaged tissue.
December 4, 2017
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Narrative expressive writing after divorce could improve cardiovascular health
Journaling after divorce could improve your cardiovascular health -- but only if you do it in a way that tells a story, new University of Arizona research suggests.
May 8, 2017
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Natural remedies for high cholesterol levels
Cholesterol is a fatty substance in the blood. There are two types of cholesterol. A correct balance between the two is needed for good health.
May 19, 2017
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Need to cut down on salt? Try something spicy instead
New research published in the journal Hypertension shows that eating spicy food may "trick" the brain into craving less salt.
October 31, 2017
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New app helps heart patients with drug-eluting stents adhere to medications, study finds
A tablet computer application helped heart patients with drug-eluting stents take their medications correctly, a study has found.
January 20, 2017
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New Automatic Technique to Measure Blood Pressure with Greater Accuracy
Existing and commonly used automatic blood pressure meters suffer from inaccuracies. An old fashioned auscultatory blood pressure test can avoid inaccurate results, but it has to be performed by a medical professional.
August 14, 2017
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New bed sensors can warn older adults of impending heart problems
Congestive heart failure is one of the most common reasons for hospital admissions among those 65 years old and older, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. to help reduce these admissions and the strain they put on the healthcare system, researchers at the University of Missouri have developed bed sensors than can warn older adults of impending heart problems.
February 14, 2017
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New blood test detects stroke and heart attack risk in lupus patients with no CVD symptoms
Introducing biomarker into clinical practice could enable more effective prevention of cardiovascular disease
June 16, 2017
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New cardiac catheter combines light and ultrasound to measure plaques
Biomedical engineers have combined intravascular ultrasound with fluorescence lifetime imaging in a single catheter probe that can image the tiny arteries of a living heart. The new catheter can simultaneously retrieve structural and biochemical information about arterial plaque that could more reliably predict heart attacks.
October 3, 2017
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New CardioFocus HeartLight Excalibur Balloon Cleared in Europe
CardioFocus, a company out of Marlborough, Massachusetts, won the European CE Mark to introduce its new HeartLight Excalibur Balloon for treatment of atrial fibrillation. The device is based on the company's previously FDA approved HeartLight ablation system, but is designed to make procedures easier and faster by improving the compliance of the balloon and by being able to ablate larger tissue targets than before.
September 29, 2017
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New class of cholesterol-lowering drug alongside statins can reduce risk of cardiovascular diseases
A new class of cholesterol-lowering drug has been found to help patients cut their risk of cardiovascular disease, stroke and heart attack.
March 17, 2017
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New congenital heart disease genes uncovered
Discoveries from 'Bench to Bassinet' investigators may help answer parents' questions about the genetic causes of heart conditions and long-term effects
October 9, 2017
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New drug could help prevent artery disease in high-risk patients
Researchers identify pharmaceutical approach to prevent vascular disease
December 21, 2016
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New heart attack treatment uses photosynthetic bacteria to make oxygen
Cyanobacteria lessened damage to rat hearts deprived of blood supply
June 14, 2017
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New heart disease risk genes point to flaws in blood vessel walls
Study aims to identify targets for cardiovascular treatments
May 23, 2017
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New Intravascular Catheter Views Plaques with Ultrasound and Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging
At University of California, Davis engineers managed to combine intravascular ultrasound with fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIm) inside a single catheter. The combined imaging modalities provide a new look inside of arteries, offering both a morphological picture as well as one that gives insight into the composition of plaques.
October 5, 2017
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New markers linked to recurrence of erratic heartbeats in some patients after ablation therapy
Ablation procedures restore a regular heartbeat in patients who have a dangerous, abnormal heart rhythm called atrial fibrillation. But it doesn't always work. Now, a new study suggests that certain molecules are associated with the recurrence of erratic heartbeats in some patients after ablation therapy.
March 19, 2017
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New method helps rule out heart valve infection
A risk assessment system in Sweden shows which patients, with a certain type of streptococcal bacteria in the blood, need to be examined for a heart valve infection -- a serious condition requiring prolonged medical treatment.
October 25, 2017
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New MyoVista hsECG device launched in the European Union for early detection of heart disease
Low-Cost Cardiac Screening Advancement Integrates Wavelet Signal Processing Technology to Improve Early Detection of Heart Disease
August 18, 2017
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New nanocluster MRI contrast agent tested on big animals
The top causes of death worldwide, ischemic heart diseases and stroke, together with another major source of illness, that is cancer, require proper imaging of blood vessels. A team formed by the Center for Nanoparticle Research, within the Institute for Basic Science, in collaboration with scientists at Anhui Provincial Hospital and Seoul National University Hospital, have tested a new non-toxic contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) that could be superior to the current mainstream dye, gadolinium.
July 31, 2017
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New Nuclear Tracer to Help Better Manage Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms
An abdominal aortic aneurysm can have a number of related causes, and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are one of those potential causes. MMP matrix enzymes have a useful role in a healthy body of breaking up the extracellular matrix during tissue growth, but sometimes they're overproduced and are related to various connective tissue disorders, including abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA). Their role is poorly understood in AAA formation, especially how to address an increase in MMPs clinically.
August 8, 2017
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New online tool can help clinicians quantify minimal risk in patients with stable chest pain
A two year follow-up on a study involving more than 10,000 people with stable chest pain finds that an online tool can accurately predict which patients are likely to have normal non-invasive tests and remain free of cardiac events. the study, published in JAMA Cardiology, could lead to better decision making by primary care doctors, by helping them identify patients at minimal risk for heart trouble.
February 15, 2017
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New optical clearing method helps analyze 3D structure of dangerous blood clots
A new technique that makes blood clots optically clear is allowing researchers to use powerful optical microscopy techniques to study the 3D structure of dangerous clots for the first time. Although blood clots stop bleeding after injury, clots that block blood flow can cause strokes and heart attacks.
July 17, 2017
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New partnership uses artificial intelligence methods to develop solutions for preventing early aging
Center for Healthy Aging at the University of Copenhagen today announced a research collaboration with a company specializing in artificial intelligence (AI) to develop solutions for preventing early aging. The aim of this partnership is to develop medicines to prevent and cure a broad range of diseases associated with aging such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and cardiovascular diseases.
August 1, 2017
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New position paper provides guidance on radiation safety for children with CAHD
Newly released recommendations for pediatric radiation safety will be discussed during the Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions (SCAI) 2017 Scientific Sessions in new Orleans. the position paper, "Radiation Safety in Children with Congenital and Acquired Heart Disease: a Scientific Position Statement on Multimodality Dose Optimization from the Image Gently Alliance," provides cardiologists, radiologists, pediatricians and internal medicine physicians guidance for treating pediatric patients with congenital and acquired heart disease (CAHD).
May 9, 2017
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New review addresses mysteries behind 'good' HDL cholesterol metabolism
A new review addresses the mysteries behind "good" HDL cholesterol and why boosting its levels does not necessarily provide protection from cardiovascular risk for patients. It appears that augmenting the function of HDL cholesterol, rather than its concentration, is key.
March 22, 2017
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New software program allows early detection of arterial calcification
Little exercise, fatty food and too many cigarettes - factors like these aid the onset of arterial calcification, also known as arteriosclerosis. If blood can no longer be pumped through arteries properly, this can lead to a heart attack or stroke.
November 6, 2017
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New study describes how gene-environment interaction leads to congenital heart defects
Infants of mothers with diabetes have a three- to five-fold increased risk of congenital heart defects. Such developmental defects are likely caused by a combination of genetic and environmental factors. However, the molecular mechanisms by which maternal diabetes disrupts normal heart development in genetically susceptible individuals remain unclear.
October 19, 2017
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New study reveals impact of race, gender and socioeconomic status on PCI outcomes
A first-of-its-kind study discovered that women and minorities who underwent a percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) are at a greater risk of experiencing recurrent cardiac events within the first year after their procedure compared to Caucasian men. Those outcomes may be attributable to their race, gender and socioeconomic status rather than the PCI procedure itself.
May 12, 2017
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New test measures blood concentrations of plasma ceramides to predict risk for heart attacks, strokes
A new type of blood test may help physicians identify which patients with and without evidence of coronary blockages are at risk for heart attacks and strokes. Even individuals with normal levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL), known as the so-called "bad" cholesterol, but still at risk, seem to be identified, according to Mayo Clinic research being presented at the American College of Cardiology's 66th Annual Scientific Session.
March 10, 2017
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Newborns with congenital heart disease show signs of brain impairment even before cardiac surgery
High-risk newborns have weaker functional connectivity between key regions of their developing brains
October 5, 2017
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Newer Blood Thinners Don't Raise Bleeding Risk
Risk is similar to warfarin, study reports
October 18, 2017
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Newly funded nanoparticle research project targets abdominal aortic aneurysms
One of the top ten killers for men older than 55 is the target of Clemson University research that could lead to a new life-saving therapy and a better way of telling whether surgery is necessary.
April 12, 2017
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Nine ways to raise blood pressure
While low blood pressure might seem like a good thing to have, a person's blood pressure can occassionally be too low and cause problems.
September 14, 2017
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Not All Plant Foods Are Equal
Analysis found that only healthy fruits, vegetables and grains guarded against heart disease
July 17, 2017
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Novel therapy rapidly and effectively reverses effect of oral blood thinner
At least 28 million prescriptions for blood thinners are filled by pharmacists yearly for the irregular heartbeat of atrial fibrillation, deep vein thrombosis, and other indications, according to the Department of Health and Human Services. However, on rare occasions, anticoagulants can present risks of accidental bleeding and hemorrhage or can delay emergency surgery. A newly completed phase III clinical study demonstrates the safety and efficacy of idarucizumab, a novel therapy that acts as an antidote to the blood thinner dabigatran.
July 11, 2017
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NSAIDs may raise heart attack risk in first week of use
When headache or back pain strikes, many of us turn to ibuprofen for some quick relief. a new study, however, finds that using this and other classes of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for as little as 1 week may increase the risk of heart attack.
May 10, 2017
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Nuts may protect against heart disease
A new study published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology looks at the impact of nut consumption on the risk of cardiovascular disease.
November 14, 2017
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NYU Langone Health launches new heart transplant program
The Transplant Institute at NYU Langone Health has launched a new heart transplant program-;the first new program of its kind in New York State in more than 15 years. Nader Moazami, MD, who achieved an international reputation for excellence leading the cardiac transplant program at Cleveland Clinic, has joined the faculty at NYU Langone to spearhead the new initiative.
December 11, 2017
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Misc. - O

Obesity linked to better outcomes following heart procedures: Confirmed
Research has confirmed a link between elevated body mass index (BMI) and patients having better survival outcomes following percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI).
August 2, 2017
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Obstructive sleep apnea might lead to irregular heartbeat
Patients with obstructive sleep apnea may be at greater risk of developing atrial fibrillation, or irregular heartbeat, new research finds.
May 23, 2017
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Older adults may not benefit from taking statins to prevent heart disease
While there is evidence to support older adults taking statins for secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease - such as to prevent a second heart attack or stroke - there is limited evidence on the risks and benefits of this age group taking the cholesterol-lowering medication to prevent a first cardiovascular event.
May 22, 2017
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ORBITA trial on heart stents for stable angina indicates placebo effect potential
A new study conducted by researchers at the Imperial College London suggests that the placebo effect experienced by patients who receive coronary artery stents might be larger than expected, even though stents themselves are life-saving.
November 6, 2017
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OU study identifies numeracy as decision delay risk factor for individuals experiencing ACS
In a recent study to determine why some individuals who experience symptoms for acute coronary syndrome decide to seek medical attention more quickly than others, a University of Oklahoma researcher has identified numeracy -- the ability to understand and apply numerical concepts as the primary decision delay risk factor for individuals experiencing the medical condition. Cardiovascular disease, which includes conditions such as acute coronary syndrome, is the number one killer worldwide responsible for about one in three deaths.
February 28, 2017
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Ozone exposure tied to cardiovascular risk
Exposure to ozone has long been linked to reductions in lung function. Now, a new study of adults in China reveals that it is also linked to cardiovascular changes that increase the risk of heart attack and stroke, and that these changes occur at levels below those of current environmental regulations.
July 18, 2017
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Misc. - P

Pain Tolerance Tied to 'Silent' Heart Attack Risk
Unusual symptoms include upper back or jaw pain, shortness of breath and nausea, cardiologist says
December 21, 2016
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Panasonic developing a new camera tech that can measure your heart rate
In the near future, there won't be a need for dedicated heart rate measuring hardware on your phone. Panasonic has announced that its developing a camera tech that can read your pulse just by looking at you.
February 28, 2017
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Paper test strip could help heart failure patients monitor their condition at home
Contrary to the condition's name, heart failure doesn't mean the heart has stopped pumping -- it's just not working at full strength. It can often be managed with medications and lifestyle changes, but its progression needs to be monitored closely. Now scientists have developed a new test strip that could potentially allow patients to do this at home for the first time.
May 24, 2017
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Paper test strip could help heart failure patients monitor their condition at home
Contrary to the condition's name, heart failure doesn't mean the heart has stopped pumping -- it's just not working at full strength. It can often be managed with medications and lifestyle changes, but its progression needs to be monitored closely. Now scientists have developed a new test strip that could potentially allow patients to do this at home for the first time.
May 24, 2017
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Paroxysmal atrial fibrillation: Causes, symptoms, and treatment
Atrial fibrillation, also known as AFib, is the most common form of arrhythmia, which is a condition where a person experiences heart rhythm problems.
March 10, 2017
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Patients with St. Jude pacemakers called in for firmware update
Patients using one of several types of implantable radio frequency-enabled pacemakers manufactured by St. Jude Medical will have to visit their healthcare provider to receive a firmware update that fixes several cybersecurity issues.
August 31, 2017
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Patients without calcium buildup in arteries have lower heart attack risk, research shows
Patients without calcium buildup in the coronary arteries had significantly lower risk of future heart attack or stroke despite other high risk factors such as diabetes, high blood pressure, or bad cholesterol levels, new research from UT Southwestern cardiologists shows.
August 8, 2017
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Penn researchers reveal new approach to restart replication in cardiomyocytes after heart attack
In mammals, including humans, the cells that contract the heart muscle and enable it to beat do not regenerate after injury. After a heart attack, there is a dramatic loss of these heart muscle cells and those that survive cannot effectively replicate. With fewer of these contractile cells, known as cardiomyocytes, the heart pumps less blood with each beat, leading to the increased mortality associated with heart disease.
November 29, 2017
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Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania
Cigarette smoking accounts for about one fifth of cases of coronary heart disease (CHD), one of the leading causes of death worldwide, but precisely how smoking leads to CHD has long been unclear. Now, a team has uncovered a molecule that may at least partly explain the smoking-CHD connection.
May 2, 2017
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PET/MR shows arterial CO2 as potent vasodilator for cardiac stress testing
Using PET/MR imaging, a new international study demonstrates that increases in partial pressure of arterial carbon dioxide (PaCO2) can safely and efficiently widen blood vessels of the heart during stress tests to help determine heart function.
June 5, 2017
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Philips announces results from clinical studies comparing iFR- and FFR-guided strategy for assessment of heart disease
Royal Philips today announced that the results from two large clinical trials comparing patient outcomes using instant wave-free ratio and fractional flow reserve in the diagnosis and treatment of heart disease have been published in the new England Journal of Medicine.
March 22, 2017
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Physical activity linked to decreased risk of heart disease and death from all causes in older adults
Being physically inactive--sitting for long periods of time--can be so harmful to your health that experts sometimes call it "sitting disease." In fact, worldwide, physical inactivity is estimated to cause some 3.2 million deaths a year.
January 5, 2017
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Physically active white men at high risk for plaque buildup in arteries
White men who exercise at high levels are 86 percent more likely than people who exercise at low levels to experience a buildup of plaque in the heart arteries by middle age, a new study suggests.
October 16, 2017
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Physicians recommend whole food, plant-based eating patterns for optimal heart health
Nutrition researcher Neal Barnard, M.D., F.A.C.C., president and founder of the nonprofit Physicians Committee, is one of 12 authors of "Journal of the American College of Cardiology, which recommends whole food, plant-based eating patterns for optimal heart health.
March 3, 2017
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Play It Smart: Stay in School for a Healthier Heart
College degree may reduce your risk of cardiac disease by one-third, study suggests
August 31, 2017
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Poor Diet Tied to Heart Disease, Diabetes Deaths
Study explores which foods and nutrients may be helpful or harmful
March 7, 2017
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Poor diet to blame for almost half of CVD deaths
It is well established that a poor diet can raise the risk of cardiovascular death. new research, however, sheds light on the leading dietary risk factors for death from cardiovascular disease, as well as how many cardiovascular deaths these risk factors equate to.
March 10, 2017
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Potassium may help to prevent heart disease
Spinach, carrots, oranges, and bananas are just some fruits and vegetables that are rich in potassium. According to a new study, we may want to consider increasing our intake of such foods; they could help to protect us against heart disease.
October 5, 2017
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Prevalence of atrial fibrillation in haemodialysis patients higher than previously thought
Atrial fibrillation, which is the most common cardiac arrhythmia, is an important risk factor for strokes. a multi-centre study led by MedUni Vienna shows that the prevalence of atrial fibrillation in haemodialysis patients in Vienna is significantly higher than previously thought. Moreover, only half of the patients affected are treated with an anticoagulant.
January 16, 2017
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Prevalence of high blood pressure found to be six times higher among obese Hispanic adolescents
Obesity raises the prevalence of high blood pressure among adolescents but the increase is particularly pronounced among Hispanics compared to white, African-American or Asian ethnic groups, according to a study by researchers at McGovern Medical School at the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth).
April 11, 2017
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Promising new drug may offer effective treatment for heart failure patients
Heart failure patients who are getting by on existing drug therapies can look forward to a far more effective medicine in the next five years or so, thanks to University of Alberta researchers.
March 8, 2017
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Protein 'tricks heart' into healthy growth without exercise
A protein called cardiotrophin 1 might be an effective treatment for heart failure, according to researchers who found that it tricks the heart into growing in a healthy way. This growth is reversible, similar to that which occurs in response to endurance exercise or pregnancy.
August 8, 2017
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Pure hypercholesterolemia: Causes, symptoms, and treatment
Pure hypercholesterolemia or familial hypercholesterolemia is a condition where a person has high cholesterol levels due to a genetic abnormality.
March 3, 2017
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Misc. - R

Racial Gap Narrows for Survival of Hospitalized Cardiac Arrest Patients
Difference stems from resuscitation, researchers report
August 9, 2017
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Racial make-up of neighborhood impacts care and outcomes in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients
Individuals who experienced an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) in neighborhoods with higher percentages of black residents had lower rates of bystander CPR and defibrillator use and were less likely to survive compared to patients who experienced an OHCA in predominantly white neighborhoods, according to a study published by JAMA Cardiology.
August 30, 2017
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Radiation therapy can be used to treat patients with life-threatening heart rhythm
Radiation therapy often is used to treat cancer patients. Now, doctors at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have shown that radiation therapy - aimed directly at the heart -; can be used to treat patients with a life-threatening heart rhythm. They treated five patients who had irregular heart rhythms, called ventricular tachycardia, at the School of Medicine.
December 14, 2017
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Raised blood platelet levels 'strong predictor' of cancer
Having a high blood platelet count is a strong predictor of cancer and should be urgently investigated to save lives, according to a large-scale study.
May 23, 2017
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Rapid blood pressure drops in middle age linked to dementia in old age
Temporary episodes of dizziness or light-headedness when standing could reduce blood flow to the brain with lasting impacts
March 10, 2017
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Rapid blood test that spots heart attack risk could improve treatment of people with chest pain
A low-cost, rapid blood test that spots whether people are at risk of a heart attack could improve the treatment of people with chest pain at emergency departments around the world, a study suggests.
November 13, 2017
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Real-world study of robotic PCI shows high success rates for patients across multiple sites
The largest real-world study of robotic percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) demonstrated clinical and technical success for patients across multiple sites using multiple operators. Results from the PRECISION trial (Efficacy and Safety Outcomes of Radial- vs Femoral-Access Robotic Percutaneous Coronary Intervention: Final Results of the Multicenter PRECISION Registry) were presented today as a late-breaking clinical trial at the Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions (SCAI) 2017 Scientific Sessions in new Orleans.
May 12, 2017
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Recall: Abbott Pacemakers for Hacking Threat
The FDA announced a voluntary recall for a brand of pacemakers over concerns the devices' software could be hacked.
September 5, 2017
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'Red Yeast Rice' Statin Alternative not Harmless
The supplements linked to muscle pain, other adverse effects similar to statins
January 24, 2017
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Reduced kidney function is major contributor of cardiovascular deaths
A new analysis indicates that by 2013, cardiovascular deaths attributed to reduced kidney function outnumbered kidney failure deaths throughout the world. the findings, which appear in an upcoming issue of the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology (JASN), provide insights on the true impact of kidney disease on societies and underscore the importance of screening for kidney disease.
April 17, 2017
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Regular sauna use could slash men's hypertension risk
Sauna bathing may be more than just a relaxing pastime; a new study finds that regular sauna use could almost halve men's risk of developing high blood pressure.
October 2, 2017
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Repairing damaged hearts with self-healing heart cells
Researchers discover a new molecule, 'Singheart,' that may hold the key to triggering the regeneration and repair of damaged heart cells
August 21, 2017
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Research finds high prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors among urban population in Nepal
Changing life-style in urban areas is increasing the risk of heart diseases. Recent research done in an urban population of Nepal's capital Kathmandu to assess their risk factors to cardio vascular diseases has found that the risk factors are high.
August 16, 2017
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Research shows the Apple watch can detect an early sign of heart disease
A new study indicates that the Apple Watch's heart rate sensor can accurately recognize atrial fibrillation, which often has no symptoms but can lead to stroke.
May 11, 2017
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Research will explore biological mechanisms triggered by air pollution exposure during pregnancy
New research will seek to understand the biological mechanisms that are triggered by exposure to air pollution during pregnancy and lead to lower birth weight in newborns, placing them at greater risk for chronic conditions such as coronary heart disease and hypertension later in life. The research will be conducted in Beijing by an international team of researchers.
October 10, 2017
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Researchers compare shunts and stents to maintain blood flow in infants with heart disease
Infants with various forms of congenital heart disease require a stable source of blood flow to their lungs in order to survive until a more definitive operation can be performed. In a recent study, pediatric researchers compared two methods to provide that flow: a shunt to reroute blood and an implanted stent to maintain an open path for blood flow.
November 21, 2017
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Researchers create 3-D beating heart
Matters of the heart can be complicated, but York University scientists have found a way to create 3D heart tissue that beats in synchronized harmony, like a heart in love, that will lead to better understanding of cardiac health and improved treatments.
February 10, 2017
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Researchers develop 'living diode' using cardiac muscle cells
Scientists are one step closer to mimicking the way biological systems interact and process information in the body a vital step toward developing new forms of biorobotics and novel treatment approaches for several muscle-related health problems such as muscular degenerative disorders, arrhythmia and limb loss.
February 14, 2017
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Researchers develop new biomedical polymer to treat atherosclerosis
Researchers at Ben-Gurion University (BGU) and the Sheba Medical Center have developed a new therapy to treat atherosclerosis and prevent heart failure with a new biomedical polymer that reduces arterial plaque and inflammation in the cardiovascular system.
May 22, 2017
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Researchers discover direct link between calcium and cholesterol
It's well known that calcium is essential for strong bones and teeth, but new research shows it also plays a key role in moderating another important aspect of health--cholesterol.
July 26, 2017
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Researchers discover mitochondrial "circuit breaker' that protects heart from damage
Two newly identified mechanisms may lead to better understanding of disease, new treatments.
April 18, 2017
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Researchers discover potential way to trigger regeneration, repair of damaged heart cells
New research has discovered a potential means to trigger damaged heart cells to self-heal. The discovery could lead to groundbreaking forms of treatment for heart diseases. For the first time, researchers have identified a long non-coding ribonucleic acid (ncRNA) that regulates genes controlling the ability of heart cells to undergo repair or regeneration.
August 21, 2017
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Researchers examine combined impact of BMI and physical activity on cardiovascular disease
The benefits of physical activity may outweigh the impact of overweight and obesity on cardiovascular disease in middle-aged and elderly people, according to research published today in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology. the observational study was conducted in more than 5,000 people aged 55 years and older who were followed-up for 15 years.
March 1, 2017
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Researchers find correlation between shorter telomeres and presence of heart failure
Each cell in the average human body contains 23 pairs of chromosomes, with four telomeres on each pair. Telomeres cover the end of the chromosome, protecting it from deterioration or fusion with adjacent chromosomes, much like the plastic tip at the end of a shoelace protects it from unraveling. While there is a length range for classifying a healthy telomere, researchers found, for the first time ever, that people with heart failure have shorter telomeres within the cells that make up the heart muscle (known as cardiomyocytes).
September 12, 2017
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Researchers find link between harmful chemicals and chronic diseases in men
Chemicals found in everyday plastics materials are linked to cardiovascular disease, type-2 diabetes and high blood pressure in men, according to Australian researchers.
July 12, 2017
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Researchers identify gene variants linked to both type 2 diabetes and CHD risk
Type 2 diabetes (T2D) has become a global epidemic affecting more than 380 million people worldwide; yet there are knowledge gaps in understanding the etiology of type-2 diabetes. T2D is also a significant risk factor for coronary heart disease (CHD), but the biological pathways that explain the connection have remained somewhat murky.
September 4, 2017
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Researchers look inside dangerous blood clots with optical clearing technique
A new technique that makes blood clots optically clear is allowing researchers to use powerful optical microscopy techniques to study the 3D structure of dangerous clots for the first time. Although blood clots stop bleeding after injury, clots that block blood flow can cause strokes and heart attacks.
July 17, 2017
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Researchers successfully treat cardiogenic shock using percutaneous auxiliary artificial heart
The Cardiovascular Surgery Group at Osaka University succeeded in minimally invasive treatment of a patient with acute heart failure due to medical treatment-resistant cardiogenic shock by making use of Impella, a percutaneous auxiliary artificial heart, for the first time in Japan. This method is anticipated as a new therapy for treating patients with acute heart failure due to medical treatment-resistant cardiogenic shock.
October 31, 2017
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Researchers uncover novel mechanism of beta-blockers in preventing progression of heart failure
Beta-blocker drugs serve a key role in the treatment of heart failure, preventing bombardment of the heart by catecholamines - substances like epinephrine and norepinephrine - which overexcite and stress the heart. But not all heart failure patients respond to beta-blockers, for reasons that have been unclear. Now, in new work, researchers at the Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University (LKSOM) show that dysfunction of beta-adrenergic receptor 3- a novel beta-blocker target - and consequent decreases in a critical cardioprotective phospholipid may be to blame.
July 4, 2017
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Researchers uncover novel role for Gata4 in reducing post-heart attack fibrosis
During a heart attack, blood stops flowing into the heart; starved for oxygen, part of the heart muscle dies. The heart muscle does not regenerate; instead it replaces dead tissue with scars made of cells called fibroblasts that do not help the heart pump. The heart weakens; most people who had a severe heart attack will develop heart failure, which remains the leading cause of mortality from heart disease.
August 14, 2017
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Researchers use Syngene's G:BOX Chemi XRQ image analysis system in cardiac research
Syngene, a world-leading manufacturer of image analysis solutions is delighted to announce that the G:BOX Chemi XRQ high resolution, multi-application image analysis system is being successfully used at the Lithuanian University of Health Sciences Academy of Medicine to study molecular mechanisms of cardiac stem cell function which could help in developing stem cell therapies for heart repair.
March 17, 2017
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Respiratory infections raise heart attack risk by 17 times
Every year, hundreds of thousands of people have a heart attack. new research suggests that both mild and severe respiratory infections might make some people more susceptible to heart attacks.
May 15, 2017
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Restriction on trans fats in foods could reduce rates of heart attack and stroke
People living in areas that restrict trans fats in foods had fewer hospitalizations for heart attack and stroke compared to residents in areas without restrictions, according to a study led by a Yale researcher. this finding suggests the benefit of limiting trans fats could have widespread impact as trans fat restrictions are set to expand nationwide.
April 12, 2017
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Rice bioengineers reveal how heart valves use different strategies to handle oxygen starvation
As the valves in a heart stretch with each beat, their cells take in life-giving oxygen. But if the supply is cut off, aortic and mitral valves use different strategies to compensate, according to Rice University scientists.
December 21, 2016
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Right ventricular hypertrophy: Causes and complications
Right ventricular hypertrophy is a heart disorder characterized by thickening of the walls of the right ventricle. It can be caused by excessive stress on the right ventricle.
August 16, 2017
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Risk of a fatty heart linked to race, type of weight gain in middle-aged women
A woman's race and where on her body she packs on pounds at midlife could give her doctor valuable clues to her likelihood of having greater volumes of heart fat, a potential risk factor for heart disease, according to new research.
August 2, 2017
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Rule could take one-third of chest pain patients off emergency department heart monitors
Researchers have validated a rule that could safely take a third of chest pain patients in the emergency department off of heart monitors, according to a study. Implementing this rule could free up these monitored beds for sicker patients and reduce wait times.
January 30, 2017
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Misc. - S

Safe Delivery of Therapeutic Genes by DNA Barcoding
Researchers used small snippets of DNA as barcodes to develop a new technique for rapidly screening the capability of nanoparticles to selectively deliver therapeutic genes to particular organs of the body. this new technique succeeded in accelerating the development and use of gene therapies for Parkinson™ disease, cancer and heart disease.
February 8, 2017
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Salt raises blood pressure, but our gut bacteria can stop it
It's a known fact that too much salt can increase blood pressure. But new research brings gut bacteria into the mix, and some good news along with it: probiotics may help to reverse the harmful effects of excessive salt.
November 16, 2017
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SBIR Fast-Track grant to fund study on new drug that targets cardiovascular diseases
The Exscien Corporation of Louisville, KY, in conjunction with LSU Health New Orleans Cardiovascular Center of Excellence, has been awarded an SBIR Fast-Track grant in the amount of $3.7 million over three years by the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute. The funding will be used to study the company's first in a new class of drugs that repairs DNA damage to reduce cardiac tissue injury and improve outcomes in cardiovascular diseases.
August 14, 2017
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SCAD: the Heart Attack That's Striking Young Women
Meghan Scheiber was in the middle of a 60-hour workweek when the call came: her 2-year-old son was sick at day care and needed to be taken home.
January 30, 2017
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Scientists aim to offer better treatment for acute heart failure using ultrasound evaluation
A new clinical study of the German Centre for Cardiovascular Research (DZHK) is examining whether an ultrasound evaluation of the inferior vena cava in acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF) with congestion can be implemented in hospitals' everyday routine and also be conducted in a sufficiently large number of patients. In the long term, the scientists want to offer patients a more targeted and better treatment with the aid of this ultrasound evaluation.
April 28, 2017
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Scientists develop way of producing 3D data to show cardiac conduction system in detail
A pioneering new study is set to help surgeons repair hearts without damaging precious tissue.
August 4, 2017
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Scientists discover receptor protein that promotes chronic heart failure
Researchers in Japan have identified a receptor protein on the surface of heart cells that promotes chronic heart failure. The study, "Corticotropin releasing hormone receptor 2 exacerbates chronic cardiac dysfunction," which will be published May 26 in The Journal of Experimental Medicine, suggests that inhibiting this protein could help treat a disease that affects more than 20 million people worldwide.
May 26, 2017
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Scientists Have Opened the Door to Biological Pacemaker Therapy
Throughout life each heart beat is regulated primarily by a specialized tissue called the sinoatrial node. Unfortunately, this natural pacemaker's ability to maintain the heart rate properly can be disrupted by a number of issues including congenital defects, aging, or ischemic heart disease. Recent work produced by researchers in Dr. Gordon Keller's lab at the University of Toronto may lead to new therapies based on natural pacemaker cells grown in the lab.
December 21, 2016
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Scientists Keep Bits of Hearts Alive Under High Speed Cameras to Study Arrhythmias
Detecting the source of errant electric signals in the heart that cause cardiac arrhythmias, as well as understanding what causes them, has been a notoriously difficult challenge for both physicians and researchers. This is because the heart is difficult to study, but researchers at Ohio State University have come up with a new technique that keeps myocardial tissue beating and alive in vitro long enough to study using video cameras.
June 8, 2017
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Scientists reveal Connshing syndrome as new cause of hypertension
Research led by scientists at the University of Birmingham has revealed a new cause of high blood pressure which could lead to major changes in managing the disease.
April 21, 2017
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Scientists show that human heart's sinoatrial node is hardwired with backup system
There's good news when it comes to our heart's sinoatrial node (SAN), the body's natural pacemaker. Scientists at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center have shown the human SAN is hardwired with a backup system -- three diverse regions of pacemakers acting as batteries and up to five conduction pathways that act as wires to connect the signal to the atria. This built-in redundancy maintains consistent heart rhythm, even under trying conditions.
July 27, 2017
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Screening for vascular disease saves one life for every 169 patients assessed
A novel screening program for vascular disease saves one life for every 169 men assessed, according to new research. The combined screening for abdominal aortic aneurysm, peripheral artery disease, and hypertension gained more living years for lower costs than European cancer screening programs.
August 28, 2017
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Screening the dark genome for disease
Researchers have developed a method to swiftly screen the non-coding DNA of the human genome for links to diseases that are driven by changes in gene regulation. the technique could revolutionize modern medicine's understanding of the genetically inherited risks of developing heart disease, diabetes, cancer, neurological disorders and others, and lead to new treatments.
April 3, 2017
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Severe heart failure may be reversible
Scientists may have discovered a way of reversing heart failure by getting heart muscle to regenerate itself.
October 5, 2017
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Shimadzu announces release of new Cannabis Analyzer for Potency at Pittcon 2017
Shimadzu Scientific Instruments (SSI) announces the release of its new Cannabis Analyzer for Potency. this high performance liquid chromatograph (HPLC) is the first-ever instrument designed specifically for quantitative determination of cannabinoid content. with the Cannabis Analyzer for Potency, operators are now able to produce accurate results with ease, regardless of cannabis testing knowledge or chromatography experience.
March 7, 2017
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Short, intense bursts of stair climbing can provide major benefits for heart health
There are no more excuses for being out of shape. Researchers at McMaster University have found that short, intense bursts of stair climbing, which can be done virtually anywhere, have major benefits for heart health.
February 7, 2017
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Skin plays role in helping regulate blood pressure and heart rate, say scientists
Skin plays a surprising role in helping regulate blood pressure and heart rate, according to scientists at the University of Cambridge and the Karolinska Institute, Sweden. While this discovery was made in mice, the researchers believe it is likely to be true also in humans.
October 25, 2017
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Sildenafil should be avoided in valve disease with residual pulmonary hypertension, study suggests
Sildenafil should not be used to treat residual hypertension in patients with valvular heart disease, according to new research. The off-label use of the drug led to worse clinical outcomes including a doubled risk of hospitalization compared to placebo.
August 28, 2017
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Simple blood test could help identify patients at greater risk of cardiac event after orthopedic surgery
A new study published today in the HSS Journal, the leading journal on musculoskeletal research, found the incidence of myocardial ischemia (defined by an elevated troponin level) after major orthopedic surgery in patients with cardiac risk factors is high, although the incidence of serious cardiac complications remains low. Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) researchers recommend a simple blood test to measure troponin, an enzyme known to play a role in cardiac complications, to help identify patients who are at greater risk of a cardiac event following surgery.
July 31, 2017
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Simple treatment leads to sustained virological response in patients with thalassaemia and HCV
Many individuals with the blood disorder thalassaemia also carry the hepatitis C virus (HCV) due to contaminated transfusions before 1990. Due to the co-existence of iron overload (from repeated blood transfusions), these patients are at increased risk of developing liver cancer. A new study indicates that treatment with a combination of sofosbuvir and ledipasvir as a once a day single pill leads to a sustained virological response in 98% of patients with thalassaemia and HCV.
June 29, 2017
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Single dose of siRNA molecule offers protection against heart attack and stroke in high-risk patients
Even a single dose of a specific ribonucleic acid molecule, known as a small interfering RNA (siRNA), offers patients at high risk of cardiovascular disease long-lasting protection against high LDL cholesterol - one of the main risk factors for heart attack and stroke.
March 30, 2017
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Skin may regulate blood pressure, study finds
When it comes to high blood pressure, a lack of exercise and a poor diet are often the primary suspects. A new study, however, finds that our skin may play a significant role in the development of the condition.
October 26, 2017
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Skipping breakfast associated with hardening of the arteries
Skipping breakfast is associated with an increased risk of atherosclerosis, or the hardening and narrowing of arteries due to a build-up of plaque, according to research.
October 2, 2017
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Skipping breakfast may increase the risk of atherosclerosis, study finds
A new study published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology indicated that skipping breakfast is linked with an augmented risk of atherosclerosis -- a condition where the arteries are narrowed or hardened because of the building up of plague.
October 3, 2017
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Small molecule prevents blood clots without increasing bleeding risk
Breakthrough study finds novel mechanism behind blood clots that could help prevent heart attacks and strokes
May 31, 2017
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Snared by New Blood Pressure Guidelines. Now What?
Nearly half of Americans have high blood pressure under guidelines published last week, which lowered the threshold for the chronic condition.
November 21, 2017
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Sleeping too much or too little increases risk of dying from heart disease
Too much or too little sleep is linked with an increased risk of certain types of cardiovascular disease. Women and the elderly are particularly at risk.
March 8, 2016
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Slow walkers could be at higher risk of heart disease, say researchers
A team of researchers at the NIHR Leicester Biomedical Research Centre, UK - a partnership between Leicester's Hospitals, the University of Leicester and Loughborough University - has concluded that middle-aged people who report that they are slow walkers could be at higher risk of heart disease compared to the general population.
August 29, 2017
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Slow walking pace is good predictor of heart-related deaths
Middle-aged people who report that they are slow walkers could be at higher risk of heart disease compared to the general population
August 29, 2017
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SMH Cardiology Services | Cardiac Surgery/Critical Care Services
Slidell Memorial is the most experienced in cardiology services on the Northshore, consistently being first to offer new, innovative services in cardiac care.
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Social smoking carries same heart-disease risks as everyday habit
Social smokers' risk for high blood pressure and high cholesterol is identical to those who light up every day, new research has found.
May 3, 2017
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'Spray painting' shows promise as minimally invasive way to patch up the heart
Animal studies suggest that applying a cardiac patch made of a regenerative polymer scaffold onto the surface of the heart could be an effective way to preserve heart function after a heart attack. However, such a procedure would most likely require open-chest surgery, which is traumatic and presents a major barrier to it being used in human patients.
March 22, 2017
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Sports-related concussion causes short-term impairment of cardiovascular system, study finds
A new study finds that concussion causes short-term impairment of the cardiovascular system but that these cardiovascular symptoms typically resolve within three days of the injury. the article is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology"Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology.
February 9, 2017
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Statin medications can cause necrotizing myopathy in some patients
Statin medications, such as Crestor, Lipitor, and other lipid-lowering medications, have been prescribed increasingly in recent years to reduce cardiovascular disease and mortality in high risk individuals. Many doctors now recommend these medications even for patients who have never demonstrated a cardiac risk.
June 6, 2017
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Statins Help Healthy People Lower Their 'Bad' Cholesterol
Study found taking them lowered risk of heart disease, death in those with high LDL levels
September 12, 2017
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Statins may improve heart structure, function
Although the use of statins for treating people at risk of heart disease has been historically quite controversial, new research suggests that statins may promote heart health by improving the structure, and, as a result, the functioning of this vital organ.
May 26, 2017
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Statins: how safe are they?
Despite evidence that aims to quash controversy over the safety and effectiveness of statins, uncertainty remains. is the safety of statins as debatable as some stories suggest, or is the controversy behind this group of medicines potentially harming more people than the drug itself? we find out.
May 12, 2017
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Stem cell researchers make advance toward long-lasting blood vessel repair
Stem cell researchers at Emory University School of Medicine have made an advance toward having a long-lasting "repair caulk" for blood vessels. The research could form the basis of a treatment for peripheral artery disease, derived from a patient's own cells. Their results were recently published in the journal Circulation.
October 24, 2017
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Stem cell therapy may harm heart disease patients, study finds
Patients with severe and end-stage heart failure have few treatment options available to them apart from transplants and "miraculous" stem cell therapy. But a new Tel Aviv University study finds that stem cell therapy may, in fact, harm heart disease patients.
June 15, 2017
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Stopping aspirin treatment raises cardiovascular risk by over a third
New research published in the journal Circulation suggests that interrupting long-term, low-dose aspirin treatment may increase the likelihood of a second stroke or heart attack.
September 26, 2017
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Study aims to improve early detection of atrial fibrillation
A new clinical study on the early detection of atrial fibrillation at home is starting at the German Centre for Cardiovascular Research (DZHK). This cardiac arrhythmia is responsible for a quarter of all strokes; and yet the risk of patients with atrial fibrillation having a stroke can be reduced by 70 percent if they take anticoagulants early enough. The problem is early diagnosis, because often the heart only beats irregularly in paroxysmal episodes, which does not cause any discomfort.
October 6, 2017
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Study casts doubt on need for statins in the 'healthy old'
But specialists cite research flaws, limitations
May 22, 2017
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Study could help doctors to better predict development of cardiovascular disease at earlier stage
Screening methods for cardiovascular diseases such as heart attacks and strokes could be improved by measuring different biological signposts to those currently being tested, a new study led by researchers from King's College London suggests.
February 21, 2017
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Study examines relationship between statin use and heart structure, function
Statins are associated with improved heart structure and function, according to research presented today at EuroCMR 2017. The benefits were above and beyond the cholesterol lowering effect of statins.
May 26, 2017
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Study finds barriers to using public access defibrillators for treating cardiac arrests
A study led the University of Warwick suggests that people are reluctant to use public access defibrillators to treat cardiac arrests.
September 25, 2017
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Study finds excessive mortality in people with extremely high levels of good cholesterol
It has been accepted wisdom for many years that the more good cholesterol people have in their blood, the better. But the good cholesterol, also known as HDL, might not be as good as we think.
August 23, 2017
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Study finds link between increased cardiovascular diseases and teen childbirth
A new study published in the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association's Open Access Journal -- Journal of the American Heart Association -- has suggested an increased risk of heart and blood vessel disease in women who became mothers for the first time in their teenage years, when compared to older mothers.
November 2, 2017
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Study finds increased heart attack risk in patients taking direct acting oral anticoagulants
A new study has examined whether different blood thinning medications prescribed to prevent strokes in patients with atrial fibrillation might increase the risk of heart attacks.
March 22, 2017
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Study finds increased risk of death in patients who develop depression after heart disease diagnosis
People who are diagnosed with coronary artery disease and then develop depression face a risk of death that's twice as high as heart patients without depression, according to a major new study by researchers at Intermountain Healthcare in Salt Lake City.
July 28, 2017
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Study finds inverse link between restrictive spirometry pattern, reduced FVC and arterial stiffness
Increased arterial stiffness is a known predictor of cardiovascular diseases in different populations, including healthy subjects and patients with hypertension, diabetes, or renal disease. A new study examining arterial stiffness in a large population determined that both restrictive spirometry pattern and reduced forced vital capacity (FVC) were associated with a higher risk of arterial stiffness not only in men but also in women. The investigators found that arterial stiffness increased fourfold when FVC decreased. Their findings are published in CHEST.
September 27, 2017
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Study finds link between air pollution and daily cause-specific mortality in China
In the largest epidemiological study conducted in the developing world, researchers found that as exposures to fine particulate air pollution in 272 Chinese cities increase, so do deaths from cardiovascular and respiratory diseases.
February 10, 2017
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Study finds link between new opioid use and increased risk of cardiac death in older adults with COPD
Older adults with chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder who recently started using opioids have an increased risk of coronary artery disease-related death compared to non-opioid users, researchers at St. Michael's Hospital have found.
June 29, 2017
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Study finds link between vitamin D deficiency and elevated heart failure risk in older adults
A recent study found an elevated risk of heart failure in more than half of older individuals, and this risk was significantly associated with vitamin D deficiency. Specifically, vitamin D deficiency was linked with a 12.2-times increased risk of heart failure.
August 18, 2017
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Study finds no improvement in survival rates for heart failure patients
Survival rates for people suffering from heart failure have not improved since 1998, according to a study led by University of Oxford researchers.
January 30, 2017
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Study finds no significant benefits of cooling down cardiac arrest patients for 48 hours
A five per cent difference in favor of the 48 hours. This is the result of a study from Aarhus University that has spent several years examining the possible benefits of cooling down patients suffering cardiac arrest to 33\u00C2\u00B0C for 48 hours, instead of the 24-hours that is standard practice in most places.
July 26, 2017
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Study finds percutaneous coronary intervention as recommendable treatment for left main coronary artery disease
The treatment of left main coronary artery disease by percutaneous coronary intervention is associated with a smaller risk of severe cardiovascular events than coronary artery bypass grafting in the weeks following surgery.
December 11, 2017
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Study finds two genetic variants linked to bicuspid aortic valve development
Researchers are working to determine why the aortic valve doesn't form correctly in patients with the most common congenital heart defect: bicuspid aortic valve.
May 25, 2017
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Study identifies possibility of umbilical cord-derived stem cells in treating heart failure
According to the study, the umbilical cord-derived stem cells might help in improving the functions of the heart muscle and thereby increases the quality of life.
September 28, 2017
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Study links heart failure biomarker to tumors observed in rare genetic diseases
Researchers at the Uniformed Services University (USU) and the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI)/National Institutes of Health have discovered that galectin-3 is produced by tumor cells in tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) and lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM).
July 11, 2017
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Study reveals impact of changes in temperature, air pressure on heart failure patients
Could decreases in temperature cause heart failure and death?
September 26, 2017
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Study reports link between fruit, vegetable, legume consumption and CVD risk, mortality
A large dietary study from 18 countries, across 7 geographic regions has found that even relatively moderate intake of fruit, vegetables and legumes such as beans and lentils may lower a person's risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and death.
August 29, 2017
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Study reveals link between cardiovascular risk factors and arterial distensibility in adolescence
The longitudinal study on children and adolescents conducted by the Research Centre of Applied and Preventive Cardiovascular Medicine at the University of Turku, Finland, is unique worldwide. The study shows that cardiovascular risk factors, such as overweight, high blood pressure, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol and insulin resistance, are associated with arterial distensibility in adolescence.
June 30, 2017
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Study reveals link between hypertension and brain changes in rats
Untreated high blood pressure can lead to a number of serious conditions, from kidney failure to a stroke or a heart attack. how does high blood pressure develop in the first place? Researchers investigate the physiological changes that accompany the onset of hypertension.
March 10, 2017
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Study reveals link of male-pattern baldness and premature graying with early heart disease
New research presented at the 69th Annual Conference of the Cardiological Society of India (CSI) indicated that premature greying and male-pattern baldness are linked to a greater than fivefold risk of heart disease before the age of 40. The study also suggested obesity is linked to a fourfold risk of early heart disease.
November 30, 2017
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Study sheds new light on underlying genetic causes of congenital heart disease
Approximately one in every 100 babies is born with congenital heart disease (CHD), and CHD remains the leading cause of mortality from birth defects. Although advancements in surgery and care have improved rates of survival for these infants, CHD patients remain at elevated risk for heart complications later in life, other congenital abnormalities and neurodevelopmental deficits.
October 9, 2017
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Study shows decrease in sudden cardiac arrest incidences among adults covered under ACA
The new study published on June 28 in the Journal of the American Heart Association shows significant reduction in the sudden cardiac arrest incidences among adults who gained health insurance through the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and were not insured previously.
June 29, 2017
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Study shows feasibility of home monitoring to detect heart arrhythmias in developing fetuses
As reported in the Journal of Perinatology, researchers from Children's Hospital Colorado (Children's Colorado) recently confirmed that it is feasible for at-risk pregnant women to use commercially-available Doppler fetal heart rate monitors for home monitoring to detect heart arrhythmias in their developing fetuses.
October 25, 2017
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Study shows how early administration of old drug reduces damage during heart attack
Scientists at the Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Cardiovasculares Carlos III (CNIC) have discovered a new mechanism of action of metoprolol, a drug that can reduce the damage produced during a heart attack if administered early.
April 18, 2017
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Study shows how immune cells drive heart damage in mice
A new study in mice reveals that eosinophils, a type of disease-fighting white blood cell, appear to be at least partly responsible for the progression of heart muscle inflammation to heart failure in mice.
March 16, 2017
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Study shows way to reverse high blood pressure in baby rats born to hypertensive mothers
Mothers contribute a lot of defining traits to their offspring, from eye color to toe length. But pregnant mothers with health complications, such as Diabetes or hypertension, also can pass these symptoms to their children.
February 22, 2017
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Study Suggests Newer Cholesterol Drugs Are Safe
Whether taking them results in fewer heart attacks and strokes isn't yet known, researcher says
January 30, 2017
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Study suggests 'synergistic' link between exercise and vitamin D for better heart health
Johns Hopkins researchers report that an analysis of survey responses and health records of more than 10,000 American adults for nearly 20 years suggests a "synergistic" link between exercise and good vitamin D levels in reducing the risk of heart attacks and strokes.
April 27, 2017
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Study: Aspirin Safe for Heart Failure Patients
Large trial comparing it to warfarin finds aspirin not tied to more hospitalizations or deaths
July 31, 2017
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Study: Men's lower resting heart rate explains higher rate of criminal offending
In the field of criminology, it is well established that men engage in more crime than women. Now, a new study from the University of Pennsylvania published in the journal Criminology, addresses the incomplete understanding of why males are more criminal than females by examining gender differences in biological functioning and behavior. It is the first study to demonstrate that men's lower resting heart rate partly explains the higher rate of criminal offending.
May 31, 2017
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Study: New Cholesterol Drugs Vastly Overpriced
But drug maker, heart experts question methodology of analysis
August 22, 2017
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Misc. - T

T1DM weakens autonomic reflex that regulates blood pressure during exercise, study finds
A new study finds that late-stage type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) weakens the autonomic reflex that regulates blood pressure during exercise, impairing circulation, nerve function and exercise tolerance. The study is published in the American Journal of Physiology-;Heart and Circulatory Physiology.
October 19, 2017
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Takeda and Cardurion announce creation of new cardiovascular development partnership
Takeda Pharmaceutical Company Limited and Cardurion Pharmaceuticals today announced the creation of a new cardiovascular development partnership. Cardurion, a recently launched Boston-area based biotechnology company, is focused on the development of novel, next-generation therapeutics for the treatment of heart failure and other cardiovascular diseases.
August 2, 2017
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The 10 best blood pressure apps
If you have been diagnosed with high blood pressure, it can be a constant worry to try and bring down your numbers. We have chosen the best apps to track, monitor, and help you to keep blood pressure within a healthy range.
November 16, 2017
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The 10 best heart disease blogs
If you have been diagnosed with heart disease, you are not alone. The condition affects people of all ages and backgrounds. We have identified the best heart disease blogs, written by those sharing similar experiences and health experts alike, that provide helpful information, advice, and support.
July 6, 2017
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The Apple Watch tops Stanford's heart rate accuracy study -- and here's why
In a recent study from Stanford, the Apple Watch bested six other wrist-worn devices in calculating accurate heart rate.
May 25, 2017
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The FDA recalls 465,000 pacemakers which are at risk from possible hacking attacks
With our world becoming ever more connected, the threat of being hacked has become a serious concern for many that go online every day. However, staying safe requires more than just making sure you do not click a seemingly innocent link sent by a Nigerian prince through email. Recently we reported on a research firm finding 8,000 security vulnerabilities in every-day pacemakers, which makes them susceptible to possible attacks.
August 31, 2017
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The new FDA-cleared Apple Watch band adds real-time EKG
The KardiaBand aims to track atrial fibrillation, something that fitness tracker heart rate monitors aren't approved to test (yet).
November 29, 2017
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These light-eating bacteria could one day help us survive heart attacks
The bacteria 'eat' light to produce oxygen
June 14, 2017
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This super-stretchy wearable feels like a second skin and can record data
This could someday replace big health monitors
July 17, 2017
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Timing of Menopause May Affect Heart Failure Risk
Women whose periods end early and those who never give birth seem at added risk, research suggests.
May 15, 2017
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Timing of your Meals Might Reduce Heart Risks
American Heart Association report suggests eating more earlier in the day may be healthier
January 31, 2017
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Tiny Wirelessly Powered Pacemaker Can Reside in Heart and Double as Defibrillator
While there are already pacemakers on the market that are so small that they fit inside the heart thus eliminating the need for electrode leads, these devices still depend on a battery that has a limited lifetime. Such implants require explantation and replacement eventually, procedures that can be difficult on patients, create additional cost, and pose challenge of choosing whether to have them implanted in the first place.
June 6, 2017
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TMJ disorders: Causes, symptoms, and relief
TMJ disorders affect the jaw joint and muscles that control the jaw. They can be challenging to diagnose and treat because of how complex this joint is.
May 31, 2017
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Too much salt may double your chances of heart failure
Sodium helps the body perform a range of biological functions, so a little salt in our diet can be healthful. But too much salt is known to be bad for our cardiovascular system. In fact, a new study suggests it may even double our risk of heart failure.
August 30, 2017
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Trans Fat Bans May Have Cut Heart Attacks, Strokes
Pending FDA regulations should remove nearly all of this unhealthy substance from your diet, experts say
April 12, 2017
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Traumatic experiences may raise women's heart disease risk
Experiencing a high number of traumatic events could increase a woman's risk of developing heart disease, especially after menopause, a new study suggests.
October 11, 2017
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Traumatic events take toll on the heart
New study links traumatic experiences with increased risk of heart disease, especially after the menopause transition
October 11, 2017
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Trial shows cost-effectiveness of TAVR compared to SAVR in intermediate risk patients with aortic stenosis
Analysis of the PARTNER 2A trial and the SAPIEN-3 Intermediate Risk registry found transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) to be highly cost-effective compared with surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) in intermediate surgical risk patients with aortic stenosis.
November 1, 2017
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Troponin elevations can occur in the absence of classic myocardial infarction, study shows
Elevated cardiac troponin, a diagnostic marker of damage to the heart, may occur even if a patient has not had a heart attack, according to a study published in JACC: Basic to Translational Science.
May 9, 2017
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TUM study shows link between zinc supply in the body and cardiac function
In addition to essential metabolic functions, the level of zinc in the body also affects the heart muscle. When oxidative stress occurs, it may be due to a shortage of zinc, which can be determined by examining the heart muscle. a study by the Technical University of Munich (TUM) shows the relationship between the total amount of zinc in the body and cardiac function.
April 18, 2017
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Tumor necrosis factor may help control blood pressure, study suggests
Investigators at the Ted Rogers Centre for Heart Research have discovered a surprising new role for tumor necrosis factor (TNF): namely, that it is a major regulator of small blood vessel function, the key determinant of blood pressure.
April 6, 2017
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Type of natural sugar may prevent arteries from clogging
A new study in mice shows that trehalose, a type of natural sugar, may boost the 'housekeeping' abilities of a certain kind of immune cell, thus reducing the buildup of plaque inside the arteries.
June 8, 2017
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Misc. - U

U.S. researchers have used gene editing to combat heart disease in human embryos
The effort was strictly for practice, but represent a major first step in its potential future clinical use.
August 2, 2017
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UAlberta study reveals sex-based differences in outcomes for atrial fibrillation
Yet more evidence can be added to the growing literature that shows women with cardiovascular disease may receive different health care and experience worse outcomes than men.
April 26, 2017
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UCLA-led consortium receives $8.6 million NIH grant to map the heart's nervous system
A consortium directed by UCLA's Dr. Kalyanam Shivkumar has received a three-year, $8.6 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to map the heart's nervous system. the group's goal: to conduct research that leads to new ways to treat cardiovascular disease by targeting nerves in the heart's nervous system.
December 23, 2016
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UK obesity levels among the worst in Europe: Heart disease statistics from more than 45 countries
A decline in deaths from heart attack and stroke in high income countries could be threatened by rising rates of obesity and diabetes, according to a new study.
November 28, 2017
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UM SOM scientists identify mutated gene that may be key player in heart disease
Heart disease kills more than 600,000 Americans every year, which translates to more than one in every four deaths. Although lifestyle choices contribute to the disease, genetics play a major role. This genetic facet has remained largely mysterious. But new research by scientists at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UM SOM) has identified what may be a key player: a mutated gene that leads to irregular heartbeat, which can lead to a dangerously inefficient heart.
June 7, 2017
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Unexpected protein structure findings could lead to new therapies
Scientists have determined unexpected characteristics of a key protein linked to blood pressure control and to nerve growth, pain control and heart tissue regeneration. the findings, published April 5 online in the journal Nature, opens doors to potential new therapies to control cardiovascular disease and pain.
April 5, 2017
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Unhealthful plant-based diet can increase heart disease risk
Plant-based diets are said to play an important role in preventing heart disease. This does hold true in most cases, but a team of researchers has found that some types of plant-based diet could do more harm than good.
July 18, 2017
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Unique 3-D printed models could improve patient outcomes in heart valve replacements
Researchers at Georgia Institute of Technology and the Piedmont Heart Institute are using standard medical imaging and new 3-D printing technologies to create patient-specific heart valve models that mimic the physiological qualities of the real valves. Their aim is to improve the success rate of transcatheter aortic valve replacements (TAVR) by picking the right prosthetic and avoiding a common complication known as paravalvular leakage.
July 7, 2017
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Using quantum imaging to rule out cardiac conditions
In the UK, more than 5% of emergency department visits and up to 40% of emergency admissions are as a direct result of chest pain. Chest pain-related emergency hospital admissions not only create a vast economic burden on healthcare services but also cause huge disruption to inpatient care.
July 3, 2017
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Misc. - V

Vegetable pigment may reduce inflammation in heart disease patients
A new study finds that lutein, a compound that gives egg yolk and some plants their color, can reduce chronic inflammation in patients with coronary artery disease, the most common type of heart disease.
July 7, 2017
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Viagra May Harm Patients With a Heart Valve Issue
Earlier data suggested the drug might ease high blood pressure in lungs, but new study refutes that
August 29, 2017
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Viagra may reduce blood clots after stent surgery
Using stents to prevent a heart attack is quite common, but, sometimes, stent implantation may cause blood clotting or arteries narrowing. New research shows that a popular drug for erectile dysfunction may reduce the risk of these complications.
July 11, 2017
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VitalSines' iHeart health devices now compatible with Android
The iHeart health-monitoring devices now have an Android companion app.
August 21, 2017
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Vitamin B diminishes effects of air pollution-induced cardiovascular disease
B vitamins can mitigate the impact of fine particle pollution on cardiovascular disease. Healthy non-smokers who took vitamin B supplements nearly reversed any negative effects on their cardiovascular and immune systems. this is the first clinical trial to evaluate whether B vitamin supplements change the biologic/physiologic responses to ambient air pollution exposure.
April 12, 2017
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Vitamin D guidelines may be changed following new study
A new study finds that, contrary to popular belief, vitamin D-2 and D-3 do not have equal nutritional value. With vitamin D deficiency on the rise, the authors call for a rethink of official guidelines.
July 6, 2017
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Vitamin D improves gut flora and metabolic syndrome
Extra vitamin D can restore good bacteria in the gut, according to a study in mice, giving hope in the fight against risk factors for Diabetes and heart disease
December 21, 2016
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Misc. - W

Want to Avoid Salt? Turn Up the Spice
If your taste buds lean toward spicy, you might be doing your heart a favor, new research suggests.
October 31, 2017
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Watching hockey increases cardiac stress by twofold
New research published in the Canadian Journal of Cardiology examines the effect of watching high-intensity moments in a hockey game on cardiovascular health.
October 5, 2017
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Ways to stop an A-fib episode
Atrial fibrillation (A-fib) is an irregular heartbeat. People with A-fib may have a rapid heart rate or feel a fluttering sensation in their chest. It can also cause fatigue, dizziness, and shortness of breath.
December 13, 2017
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'Weekend warriors' have lower risk of death from cancer, cardiovascular disease
One or two exercise sessions per week may be enough to reduce health risks in men and women
January 9, 2017
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Where do heart cells come from?
Id genes play surprise role in cardiac development
August 22, 2017
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Where you live could determine risk of heart attack, stroke or dying of heart disease
People living in parts of Ontario with better access to preventive health care had lower rates of cardiac events compared to residents of regions with less access, found a new study.
April 3, 2017
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Why do firefighters have an increased risk of heart attacks?
New research adds another danger to the already long list of hazards associated with one of the riskiest jobs on earth: extreme heat has been linked to an increased risk of heart attacks in firefighters.
April 4, 2017
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Will Phase Space Tomography Revolutionize Cardiac Diagnostics? Interview with Don Crawford, CEO of Analytics 4 Life
Human body emits all kinds of signals that, if analyzed with the proper sensors and computers, can help us develop completely new diagnostic and therapeutic modalities. Most medical technology advancements are improvements of existing devices, but some people try for bigger leaps.
October 30, 2017
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Wireless remote monitoring: the future for patients with atrial fibrillation?
What is the vision behind Peerbridge Health?
August 9, 2017
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With new EKG monitor and Heart Study app, Apple Watch could one day save your life
Apple Watch can now identify irregular heart rhythms.
November 29, 2017
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Women at higher cardiometabolic risk due to fat distribution
The way that fat is distributed across our body puts us at risk of cardiometabolic conditions such as heart disease and diabetes. New research examines how gender influences this risk.
November 28, 2017
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Women have higher mortality risk than men in the first year after heart attack
Heart attacks pose a greater threat to women than to men. A team at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has determined that in the first year after a heart attack women are subject to a significantly higher mortality risk than men with similar case histories. The scientists are urging doctors to provide intensive support to female heart attack patients, above all in the first 365 days after the event.
October 25, 2017
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Women's dementia risk increased by midlife hypertension
Researchers have uncovered a possible sex difference in how blood pressure affects dementia risk, after finding that women who get hypertension in their 40s are likelier to develop the condition. But for men, hypertension in midlife appears to have no impact on dementia risk.
October 5, 2017
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Working for many hours each day can increase risk of heart problems
Research published yesterday shows that the risk of developing an irregular heartbeat--atrial fibrillation-- is considerably higher among people working more than 55 hours a week.
July 14, 2017
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World's smallest pacemaker for cardiology patients now offered at Medical City Dallas
Miniaturized Heart Device Provides Patients with the Most Advanced Pacing Technology Available
October 6, 2017
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Misc. - Y

Yoga + Aerobics Doubles Heart Benefits
Combined, these exercises are better than either alone, study suggests
October 20, 2017
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Yoga and aerobic exercise together may improve heart disease risk factors
Study shows significant improvement in heart health when patients practice both activities
October 19, 2017
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