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483 Health - Heart Disease Resources

Misc. - Numbers

3 Keys to Cutting your Risk of Heart Failure
Guarding against obesity, high blood pressure and Diabetes at middle age may slash risk, study finds
November 28, 2016
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3D Printed Pediatric Stents That Grow With Patient's Vessels
Sadly, it is not only old people that receive cardiac stent implants. Often young children with certain cardiovascular conditions can benefit significantly from stent implantations and conduits, but because vasculature grows along with the rest of the body, the stents' benefits can be short lived and not fully realized. Now researchers at Eindhoven University of Technology in The Netherlands have developed 3D printing technology that can generate stents that grow along with the patient's growth, and eventually biodegrade and leave the body.
May 31, 2017
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20 minutes of ultrasound to the forearm cuts high blood pressure
Blood pressure can significantly drop by applying 20 minutes of ultrasound to the forearm of type II Diabetes patients with treatment-resistant hypertension, according to new research.
July 27, 2016
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24-Hour Shifts can play Havoc with the Heart
Small study found lack of sleep affected blood pressure, heart rate in healthy volunteers
December 2, 2016
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Misc. - A

Abbott™ Gets FDA Green Light for First Fully Absorbable Heart Stent
Abbott just received FDA approval for the Absorb coronary heart stent, the first and only fully resorbable stent available in the U.S. We're kind of surprised the company is calling it what it is and isn't pushing the new term "scaffold" on us. Nevertheless, while it is novel, the device isn't exactly a new product, having been approved in the EU already six years ago, available in over 100 countries, and having gone through years of study.
July 5, 2016
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Abbott™ Assurity MRI Pacemaker and Tendril MRI Lead now Labeled by FDA for Use During MR Scans
ABBOTT, having recently purchased St. Jude Medical, is already reaping rewards. the FDA has issued MR-conditional labeling for the Assurity MRI pacemaker and the matching Tendril MRI lead.
February 7, 2017
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Abbott™ releases First Insertable Cardiac Monitor that Works with your Smartphone
Abbott received the European CE Mark and is introducing its Confirm Rx Insertable Cardiac Monitor (ICM). Still sporting St. Jude Medical's logo, now part of Abbott, the Confirm Rx features wireless Bluetooth connectivity to a paired app on the patient's smartphone. this allows for transmission of cardiac event data to the patient's cardiologist from just about anywhere there is cellular connectivity.
May 10, 2017
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Ablation Procedure Helps 3 out of 4 AFib Patients
But results may not be lasting, and patients may still need to take medications
January 25, 2017
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ACC joins with Google to create "Ask a Doctor" to provide in-depth information about heart conditions
A Google search for heart conditions will now prominently display important questions patients should ask their doctor based on clinical guidelines developed by the American College of Cardiology.
August 31, 2016
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Acute heart failure: What you need to know
Acute heart failure is an illness that hits suddenly and without any earlier symptoms.
June 2, 2017
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Adherence to medical therapy linked to better outcomes for patients who had heart procedures
Patients who had a stent procedure or heart bypass surgery and continued with their prescribed medical therapy had significantly better outcomes than non-adherent patients.
October 22, 2016
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A-fib and exercise: Health benefits and risks
Atrial fibrillation is an irregular heartbeat caused by faulty electrical signals in the upper chambers of the heart. In people with atrial fibrillation, the heart beats irregularly and often too quickly.
March 21, 2017
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A-fib with RVR: Information, treatment, and management
A-fib with RVR is the common term for atrial fibrillation with rapid ventricular response. a common disorder that involves a rapid heart rate, it requires medical attention and, in many cases, hospitalization.
March 22, 2017
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AFib Patients May not Always Need Blood Thinners
If episodes of atrial fibrillation are brief, the risk of stroke is low, specialists say
October 18, 2016
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AFib surgery: Types, risks, and what to expect
A trial fibrillation is a serious medical condition characteristic of an abnormal heartbeat. the irregular response is due to erratic electrical impulses in the heart's upper chambers.
March 15, 2017
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After heart attack, people with depression twice as likely to die
Researchers have known for a while that heart disease and depression influence each other. However, a new study investigates the impact of depression on heart disease over a long period of time, and finds the psychological disorder to increase mortality risk.
March 9, 2017
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Aggressive home blood pressure monitoring may contribute to rise in emergency department visits
Visits to emergency departments for patients with hypertension increased by 64 percent between 2002 and 2012 while hospitalizations for those visits declined by 28 percent. a study published online yesterday in Annals of Emergency Medicine suggests that aggressive home monitoring of blood pressure may be driving patients to emergency departments despite the lack of other emergency conditions, such as stroke ("A Population-Based Analysis of Outcomes In Patients with a Primary Diagnosis of Hypertension In the Emergency Department").
July 7, 2016
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Aging does not necessarily preclude healthy arteries
Research tells us that living in a Western culture makes it unlikely that people in their 70s can have arteries as healthy as those of people in their 20s and 30s. However, a new study suggests that this is not impossible, especially for people whose diet and lifestyle are in keeping with those recommended by the American Heart Association.
May 31, 2017
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AHA collaborates with Amazon Web Services to advance discoveries in cardiovascular precision medicine
New Data Grants for clinical and population researchers, computer engineers and computational biologists will drive more precise medical approaches to improve health
July 8, 2016
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AliveCor is Expanding the Role that Mobile Applications play in Cardiac Care
AliveCor is at it again. we recently covered AliveCor's inclusion of Omron blood pressure data in their Kardia mobile application (iOS/Android) and they are quickly expanding their offering by integrating weight and activity tracking. this rounds out their offering to focus on the entire continuum of cardiac care -- focused on delivering meaningful information to patients and providers.
November 15, 2016
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Amend: a new Minimally Invasive Device for Treatment of Mitral Regurgitation
Valcare Medical, a company out of Herzliya, Israel, has developed a device and complementary minimally invasive procedure for mitral valve repair and replacement via subxiphoid transapical approach. this involves delivering the firm's Amend catheter through the chest and into the heart where a D-shaped ring is deployed and positioned to match the annulus of the original valve. a special mechanism provides control for moving and shaping the ring, allowing the physician to affix it accurately to the targeted tissue.
June 22, 2016
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American Heart Association looks for cure in the cloud
Scientists around the world can share and collaborate on research in AWS cloud
December 1, 2016
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Americans with High BP Still Eating Too Much Salt
Average sodium intake more than double the recommended daily limit for these patients, study finds
March 8, 2017
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Americans' Cholesterol Levels Keep Falling
Eliminating trans fats from the U.S. diet may be one factor in this healthy trend, CDC researchers say
November 30, 2016
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Amphetamine Abuse Abuses the Heart
Study finds arteries of recreational users look older than their years
February 10, 2017
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Angioplasty, Stents Help Heart Attack Survival
Aggressive interventions play big part in improvements after even 'mild' attacks, U.K. report says
August 30, 2016
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Anti-tumor antibodies could counter atherosclerosis, study finds
Investigators have learned the signal that tumor cells display on their surfaces to protect themselves from being devoured by the immune system also plays a role in enabling atherosclerosis, the process underlying heart attacks and strokes.
July 20, 2016
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Are Herbal Medicines Safe for Heart Problems?
While popular among patients, they haven't been proven safe or effective in clinical trials, study says
February 27, 2017
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Are Many A-Fib Patients Getting the Wrong Dose?
Study of newer blood thinners finds 16 percent receive too much or too little medication
June 5, 2017
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Are Omega-3s Linked to Lower Heart Attack Risk?
These vital nutrients are found in seafood, nuts and seeds
June 27, 2016
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Are Vegetarian Diets Heart-Healthier?
Study finds no significant difference in 10-year cardiovascular risk, but one expert is skeptical of research
October 18, 2016
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Atrial fibrillation triggers: what can lead to an A-fib attack?
Atrial fibrillation is an irregular, rapid heartbeat. During an atrial fibrillation attack, the heart might not pump enough oxygen-rich blood to the rest of the body, leading to symptoms including weakness, light-headedness, and dizziness.
March 21, 2017
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Atrial fibrillation: List of medications for treatment
When people develop atrial fibrillation, the normal, healthy rhythm of the heart is disrupted with an irregular and rapid beating of its upper chambers.
March 28, 2017
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Atrial fibrillation: Natural treatments, remedies, and tips
The heart's upper chambers normally beat in a regular, coordinated rhythm with the heart's lower chambers. In atrial fibrillation, the heart's upper chambers can quiver out of rhythm.
March 24, 2017
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Arineta SpotLight CT Dedicated Cardiac Scanner Coming to U.S.
Arineta, an Israeli firm, won FDA clearance to bring its SpotLight CT cardiac scanner technology to U.S. shores. SpotLight CT is a system designed specifically for cardiac imaging and is not a general purpose whole-body CT scanner. by focusing on imaging the heart, the SpotLight CT can offer high-resolution, artifact-free imaging at a much lower cost.
August 18, 2016
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Artery-clogging saturated fat myth debunked
Among doctors and the public alike, there is a popular belief that dietary saturated fat clogs up the arteries and results in coronary heart disease. a new editorial published in the British Journal of Sports Medicine says that this notion of saturated fat clogging a pipe is "just plain wrong."
April 26, 2017
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Arterys 4D Blood Flow MRI Imaging System Cleared by FDA
The FDA has granted clearance to Arterys, a San Francisco firm, for its cardiac flow assessment software. the technology uses data gathered during 1.5 or 3.0 Tesla MRI exams to understand the blood flow going in and out of the heart and nearby vasculature.
November 7, 2016
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ASA recommends parents to ask seven questions to child's physician anesthesiologist prior to surgery
Millions of children have surgery every year - for everything from tonsil removal to correction of a heart defect - and understandably parents are often anxious about their child's safety and comfort. the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) wants parents to know that anesthesia is extremely safe and effective at managing pain and discomfort surgery or a procedure may cause.
July 12, 2016
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Aspirin not an effective treatment for atrial fibrillation, study suggests
New research suggests that aspirin may not be as effective as previously believed for treating patients with atrial fibrillation. In fact, for patients who had a catheter ablation to lower their risk of stroke, the risks of using aspirin may outweigh the benefits.
May 15, 2017
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Assessing heart disease risk is within arm's reach
Researchers may have just discovered a potential new method to diagnose and monitor atherosclerosis: the radial artery.
April 14, 2017
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Atomic level analysis reveals how two classes of calcium channel blockers produce different effects
An atomic level analysis has revealed how two classes of calcium channel blockers, widely prescribed for heart disease patients, produce separate therapeutic effects through their actions at different sites on the calcium channel molecule.
August 25, 2016
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Misc. - B

BAG3 protein plays protective role by limiting reperfusion injury to the heart
The inability of cells to eliminate damaged proteins and organelles following the blockage of a coronary artery and its subsequent re-opening with angioplasty or medications - a sequence known as ischemia/reperfusion - often results in irreparable damage to the heart muscle.
November 17, 2016
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BBK II trial compares two commonly used stenting techniques for coronary bifurcation
Coronary bifurcations - a type of coronary artery narrowing - are best treated with a technique known as culotte stenting, as opposed to T-and-protrusion (TAP) stenting, when there is need for a side-branch stent according to results of the BBK II (Bifurcations Bad Krozingen) trial.
August 30, 2016
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Beat2Phone Wearable ECG and Activity Tracker for AFib and More
At the VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland a new device and accompanying app have been created to help identify asymptomatic atrial fibrillation, which may in turn point to therapy options to reduce the chances of an ischemic stroke. the Beat2Phone system includes a chest-worn ECG, position, and activity monitor, and an Android app that captures the readings and automatically passes them to the patient's cardiologist.
September 23, 2016
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Belly Size Genes Also Linked to Heart Disease
Large study found association, but did not prove cause and effect
February 14, 2017
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Better AFib Treatment Might Prevent Strokes
Study says too many people aren't getting meds to fight atrial fibrillation, a major cause of these attacks
May 15, 2017
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Biosense Webster's THERMOCOOL SMARTTOUCH SF Ablation Catheter approved by FDA
Biosense Webster, a part of J&J, is releasing its THERMOCOOL SMARTTOUCH SF Catheter in the U.S. following FDA approval. the device is used along with the company's flagship CARTO 3 during cardiac ablation procedures to treat atrial fibrillation.
August 22, 2016
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BioSig's Pure EP System Detects Deadly Cardiac Arrhythmia Cells (Interview)
BioSig Technologies, a company out of Minneapolis, Minnesota, touts its PURE EP technology as superior electrophysiology (EP) signal recording and processing system compared to conventional devices, and is positioned to shake-up the EP market when it is launched in 2018.
June 8, 2017
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BioTrace Tempo Temporary Cardiac Pacing Lead Cleared in USA
BioTrace Medical, a company based in San Carlos, California, won FDA clearance for its only product, the Tempo temporary cardiac pacing lead. it's intended to be primarily used for transcatheter aortic valve replacements (TAVR), positioned during the implantation and used for a number of days following to both monitor and pace the patient's heart.
November 7, 2016
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BIOTRONIK Introduces Its First Stent in U.S.
BIOTRONIK, a company known best for its implantable pacemakers and defibrillators, has just landed its first FDA approval for a coronary stent. the PRO-Kinetic Energy Cobalt Chromium (CoCr) metal stent is intended for placement within narrow arteries, only between 2.25 and 4 mm in diameter, and features struts that are nearly microscopic at 60 µm in width.
February 16, 2017
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BIOTRONIK Releases in U.S. Its Compact Edora Line of MR Conditional Pacemakers
BIOTRONIK is releasing in the U.S. its Edora line of pacemakers that come with the firm's MRI AutoDetect technology. MRI AutoDetect, which makes the Edora SR-T the smallest MR conditional device on the market, is a setting that is enabled by a physician up to fourteen days prior to an MRI scan. When the patient wearing the pacemaker gets close to the magnet, the implant switches into a special safe mode to prevent any abnormal events.
June 9, 2017
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BIOTRONIK releases Most Powerful Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator in U.S.
BIOTRONIK is releasing the world's most powerful implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) in the United States. the Inventra HF-T cardiac resynchronization therapy defibrillator (CRT-D) can deliver 42 joules of energy in one punch to jolt even difficult to manage hearts back into a proper rhythm.
November 7, 2016
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BIOTRONIK's new E-Series Pacemakers Rolling Out in Europe
BIOTRONIK is touting the first implantation of a pacemaker from the newly EU-approved E-Series of the company's devices. the Enitra 8 HF-T QP is now pacing a woman with a history of failure and complete heart block who received the device at the Great Western Hospital in Swindon, UK, according to the company.
August 02, 2016
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Blood group may affect heart attack risk
What blood group are you? According to a new study, the answer to this question may affect your heart health.
May 2, 2017
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Blue maize may help protect against metabolic syndrome, rat study shows
A new study shows that a rat model of metabolic syndrome fed a high-sugar and high-cholesterol diet and given blue maize extract showed significant improvement in systolic blood pressure, high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, and triglyceride levels compared to those not given the extract.
January 11, 2017
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Bonus from your BP Medicine: Fewer Fractures?
In study, a certain class of medications was tied to more resilient bones for older patients
November 21, 2016
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Boston Sci's EMBLEM MRI Subcutaneous Implantable Defibrillator FDA Approved
Boston Scientific won FDA approval for its EMBLEM MRI Subcutaneous Implantable Defibrillator (S-ICD), as well as retroactive magnetic resonance (MR) conditional labeling for already implanted EMBLEM S-ICDs. the new regulatory decision will allow patients sporting these devices to continue to be protected from cardiac arrest even while inside an MRI machine.
August 10, 2016
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BP Problems During Pregnancy, Heart Trouble Later?
Spotting risk early may help women make healthy lifestyle changes sooner, study author says
June 27, 2016
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Brazilian researchers propose new way for treating thalassemia major
Iron accumulation in myocardial cells, potentially resulting in heart failure or fatal arrhythmia, is one of the complications most feared by patients with thalassemia major, a hereditary disease also known as Mediterranean anemia.
December 6, 2016
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Breastfeeding a Boon to Preemies' Hearts: Study
Improvements seen in function and size 20 years later
June 14, 2016
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Bruker showcases innovative high-performance systems and high-value analytical solutions at Pittcon 2017
Bruker is showcasing a selection of innovative high-performance systems and high-value analytical solutions at Pittcon 2017, with an emphasis on pharma and applied markets, as well as on nano-materials research and microscopy. Frank H. Laukien, Ph.D., the Bruker President and CEO, commented:
March 7, 2017
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Building a smart cardiac patch with nanoelectronic scaffolds and living cells
Scientists and doctors in recent decades have made vast leaps in the treatment of cardiac problems - particularly with the development in recent years of so-called "cardiac patches," swaths of engineered heart tissue that can replace heart muscle damaged during a heart attack.
June 27, 2016
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'Business Diet' a Bad Deal for the Heart
Unhealthy eating on the road linked with early signs of artery clogging, study says
August 19, 2016
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Bystander CPR Saves Lives and Lessens Disability
Good Samaritans can help prevent brain damage, nursing home care for cardiac arrest victims
May 4, 2017
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Misc. - C

Caffeine may be able to block inflammation, new research says
This could help explain why caffeine is correlated with health benefits
January 16, 2017
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Caffeine, Irregular Heartbeat and Heart Failure
Stress test didn't show short-term changes after coffee drinking
October 17, 2016
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Calcium channel blockers caught in the act at atomic level
Structural studies unlock basic mechanisms of common heart and blood pressure medications, and could lead to better drug design
August 24, 2016
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Calcium in Young Arteries and Heart Attack Risk
Even small amount in 30s, 40s appears to boost the odds, study finds
February 8, 2017
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Can Teens' Heart Rate, Blood Pressure Show Ties to Mental Ills?
Indicators of schizophrenia, obsessive-compulsive disorder, anxiety might be spotted in physical at 18
October 26, 2016
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Cancer drug could promote regeneration of heart tissue
An anticancer agent in development promotes regeneration of damaged heart muscle -- an unexpected research finding that may help prevent congestive heart failure in the future.
February 3, 2017
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Cancer on Course to Become Americans' Top Killer
Report shows it will probably eclipse heart disease as leading cause of death in coming years
August 24, 2016
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Cancer Passes Heart Disease for Leading Cause of Death In These States
For the First Time, 22 States Make the Flip
August 25, 2016
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Cancer-cardiac connection illuminates promising new drug for heart failure
Scientists show that a cancer drug is effective in treating common causes of heart failure
May 17, 2017
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CardioFocus Heart-Illuminating Endoscopic Ablation System Coming to U.S. Market
CardioFocus, a company out of Marlborough, Massachusetts, is releasing in the U.S. its HeartLight endoscopic ablation system for treating paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. Having received FDA approval back in April, the company is starting rolling out the device with first post approval use at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City.
September 29, 2016
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CardioInsight ECG Vest for Non-Invasive, Precise Heart Maps
Medtronic landed FDA clearance for its CardioInsight 3D cardiac mapping system that's used to locate sources of arrhythmias. the system consists of an ECG vest with a whopping 252 electrodes. it's used to collect highly detailed skin surface electric signal data while the patient is inside a CT scanner.
February 3, 2017
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CARMAT's Total Artificial Heart Implanted Into First Patient
CARMAT (Velizy Villacoublay, France) announced that its artificial heart has been implanted for the first time in an important clinical study that may lead to European regulatory approval. it's similarly sized to a real heart and is designed to closely mimic the natural biomechanics of a human heart. Powered by an external power source, the device may have the ability to sustain patients continuously for years if the trial and subsequent observations prove successful.
August 31, 2016
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Catheter ablation for A-fib: what to expect
Catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation is a procedure that involves using radiofrequency energy to destroy areas of heart tissue that are causing the heart to beat with an irregular rhythm.
March 24, 2017
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Cause of heart arrhythmia in adult muscular dystrophy clarified
Key findings for the prevention of death and the therapeutic development
June 16, 2016
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CE Mark Approval for Moleculight i:X Wound Imaging Device Initiates Product Commercialization in the EU
Medgadget previously reported on Health Canada's approval of the wound care imaging device, MolecuLight i:X. Canadian fluorescence image-guidance technology company MolecuLight Inc continues to reach milestones for both the company and the field of wound care. MolecuLight has now been granted CE Mark approval for the MolecuLight i:X Imaging Device, which enables the commercial distribution of this technology in the European Union.
September 29, 2016
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Celt ACD Vascular Puncture Closure Device Coming to U.S.
Vasorum Ltd., an Irish Firm, won FDA approval to introduce its Celt ACD vascular closure device in the U.S. market. it's already used in Europe to close arterial punctures following both diagnostic and interventional cath lab procedures.
July 21, 2016
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Cerebral protection device reduces brain lesions after TAVI in patients with severe aortic stenosis
Among patients with severe aortic stenosis (narrowing of the aortic valve) undergoing transcatheter aortic valve implantation, the use of a cerebral protection device (a filter that captures debris [tissue and plaque] dislodged during the procedure) reduced the number and volume of brain lesions, according to a study appearing in the August 9 issue of JAMA.
August 09, 2016
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Challenge for some Cancer Survivors: Heart Disease
The younger the age at diagnosis, the greater the risk, study suggests
November 7, 2016
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Changes in cavefish metabolism could lead to new insights into diabetes
Cavefish that live in dark caves with only sporadic access to food show symptoms similar to diabetes, but don't appear to experience any health problems. new findings presented at the Allied Genetics Conference (TAGC) 2016, a meeting hosted by the Genetics Society of America, reveal the genetic basis of how cavefish have adapted to their extreme environment, information that might one day lead to new kinds of treatments for Diabetes and other diseases.
July 13, 2016
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Cholesterol-lowering statins linked to increased risk of Diabetes in older women
Older Australian women taking cholesterol-lowering statins face a significantly increased risk of developing diabetes, according to a University of Queensland study.
March 15, 2017
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CHD rates decrease significantly in the U.S.
Coronary heart disease is one of the leading causes of death in the United States. a new study evaluating recent trends in the prevalence of CHD in the U.S. population aged 40 years and older showed that CHD rates have decreased significantly, from 10.3% in 2001-2002 to 8.0% in 2011-2012.
June 15, 2016
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Children born with CHD more likely to develop type 2 Diabetes in adulthood
Children born with heart disease have an increased risk of developing type 2 Diabetes after age 30, according to a new study.
July 19, 2016
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Chocolate may cut risk of irregular heartbeat by a fifth
Succumbed to that bar of chocolate? New research suggests that you shouldn't feel too guilty. Eaten in moderation, chocolate could reduce your risk of irregular heartbeat by a fifth.
May 24, 2017
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Clinical review of patients with atrial fibrillation prevents hundreds of strokes, saves NHS millions of pounds
A review of 135,000 patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) at more than a 1,000 GP practices led to over 25,000 medical interventions, which is believed to have prevented hundreds of strokes and saved the NHS millions of pounds. this extensive service was carried out by Interface Clinical Services during 2015 with help from industry sponsorship.
September 13, 2016
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Clinical scientists find new way to treat hypertension
A team of clinical scientists at the University of Bristol have found a new way to treat high blood pressure (hypertension). the research study, entitled "Unilateral carotid body resection in resistant hypertension: a safety and feasibility trial," was led by Professor Julian Paton at the University of Bristol, and Dr Angus Nightingale (Cardiology Consultant) at the Bristol Heart Institute, Bristol, and was published recently in the Journal of American College of Cardiology: Basic to Translational Science.
September 16, 2016
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Conflicting Statin Guidelines Create Confusion
Doctors, patients often confused by differing advisories on the cholesterol-lowering drugs
April 18, 2017
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Congestive heart failure: Symptoms, treatment, and prevention
Congestive heart failure undermines the heart's job of pumping blood around the body. This can occur when the heart muscle is too weak, or when another defect prevents it from circulating blood properly.
June 9, 2017
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Connecting the dots between insulin resistance, unhealthy blood vessels and cancer
Animal studies examine risk factors that may overlap between colorectal cancer and cardiovascular disease
May 1, 2017
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Consensus paper on atrial cardiomyopathies could be important step forward for research, treatment
The first consensus paper on atrial cardiomyopathies is set to be published simultaneously in EP-Europace, HeartRhythm, and the Journal of Arrhythmia. the key contents are launched today at CARDIOSTIM - EHRA EUROPACE 2016.
June 13, 2016
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Consumption of omega-3s linked to lower risk of fatal heart disease
A global consortium of researchers banded together to conduct an epidemiological study analyzing specific omega-3 fatty acid biomarkers and heart disease. they found that blood levels of omega-3 fatty acids from seafood and plant-based foods are associated with a lower risk of fatal heart attack.
June 27, 2016
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Contaminated devices used during open heart surgery could put patients at risk for infections
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is warning healthcare providers and patients about the potential risk of infection from certain devices used during open heart (open-chest) surgery.
October 13, 2016
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Coronary angioplasty, 40 years on and millions of lives saved
While heart disease remains the leading cause of death for both men and women in the U.S., according to the Centers for Disease Control, advances in medicine over the past 40 years have led to a substantial reduction in cardiovascular-related deaths.
April 14, 2017
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Could a magnesium cream be used as an alternative to tablets for deficiency?
A new study by the University of Hertfordshire has revealed that a magnesium cream could be used as an alternative to tablets to combat major health problems including high blood pressure which are linked with deficiency.
May 1, 2017
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Could Good Sex be Bad for an Older Man's Heart?
Once a week or more may take toll, study finds, but at least one cardiologist questions the findings
September 6, 2016
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Could new markers identify patients at high risk of AFib recurrence after ablation?
If medication or resetting the heartbeat do not work as treatments for atrial fibrillation, which is a dangerous type of abnormal heart rhythm, doctors may try ablation. However, the procedure - which involves scarring tissue in the heart - is expensive, not without risk, and does not work for all patients. Now, a new study suggests that the presence of three microRNA molecules in the blood may serve as markers of whether erratic heartbeats are likely to recur following ablation.
March 19, 2017
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CRCHUM receives NIH grant to study ways to prevent mortality after myocardial infarction
The University of Montreal Hospital Research Centre (CRCHUM) has been awarded a grant of US$2 million from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to pilot the Canadian component of a study to determine the optimal amount of blood to transfuse in anemic patients who have suffered a myocardial infarction.
January 4, 2017
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Creating a slippery slope on the surface of medical implants
Implanted medical devices such as left ventricular-assist devices for patients with heart failure or other support systems for patients with respiratory, liver or other end organ disease save lives every day. However, bacteria that form infectious biofilms on those devices, called device-associated infections, not only often sabotage their success but also contribute to the rampant increase in antibiotic resistance currently seen in hospitals.
November 1, 2016
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CTA tests motivate people with suspected coronary artery disease to adopt healthier lifestyle practices
UCLA researchers have found that undergoing a computer tomographic angiography was a better motivator to get people with suspected coronary artery disease to adopt healthier lifestyle practices than an exercise electrocardiography and stress test.
October 14, 2016
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Misc. - D

DABRA Laser Ablates Blocked Arteries
Ra Medical, a company out of Carlsbad, California, received FDA clearance and is reporting the first commercial use of its DABRA laser-based arterial blockage ablation system. Unlike most other intravascular tools used for removing arterial plaque that rely on mechanical methods, the DABRA is an excimer laser that emits at a wavelength of 308 nm, in the UVB range. The laser essentially cooks down calcium, thrombi, and atheroma that narrow the artery into simpler components, reducing the material that ends up going through the vessel as it's cleared.
June 6, 2017
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Desk-bound jobs linked to bigger waists and increased risk of heart disease
A new study shows further evidence for the view that spending too much time sitting down is bad for our health and our waistline.
March 1, 2017
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Device Promising for Tough-to-Treat Heart Failure
After a year, patients reported fewer symptoms, better quality of life, study finds
November 16, 2016
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Diabetes drug may also offer vascular protection
Study suggests medication provided arterial protection in mouse model
August 18, 2016
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Diabetes increases risk of dying from heart attack by 50%
Having Diabetes increases the risk of dying from the effects of a heart attack by around 50 per cent, according to a widespread study.
June 22, 2016
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Diabetes raises risk of heart attack death by 50 percent
Having Diabetes increases the risk of dying from the effects of a heart attack by around 50 percent, according to a widespread study. the study's participants with Diabetes were 39 per cent more likely to have died if they had a non-ST elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) heart attack -- in which the artery is partially blocked -- than those without diabetes.
June 22, 2016
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Diabetes Ups Risk of Heart Attack Death
Study points to need for better coordinated care, more effective use of medications, cardiology specialist says
June 24, 2016
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Diabetes: Heart attack risk due to loss of small blood vessels around the heart
People with Diabetes have a significantly higher risk for heart attack. Now, new research suggests that Diabetes damages the small blood vessels around the heart, and this might explain the link to heart attack.
March 24, 2017
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Diet or Exercise: best for Middle-Aged Heart?
Study finds each effective, as long as healthy weight loss is the result
September 15, 2016
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Digesting Meat Ups Risks for some Heart Patients
Those with narrowed leg arteries and high levels of the byproduct had higher odds of dying early, study suggests
October 19, 2016
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DNA 'barcoding' allows rapid testing of nanoparticles for therapeutic delivery
Using tiny snippets of DNA as 'barcodes,' researchers have developed a new technique for rapidly screening the ability of nanoparticles to selectively deliver therapeutic genes to specific organs of the body. the technique could accelerate the development and use of gene therapies for such killers as heart disease, cancer and Parkinson's disease.
February 7, 2017
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Do Angioplasty Patients Need Beta-Blocker Drugs?
Study suggests doctors reconsider their use in the absence of heart attack, heart failure
August 16, 2016
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Does Good Cholesterol Affect Heart Disease Risk?
Lifestyle appears more important than the HDL number, study suggests
October 30, 2016
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Drug Combo for AFib Might Raise Bleeding Risk
Study found heightened odds when blood thinner Pradaxa was taken with one of two statin drugs
November 21, 2016
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Does moderate drinking really protect against heart disease?
When studies first suggested that alcohol, in moderation, may improve health, many of us were delighted at the news. But a new, in-depth review of these studies suggests that believing the health benefits of alcohol may be wishful thinking.
May 22, 2017
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Drug-Coated Stents don't Improve Patient Survival
But, the pricier devices do lead to fewer repeat heart procedures
August 31, 2016
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Drug-eluting stents more beneficial to patients undergoing saphenous vein graft angioplasty
Drug-eluting stents had a clear advantage over bare metal stents in patients undergoing revascularisation of saphenous (leg) vein grafts, results of the BASKET-SAVAGE trial show.
August 30, 2016
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Misc. - E

Early intervention provides survival benefit for NSTEMI patients
An analysis of NSTEMI patients who undergo coronary revascularization within 24 hours of hospitalization showed an increased reduction in mortality, marking the first time this difference has been demonstrated. Results from "Outcomes of Early versus Late Revascularization in Low and High-Risk Patients Hospitalized with Non-ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction: the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Surveillance Study" were presented today as a late-breaking clinical trial at the Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions (SCAI) 2017 Scientific Sessions in new Orleans.
May 12, 2017
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Early Menopause Tied to Heart Disease, Death Risk
Findings highlight need for certain women to discuss hormone therapy with their doctor, researchers say
September 15, 2016
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Early Onset Hot Flashes May Signal Heart Risks
Study found link between menopausal symptoms in younger women and reduced blood vessel function
April 13, 2017
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Eating oat fibre can reduce three markers linked to cardiovascular risk
Researchers have known for more than 50 years that eating oats can lower cholesterol levels and thus reduce a person's risk of developing cardiovascular disease.
October 7, 2016
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Eating potassium-rich foods could be key to lowering blood pressure
Eating potassium-rich foods like sweet potatoes, avocados, spinach, beans, bananas -; and even coffee -; could be key to lowering blood pressure, according to Alicia McDonough, PhD, professor of cell and neurobiology at the Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California (USC).
April 5, 2017
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Echocardiography Videos: the Latest from EchoJournal
We are very proud of EchoJournal, our echocardiography video website. If you are a cardiologist, anesthesiologist, radiologist, medical student, or just a person interested in cardiac ultrasounds, EchoJournal is the place for you.
January 4, 2017
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Edwards INSPIRIS RESILIA Aortic Valve Cleared in Europe
Edwards Lifesciences won European CE Mark approval for its new INSPIRIS RESILIA aortic valve. Its primary feature are the flaps that are made of RESILIA tissue, an innovation developed by Edwards that helps maintain the integrity of the material as well as reducing calcification over the flaps. Unlike many other flaps, this technology allows it to come packaged dry and ready for implantation.
September 29, 2016
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Edwards SAPIEN 3 Cardiac Valve FDA Approved for Mitral and Aortic Valve-in-Valve Procedures
Edwards Lifesciences received FDA approval for its SAPIEN 3 transcatheter prosthetic heart valve to be used for valve-in-valve procedures. Indicated for placement within both the aortic and mitral valves in patients at risk of undergoing open heart surgery to remove an existing valve, the SAPIEN 3 can reside within a previously implanted bioprosthetic valve that has begun to fail.
June 6, 2017
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Edwards Transcatheter Valves now Available for a Lot More Patients
Edwards Lifesciences won an important approval from the FDA to make the company's two transcatheter heart valves be available for many patients who are not at extreme mortal threat from open heart surgery or serious post-op complications.
August 19, 2016
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EKG results for A-fib: what do they look like?
Atrial fibrillation is a heart condition that causes the heart to beat in irregular time. the heart's beat is the result of an electrical conduction system that sends message from one part of the heart to another in a chain-like reaction.
March 30, 2017
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Eko DUO, a Novel Mobile Stethoscope with ECG Capability Unveiled
Eko, the company that's responsible for the Eko CORE digital stethoscope we highly praised, is now releasing an interesting new device that provides ECG and auscultation capabilities in a mobile package. The Eko DUO looks a bit like a cell phone from the 1990's, but with only three buttons on its body. When held against the chest, it provides both a 1-lead ECG and auscultation comparable to a standard stethoscope.
June 9, 2017
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Electronic Patch Seeded with Patient's Own Heart Cells for Advanced Monitoring, Treatment of Cardiac Conditions
Over the past few years we've covered a number of electronic patches designed to be biocompatible with the human body to allow for long-term monitoring of various health parameters. We've also seen scaffolds that can host cardiac cells to be used as material to repair heart tissue injured from events such as heart attacks.
July 11, 2016
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Elevated troponin I should not rule out donor hearts
Donor cardiac troponin I level is not associated with intermediate-term mortality, cardiac allograft vasculopathy or primary graft failure in patients receiving heart transplants, US researchers report.
June 28, 2016
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Emory researchers reveal 'matchmaker' role for protein linked to SMA
A puzzling question has lurked behind SMA (spinal muscular atrophy), the leading genetic cause of death in infants.
February 14, 2017
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Engineering nanomaterials to deliver precise treatments for heart disease
Northwestern University researchers have demonstrated an enhanced approach to using nanomaterials to target inflammatory cells involved in atherosclerosis. the findings, published in the journal ACS Nano, could lead to improved diagnosis and treatment of atherosclerosis, a leading cause of heart disease.
January 12, 2017
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Europe Clears FA100 SCCD Sequential Contraction Compression Device
FlowAid Medical Technologies, a company based in New York City, won the CE Mark in Europe for its FA100 SCCD Sequential Contraction Compression Device. the FA100 uses four electrodes stuck to the skin over the calf on each leg to generate muscle contractions that improve venous outflow from the legs.
August 18, 2016
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Even a Little Exercise May Help Younger Women's Hearts
Those active about 2.5 hours a week had 25 percent lower disease risk than those who weren't, study found
July 25, 2016
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Even 'Good' Insurance Comes with Hidden Hospital Bills
Quality private health insurance is no protection against large out-of-pocket bills following routine hospital stays, a new study warns.
June 27, 2016
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Even High-Fat Mediterranean Diet Good for You
Still protected against diabetes, heart disease and breast cancer
July 19, 2016
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Excessive weight at young age increases risk of heart failure
It comes down to starting healthy habits early. Fortunately, it's never too late to adopt a healthier lifestyle, and losing weight is great for reducing your risk of heart attack. But you can still be at a higher risk for other heart problems if you're late in changing your habits.
June 29, 2016
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Exercise and Vitamin D: a Heart-Healthy Combo
Together, the two offer more protection against disease than either does alone, study suggests
May 1, 2017
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Exercise May Help the Heart Survive a Heart Attack
Researchers suggest that people who work out might develop 'collateral' blood vessels in the heart
April 12, 2017
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Exercise, Weight Loss May Cut Heart Failure Risk
Link was stronger for common but difficult-to-treat type of heart failure
February 27, 2017
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Experts develop new genomic testing method for pulmonary hypertension caused by genetic mutation
Pulmonology and genetics experts from two Utah healthcare organizations have collaboratively developed a new diagnostic genomic testing method for a rare form of pulmonary hypertension caused by a genetic mutation they discovered three years ago.
August 09, 2016
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Exposure to cardiovascular risk factors in childhood linked to poorer learning, memory in midlife
A Finnish study coordinated by the Research Centre of Applied and Preventive Cardiovascular Medicine at the University of Turku shows that exposure to cardiovascular risk factors, such as high blood pressure, elevated serum LDL-cholesterol and smoking in childhood and adolescence, is associated with poorer learning ability and memory in middle age.
May 3, 2017
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Exposure to road and rail traffic noise increases risk of heart attack
Your risk of heart attack increases with the amount of traffic noise to which you are exposed. the increase in risk - though slight - is greatest with road and rail traffic noise, less with aircraft noise. Such are the conclusions reached by Andreas Seidler and co-authors in the Deutsches arzteblatt International after evaluating information from statutory health insurers on over a million Germans over the age of 40.
July 28, 2016
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Extensive surgical repair of type A aortic dissection results in better long-term outcomes
Cardiac surgeons are successfully performing more extensive surgical repairs of type A aortic dissection -- one of the highest risk operations in cardiothoracic surgery. These new surgical techniques, along with improved postoperative care, are resulting in better long-term outcomes and lower rates of complications, according to an article published online today in The Annals of Thoracic Surgery.
June 6, 2017
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Misc. - F

Face cooling may temporarily prevent cardiovascular shutdown following blood loss
Applying ice water to the face may be a simple and quick method for first responders to temporarily prevent cardiovascular shutdown in casualties who have lost a lot of blood. Such a tool could be an effective way to buy time until the patient - whether in a civilian or combat setting - receives proper medical care.
April 27, 2017
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Fat metabolism in live fish: Real-time lipid biochemistry observed
Studying how our bodies metabolize lipids such as fatty acids, triglycerides, and cholesterol can teach us about cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and other health problems, as well as reveal basic cellular functions. But the process of studying what happens to lipids after being consumed has been both technologically difficult and expensive to accomplish until now.
May 8, 2017
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Fat Near Heart a Hazard for Postmenopausal Women
Study ties 'paracardial' fat to raised risk of hardening of the arteries
January 31, 2017
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Fat stem cells can lower risk of Diabetes in healthy obese individuals
Obesity is responsible for the deaths of over three million people a year worldwide due to its associated diseases such as diabetes, cancer and cardiovascular disease.
September 16, 2016
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FDA approves Absorb GT1 BVS to treat coronary artery disease
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved the first fully absorbable stent to treat coronary artery disease. the Absorb GT1 Bioresorbable Vascular Scaffold System (BVS), which releases the drug everolimus to limit the growth of scar tissue, is gradually absorbed by the body in approximately three years.
July 5, 2016
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FDA Approves Edwards INTUITY Elite Aortic Valve
Edwards Lifesciences won FDA approval for its INTUITY Elite aortic valve replacement system. the device is intended for minimally invasive implantation, even importing some characteristics from the company's existing transcatheter devices that make the process easier.
August 16, 2016
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FDA Cleared: Medtronic's Reveal LINQ Insertable Cardiac Monitor with TruRhythm Detection
Medtronic won FDA clearance for its Reveal LINQ Insertable Cardiac Monitor with TruRhythm Detection. the device is used to spot and analyze difficult to diagnose arrhythmias over periods as long as three years. It is an upgrade of the original Reveal LINQ, now sporting algorithms that significantly reduce the number of false positive cases of atrial fibrillation, bradycardia, and false pause episodes.
March 14, 2017
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Female migraine patients have increased cardiovascular disease risk
Women who suffer from migraine headaches have a slightly increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease in later life. a team of researchers led by Prof. Tobias Kurth, Head of the Institute of Public Health (IPH) at Charite - Universitatsmedizin Berlin, has now been able to establish the following: female migraine patients have a higher risk of stroke or heart attacks than women without migraine.
June 15, 2016
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Fertility treatment failure may harm women's heart health
Researchers found that women who did not become pregnant after undergoing gonadotropin-based fertility therapy - treatment often used in preparation for in vitro fertilization (IVF) and other assisted reproductive technologies - were at greater risk of heart failure and stroke than those whose fertility therapy was successful.
March 13, 2017
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Financial barriers to healthcare may lead to worse outcomes in young heart attack patients
In the year following a heart attack, financial barriers to healthcare are linked to worse health outcomes in young women and young men, according to a new study by Yale School of Medicine researchers published in the current issue of the Journal of the American Heart Association (JAHA).
October 20, 2016
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First look at Omron Evolv: Smart blood pressure tracking on Android
Second in a series of how Phil is trying to not die of high blood pressure after years and years of running Android Central. (And doing other unhealthy things.)
February 10, 2017
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First-Born Children More Intelligent: Study
First-born children tend to be more intelligent than their siblings, perhaps because they get extra parental attention in early life compared to siblings, a new study finds.
February 9, 2017
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Fitbit adds heart rate monitoring to its Alta line and improves sleep tracking
Fitbit's big smartwatch announcement is, it seems, still a ways off. But the company's got a pair of announcements this week, including an update to its popular Alta tracker and changes to the way it gathers sleep tracking.
March 6, 2017
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Fitbit proves heart rate monitors can be slim with new Alta HR
This might be the tracker you want to wear both day and night.
March 6, 2017
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Fitbit's new Alta HR tracks heart rate and sleep for a week
There's a new Fitbit coming, and it's got a week's worth of battery life, a stylish look, and a heart rate monitor.
March 6, 2017
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Five simple tests provide more accurate assessment of heart-disease risk
Five simple medical tests together provide a broader and more accurate assessment of heart-disease risk than currently used methods, cardiologists at UT Southwestern Medical Center found.
March 31, 2017
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Flow diversion shows high rate of visual improvement in patients with paraclinoid aneurysms
Aneurysms of the paraclinoid region of the internal carotid artery (ICA) and the interventions used to treat them often result in visual impairment.
July 27, 2016
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Following a healthy lifestyle can greatly reduce genetic heart attack risk
Even among those at highest genetic risk, lifestyle factors can reduce incidence by one half
November 15, 2016
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Fraunhofer scientists show how seaweed has potential to substitute salt
Salt (sodium chloride) is an essential nutrient, but one that is often present in surprising quantities in industrially processed foods. Consuming too much sodium puts strain on the heart, stomach and kidneys. Fraunhofer researchers show how seaweed, which has a naturally salty taste, has the potential to replace salt.
July 7, 2016
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Function of olfactory receptor in the human heart identified
The new findings may be relevant in the long term for diabetic patients and patients with increased heart rates
February 8, 2017
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Functional Effects of Human Stem Cell Delivery to Heart Muscle After Heart Attack
Researchers delivered human stem cells seeded in biological sutures to the damaged heart muscles of rats following induced acute myocardial infarction and assessed the effects on cardiac function one week later. the differences in mechanical function at a local and global level when stem cell seeded sutures were used compared to sutures without stem cells have now been documented.
October 19, 2016
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Misc. - G

Gallstones Linked to Higher Heart Disease Risk
Researcher says study highlights a connection between the gut and the cardiovascular system
August 18, 2016
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Gasotransmitters in the body could potentially be used to develop new drugs
Gases once thought of only as environmental pollutants are now known to be produced by the body. they could potentially be used to develop drugs to treat diseases including heart failure and cancer.
August 08, 2016
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GE Healthcare Launches Vivid iq Portable Cardiovascular Ultrasound
GE Healthcare has recently announced the global launch of its new generation of high-end portable compact cardiovascular ultrasounds, the Vivid iq.
September 23, 2016
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Global Mycobacterium chimaera outbreak linked to heater-cooler devices used in cardiac surgery
A global outbreak of Mycobacterium chimaera, an invasive, slow-growing bacterium, is linked to heater-cooler devices (HCD) used in cardiac surgery, according to a study published today in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, the journal of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. this study adds interim guidance to recent field reports on the outbreak, providing precautionary recommendations to hospitals and health systems to reduce the risk of infections.
November 14, 2016
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'Good' cholesterol levels reduced with high air pollution exposure
A wealth of studies have suggested a link between exposure to air pollution and a greater risk of cardiovascular disease. new research suggests that the effects of such pollution on levels of "good" cholesterol may be to blame.
April 14, 2017
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Google Cardboard saves baby's life
A toy-like cardboard contraption that sells for less than $20 online has helped save the life of a baby who was so sick that doctors told her parents to take her home to die.
January 7, 2016
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Google's AI subsidiary turns to blockchain technology to track UK health data
Forays by Google subsidiary DeepMind Health into the UK's medical institutions have been characterized by two major themes. First, amazing results powered by cutting-edge AI; and second, a lack of transparency over the handling of the UK's public-funded data. with the science going swimmingly, DeepMind Health is focusing more than ever on reassuring UK citizens that their medical records are in safe hands. Its latest plan is a public ledger that shows which bits of data it's using; when; and for what purposes.
March 10, 2017
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GORE TIGRIS, a Third Generation Stent with Flexibility, Strength, Anti-Thrombus Technology, FDA Approved
This gives it impressive strength and flexibility to resist the mechanical forces applied by either superficial femoral artery (SFA) or proximal popliteal artery (PPA), depending on the site of implantation. In a study that led to the FDA approval, the GORE TIGRIS had no fractures at all while 27% of the control devices experienced fractures.
August 08, 2016
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Groundbreaking research opens door for prevention of cardiac fibrosis
Groundbreaking research from the University of Alberta and McGill University has opened the door towards the future prevention of cardiac fibrosis–a condition leading to heart failure for which there is currently no treatment.
July 27, 2016
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Gut microbiome can influence common dietary compound linked to heart disease
In the last five years, some scientists have cautioned against eating eggs and meat because these foods generate a common dietary compound, trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO), that research has suggested plays a role in heart disease.
August 11, 2016
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Misc. - H

Heart Disease Health Center
Heart disease, such as coronary heart disease, heart attack, congestive heart failure, and congenital heart disease, is the leading cause of death for men and women in the U.S. Prevention includes quitting smoking, lowering cholesterol, controlling high blood pressure, maintaining a healthy weight, and exercising.
November 30, 2016
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Heart drug could reduce Diabetes related blindness, researchers discover
A drug, originally developed to treat cardiovascular disease, has the potential to reduce Diabetes related blindness, researchers have discovered. According to recent WHO global estimates, 422 million people have diabetes, and one of the most common complications of this disease is vision loss.
June 14, 2016
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Heart Failure Drug Shows Promise in Human Trial
Cimaglermin appears to strengthen cells and improve heart function, researchers report
December 27, 2016
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Heart failure more fatal than common cancers
A new study shows that men and women suffering from heart failure have a higher risk of death than people with most common types of cancer.
May 4, 2017
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Heart Health Might be a Matter of Geography
U.S. counties where cardiovascular death rates are high or low sometimes sit side-by-side, study finds
May 16, 2017
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Heart Rate Wristband Monitors Often Inaccurate
In test of 4 models, 2 provided 'suboptimal' readings during exercise; none as accurate as chest strap
October 12, 2016
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Heart Risk Factors Rise Before Menopause
'Danger zone' for women earlier than thought, study finds
August 03, 2016
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Heart Rhythm Disorder May be Tied to Range of Ills
Review links atrial fibrillation to increased risk for heart and kidney problems, not just stroke
September 7, 2016
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'Heart-on-chip' technology could ensure potentially lifesaving new drugs
Prescription drugs have enabled millions of Americans with chronic medical conditions to live longer and more fulfilling lives, but many promising new drugs never make it to the human trials stage due to the potential for cardiac toxicity.
May 11, 2017
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Heart-resident macrophages promote neutrophil recruitment after ischemic injury
Tissue injury, such as occurs in response to a lack of oxygen, promotes an influx of immune cells to the site of damage. After an ischemic injury to the heart, such as occurs after a heart attack or heart transplant, these responses are often maladaptive, resulting in decreased contractility and possible failure. Innate immune cells called neutrophils infiltrate the heart and are linked to pathogenic responses following an ischemic event; however, it is not clear how these cells are recruited to the site of damage.
August 05, 2016
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HeartIn, a Workout T-Shirt With ECG Built Right In
HeartIn, a company with offices in Silicon Valley and Kyiv, Ukraine, recently launched a Kickstarter campaign to help bring to market a t-shirt with built-in electrocardiography (ECG) capabilities. The technology is aimed at helping athletes optimize their workout routines by having a better idea of how the heart is doing during various exercise regimens.
June 1, 2017
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Hidden dental root tip infections may increase risk of coronary artery disease
Hidden dental root tip infections are very common: as many as one in four Finns suffers from at least one. Such infections are usually detected by chance from X-rays.
August 02, 2016
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High blood pressure in middle age could be potential risk factor for Alzheimer's disease
High blood pressure in middle age can lead to impaired cognition and is a potential risk factor for Alzheimer's disease, according to a statement from the American Heart Association co-authored by Loyola Medicine neurologist Jose Biller, MD.
October 26, 2016
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High blood pressure linked to racial segregation in neighborhoods
Living in racially segregated neighborhoods is associated with a rise in the blood pressure of black adults, while moving away from segregated areas is associated with a decrease -- and significant enough to lead to reductions in heart attacks and strokes, a National Institutes of Health-funded study has found.
May 15, 2017
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High Blood Pressure May not be all Bad in Elderly
Developing it after 80 might help prevent mental decline, research suggests
January 17, 2017
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High blood pressure: Sodium may not be the culprit
Salt has long been vilified as the harbinger of hypertension. However, as research into the condition has delved deeper, it is becoming clear that the story is more complex. the latest study in this arena goes some way toward absolving sodium.
April 25, 2017
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High BP Might Affect some Kids' Thinking Ability
But researchers noted that all of the children still tested within normal ranges
September 29, 2016
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High BP Rates Have Doubled Worldwide Since 1975
Most of the burden lies in poorer nations and not the U.S. and other wealthy countries, study finds
November 16, 2016
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High levels of childhood muscular fitness may protect against metabolic syndrome in adult life
About 20-25 percent of adults have the metabolic syndrome and have increased risk of developing both cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. In this longitudinal study, investigators examined associations between childhood muscular fitness (strength, endurance, and power) and metabolic syndrome - the latter assessed once they reached adulthood.
September 23, 2016
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High levels of two biomarkers can predict risk for adverse cardiac events, research suggests
New research suggests that GlycA, a newly identified blood marker, and C-reactive protein both independently predict major adverse cardiac events, including heart failure and death. Patients who have high levels of both biomarkers are at especially high risk.
March 17, 2017
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High resting heart rate and blood pressure predict increased risk for later mental health disorders
A high resting heart rate and blood pressure in youth predict an increased susceptibility for anxiety disorders, schizophrenia and obsessive-compulsive disorder later in life, reveals an extensive study conducted by the University of Helsinki and the Karolinska Institutet in Stockholm.
October 26, 2016
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High Thyroid Hormone Levels and Stiffer Arteries
Measuring these levels might help identify people at risk of heart disease, researcher says
April 4, 2017
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High-fat, low-sugar diet prior to imaging can help reduce uncertainty in diagnosing cardiac sarcoidosis
Researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago were able to reduce uncertainty in diagnosing cardiac sarcoidosis by having patients consume a high-fat, low-sugar diet for 72 hours prior to diagnostic imaging.
December 20, 2016
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Honeybee study finds link between social behavior and circadian rhythms
Circadian rhythms are internal clocks that determine many of an organism's daily rhythms, for example sleep-wake, feeding, urinary output and hormone production. Aligned with the environment by external forces such as sunlight and ambient temperature, circadian rhythms are important for animal health and survival. Disturbances of the circadian clock are associated with a variety of diseases in humans and animals, including cancer, mental illnesses and metabolic disorders, such as Diabetes and obesity.
June 29, 2016
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Hormone replacement therapy linked to lower risk of atherosclerosis and death in women
Hormone replacement therapy has long been controversial as studies have associated it with health benefits and risks. While some studies suggest that it lowers the risk of osteoporosis and improves some aspects of heart health, others link it to higher risk of cancer and stroke.
March 9, 2017
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HSE researchers uncover new brain mechanism that generates cognitive dissonance
A new study by HSE researchers has uncovered a new brain mechanism that generates cognitive dissonance - a mental discomfort experienced by a person who simultaneously holds two or more contradictory beliefs or values, or experiences difficulties in making decisions. The results of the study have been published in the paper 'Open Access Neural Mechanisms of Cognitive Dissonance (Revised): an EEG Study' in The Journal of Neuroscience.
May 17, 2017
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Hydraulic forces aid to fill the heart's chambers with blood, research finds
Researchers at Karolinska Institutet and KTH Royal Institute of Technology in Sweden have contributed to a recent discovery that the heart is filled with the aid of hydraulic forces, the same as those involved in hydraulic brakes in cars.
February 23, 2017
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Hypertension linked to cognitive issues in children and adolescents
Hypertension, more commonly known as high blood pressure, has increased significantly in children, paralleling the current childhood obesity epidemic. Although we know that adult hypertension can affect the brain, little research has been done on the cognitive effects of childhood hypertension. In a new study scheduled for publication in the Journal of Pediatrics, researchers found that hypertension is associated with cognitive issues in children and adolescents.
September 29, 2016
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Misc. - I

iBeat Smartwatch Promises to Detect Oncoming Cardiac Arrest
Ryan Howard, the founder of Practice Fusion, and Dr. Mehmet Oz, the know-it-all celebrity doctor that's always trying to sell you a miracle, have partnered to release a new heart rate monitoring smartwatch. the iBeat Life Monitor is touted to be able to detect "signs of oncoming cardiac arrest."
October 4, 2016
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ICNC 2017 to unveil future applications of nuclear cardiology and cardiac CT imaging
Future applications of nuclear cardiology and cardiac computed tomography (CT) imaging are set to be revealed at the International Conference on Nuclear Cardiology and Cardiac CT (ICNC) 2017.
April 10, 2017
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Identifying early markers of cardiac dysfunction in pregnancy
Study looks at women with and without preeclampsia
January 23, 2017
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IGF-1 protein may be key to prevent heart disease in older adults
As men and women grow older, their chances for coronary heart disease also increase. Atherosclerosis is a condition in which plaque builds up inside the arteries, which can lead to serious problems, including heart attacks, strokes or even death.
June 16, 2016
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Immune cell may turn heart inflammation into heart failure
Heart inflammation, or myocarditis, is a disorder usually caused by an infection reaching the heart. Although the condition is rare, it can sometimes lead to dilated cardiomyopathy - a leading cause of heart failure in younger adults. new research helps to explain why this happens in some cases and not others, by examining an immune cell that appears to cause heart failure in mice.
March 16, 2017
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Immune cells play surprising role in steady heartbeat
Macrophages boost electrical jolt that causes mouse heart muscle cells to contract
April 20, 2017
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Intensive treatment to lower systolic blood pressure could save many lives
Intensive treatment to lower systolic blood pressure to below 120 would save more than 100,000 lives per year in the United States, according to a study led by Loyola University Chicago researcher Holly Kramer, MD, MPH.
September 15, 2016
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Irregular Heartbeat More Deadly in Blacks: Study
They were twice as likely to suffer stroke, heart failure and death than whites with atrial fibrillation
June 22, 2016
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Irregular Heartbeat Therapy: Harmful to Brain?
Small study shows higher rate of brain lesions in people receiving ablation for ventricular arrhythmias
January 24, 2017
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Is a Low-Salt Diet Always Healthy?
Study claims current guidelines are too restrictive when there's sufficient potassium intake
April 25, 2017
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Misc. - J

Jabra announces truly wireless earbuds that track your heart rate
The Elite Sport will run you $249
September 1, 2016
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Jarvik Heart's new Tiny Pediatric Pump Cleared by FDA for Clinical Trial
Jarvik Heart has announced that its new pediatric heart pump is going on a clinical trial thanks to an FDA Investigational Device Exemption. the Jarvik 15mm left ventricular assist device (LVAD), being about the size of a AA battery, is small enough even for implantation into infants.
October 28, 2016
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Just 14 days of physical inactivity can raise risk of chronic disease
It is well established that a lack of exercise can raise the risk of chronic disease, including type 2 Diabetes and heart disease. New research, however, finds that the risk of such conditions could increase with as little as 2 weeks of inactivity.
May 17, 2017
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Misc. - K

Knocking out lipid-modifying enzyme can boost post-heart attack healing, study shows
Two immune responses are important for recovery after a heart attack -; an acute inflammatory response that attracts leukocyte immune cells to remove dead tissue, followed by a resolving response that allows healing.
May 2, 2017
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Misc. - L

Larger women almost three times more likely to have atrial fibrillation
Atrial fibrillation affects millions of people worldwide and in the United States. new research suggests that women with a larger body surface area may have an increased risk of atrial fibrillation - a type of arrhythmia that can have serious cardiovascular consequences if left untreated.
April 7, 2017
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Length of telomeres may reveal if vitamin D and omega-3 supplements improve heart health, longevity
The length of your telomeres appears to be a window into your heart health and longevity, and scientists are measuring them to see if vitamin D and omega-3 supplements really improve both.
November 14, 2016
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Living at high altitudes linked to lower risk of developing Metabolic Syndrome
Could something as simple as the geographic area in which you live contribute to your risk of developing heart disease and diabetes, or suffering a stroke?
January 30, 2017
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Long work hours may triple risk of life-threatening illnesses in women
Women who put in long hours for the bulk of their careers may pay a steep price: life-threatening illnesses, including heart disease and cancer.
June 16, 2016
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Long-term use of testosterone therapy in hypogonadal men may reduce risk of death from CV disease
Despite the continued controversy surrounding the use of testosterone in men who have testosterone deficiency (hypogonadism), a new study has found that long-term use of testosterone therapy not only improves vigor and vitality, but may reduce the risk of death due to cardiovascular (CV) disease.
February 13, 2017
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Low-oxygen environment leads to heart regeneration in mice, research shows
Normal, healthy heart muscle is well-supplied with oxygen-rich blood. But now cardiologists have been able to regenerate heart muscle by placing mice in an extremely low-oxygen environment.
November 1, 2016
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Lower Cholesterol from a Twice-a-Year Shot?
Injectable drugs could provide major advance in heart-disease prevention, researchers say
November 15, 2016
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Loyola among first health systems to offer absorbable stent to heart patients
Loyola Medicine will be among the first health systems in the country to offer heart patients a new stent that is absorbed by the body once it has served its purpose.
July 7, 2016
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Luminous heart cells
Cell models from stem cells serve an ever-increasing role in research of cardiac dysfunction. Researchers at the Technical University of Munich have succeeded in producing cells which offer new insights into properties of the heart. they installed a molecular sensor into the cells which emits light, and not only makes the cells' electrical activity visible, but also makes it possible for the first time to quickly identify cell types.
September 2, 2016
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Misc. - M

Magnesium supplementation could help reduce risk of strokes, Diabetes and heart disease
A study by scientists at Zhejiang University in China claimed that eating a magnesium rich Mediterranean diet could combat a range of diseases (such as strokes, Diabetes and heart disease) linked to magnesium deficiency. However, they also explained that the daily requirement for magnesium is difficult to achieve through a single serving of any one food item.
December 14, 2016
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Magnets and Nanoparticles for On-Demand Leaky Vessels
Scientists at Rice University have developed a method to open gaps between the endothelial cells that line blood vessels using a magnetic field and iron oxide nanoparticles. The gaps close by themselves after the researchers remove the magnets. They hope that the concept could be used to help deliver larger therapeutic molecules like proteins to specific sites in the body.
June 9, 2017
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MANTA Large Bore Vascular Closure Device Cleared in EU
Essential Medical, a company based in Malvern, Pennsylvania, landed EU CE Mark approval for its MANTA Large Bore Vascular Closure Device, a device designed to improve access site closures following cath lab procedures requiring large openings such as when replacing aortic valves.
July 19, 2016
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Many adults have poor knowledge about severity and prognosis of heart failure
In the largest German survey on heart failure to date, investigators found that the overall awareness of heart failure has not increased over the past decade and is not at a satisfactory level.
March 22, 2017
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Many don't Know how to Handle High Cholesterol
Survey found they know it raises heart risks, but are confused, discouraged about how to lower it
April 11, 2017
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Many good years after heart bypass surgery, but something happens after ten years
The probability of continuing your life following bypass surgery is close to being the same as for the population in general - once a patient has completed the procedure. But a study from Aarhus, Denmark, shows that mortality increases after 8-10 years.
June 7, 2017
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Many older adults may not be receiving AED treatment after potential epilepsy diagnosis
Many older adults with newly diagnosed epilepsy in the United States are being prescribed older anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs), and only half begin treatment with AEDs within the first 30 days of a potential epilepsy diagnosis.
February 8, 2017
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Many Young Adults not Treating High Cholesterol
Guidelines suggest statins could help ward off heart trouble, but too many people are missing out, study finds
January 4, 2017
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Marijuana use associated with increased risk of stroke, heart failure
As marijuana legalization spreads, better understanding of side effects is needed
March 9, 2017
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Marijuana use may raise stroke, heart failure risk
In the United States, marijuana is becoming increasingly legalized for medicinal or recreational purposes. However, new research warns of the harms of marijuana use after finding that the drug may have negative implications for cardiovascular health.
March 10, 2017
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Mayo Clinic launches new blood test that measures plasma ceramides to predict risk for heart disease
Mayo Clinic has launched a new type of blood test that will be used to predict adverse cardiovascular events in patients with progressing coronary artery disease (CAD). the test measures blood concentrations of plasma ceramides, a class of lipids that are highly linked to cardiovascular disease processes. Researchers say this test is especially useful for patients with CAD when it does not improve with treatment or for young patients with premature CAD.
August 11, 2016
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MDI Biological Laboratory researchers receive patent for novel heart disease drug
The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office has announced that it will grant a patent to MDI Biological Laboratory scientists Voot P. Yin, Ph.D., and Kevin Strange, Ph.D., and their collaborator Michael Zasloff, M.D., Ph.D., for use of the small molecule MSI-1436 to stimulate the repair and regeneration of heart tissue damaged by injuries such as a heart attack.
August 23, 2016
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Meat-Heavy Diet May Raise Older Women's Heart Risk
Vegetable protein sources appear safer, study suggests
November 14, 2016
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Meat-Linked Chemical Levels Tied to Heart Risks
Produced when meat, eggs and dairy are digested, TMAO may trigger plaque buildup in vessels, researchers explain
January 11, 2017
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Medications, PCI equally beneficial for treating complete blockage in heart's arteries
In patients with a complete blockage in the heart's arteries that persists over time, treatment with medications alone was found to be equal to percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), a procedure to open blocked arteries, in terms of major adverse events over three years, according to a study presented at the American College of Cardiology's 66th Annual Scientific Session.
March 19, 2017
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Medtronic's Claria MRI Quad CRT-D SureScan with EffectivCRT approved by FDA
Medtronic just announced that its Claria MRI Quad Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy Defibrillator (CRT-D) SureScan implant has been approved for use on patients with heart failure. the "MRI" in the name of the device indicates that its safe for magnetic resonance scanning in both 1.5 and 3 Tesla machines, given certain precautions.
November 14, 2016
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Medtronic's SureScan Cardiac Implants approved for 3T MRI Scans Anywhere on Body
Medtronic won FDA approval to allow patients with its SureScan MR-conditional pacemakers, implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs), cardiac resynchronization therapy-defibrillators (CRT-Ds), and accompanying leads, to receive up to 3 Tesla MRI scans over any part of the body.
October 14, 2016
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Meet Moov HR, the ultra-cheap heart-rate sensor you wear on your head
Chest straps are uncomfortable and fitness bands can be unreliable, so Moov is putting a heart rate sensor on your temple.
October 19, 2016
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Meet Withings Steel HR, the heart rate-monitoring activity tracker that looks like a classic watch
Oh, and it has 25-day battery life.
September 1, 2016
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Memory of a heart attack is stored in our genes
Both heredity and environmental factors influence our risk of cardiovascular disease. a new study shows now that the memory of a heart attack can be stored in our genes through epigenetic changes.
September 16, 2016
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Men Face Greater Risk of Cardiac Arrest
Heart disease tends to develop earlier than it does in women, researchers say
June 30, 2016
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Migraine sufferers have more nitrate-reducing microbes in their mouths
The mouths of migraine sufferers harbor significantly more microbes with the ability to modify nitrates than people who do not get migraine headaches, new research has found.
October 18, 2016
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MILabs to provide new hybrid imaging system to Yale for advancing cardiovascular research
MILabs will provide an advanced U-SPECT4CT system to the Yale Translational Research Imaging Center (Y-TRIC) in new Haven-Connecticut, with support of an NIH Shared Instrument Grant for advancing their program in multimodality molecular and translational cardiovascular imaging research.
August 17, 2016
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Mobile device detects irregular heartbeats, helps to prevent cerebral infarctions
A research team has developed a mobile app and thumb-size device that help to prevent cerebral infarctions at an early stage, during asymptomatic atrial fibrillation. the mobile device detects arrhythmia (irregular heartbeat) has been tested with excellent results for around two years in real-life conditions. An irregular heartbeat tends to remain undiagnosed, if no symptoms are detected during Holter monitoring of heart activity.
September 19, 2016
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MOCACARE Reveals MOCACuff: a new Wireless Wrist Blood Pressure Monitor
Hypertension affects more than 70 million adults in the United States, and even more individuals remain undiagnosed. Hypertension increases the risk of developing other serious health conditions, such as heart attacks, kidney damage, and stroke. Even though there are multiple devices on the market that enable people to track their blood pressure at home, consumer adoption of these self-monitoring devices has remained somewhat limited due to persistent deficits in design, portability, accuracy, and/or usability.
November 21, 2016
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Moderate to high levels of aerobic capacity could partially reduce risk of sudden cardiac death
UCA researchers, collaborating with the Exercise and Epidemiology Science and Biostatistics Departments from the University of South Carolina in Columbine (USA), have carried out a study focused in knowing how important the aerobic capacity in the sudden death prevention is, paying special attention to those people who have some pathology such as obesity and hypertension.
September 19, 2016
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Monitoring your blood pressure? Careful, 70% of home devices may be inaccurate
The error range is enough to sway decisions about taking or stopping medication.
June 9, 2017
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Morbidly obese individuals more likely to experience heart failure, say researchers
A study by Johns Hopkins researchers of more than 13,000 people has found that even after accounting for such risk factors as high blood pressure, high cholesterol and diabetes, so-called morbid obesity appears to stand alone as a standout risk for heart failure, but not for other major types of heart disease.
August 22, 2016
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Multivitamins May not Help Men's Hearts
Study found no preventive benefit, but more research might still be warranted
April 7, 2017
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Narrative expressive writing after divorce could improve cardiovascular health
Journaling after divorce could improve your cardiovascular health -- but only if you do it in a way that tells a story, new University of Arizona research suggests.
May 8, 2017
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Natural remedies for high cholesterol levels
Cholesterol is a fatty substance in the blood. There are two types of cholesterol. A correct balance between the two is needed for good health.
May 19, 2017
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NCX1 protein could help prevent progression of heart failure
A protein known to be crucial for maintaining the balance of calcium in cells could prove useful in halting the progression of heart failure.
June 24, 2016
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New anticoagulant treatment safe and effective for AF patients before cardioversion
Patients with atrial fibrillation who need anticoagulation before undergoing electrical correction of their abnormal heartbeat may benefit from treatment with edoxoban - a non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulant, according to results of the ENSURE-AF trial.
August 30, 2016
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New app helps heart patients with drug-eluting stents adhere to medications, study finds
A tablet computer application helped heart patients with drug-eluting stents take their medications correctly, a study has found.
January 20, 2017
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New bed sensors can warn older adults of impending heart problems
Congestive heart failure is one of the most common reasons for hospital admissions among those 65 years old and older, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. to help reduce these admissions and the strain they put on the healthcare system, researchers at the University of Missouri have developed bed sensors than can warn older adults of impending heart problems.
February 14, 2017
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New class of cholesterol-lowering drug alongside statins can reduce risk of cardiovascular diseases
A new class of cholesterol-lowering drug has been found to help patients cut their risk of cardiovascular disease, stroke and heart attack.
March 17, 2017
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New drug could help prevent artery disease in high-risk patients
Researchers identify pharmaceutical approach to prevent vascular disease
December 21, 2016
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New educational campaign aims at reducing number of recurrent heart attacks
Every 42 seconds someone in the U.S. has a heart attack. Just after noon on March 26, 2016, Julie Kubala, become one of those statistics. She's working now to ensure she doesn't become a different stat -- about 21 percent of women and 17 percent of men age 45 and older will have another heart attack within five years of their first one.
August 02, 2016
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New generation drug eluting stents show lower efficacy than contemporary BMS, study shows
New generation drug eluting stents (new DES) did not outshine contemporary bare metal stents (BMS) as they were expected to, in a surprise finding of the largest randomized stent trial to date.
August 30, 2016
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New graphene-based system could help us see electrical signaling in heart and nerve cells
Team creates a system to visualize faint electric fields
December 16, 2016
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New heart disease risk genes point to flaws in blood vessel walls
Study aims to identify targets for cardiovascular treatments
May 23, 2017
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New imaging technique may help detect amyloid-related heart failure
A type of heart failure caused by a build-up of amyloid can be accurately diagnosed and prognosticated with an imaging technique, eliminating the need for a biopsy, according to a multicenter study led by researchers at Columbia University Medical Center.
August 24, 2016
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New initiative by UNC Hospitals expedites treatment of patients having STEMI heart attacks
UNC Hospitals launched an initiative aimed at reducing the time it takes hospital staff to recognize when a patient is having a STEMI (ST elevation myocardial infarction) heart attack - the sudden and complete blockage of a heart artery - and to begin appropriate treatment.
September 21, 2016
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New markers linked to recurrence of erratic heartbeats in some patients after ablation therapy
Ablation procedures restore a regular heartbeat in patients who have a dangerous, abnormal heart rhythm called atrial fibrillation. But it doesn't always work. Now, a new study suggests that certain molecules are associated with the recurrence of erratic heartbeats in some patients after ablation therapy.
March 19, 2017
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New method for performing aortic valve replacement proves successful in high-risk patients
Researchers at the National Institutes of Health have developed a new, less invasive way to perform transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR), a procedure widely used to treat aortic valve stenosis, a lethal heart condition. the new approach, called transcaval access, will make TAVR more available to high risk patients, especially women, whose femoral arteries are too small or diseased to withstand the standard procedure.
October 30, 2016
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New method provides cost-effective way to effectively diagnose genetic forms of high-cholesterol
A new genetic testing method developed at Western University called LipidSeq can identify a genetic basis for high-cholesterol in almost 70 per cent of a targeted patient population. Using next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology, researchers were able to pinpoint specific areas of a person's DNA to more effectively diagnose genetic forms of high-cholesterol, which markedly increase risk for heart attack and stroke.
October 20, 2016
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New model shows how globalization may create workplace stress leading to cardiovascular disease
University of California, Irvine and SUNY Downstate Medical Center researchers have created a model illustrating how economic globalization may create stressful employment factors in high-income countries contributing to the worldwide epidemic of cardiovascular disease.
September 15, 2016
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New online tool can help clinicians quantify minimal risk in patients with stable chest pain
A two year follow-up on a study involving more than 10,000 people with stable chest pain finds that an online tool can accurately predict which patients are likely to have normal non-invasive tests and remain free of cardiac events. the study, published in JAMA Cardiology, could lead to better decision making by primary care doctors, by helping them identify patients at minimal risk for heart trouble.
February 15, 2017
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New position paper provides guidance on radiation safety for children with CAHD
Newly released recommendations for pediatric radiation safety will be discussed during the Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions (SCAI) 2017 Scientific Sessions in new Orleans. the position paper, "Radiation Safety in Children with Congenital and Acquired Heart Disease: a Scientific Position Statement on Multimodality Dose Optimization from the Image Gently Alliance," provides cardiologists, radiologists, pediatricians and internal medicine physicians guidance for treating pediatric patients with congenital and acquired heart disease (CAHD).
May 9, 2017
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New report reveals high levels of caffeine in energy drinks could lead to cardiac complications
The high levels of caffeine in energy drinks may lead to cardiac complications, suggests a case report in the July/August Journal of Addiction Medicine, the official journal of the American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM).
August 02, 2016
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New research sheds light on underlying genetic basis of heart arrhythmias
In the August 31 issue of Science Translational Medicine, new research from the University of Chicago shows how deficits in a specific pathway of genes can lead to the development of atrial fibrillation, a common irregular heartbeat, which poses a significant health risk.
August 31, 2016
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New research shows high and low levels of HDL cholesterol may increase risk of early death
Commonly touted as "good cholesterol" for helping to reduce risk of stroke and heart attack, both high and low levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol may increase a person's risk of premature death, according to new research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and Veterans Affairs St. Louis Health Care System.
August 11, 2016
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New review addresses mysteries behind 'good' HDL cholesterol metabolism
A new review addresses the mysteries behind "good" HDL cholesterol and why boosting its levels does not necessarily provide protection from cardiovascular risk for patients. It appears that augmenting the function of HDL cholesterol, rather than its concentration, is key.
March 22, 2017
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New Steerable Cardiac Catheter Reaches Challenging Targets
King's College London researchers have prototyped a new steerable cardiac ablation catheter technology and worked with Cambridge Design Partnership (Cambridge, UK) to develop it into a device that's ready for testing.
August 08, 2016
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New study aims to test safety and efficacy of antiplatelet drug in preventing blood clots
The coronary vessels are blocked in coronary heart disease. If physicians dilate the vessels with a catheter, the deposits (plaques) can tear and damage the walls of the blood vessels. Such small damages are a risk factor for circulatory disorders and heart attacks, as platelets can adhere to these sites and clots can form. Patients therefore receive blood thinning drugs that prevent platelet accumulation during the procedure.
April 28, 2017
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New study reveals impact of race, gender and socioeconomic status on PCI outcomes
A first-of-its-kind study discovered that women and minorities who underwent a percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) are at a greater risk of experiencing recurrent cardiac events within the first year after their procedure compared to Caucasian men. Those outcomes may be attributable to their race, gender and socioeconomic status rather than the PCI procedure itself.
May 12, 2017
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New study reveals startling trend in mortality rates from heart disease and stroke
After more than a decade of steady improvements, the decline in mortality rates from heart disease and stroke has slowed nationally and nearly leveled out since 2011, according to a new analysis from Kaiser Permanente published in JAMA Cardiology.
June 29, 2016
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New study suggests major change in treatment of significant number of ACS patients
More than one quarter of heart attack patients who are normally treated with stents to re-open their blocked arteries might be able to forgo this procedure and receive anti-thrombotic medications only, according to results of a pilot study.
August 30, 2016
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New suite of sensors can help monitor patients to prevent heart failure events
A suite of sensors can predict heart failure events by detecting when a patient's condition is worsening, according to Dr. John Boehmer, professor of medicine, Penn State College of Medicine, who presented the findings at the American Heart Association annual meeting in new Orleans.
November 21, 2016
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New technology for measuring heart health and internal age now available worldwide
Following a successful Indiegogo campaign, the technology system for measuring heart health and Internal Age is now available on the consumer market
September 29, 2016
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New test measures blood concentrations of plasma ceramides to predict risk for heart attacks, strokes
A new type of blood test may help physicians identify which patients with and without evidence of coronary blockages are at risk for heart attacks and strokes. Even individuals with normal levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL), known as the so-called "bad" cholesterol, but still at risk, seem to be identified, according to Mayo Clinic research being presented at the American College of Cardiology's 66th Annual Scientific Session.
March 10, 2017
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New treatment strategy effective in preventing bleeding in AF patients who underwent PCI, study shows
A new study led by clinician-researchers at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) testing the safety and effectiveness of anticoagulant strategies for patients with atrial fibrillation who undergo stenting procedures has shown that therapies combining the anticoagulant drug rivaroxaban with either single or dual anti-platelet therapy (DAPT) were more effective in preventing bleeding complications than the current standard of care.
November 14, 2016
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New Wireless Heart Pump makes No Contact with Blood
Scientists at the ecole polytechnique federale de Lausanne in Switzerland have developed a completely new type of heart pump that does not make any contact with the blood that it's augmenting. There's a number of pumps on the market, including total heart replacements and left ventricular assist devices, but they all inevitably cause damage to red blood cells. Moreover, the turbulence produced by the pumps can lead to the formation of clots, requiring patients to be on anticoagulants.
June 27, 2016
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Newly funded nanoparticle research project targets abdominal aortic aneurysms
One of the top ten killers for men older than 55 is the target of Clemson University research that could lead to a new life-saving therapy and a better way of telling whether surgery is necessary.
April 12, 2017
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Normal BP in Clinic May Mask Hypertension
Young, lean patients can have high blood pressure that's not caught during regular exams, study finds
December 5, 2016
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Novel antidote effective in quickly reversing acute anticoagulant-related bleeding
A specially designed antidote to reverse acute, potentially life-threatening anticoagulant-related bleeding worked quickly, and was well-tolerated according to interim results of the ongoing ANNEXA-4 study.
August 30, 2016
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NSAIDs may raise heart attack risk in first week of use
When headache or back pain strikes, many of us turn to ibuprofen for some quick relief. a new study, however, finds that using this and other classes of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for as little as 1 week may increase the risk of heart attack.
May 10, 2017
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Misc. - O

Obstructive sleep apnea might lead to irregular heartbeat
Patients with obstructive sleep apnea may be at greater risk of developing atrial fibrillation, or irregular heartbeat, new research finds.
May 23, 2017
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Older adults may not benefit from taking statins to prevent heart disease
While there is evidence to support older adults taking statins for secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease - such as to prevent a second heart attack or stroke - there is limited evidence on the risks and benefits of this age group taking the cholesterol-lowering medication to prevent a first cardiovascular event.
May 22, 2017
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Older adults with high LDL-C live longer than peers with low levels of same cholesterol, say experts
A University of South Florida professor and an international team of experts have found that older people with high levels of a certain type of cholesterol, known as low-density lipoprotein (LDL-C), live as long, and often longer, than their peers with low levels of this same cholesterol.
June 27, 2016
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Older Drug May Help Type 1 Diabetics' Heart Health
Metformin appears to have cardiovascular benefits, researchers report
September 6, 2016
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Opioids Raise Deadly Heart Risks for Some
Much of the risk for early death was related to cardiovascular complications, not overdoses
June 14, 2016
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Optical and PET/CT activity-based probes could help in non-invasive imaging of atherosclerotic plaques
Researchers at Stanford University have demonstrated for the first time the use of a dual optical and PET/CT activity-based probe to detect atherosclerotic plaques.
October 20, 2016
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Optical Defibrillation to Soothe Arrhythmic Hearts
While electric cardiac defibrillators are successful life-saving devices that have been used in practice for many years now, they are extremely shocking (forgive the pun) and potentially harmful to cardiac tissue when they fire. a new approach, that of optical defibrillation, may be a lot more tender and maybe even pleasant to get an arrhythmic heart into a normal rhythm.
September 13, 2016
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OPTICARE study shows year-long CR program makes heart patients happier, healthier and active
Enhanced cardiac rehabilitation (CR) programs that include a year of group or personal lifestyle and fitness coaching did not improve cardiovascular risk scores more than a standard 3-month program in patients recovering from a heart attack.
August 30, 2016
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OU study identifies numeracy as decision delay risk factor for individuals experiencing ACS
In a recent study to determine why some individuals who experience symptoms for acute coronary syndrome decide to seek medical attention more quickly than others, a University of Oklahoma researcher has identified numeracy -- the ability to understand and apply numerical concepts as the primary decision delay risk factor for individuals experiencing the medical condition. Cardiovascular disease, which includes conditions such as acute coronary syndrome, is the number one killer worldwide responsible for about one in three deaths.
February 28, 2017
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Over 100 Drugs Pose Risk to Heart Failure Patients
- More than a hundred drugs and supplements, including common medications bought over the counter, may pose a danger to people with heart failure or at risk of heart failure.
July 12, 2016
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Misc. - P

Pain Tolerance Tied to 'Silent' Heart Attack Risk
Unusual symptoms include upper back or jaw pain, shortness of breath and nausea, cardiologist says
December 21, 2016
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Panasonic developing a new camera tech that can measure your heart rate
In the near future, there won't be a need for dedicated heart rate measuring hardware on your phone. Panasonic has announced that its developing a camera tech that can read your pulse just by looking at you.
February 28, 2017
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Paper test strip could help heart failure patients monitor their condition at home
Contrary to the condition's name, heart failure doesn't mean the heart has stopped pumping -- it's just not working at full strength. It can often be managed with medications and lifestyle changes, but its progression needs to be monitored closely. Now scientists have developed a new test strip that could potentially allow patients to do this at home for the first time.
May 24, 2017
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Paper test strip could help heart failure patients monitor their condition at home
Contrary to the condition's name, heart failure doesn't mean the heart has stopped pumping -- it's just not working at full strength. It can often be managed with medications and lifestyle changes, but its progression needs to be monitored closely. Now scientists have developed a new test strip that could potentially allow patients to do this at home for the first time.
May 24, 2017
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Paroxysmal atrial fibrillation: Causes, symptoms, and treatment
Atrial fibrillation, also known as AFib, is the most common form of arrhythmia, which is a condition where a person experiences heart rhythm problems.
March 10, 2017
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Pediatric health educator provides tips for protecting children from heat stroke
Hot temperatures and high humidity can put nearly anyone at risk for dehydration and heat stroke, but children are especially vulnerable.
July 7, 2016
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Penn researchers develop model to predict sudden cardiac death risk
Each year more than 300,000 Americans will succumb to out-of-hospital sudden cardiac death -- the immediate and unexpected cessation of the heart's ability to function properly -- one of the leading causes of death in the United States. for the first time, a team of researchers led by Rajat Deo, MD, MTR, an assistant professor of Cardiovascular Medicine in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, has developed and validated a prediction model to determine sudden cardiac death risk in adults without a history of cardiovascular disease (CVD).
August 23, 2016
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Penn researchers search twitter for tweets about cardiovascular disease
For years, marketers and other commercial data-miners have been using Twitter's vast database of "tweets" to gauge consumer attitudes and track events. now medical researchers are getting in on the trend. Researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania completed a pilot analysis of archived tweets on cardiovascular disease.
September 28, 2016
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Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania
Cigarette smoking accounts for about one fifth of cases of coronary heart disease (CHD), one of the leading causes of death worldwide, but precisely how smoking leads to CHD has long been unclear. Now, a team has uncovered a molecule that may at least partly explain the smoking-CHD connection.
May 2, 2017
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PET/MR shows arterial CO2 as potent vasodilator for cardiac stress testing
Using PET/MR imaging, a new international study demonstrates that increases in partial pressure of arterial carbon dioxide (PaCO2) can safely and efficiently widen blood vessels of the heart during stress tests to help determine heart function.
June 5, 2017
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Pharmacotherapy reduces conduction system disease risk
Lisinopril therapy significantly reduces incident conduction system disease, indicates a post-hoc analysis of ALLHAT data.
June 28, 2016
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Philips announces results from clinical studies comparing iFR- and FFR-guided strategy for assessment of heart disease
Royal Philips today announced that the results from two large clinical trials comparing patient outcomes using instant wave-free ratio and fractional flow reserve in the diagnosis and treatment of heart disease have been published in the new England Journal of Medicine.
March 22, 2017
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Physical activity linked to decreased risk of heart disease and death from all causes in older adults
Being physically inactive--sitting for long periods of time--can be so harmful to your health that experts sometimes call it "sitting disease." In fact, worldwide, physical inactivity is estimated to cause some 3.2 million deaths a year.
January 5, 2017
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Physicians recommend whole food, plant-based eating patterns for optimal heart health
Nutrition researcher Neal Barnard, M.D., F.A.C.C., president and founder of the nonprofit Physicians Committee, is one of 12 authors of "Journal of the American College of Cardiology, which recommends whole food, plant-based eating patterns for optimal heart health.
March 3, 2017
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Poor Diet Tied to Heart Disease, Diabetes Deaths
Study explores which foods and nutrients may be helpful or harmful
March 7, 2017
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Poor diet to blame for almost half of CVD deaths
It is well established that a poor diet can raise the risk of cardiovascular death. new research, however, sheds light on the leading dietary risk factors for death from cardiovascular disease, as well as how many cardiovascular deaths these risk factors equate to.
March 10, 2017
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Preconsumption of red wine can prevent short-term vascular injury caused by smoking
Drinking red wine is widely regarded as protective against cardiovascular disease. a new report in the American Journal of Medicine found that a glass or two of red wine before lighting up a cigarette can counteract some of the short-term negative effects of smoking on blood vessels.
November 15, 2016
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Prevalence of atrial fibrillation in haemodialysis patients higher than previously thought
Atrial fibrillation, which is the most common cardiac arrhythmia, is an important risk factor for strokes. a multi-centre study led by MedUni Vienna shows that the prevalence of atrial fibrillation in haemodialysis patients in Vienna is significantly higher than previously thought. Moreover, only half of the patients affected are treated with an anticoagulant.
January 16, 2017
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Prevalence of high blood pressure found to be six times higher among obese Hispanic adolescents
Obesity raises the prevalence of high blood pressure among adolescents but the increase is particularly pronounced among Hispanics compared to white, African-American or Asian ethnic groups, according to a study by researchers at McGovern Medical School at the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth).
April 11, 2017
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Progress Against Heart Deaths Starting to Wane
Obesity, Diabetes epidemics may be to blame, doctors say
June 29, 2016
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Promising new drug may offer effective treatment for heart failure patients
Heart failure patients who are getting by on existing drug therapies can look forward to a far more effective medicine in the next five years or so, thanks to University of Alberta researchers.
March 8, 2017
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Protein-based CHD risk score developed
Researchers have screened over 1000 plasma proteins to develop a predictive score in patients with stable coronary heart disease .
June 22, 2016
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Prytime's ER-REBOA Emergency Aorta Occluder Cleared in Europe
Xconomy is reporting that Prytime Medical Devices, a company based outside of San Antonio, Texas formerly known as Pryor Medical Devices, won CE Mark clearance to introduce its ER-REBOA emergency occlusion balloon catheter in Europe. Designed to occlude large vessels, the aorta in particular, it provides time for doctors to stabilize a patient before too much blood loss occurs.
November 16, 2016
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Psoriasis treatments may help improve cardiovascular symptoms by reducing skin inflammation
Approximately 7.5 million people in the United States have psoriasis, and the impact of this disease goes far beyond its visible effects on the skin.
July 28, 2016
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Pure hypercholesterolemia: Causes, symptoms, and treatment
Pure hypercholesterolemia or familial hypercholesterolemia is a condition where a person has high cholesterol levels due to a genetic abnormality.
March 3, 2017
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Misc. - R

Race impacts adverse outcomes in atrial fibrillation
Black individuals with atrial fibrillation have markedly higher rates of stroke, heart failure, coronary heart disease and mortality than their White counterparts, data from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study show.
June 24, 2016
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Radio Signals Measure Heart Rate, Its Variability Almost as Accurately as ECG
In a slightly disturbing development for poker players everywhere, researchers at MIT are now able to use a radio transmitter to accurately measure a person's heart rate and heart rate variability, and to figure out whether that person is happy, sad, angry, or excited. In healthcare the technology may end up being used to keep an eye on patient health and maybe to even help in diagnosing anxiety, depression, and other psychiatric conditions.
September 22, 2016
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Raised blood platelet levels 'strong predictor' of cancer
Having a high blood platelet count is a strong predictor of cancer and should be urgently investigated to save lives, according to a large-scale study.
May 23, 2017
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Rapid blood pressure drops in middle age linked to dementia in old age
Temporary episodes of dizziness or light-headedness when standing could reduce blood flow to the brain with lasting impacts
March 10, 2017
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Real-world analysis questions very low LDL targets
Patients treated for hypercholesterolaemia in clinical practice may not derive additional benefit from very intensive statin treatment, say researchers.
June 22, 2016
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Real-world study of robotic PCI shows high success rates for patients across multiple sites
The largest real-world study of robotic percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) demonstrated clinical and technical success for patients across multiple sites using multiple operators. Results from the PRECISION trial (Efficacy and Safety Outcomes of Radial- vs Femoral-Access Robotic Percutaneous Coronary Intervention: Final Results of the Multicenter PRECISION Registry) were presented today as a late-breaking clinical trial at the Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions (SCAI) 2017 Scientific Sessions in new Orleans.
May 12, 2017
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'Red Yeast Rice' Statin Alternative not Harmless
The supplements linked to muscle pain, other adverse effects similar to statins
January 24, 2017
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Reduced kidney function is major contributor of cardiovascular deaths
A new analysis indicates that by 2013, cardiovascular deaths attributed to reduced kidney function outnumbered kidney failure deaths throughout the world. the findings, which appear in an upcoming issue of the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology (JASN), provide insights on the true impact of kidney disease on societies and underscore the importance of screening for kidney disease.
April 17, 2017
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Reducing cholesterol to level of newborn baby lowers cardiovascular disease risk, research finds
Reducing our cholesterol levels to those of a new-born baby significantly lowers the risk of cardiovascular disease, according to new research.
December 16, 2016
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Regular Drinkers, Irregular Heartbeat?
Even moderate amounts of alcohol may contribute to atrial fibrillation, study suggests
December 5, 2016
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Rehabilitation programme for heart disease could help bowel cancer patients
Could rehabilitation programmes for heart disease patients be used to help people recovering from bowel cancer get back on their feet? That's the question cancer care experts at the University of Stirling have been exploring.
September 28, 2016
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ReliantHeart's New, More Powerful and Efficient aVAD Pump Wins European Approval
ReliantHeart has announced that its aVAD intraventricular heart pump won approval in the European union, allowing the company to begin implants in the coming months. the device, while only 2.5 centimeters in diameter, still has a 1.2 cm main channel for the blood to flow through. It rests outside the ventricle, while a component that is inserted into the heart contains an adjustable pump depth mechanism to provide optimal action for individual patients.
August 04, 2016
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Research finds link between insomnia and increased risk of heart attack, stroke
Insomnia is associated with increased risk of heart attack and stroke, according to research published today in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology.
March 31, 2017
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Research finds low rates of oral anticoagulant use in hospitalized atrial fibrillation patients
When patients suffer from atrial fibrillation, an irregular heartbeat, they are at considerably higher risk for blood clots and stroke. However, when hospitalized, half of these patients do not receive medications that could help prevent such complications, according to research being presented Nov. 14 at the American Heart Association Scientific Sessions.
November 14, 2016
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Research provides insight into link between chronic pain and anxiety
New research provides insight into a long-observed, but little-understood connection between chronic pain and anxiety and offers a potential target for treatment. the study's findings, published as an Article in Press in Biological Psychiatry, show that increased expression of PACAP - a peptide neurotransmitter the body releases in response to stress - is also increased in response to neuropathic pain and contributes to these symptoms.
August 31, 2016
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Research reveals role of endoglin in shaping blood and cardiac cell fate during early development
New research from the University of Minnesota reveals endoglin as a critical factor in determining the fate of early undifferentiated cells during development. Endoglin, a receptor involved in cell signaling, has previously been known mostly for its function in blood vessels and angiogenesis. In a new paper published in the journal Nature Communications, researchers showed endoglin modulates key signaling pathways to encourage early cells to develop into blood cells at the expense of the heart.
October 7, 2016
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Research shows the Apple watch can detect an early sign of heart disease
A new study indicates that the Apple Watch's heart rate sensor can accurately recognize atrial fibrillation, which often has no symptoms but can lead to stroke.
May 11, 2017
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Researchers aim to explore impact of gender and aging on CapZ levels in the heart
Why do women have lower rates of heart failure than men for most of their lives?
July 7, 2016
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Researchers clarify cause of heart arrhythmia in myotonic dystrophy
An international joint research group found that the cause of heart arrhythmia in myotonic dystrophy was RNA abnormalities in the sodium channel in the heart, clarifying the symptom's mechanism. this finding will be helpful in prevention and early intervention of death in this disease, leading to the development of new treatment.
June 16, 2016
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Researchers create 3-D beating heart
Matters of the heart can be complicated, but York University scientists have found a way to create 3D heart tissue that beats in synchronized harmony, like a heart in love, that will lead to better understanding of cardiac health and improved treatments.
February 10, 2017
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Researchers develop 'living diode' using cardiac muscle cells
Scientists are one step closer to mimicking the way biological systems interact and process information in the body a vital step toward developing new forms of biorobotics and novel treatment approaches for several muscle-related health problems such as muscular degenerative disorders, arrhythmia and limb loss.
February 14, 2017
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Researchers develop new biomedical polymer to treat atherosclerosis
Researchers at Ben-Gurion University (BGU) and the Sheba Medical Center have developed a new therapy to treat atherosclerosis and prevent heart failure with a new biomedical polymer that reduces arterial plaque and inflammation in the cardiovascular system.
May 22, 2017
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Researchers develop new, less invasive method to perform TAVR for treating aortic valve stenosis
Researchers at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) have developed a new, less invasive way to perform transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR), a procedure widely used to treat aortic valve stenosis, a lethal heart condition. the new approach, called transcaval access, will make TAVR more available to high risk patients, especially women, whose femoral arteries are too small or diseased to withstand the standard procedure.
October 30, 2016
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Researchers discover mitochondrial "circuit breaker' that protects heart from damage
Two newly identified mechanisms may lead to better understanding of disease, new treatments.
April 18, 2017
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Researchers examine combined impact of BMI and physical activity on cardiovascular disease
The benefits of physical activity may outweigh the impact of overweight and obesity on cardiovascular disease in middle-aged and elderly people, according to research published today in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology. the observational study was conducted in more than 5,000 people aged 55 years and older who were followed-up for 15 years.
March 1, 2017
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Researchers explore correlation between sugar intake and coronary artery disease
What connection is there between food and drink with added sugar and coronary artery disease? Until recently, the question had been inadequately answered by research, but an extensive study from Lund University in Sweden has now contributed important clues.
November 3, 2016
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Researchers identify biomarkers to improve prognosis of CKD
Currently, there is no effective method to predict the prognosis of chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. Tomonori Kimura and Yoshitaka Isaka, researchers in Department of Nephrology, Osaka University, found that measuring D-amino acids, which present only trace in human, provides prognostic information of CKD.
July 27, 2016
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Researchers identify heart defects in progeria patients that may raise risk of arrhythmias, premature death
Researchers at the Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Cardiovasculares Carlos III (CNIC), working in collaboration with colleagues at other centers in Spain and abroad, have identified defects in the hearts of progeria patients that appear to be related to an elevated risk of arrhythmias and premature death.
November 2, 2016
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Researchers implant the first 3D-printed blood vessels into monkeys
Scientists at Sichuan Revotek and the Regenerative Medicine Research Center of West China Hospital at Sichuan University have successfully embedded 3D-printed blood vessels into simian test subjects. the vessels, which are made of stem cell-based organic material, were a major breakthrough in vascular regeneration.
December 14, 2016
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Researchers uncover specific sites in the genome linked to high blood pressure
Three large, collaborating international consortia of researchers, including a team co-led by investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH), have uncovered new genes and sites in the genome tied to elevated blood pressure, implicating certain biological pathways and pointing toward new therapeutic strategies for treating hypertension.
September 12, 2016
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Researchers use Syngene's G:BOX Chemi XRQ image analysis system in cardiac research
Syngene, a world-leading manufacturer of image analysis solutions is delighted to announce that the G:BOX Chemi XRQ high resolution, multi-application image analysis system is being successfully used at the Lithuanian University of Health Sciences Academy of Medicine to study molecular mechanisms of cardiac stem cell function which could help in developing stem cell therapies for heart repair.
March 17, 2017
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Respiratory infections raise heart attack risk by 17 times
Every year, hundreds of thousands of people have a heart attack. new research suggests that both mild and severe respiratory infections might make some people more susceptible to heart attacks.
May 15, 2017
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Restriction on trans fats in foods could reduce rates of heart attack and stroke
People living in areas that restrict trans fats in foods had fewer hospitalizations for heart attack and stroke compared to residents in areas without restrictions, according to a study led by a Yale researcher. this finding suggests the benefit of limiting trans fats could have widespread impact as trans fat restrictions are set to expand nationwide.
April 12, 2017
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REVERSE II trial validates HERDOO2 rule to help spot women who can discontinue anticoagulants
A clinical decision rule that can be applied to women after a first, unprovoked venous thromboembolism was able to identify those with a low-risk of recurrence who could safely discontinue anticoagulant therapy, researchers reported at ESC Congress 2016.
August 30, 2016
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Revised blood pressure targets for Diabetes patients may increase number of stroke patients
The Swedish National Board of Health and Welfare recently raised the recommended target blood pressure for patients with diabetes. this may lead to more patients suffering from stroke or heart attack, according to a new study from the Sahlgrenska Academy. the new study is the world's largest on the subject and is based on data from the National Diabetes Register.
August 23, 2016
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Revivent TC for Minimally Invasive Reconstruction of Left Ventricle Cleared in EU
BioVentrix, a company out of San Ramon, California, landed CE Mark approval in the EU for its Revivent TC system that allows for reconstruction of the left ventricule without an open heart surgery. the minimally invasive system can be an option over traditional open-chest surgical ventricular restoration, particularly for fragile patients who would not be good candidates for a more invasive procedure.
June 27, 2016
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Rice bioengineers reveal how heart valves use different strategies to handle oxygen starvation
As the valves in a heart stretch with each beat, their cells take in life-giving oxygen. But if the supply is cut off, aortic and mitral valves use different strategies to compensate, according to Rice University scientists.
December 21, 2016
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Routinely measured lipids show contrasting associations with risk of coronary artery disease, diabetes
An analysis using genetics finds that increased low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), and possibly triglyceride (TG) levels are associated with a lower risk of diabetes, and increased LDL-C and TG levels are associated with an increased risk of coronary artery disease, according to a study.
August 03, 2016
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Rule could take one-third of chest pain patients off emergency department heart monitors
Researchers have validated a rule that could safely take a third of chest pain patients in the emergency department off of heart monitors, according to a study. Implementing this rule could free up these monitored beds for sicker patients and reduce wait times.
January 30, 2017
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Misc. - S

Safe Delivery of Therapeutic Genes by DNA Barcoding
Researchers used small snippets of DNA as barcodes to develop a new technique for rapidly screening the capability of nanoparticles to selectively deliver therapeutic genes to particular organs of the body. this new technique succeeded in accelerating the development and use of gene therapies for Parkinson™ disease, cancer and heart disease.
February 8, 2017
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SCAD: the Heart Attack That's Striking Young Women
Meghan Scheiber was in the middle of a 60-hour workweek when the call came: her 2-year-old son was sick at day care and needed to be taken home.
January 30, 2017
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Scientists 3D Print Heart on a Chip with Built-in Sensors
Harvard scientists have developed a way to quickly, and relatively easily, build organs on a chip with built-in sensors using 3D printers. Technically known as microphysiological systems, organs on a chip couple microfluidic technology with living cells to mimic the functionality of living organs.
October 28, 2016
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Scientists aim to offer better treatment for acute heart failure using ultrasound evaluation
A new clinical study of the German Centre for Cardiovascular Research (DZHK) is examining whether an ultrasound evaluation of the inferior vena cava in acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF) with congestion can be implemented in hospitals' everyday routine and also be conducted in a sufficiently large number of patients. In the long term, the scientists want to offer patients a more targeted and better treatment with the aid of this ultrasound evaluation.
April 28, 2017
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Scientists Create Computer Model of Electrical Activity of Heart
At University of California, Los Angeles researchers have developed a computer model of a heart that can be used to study congestive heart failure and potential therapies for the disease. the simulation replicates how electrical signals are affected by changes within the cells and tissues of the heart, offering the opportunity to virtually try new compounds before testing them on animals and humans.
June 27, 2016
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Scientists develop novel bionic cardiac patch to treat heart problems
Scientists and doctors in recent decades have made vast leaps in the treatment of cardiac problems - particularly with the development in recent years of so-called "cardiac patches," swaths of engineered heart tissue that can replace heart muscle damaged during a heart attack.
June 28, 2016
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Scientists develop revolutionary nanotechnology heart attack sensor
An international collaboration of scientists involving a team of researchers at Manchester led by Dr David J. Lewis has developed a tiny electric sensor, which could potentially improve patient survival rates by telling doctors if a person has had a heart attack.
September 7, 2016
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Scientists discover receptor protein that promotes chronic heart failure
Researchers in Japan have identified a receptor protein on the surface of heart cells that promotes chronic heart failure. The study, "Corticotropin releasing hormone receptor 2 exacerbates chronic cardiac dysfunction," which will be published May 26 in The Journal of Experimental Medicine, suggests that inhibiting this protein could help treat a disease that affects more than 20 million people worldwide.
May 26, 2017
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Scientists Have Opened the Door to Biological Pacemaker Therapy
Throughout life each heart beat is regulated primarily by a specialized tissue called the sinoatrial node. Unfortunately, this natural pacemaker's ability to maintain the heart rate properly can be disrupted by a number of issues including congenital defects, aging, or ischemic heart disease. Recent work produced by researchers in Dr. Gordon Keller's lab at the University of Toronto may lead to new therapies based on natural pacemaker cells grown in the lab.
December 21, 2016
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Scientists Keep Bits of Hearts Alive Under High Speed Cameras to Study Arrhythmias
Detecting the source of errant electric signals in the heart that cause cardiac arrhythmias, as well as understanding what causes them, has been a notoriously difficult challenge for both physicians and researchers. This is because the heart is difficult to study, but researchers at Ohio State University have come up with a new technique that keeps myocardial tissue beating and alive in vitro long enough to study using video cameras.
June 8, 2017
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Scientists link malfunctioning molecular pathways to specific heart abnormalities in SCA
Patients with sickle cell anemia (SCA) develop heart complications and nearly a quarter die a sudden death. Now, researchers have linked malfunctioning molecular pathways to specific heart anomalies in SCA that result from progressive fibrosis and result in sudden death.
August 09, 2016
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Scientists produce functional heart pacemaker cells
Scientists have developed the first functional pacemaker cells from human stem cells, paving the way for alternate, biological pacemaker therapy.
December 14, 2016
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Scientists reveal Connshing syndrome as new cause of hypertension
Research led by scientists at the University of Birmingham has revealed a new cause of high blood pressure which could lead to major changes in managing the disease.
April 21, 2017
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Screening the dark genome for disease
Researchers have developed a method to swiftly screen the non-coding DNA of the human genome for links to diseases that are driven by changes in gene regulation. the technique could revolutionize modern medicine's understanding of the genetically inherited risks of developing heart disease, diabetes, cancer, neurological disorders and others, and lead to new treatments.
April 3, 2017
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Screening Urged for Inherited Heart Condition
People with familial hypercholesterolemia have higher risk of heart attack before 40, researchers say
October 27, 2016
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Senescent cells drive plaque formation in animal models of atherosclerosis, research shows
Atherosclerosis is a disease in which arteries narrow due to plaques. that narrowing can lead to heart attacks and strokes -- both of which are leading causes of death in the U.S. Now, in a paper published in Science, Mayo Clinic researchers and colleagues show that senescent cells drive plaque formation in animal models of atherosclerosis.
October 27, 2016
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Serious heart problem can run in families and occur at similar ages, study suggests
People with a family member who had an aortic dissection–a spontaneous tear in one of the body's main arteries–should take note of the age that family member was when the aortic dissection occurred. According to a new study published online today in the Annals of Thoracic Surgery, aortic dissections have the potential to run in families and often occur within 10 years of the same age.
August 25, 2016
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Serious Heart Problem a Family Matter
If a relative has had an aortic dissection, you could too, study says
August 25, 2016
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Sex Suffers for Younger Adults After Heart Attack
Lack of interest a complaint of many women and men, study finds
August 31, 2016
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Shimadzu announces release of new Cannabis Analyzer for Potency at Pittcon 2017
Shimadzu Scientific Instruments (SSI) announces the release of its new Cannabis Analyzer for Potency. this high performance liquid chromatograph (HPLC) is the first-ever instrument designed specifically for quantitative determination of cannabinoid content. with the Cannabis Analyzer for Potency, operators are now able to produce accurate results with ease, regardless of cannabis testing knowledge or chromatography experience.
March 7, 2017
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Short, intense bursts of stair climbing can provide major benefits for heart health
There are no more excuses for being out of shape. Researchers at McMaster University have found that short, intense bursts of stair climbing, which can be done virtually anywhere, have major benefits for heart health.
February 7, 2017
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Single dose of siRNA molecule offers protection against heart attack and stroke in high-risk patients
Even a single dose of a specific ribonucleic acid molecule, known as a small interfering RNA (siRNA), offers patients at high risk of cardiovascular disease long-lasting protection against high LDL cholesterol - one of the main risk factors for heart attack and stroke.
March 30, 2017
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Sleep Apnea Mask Fails to Curb Heart Risks
CPAP helped patients feel better, but didn't cut odds for heart death, heart attack or stroke, study found
August 30, 2016
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Small molecule prevents blood clots without increasing bleeding risk
Breakthrough study finds novel mechanism behind blood clots that could help prevent heart attacks and strokes
May 31, 2017
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Sleeping too much or too little increases risk of dying from heart disease
Too much or too little sleep is linked with an increased risk of certain types of cardiovascular disease. Women and the elderly are particularly at risk.
March 8, 2016
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Small changes in diet can reduce CVD risk by 30%
Exchanging few commercially regular-consumed food items with improved fat quality reduces total and LDL cholesterol. a new double-blind randomized controlled trial published in British Journal of Nutrition suggests almost 30% reduction in cardiovascular disease risk
October 14, 2016
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Small dense HDL particles protectively linked to coronary heart disease risk
The idea that plasma high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) is protective against coronary heart disease has been part of medical conventional wisdom for five decades. HDL-C has traditionally been considered the most important component of so-called "good cholesterol" HDL.
August 03, 2016
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SMH Cardiology Services | Cardiac Surgery/Critical Care Services
Slidell Memorial is the most experienced in cardiology services on the Northshore, consistently being first to offer new, innovative services in cardiac care.
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Smoking for longer duration linked to increased CHD risk
Increased relative risks for coronary heart disease (CHD) have long been associated with smoking, and traditionally they have been dependent on the number of cigarettes smoked a day, smoking intensities, and total exposure over time. a study published today in Nicotine & Tobacco Research suggests relative CHD risk is higher for smokers consuming cigarettes over a longer period of time than for smokers consuming the same quantity over a shorter period.
December 9, 2016
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Social smoking carries same heart-disease risks as everyday habit
Social smokers' risk for high blood pressure and high cholesterol is identical to those who light up every day, new research has found.
May 3, 2017
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Some Bleeding Risk Seen with Xarelto versus Pradaxa
But study wasn't definitive, and heart experts say both newer drugs are better than warfarin
October 3, 2016
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Sound Waves: Rx for High Blood Pressure, Migraine?
Sound therapy balances brain signals, researcher says
September 16, 2016
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'Spray painting' shows promise as minimally invasive way to patch up the heart
Animal studies suggest that applying a cardiac patch made of a regenerative polymer scaffold onto the surface of the heart could be an effective way to preserve heart function after a heart attack. However, such a procedure would most likely require open-chest surgery, which is traumatic and presents a major barrier to it being used in human patients.
March 22, 2017
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Sports-related concussion causes short-term impairment of cardiovascular system, study finds
A new study finds that concussion causes short-term impairment of the cardiovascular system but that these cardiovascular symptoms typically resolve within three days of the injury. the article is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology"Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology.
February 9, 2017
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St. Jude Gets new Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy Approvals in Europe
Today, St. Jude Medical, soon to be part of Abbott, is releasing in Europe its SyncAV CRT software for cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) implants and announcing CE Mark approval for the Quadra Assura MP CRT-Defibrillator for use under MRI. the company promises that the new algorithm powering SyncAV CRT will help more patients respond better to CRT devices, while those that would already benefit from existing devices would also receive improvement in therapy.
June 23, 2016
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Statin medications can cause necrotizing myopathy in some patients
Statin medications, such as Crestor, Lipitor, and other lipid-lowering medications, have been prescribed increasingly in recent years to reduce cardiovascular disease and mortality in high risk individuals. Many doctors now recommend these medications even for patients who have never demonstrated a cardiac risk.
June 6, 2017
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Statins can help prevent first time heart attacks, strokes in adults with cardiovascular risk factors
Cholesterol-lowering drugs help prevent heart attacks and strokes in adults with cardiovascular risk factors such as high cholesterol, high blood pressure, Diabetes and smoking, but have not yet had a heart attack or stroke, according to a large-scale analysis of clinical trial data led by the OHSU Pacific Northwest Evidence-Based Practice Center.
November 14, 2016
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Statins may improve heart structure, function
Although the use of statins for treating people at risk of heart disease has been historically quite controversial, new research suggests that statins may promote heart health by improving the structure, and, as a result, the functioning of this vital organ.
May 26, 2017
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Statins Often Interact with other Heart Drugs
Doctors, patients should be aware of risky combinations, heart group says
October 17, 2016
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Statins: how safe are they?
Despite evidence that aims to quash controversy over the safety and effectiveness of statins, uncertainty remains. is the safety of statins as debatable as some stories suggest, or is the controversy behind this group of medicines potentially harming more people than the drug itself? we find out.
May 12, 2017
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Strict blood pressure control may help protect against early death in CKD patients
For individuals with chronic kidney disease, strict blood pressure control may help protect against premature death. That's the conclusion of a recent analysis of clinical trial data.
August 11, 2016
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Study casts doubt on need for statins in the 'healthy old'
But specialists cite research flaws, limitations
May 22, 2017
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Study could help doctors to better predict development of cardiovascular disease at earlier stage
Screening methods for cardiovascular diseases such as heart attacks and strokes could be improved by measuring different biological signposts to those currently being tested, a new study led by researchers from King's College London suggests.
February 21, 2017
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Study evaluates outcomes of hypothermia treatment among patients with in-hospital cardiac arrest
In a study appearing in the October 4 issue of JAMA, Paul S. Chan, M.D., of Saint Luke's Mid America Heart Institute, Kansas City, and colleagues evaluated the association of hypothermia treatment with survival to hospital discharge and with favorable neurological survival at hospital discharge among patients with in-hospital cardiac arrest.
October 4, 2016
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Study examines relationship between statin use and heart structure, function
Statins are associated with improved heart structure and function, according to research presented today at EuroCMR 2017. The benefits were above and beyond the cholesterol lowering effect of statins.
May 26, 2017
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Study finds alarming rates of obesity, high blood pressure readings among adolescent student-athletes
Researchers at Thomas Jefferson University found similar rates of obesity and high blood pressure readings in student-athletes as would be expected in the general adolescent population, which may suggest that participation in athletics does not protect against these conditions.
August 16, 2016
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Study finds ARNI therapy could potentially prevent 28,484 deaths from heart failure each year
A UCLA-led study estimates that almost 28,500 deaths could be prevented each year in the U.S. through use of a new FDA-approved class of cardiovascular medication that helps reduce mortality in patients diagnosed with heart failure and reduced ejection fraction, the percentage of blood pumped from the heart with each contraction.
June 22, 2016
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Study finds increased heart attack risk in patients taking direct acting oral anticoagulants
A new study has examined whether different blood thinning medications prescribed to prevent strokes in patients with atrial fibrillation might increase the risk of heart attacks.
March 22, 2017
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Study finds link between air pollution and daily cause-specific mortality in China
In the largest epidemiological study conducted in the developing world, researchers found that as exposures to fine particulate air pollution in 272 Chinese cities increase, so do deaths from cardiovascular and respiratory diseases.
February 10, 2017
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Study finds little to no link between butter consumption and chronic disease or all-cause mortality
Butter consumption was only weakly associated with total mortality, not associated with cardiovascular disease, and slightly inversely associated (protective) with diabetes, according to a new epidemiological study which analyzed the association of butter consumption with chronic disease and all-cause mortality.
June 30, 2016
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Study finds no improvement in survival rates for heart failure patients
Survival rates for people suffering from heart failure have not improved since 1998, according to a study led by University of Oxford researchers.
January 30, 2017
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Study finds no link between milk intake and cardiovascular risk
Researchers in Valencia participated in an international study that has debunked the association between milk and dairy products and increased cardiovascular risk. Lecturer ҳcar Coltell of the Universitat Jaume I de Castell򬟬ed the computational analysis of the masses of data obtained in relation to an innovative new biomarker.
September 29, 2016
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Study finds no major difference in effectiveness of two classes of drugs in peritoneal dialysis patients
With cardiovascular disease being the No. 1 cause of death in end-stage kidney disease patients on peritoneal dialysis, a new study examined two classes of medications commonly prescribed to prevent cardiovascular events in these patients and found no significant difference in outcomes.
August 09, 2016
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Study finds two genetic variants linked to bicuspid aortic valve development
Researchers are working to determine why the aortic valve doesn't form correctly in patients with the most common congenital heart defect: bicuspid aortic valve.
May 25, 2017
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Study reports influence of air pollution on pulmonary vascular function
Air pollution impairs the function of blood vessels in the lungs, according to a study in more than 16 000 patients presented today at EuroEcho-Imaging 2016.
December 9, 2016
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Study reveals link between hypertension and brain changes in rats
Untreated high blood pressure can lead to a number of serious conditions, from kidney failure to a stroke or a heart attack. how does high blood pressure develop in the first place? Researchers investigate the physiological changes that accompany the onset of hypertension.
March 10, 2017
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Study shows ancient grain varieties may help reduce risk factors for CVD
Randomized trial suggests eating bread made with ancient grains could help lower cholesterol and blood glucose
September 28, 2016
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Study shows Diabetes drug ineffective in improving condition of patients with advanced heart failure
In an attempt to correct defects in the energy generation that contribute to poor pump function among heart failure patients, researchers examined whether the Diabetes drug liraglutide, could improve the condition of patients with advanced heart failure.
August 02, 2016
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Study shows faith-based community program as effective method for heart health education
HeartSmarts, a faith-based community education and outreach program, is an effective method for teaching underserved communities about heart health in New York City, according to a study published in the Journal of Religion and Health. Based at the Ronald O. Perelman Heart Institute at NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center, the program marks its fifth year of collaborating with local churches to improve understanding of cardiovascular disease, the leading cause of death in the United States, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
September 14, 2016
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Study shows hospitals that send more number of heart patients to ICU perform worse in quality of care
Patients who suffer heart attacks, or flare-ups of congestive heart failure, can be cared for in a variety of hospital locations. But a new study suggests that they'll fare worse in hospitals that rely heavily on their intensive care units to care for patients like them.
August 03, 2016
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Study shows how early administration of old drug reduces damage during heart attack
Scientists at the Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Cardiovasculares Carlos III (CNIC) have discovered a new mechanism of action of metoprolol, a drug that can reduce the damage produced during a heart attack if administered early.
April 18, 2017
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Study shows how immune cells drive heart damage in mice
A new study in mice reveals that eosinophils, a type of disease-fighting white blood cell, appear to be at least partly responsible for the progression of heart muscle inflammation to heart failure in mice.
March 16, 2017
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Study shows way to reverse high blood pressure in baby rats born to hypertensive mothers
Mothers contribute a lot of defining traits to their offspring, from eye color to toe length. But pregnant mothers with health complications, such as Diabetes or hypertension, also can pass these symptoms to their children.
February 22, 2017
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Study suggests calorie-restricted diet can protect mice from abdominal aortic aneurysms
Mice placed on a low-calorie diet are less likely to develop abdominal aortic aneurysms, according to a new study in the Journal of Experimental Medicine. the paper, "Calorie restriction protects against experimental abdominal aortic aneurysms in mice," which will be published online September 26 ahead of issue, suggests new ways to prevent the often fatal condition from occurring in humans.
September 23, 2016
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Study suggests microRNAs may connect inflammation with heart disease risk in obese people
Inflammation likely plays a role in the increased risk of heart disease that comes with obesity, but scientists don't fully understand how obesity leads to heart disease. Results from a new study suggest that small molecules known as microRNAs may be part of the pathway connecting inflammation with increased heart disease risk in obese people.
August 26, 2016
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Study Suggests Newer Cholesterol Drugs Are Safe
Whether taking them results in fewer heart attacks and strokes isn't yet known, researcher says
January 30, 2017
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Study suggests 'synergistic' link between exercise and vitamin D for better heart health
Johns Hopkins researchers report that an analysis of survey responses and health records of more than 10,000 American adults for nearly 20 years suggests a "synergistic" link between exercise and good vitamin D levels in reducing the risk of heart attacks and strokes.
April 27, 2017
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Study to investigate clinical impact of new treatment for HFrEF patients
The academic partners in the VerICiguaT GlObal Study in Subjects with Heart Failure with Reduced EjectIon FrAction (VICTORIA) are pleased to announce that patient enrollment has begun. the study will explore a novel treatment pathway in patients suffering from chronic heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF), by investigating the clinical impact of the drug vericiguat. VICTORIA is a pivotal Phase III clinical study conducted in collaboration with Merck (known as MSD outside the U.S. and Canada) and Bayer.
October 12, 2016
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Study underscores importance of targeting prevention efforts at preclinical HF stages
According to a recent study of Framingham Study participants, nearly 60 percent of people have prevalent preclinical heart failure (HF) stages a and B. Heart failure occurs when the heart muscle is weakened and cannot pump enough blood to meet the body's needs for blood and oxygen. In addition, individuals with stage B HF had greater circulating concentrations of cardiac stress biomarkers levels, putting them at increased risk for death.
July 7, 2016
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Study urges caution when using BP-lowering treatment in patients with coronary artery disease
Caution has been urged in the use of blood pressure lowering treatment for heart disease patients after a study in more than 22 000 patients with coronary artery disease found that too low blood pressure was associated with worse outcomes.
August 30, 2016
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Study: Men's lower resting heart rate explains higher rate of criminal offending
In the field of criminology, it is well established that men engage in more crime than women. Now, a new study from the University of Pennsylvania published in the journal Criminology, addresses the incomplete understanding of why males are more criminal than females by examining gender differences in biological functioning and behavior. It is the first study to demonstrate that men's lower resting heart rate partly explains the higher rate of criminal offending.
May 31, 2017
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Surgical repair of mitral valve may provide greater benefit in patients with no symptoms
A new study recently published in the Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery questions whether patients with isolated moderate to severe mitral valve regurgitation should receive treatment in earlier stages instead of waiting until symptoms appear.
August 25, 2016
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Misc. - T

Targeting cardiovascular disease risk factors may be important across a lifetime
NIH-funded study suggests efforts to prevent risk factors should extend to those older than 65.
October 3, 2016
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The Apple Watch tops Stanford's heart rate accuracy study -- and here's why
In a recent study from Stanford, the Apple Watch bested six other wrist-worn devices in calculating accurate heart rate.
May 25, 2017
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This Disorder Significantly Boosts Heart Risks
Untreated, the condition also makes arteries age decades faster, study reports
June 30, 2016
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This temporary tattoo can listen to your heart
This new wearable is a stick-on stethoscope that's smaller than a penny
November 16, 2016
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Three-dimensional heart patches may soon move closer to clinical application
The promise of stem cells to treat cardiovascular disease may soon be a step closer to clinical application as scientists from three institutions seek to perfect and test three-dimensional "heart patches" in a large animal model – the last big hurdle before trials in human patients.
September 21, 2016
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Thyroid hormone level may identify people at risk for atherosclerosis
For the first time, researchers have linked high levels of thyroid hormone in middle-aged and older people to higher risk for atherosclerosis, a condition in which arteries become clogged up and which is a major cause of heart attacks and strokes. the new study does not say that raised thyroid hormone leads to atherosclerosis, but it does suggest that it could help to identify people at higher risk for the condition.
April 3, 2017
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Ticagrelor drug shows minor added benefit for patients with history of myocardial infarction
The German Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG) assessed the added benefit of ticagrelor for patients with acute coronary syndrome already in 2011 in its very first dossier assessment, just after the Act on the Reform of the Market for Medicinal Products (AMNOG) had come into force. It was shown then that the drug provided considerable added benefit to patients with mild myocardial infarction without the typical changes in the ECG or with unstable angina pectoris. There was no corresponding proof for severe myocardial infarction.
July 5, 2016
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Tighter BP Control Could Save 100,000 U.S. Lives
High-risk adults would benefit from intensive program to lower systolic reading
September 15, 2016
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Timing of Menopause May Affect Heart Failure Risk
Women whose periods end early and those who never give birth seem at added risk, research suggests.
May 15, 2017
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Timing of your Meals Might Reduce Heart Risks
American Heart Association report suggests eating more earlier in the day may be healthier
January 31, 2017
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Tiny electronic device can monitor heart, recognize speech
Acoustical vibrations of heart and vocal cords measured
November 16, 2016
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Tiny Wirelessly Powered Pacemaker Can Reside in Heart and Double as Defibrillator
While there are already pacemakers on the market that are so small that they fit inside the heart thus eliminating the need for electrode leads, these devices still depend on a battery that has a limited lifetime. Such implants require explantation and replacement eventually, procedures that can be difficult on patients, create additional cost, and pose challenge of choosing whether to have them implanted in the first place.
June 6, 2017
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TMJ disorders: Causes, symptoms, and relief
TMJ disorders affect the jaw joint and muscles that control the jaw. They can be challenging to diagnose and treat because of how complex this joint is.
May 31, 2017
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Tough Injectable Hydrogel to Help Hearts Recover After Heart Attack
At the national meeting of the American Chemical Society, researchers from University of Pennsylvania are showing off a new hydrogel that may be used to help ailing hearts recover post myocardial infarction. There are already a few hydrogels developed, some going through clinical trials, for helping restore cardiac function. UPenn's material was developed to result in a stronger product that can be injected right into the myocardium to provide improved structural integrity and a welcoming home for new cells.
August 24, 2016
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Traffic noise exposure linked to heart attack risk
Your risk of heart attack increases with the amount of traffic noise to which you are exposed. the increase in risk - though slight - is greatest with road and rail traffic noise, less with aircraft noise. Such are the conclusions reached by Andreas Seidler and co-authors in the Deutsches arzteblatt International after evaluating information from statutory health insurers on over a million Germans over the age of 40.
July 8, 2016
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Trans Fat Bans May Have Cut Heart Attacks, Strokes
Pending FDA regulations should remove nearly all of this unhealthy substance from your diet, experts say
April 12, 2017
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Transcranial direct current stimulation may activate the human cerebral cortex, study shows
The notion that low levels of electrical stimulation applied to the scalp, barely enough to create a mild tingling sensation, could activate the brain is a relatively new and somewhat controversial idea. the technique, called transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) has been reported to modify mood, emotion, and cognition, yet researchers lack any evidence for how - or even if - it directly modulates brain activity.
September 19, 2016
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Trial of high-dose flu vaccine aims to better protect heart failure patients
A network of researchers in the United States and Canada will try to spare thousands of patients the dangers of heart attacks and hospitalizations over the next five years in a trial of a high-dose flu vaccine.
September 12, 2016
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Troponin elevations can occur in the absence of classic myocardial infarction, study shows
Elevated cardiac troponin, a diagnostic marker of damage to the heart, may occur even if a patient has not had a heart attack, according to a study published in JACC: Basic to Translational Science.
May 9, 2017
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TUM study shows link between zinc supply in the body and cardiac function
In addition to essential metabolic functions, the level of zinc in the body also affects the heart muscle. When oxidative stress occurs, it may be due to a shortage of zinc, which can be determined by examining the heart muscle. a study by the Technical University of Munich (TUM) shows the relationship between the total amount of zinc in the body and cardiac function.
April 18, 2017
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Tumor necrosis factor may help control blood pressure, study suggests
Investigators at the Ted Rogers Centre for Heart Research have discovered a surprising new role for tumor necrosis factor (TNF): namely, that it is a major regulator of small blood vessel function, the key determinant of blood pressure.
April 6, 2017
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Type of natural sugar may prevent arteries from clogging
A new study in mice shows that trehalose, a type of natural sugar, may boost the 'housekeeping' abilities of a certain kind of immune cell, thus reducing the buildup of plaque inside the arteries.
June 8, 2017
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Misc. - U

UAlberta study reveals sex-based differences in outcomes for atrial fibrillation
Yet more evidence can be added to the growing literature that shows women with cardiovascular disease may receive different health care and experience worse outcomes than men.
April 26, 2017
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UCLA-led consortium receives $8.6 million NIH grant to map the heart's nervous system
A consortium directed by UCLA's Dr. Kalyanam Shivkumar has received a three-year, $8.6 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to map the heart's nervous system. the group's goal: to conduct research that leads to new ways to treat cardiovascular disease by targeting nerves in the heart's nervous system.
December 23, 2016
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UHZ cardiologists use innovative catheter technology to repair tricuspid valve
A team led by Francesco Maisano, co-director of the University Heart Center at the University Hospital Zurich (UHZ) and professor for Heart Surgery at the University of Zurich, made up of heart surgeons and cardiologists used new catheter technology to repair a leaky tricuspid valve for the very first time.
September 23, 2016
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UM SOM scientists identify mutated gene that may be key player in heart disease
Heart disease kills more than 600,000 Americans every year, which translates to more than one in every four deaths. Although lifestyle choices contribute to the disease, genetics play a major role. This genetic facet has remained largely mysterious. But new research by scientists at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UM SOM) has identified what may be a key player: a mutated gene that leads to irregular heartbeat, which can lead to a dangerously inefficient heart.
June 7, 2017
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Under Armour brings heart-rate monitoring and a bulky design to its Bluetooth earbuds
First and foremost, a pair of earbuds ought to be comfortable. I mean, if you don't want to wear the things around, what's the point, really? But try as I might, I just couldn't get a good fit with the UA Headphones Wireless Heart Rate -- Engineered by JBL. as with the verbose naming scheme, the issue seems to come down to a company trying to cram too much into too small a space.
October 19, 2016
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Unexpected protein structure findings could lead to new therapies
Scientists have determined unexpected characteristics of a key protein linked to blood pressure control and to nerve growth, pain control and heart tissue regeneration. the findings, published April 5 online in the journal Nature, opens doors to potential new therapies to control cardiovascular disease and pain.
April 5, 2017
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Unseen health risks of aortic stenosis: an interview with Dr Shelley Rahman Haley
Can you give me a brief overview of aortic stenosis? how does it affect the body?
June 22, 2016
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Updated AAN guidelines state closure not recommended for individuals with stroke and heart defect
An updated recommendation from the American Academy of Neurology (AAN) states that catheter-based closure should not be routinely recommended for people who have had a stroke and also have a heart defect called a patent foramen ovale (PFO), a channel between the top two chambers in the heart.
July 28, 2016
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UTHealth researchers examine effectiveness of Sapien 3 TAVR in low-risk patients with aortic stenosis
The Structural Heart Program team at McGovern Medical School at the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston is among the first in the country to investigate the safety and effectiveness of Edwards Lifesciences Sapien 3 transcatheter aortic heart valve in low surgical risk patients who suffer from severe aortic valve disease.
July 8, 2016
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UTHealth scientists discover powerful predictors of congestive heart failure
A team of scientists at the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) and Baylor College of Medicine, led by Eric Boerwinkle, Ph.D., Richard Gibbs, Ph.D., and Bing Yu, Ph.D., have identified powerful predictors of congestive heart failure, a major cause of hospitalization and death in the United States. the discovery, published today in Science Advances, was made through an analysis of how gene mutations affect circulating metabolites in the human body.
August 31, 2016
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Misc. - V

Vitamin B diminishes effects of air pollution-induced cardiovascular disease
B vitamins can mitigate the impact of fine particle pollution on cardiovascular disease. Healthy non-smokers who took vitamin B supplements nearly reversed any negative effects on their cardiovascular and immune systems. this is the first clinical trial to evaluate whether B vitamin supplements change the biologic/physiologic responses to ambient air pollution exposure.
April 12, 2017
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Vitamin D improves gut flora and metabolic syndrome
Extra vitamin D can restore good bacteria in the gut, according to a study in mice, giving hope in the fight against risk factors for Diabetes and heart disease
December 21, 2016
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Voice Used as Diagnostic Biomarker for Coronary Artery Disease
Beyond Verbal, a company that provides voice analysis software, has announced that its algorithms were used successfully to help detect the presence of coronary artery disease (CAD) in a group of patients.
November 15, 2016
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VTT researchers develop new mobile device that helps prevent cerebral infarctions
VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland has developed a mobile app and thumb-size device that help to prevent cerebral infarctions at an early stage, during asymptomatic atrial fibrillation. the mobile device, which detects arrhythmia (irregular heartbeat) has been tested with excellent results for around two years in real-life conditions in cooperation with Turku University Central Hospital.
September 19, 2016
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Misc. - W

Weight-Loss Surgery Brings Bigger Heart Benefits to Women: Study
Researchers suggest their bodies may respond differently than men after procedure
November 4, 2016
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'Weekend warriors' have lower risk of death from cancer, cardiovascular disease
One or two exercise sessions per week may be enough to reduce health risks in men and women
January 9, 2017
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Where you live could determine risk of heart attack, stroke or dying of heart disease
People living in parts of Ontario with better access to preventive health care had lower rates of cardiac events compared to residents of regions with less access, found a new study.
April 3, 2017
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Why do firefighters have an increased risk of heart attacks?
New research adds another danger to the already long list of hazards associated with one of the riskiest jobs on earth: extreme heat has been linked to an increased risk of heart attacks in firefighters.
April 4, 2017
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Withings adds heart-rate monitoring to its analog fitness watch
There's really only so much you can do with your analog fitness watch before it turns into something else. Withings already has one of the nicer offerings in the space in the form of the Steel – a solid time-keeping device with step and sleep tracking baked in.
September 1, 2016
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Misc. - X

Xeltis Fully Bioabsorbable Pulmonary Valve Implanted for First Time
Xeltis, a Swiss-Dutch firm, announced that its bioabsorbable pulmonary heart valve has been implanted for the first time into three pediatric patients. the trial is investigating the survival rate of patients following right ventricular outflow tract reconstructions using the new device.
October 7, 2016
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