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173 Agricultural Resources

Misc. - Numbers

7 Things we Learned from new 'Frontline' About State of the Seafood Industry
While a growing number of Americans are paying close attention to traditional livestock -- demanding more organic meat, cage-free eggs, and grass-fed beef -- not as much attention has been paid to the massive global market for seafood, and the ethical, financial, and environmental impact it has.
April 25, 2017
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Misc. - A

A better way to farm algae
Scientists have long known of the potential of microalgae to aid in the production of biofuels and other valuable chemicals. However, the difficulty and significant cost of growing microalgae have in some ways stalled further development of this promising technology. Bendy Estime, a biomedical and chemical engineering Ph.D. candidate, has devoted his research to this area, and developed a new technology for energy efficient cultivation and harvesting of microalgae.
January 30, 2017
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A better way to predict the environmental impacts of agricultural production
Consumer goods companies often rely on life-cycle assessments (LCA) to figure out the potential consequences of how they design products and source ingredients. this kind of assessment, while sophisticated, often lacks detail about how the products affect natural resources such as land, water and biodiversity.
April 21, 2017
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A nano form of iron for fortification of foods
Around 1.2 billion people worldwide suffer from iron deficiency, with women worse affected than men. In Europe, one in five women around the age of 20 suffers from iron deficiency. Typical symptoms include diminished work performance, fatigue, anaemia and headaches.
April 25, 2017
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A possible alternative to antibiotics
A combination of metals and organic acids is an effective way to eradicate cholera, salmonella, pseudomonas, and other pathogenic bacteria, researchers report. The combination also works on bacteria that attack agricultural crops.
May 23, 2017
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ABC News Settles 'Pink Slime' Defamation Case With Beef Company
Well, that was quick: Just a few weeks after Beef Products Inc. and ABC News squared off in the opening arguments of the trial over the broadcaster's use of the phrase "pink slime" to describe an ingredient in some ground beef, the two sides have agreed to put the whole thing to rest.
June 28, 2017
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Agribuild
offers personal coaching and strategic planning advice to farmers and agricultural contractors.
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Algorithm could streamline harvesting of hand-picked crops
A professor of industrial and enterprise systems engineering and mathematics has developed an algorithm that promises to give valuable information to farmers of crops picked by hand.
March 13, 2018
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Agricool raises $9.1 million to grow fruits and vegetables in containers
French startup Agricool is using containers to grow strawberries around big cities. The company just raised a $9.1 million (€8 million) funding round from Jacques-Antoine Granjon, Thibault Elziere as well as existing investors Henri Seydoux and Daphni.
July 11, 2017
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Agricultural fungicide attracts honey bees
When given the choice, honey bee foragers prefer to collect sugar syrup laced with the fungicide chlorothalonil over sugar syrup alone, researchers report.
January 8, 2018
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Agricultural parasite takes control of host plant's genes
Dodder, a parasitic plant that causes major damage to crops in the US and worldwide every year, can silence the expression of genes in the host plants from which it obtains water and nutrients. This cross-species gene regulation, which includes genes that contribute to the host plant's defense against parasites, has never before been seen from a parasitic plant.
January 3, 2018
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Ant agricultural revolution began 30 million years ago in dry, desert-like climate
World's first sustainable, industrial-scale agriculture began when crops became dependent on their ant farmers
April 12, 2017
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"Atypical" mad cow disease detected in Alabama
USDA stresses that it does not pose a threat to humans or our food.
July 19, 2017
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Misc. - B

Backyard chickens need more regulation
Safety of birds and people at stake
March 2, 2018
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Barley genome sequenced
Research could lead to better beer, single malt Scotch whiskey
April 26, 2017
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'Bee' informed: Public interest exceeds understanding in bee conservation
Survey reveals need for public education, outreach about bees
September 5, 2017
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Better way to predict the environmental impacts of agricultural production
Many companies want to know how the creation of their products affects the environment. Scientists have now found a way to better predict and quantify environmental impacts.
April 21, 2017
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Biochar could clear the air in more ways than one
Health, economic benefits of capturing agricultural nitric oxide outlined in study
July 27, 2017
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Brakke Consulting
offers services to the animal health, agricultural, veterinary, pet, and specialty chemical product industries including executive search, market studies, and professional management services.
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Breeding highly productive corn has reduced its ability to adapt
Researchers wanted to know whether the last 100 years of selecting for corn that is acclimated to particular locations has changed its ability to adapt to new or stressful environments. By measuring populations of corn plants planted across North America, they could test how the corn genomes responded to different growing conditions.
November 9, 2017
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Bringing 'Avatar'-like glowing plants to the real world
The 2009 film "Avatar" created a lush imaginary world, illuminated by magical, glowing plants. Now researchers are starting to bring this spellbinding vision to life to help reduce our dependence on artificial lighting.
December 13, 2017
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Butter Is So Popular Right Now, It's Causing A Croissant Shortage In France
If you're traveling to France in the near future and have dreams of picking apart the delicate, flaky layers of authentic croissant, be warned that these beloved pastries may be in short supply when you get there. Why? Apparently because people are eating more butter.
October 25, 2017
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Misc. - C

Camelina: Where you grow what you grow
Camelina's varied response to location
May 24, 2017
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Ceres Imaging scores $2.5M to bring machine learning-powered insights to farmers
Agtech has largely seemed underserved by emerging startups, though farmers have largely proven more receptive to adopting new tech than most might assume.
November 1, 2017
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Chicken May Get More Expensive Because Birds Are Too Old And Fat To Breed
Years of very precise breeding means that modern poultry grow to massive sizes very quickly -- sometimes in a matter of weeks. While this results in more meat in less time, it's also causing a problem: Some birds are so top-heavy that they may not be all that interested in breeding, and there's now an older breeding population of roosters and hens that are less likely to produce viable eggs.
June 19, 2017
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Circadian clock proteins set the pace of plant growth
Scientists at the Centre for Research in Agricultural Genomics (CRAG) in Spain have identified the members of a protein family linked with the internal clocks of plants that act sequentially to restrict plant growth until just before daylight, according to a new study published in the journal Current Biology.
January 15, 2018
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Climate Change Will Hit the Poorest the Hardest in the U.S.
Union County is tucked in northern Florida, half an hour north of Gainesville and an hour west of Jacksonville. It's Florida's smallest county, a mostly unremarkable landlocked stretch of pine forest interspersed with lakes.
June 29, 2017
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Climate change will make your coffee cost more and taste worse
Over half of Ethiopia's crop is in peril, and the same goes for other coffee-producing countries.
June 21, 2017
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Climate insurance is rarely well thought out in agriculture
Researchers reveal unwanted developments and make recommendations for improvement
September 25, 2017
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Commercial agriculture is preventing wildfires--and that's not good news
We need more scorched earth.
June 29, 2017
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Commercial pesticides: Not as safe as they seem
This is the first comprehensive review of gaps in risk assessments for adjuvants in pesticide formulations which are not currently subject to safety assessments. Ignoring the potential dangers of other ingredients in commonly used commercial pesticides leads to inaccuracies in the safety profile of the pesticide solution, as well as confusion in scientific literature on pesticide effects.
March 8, 2018
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Common crop chemical leaves bees susceptible to deadly viruses
A chemical that is thought to be safe and is, therefore, widely used on crops -- such as almonds, wine grapes and tree fruits -- to boost the performance of pesticides, makes honey bee larvae significantly more susceptible to a deadly virus, according to researchers.
January 16, 2017
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Corn better used as food than biofuel, study finds
Corn is grown not only for food, it is also an important renewable energy source. Renewable biofuels can come with hidden economic and environmental issues, and the question of whether corn is better utilized as food or as a biofuel has persisted since ethanol came into use. For the first time, researchers have quantified and compared these issues in terms of economics of the entire production system to determine if the benefits of biofuel corn outweigh the costs.
June 19, 2017
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Cracking the code of megapests
For the first time, researchers have mapped the complete genome of two closely related megapests potentially saving the international agricultural community billions of dollars a year.
August 3, 2017
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Crops that kill pests by shutting off their genes
Plants are among many eukaryotes that can 'turn off' one or more of their genes by using a process called RNA interference to block protein translation. Researchers are now weaponizing this by engineering crops to produce specific RNA fragments that, upon ingestion by insects, initiate RNA interference to shut down a target gene essential for life or reproduction, killing or sterilizing the insects.
July 27, 2017
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Culture: a Farming Tale
A building needs a foundation. A foundation comes from a plan, which comes from a vision or dream. When music is written, it comes from inspiration or a muse. Wisdom comes from Truth which is built on facts and data.
November 7, 2017
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Misc. - D

Dairy Industry Says 48% Of Americans Don't Know Where Chocolate Milk Comes From
Even though the term "chocolate milk" may seem pretty self-explanatory, a large number of people apparently think there is some secret alchemy involved in brewing this mysterious elixir.
June 15, 2017
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Denzil Phillips International Ltd.
introduce, conserve, propagate, cultivate, harvest, process, evaluate, and market useful plants from around the world.
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Desert Basins Could Hold 'Missing' Carbon Sinks
Deserts across the globe may contain some of the world's "missing" carbon sinks -- land masses scientists had not previously identified that absorb carbon from the atmosphere, according to researchers at China's Lanzhou University.
June 19, 2017
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Designing microbial communities to help plants battle nutritional stress
Plants and microbes engage in a diverse array of symbiotic relationships, but identifying the specific microbes or groups of microbes that contribute to plant health is extremely difficult. Researchers have devised a general experimental scheme to identify and predict which small groups of bacterial species can help plants respond to phosphate starvation, a form of nutritional stress.
February 20, 2018
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Drone software gives offline farmers real-time images
Drones can send images to iOS devices in the field using edge computing.
April 18, 2017
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Misc. - E

Eco-label in exchange for less chemicals on rice fields
What are the incentives for Taiwan's farmers to produce in a more environmentally friendly manner?
June 2, 2017
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Effective Slow-Release Fertilizers Using Graphene
Researchers at the University of Adelaide are developing fertilizers with lower environmental impacts and minimized costs for farmers using, for the first time ever, the new, advanced material graphene as a fertilizer carrier. In collaboration with industry, the team has shown effective slow-release fertilizers can be made by loading vital trace elements onto graphene oxide sheets.
March 12, 2018
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Exclusive: Alphabet X is exploring new ways to use AI in food production
Astro Teller says it's thinking about how to pair machine learning with other technologies to revolutionize agriculture.
March 27, 2018
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Exploring an ancient event in pumpkin, gourd and melon evolution
Recently, scientists have making great strides in better understanding with the genomes sequenced of cucumber, watermelon, and melons. With these projects completed, a research team has performed the first large comparative genomics exploration of their genome structures and evolution. After reconstructing evolutionary trees and extensive comparisons of common genes between Cucurbitaceae plants, unexpectedly, the research team has found the first evidence of an ancient whole genome duplication event.
September 28, 2017
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Exposure to neonic pesticides results in early death for honeybee workers and queens
Worker and queen honeybees exposed to field realistic levels of neonicotinoids die sooner, reducing the health of the entire colony, biologists have found. The researchers were also surprised to find that the neonicotinoid contaminated pollen collected by the honeybees came not from crops grown from neonicotinoid treated seeds, but plants growing in areas adjacent to those crops. This is season-long, field realistic research with typical exposure.
June 29, 2017
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Misc. - F

Farm sunshine, not cancer: Replacing tobacco fields with solar arrays
Researchers contend that tobacco farmers could increase profits by converting their land to solar farms, which in turn provides renewable energy generation.
February 5, 2018
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Farming crops with rocks to reduce CO2 and improve global food security
Farming crops with crushed rocks could help to improve global food security and reduce the amount of CO2 entering the atmosphere, a new study has found.
February 19, 2018
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Farming needs technology to feed the globe
Farmers need to embrace advanced technologies such as the IoT in the next few years in order to support the growing human population, new research has claimed.
June 12, 2017
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Fighting plant disease at warm temperatures keeps food on the table
An issue of global concern is the anticipated shortage of agricultural output to meet the steady rise in human population. Scientists understand that overcoming crop loss due to disease and adverse weather will be key in achieving this goal.
November 27, 2017
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Five Seasons Ventures is a new €60M European early-stage fund investing in food and agriculture tech
More VC money sloshing around Europe, this time with the launch of a new early-stage fund targeting food and agriculture technology. Backed by the likes of European Investment Fund, Nestle, Fondo Italiano d'Investimento, and Bpifrance, Five Seasons Ventures is announcing the first closing of its fund with commitments "in excess of €60 million" to invest in food/agtech in the region.
March 15, 2018
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Five-G Consulting
custom design of livestock handling facilities.
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Food webs entangle humans in complex relationships with animals, crops and the environment
Reconstructed food webs from the Ancestral Puebloan southwestern United States show the complexity and interconnectedness of humans, other animals, crops and the environment, in an area of uncertain climate and resources, according to researchers, who think climate change and human decisions then, may shed light on future human choices.
April 10, 2017
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Future rice yield losses due to climate change could be extreme
Climate warming poses a major threat to rice's role in our global food security.
January 9, 2017
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Misc. - G

Genetic map reveals heat tolerance traits in peas
As the global climate changes and temperatures continue to rise, heat stress is becoming a major limiting factor for pea cultivation. A new study indicates that pea plants with some specific traits -- such as longer flowering time and higher pod numbers -- may be more resistant to heat stress. The researchers also gained new insights into the genetics of heat tolerance in pea.
August 23, 2017
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Genetically boosting the nutritional value of corn could benefit millions
Scientists discover way to reduce animal feed and food production costs by increasing a key nutrient in corn
October 9, 2017
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Genetically modified insects could disrupt international food trade
Genetically modified organisms for pest control could end up as contaminants in agricultural products throughout the globe
February 1, 2017
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Genome of wheat ancestor sequenced
Technological breakthrough will help decode massive bread wheat genome, accelerate wheat breeding
November 15, 2017
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Getting a better handle on methane emissions from livestock
Cattle, swine and poultry contribute a hefty portion to the average American's diet, but raising all this livestock comes at a cost to the environment: The industry produces a lot of methane, a potent greenhouse gas. Just how much gas the animals release, however, is the subject of debate. Now, one group reports that a new approach could shed light on how accurate current data are.
November 29, 2017
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Global methane emissions from agriculture larger than reported, according to new estimates
Global methane emissions from agriculture are larger than estimated due to the previous use of out-of-date data on carbon emissions generated by livestock, according to a new study.
September 29, 2017
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Graphene 'tattoo' sensor enables measurements of water use in crops
Iowa State University plant scientist Patrick Schnable quickly described how he measured the time it takes for two kinds of corn plants to move water from their roots, to their lower leaves and then to their upper leaves.
January 4, 2018
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Greater efforts are needed to promote biopesticides
There are a number of environmental and economic reasons to promote the development and use of biological compounds as pesticides. a new analysis finds that there are fewer biopesticides registered in the European Union (EU) compared with the United States, India, Brazil, and China.
May 4, 2017
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Grocery store program improves farmers' adoption of environmental practices
In one of the first analyses of a company-led sustainability program in the food and agriculture space, researchers found a major grocery chain fostered increased adoption of environmental practices at the farm level.
January 9, 2018
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Misc. - H

Harvests in US to suffer from climate change
Some of the most important crops risk substantial damage from rising temperatures. to better assess how climate change caused by human greenhouse gas emissions will likely impact wheat, maize and soybean, an international team of scientists now ran an unprecedentedly comprehensive set of computer simulations of US crop yields. Importantly, the scientists find that increased irrigation can help to reduce the negative effects of global warming on crops -- but this is possible only in regions where sufficient water is available.
January 19, 2017
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How (and Why) Big Data Is Growing Agriculture
We take a look at how the agricultural sector is being impacted by big data and why this matters on a global scale. Let's dive in!
March 26, 2018
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How blood-sucking insects find dark-coated cattle in the dark
Dark-coated horses suffer more from blood-sucking horseflies compared to their white counterparts, research shows. Now, investigators know why animals with a dark, smooth coat are particularly vulnerable - even in a dark environment.
November 30, 2017
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How plant cells regulate growth shown for the first time
Researchers have managed to show how the cells in a plant, a multicellular organism, determine their size and regulate their growth over time. the findings overturn previous theories in the field and are potentially significant for the future of agriculture and forestry -- as it reveals more about one of the factors which determine the size of plants and fruits.
January 23, 2017
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How plants form their seeds
Vegetable, fruit, or grain -- the majority of our food results from plant reproduction. Researchers have now discovered the key to how plants regulate pollen growth and seed formation. In addition to seed formation, knowledge about these signaling pathways can be used to influence plant growth or their defense against pests.
December 20, 2017
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How to actually remove pesticides from your fruit
Assuming that you should be worried about them in the first place.
October 25, 2017
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How to wash pesticides off apples, according to science
Baking soda is better than bleach for washing them apples
October 26, 2017
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Misc. - I

I've got a brand new combine harvester and I'll give you the API key
Yes, you can stick IoT sensors on tractors - and John Deere's been doing it for 20 years
January 25, 2017
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Improved prediction of pesticide residues
Researchers develop model to assess toxic residues in soil
February 13, 2018
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In search of the wild fava bean
Seeds from a site in Northern Israel are the ancestors of today's fava beans, report researchers. Understanding the ecology of the wild plants' environment and the evolution they underwent in the course of domestication is crucial to improving the biodiversity of the modern crop.
April 10, 2017
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Indoor vertical farming in Asia and beyond: Digging deep in data
When it comes to farming, Ken Tran digs deep -- not in dirt, but in data. He doesn't drive a tractor and he doesn't pull a plow. But he is helping to sow the seeds of a new type of agriculture -- one that is nurtured by machine learning and artificial intelligence. And, it promises to revolutionize how communities across Asia and the world feed themselves.
February 27, 2018
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Industrial farming disrupts burn-regrowth cycle in grasslands
The world's open grasslands and the beneficial fires that sustain them have shrunk rapidly over the past two decades, due to a massive increase in agriculture, according to a new study.
June 29, 2017
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Insecticide-resistant flies unskilled at courting females
Insecticide resistance sounds like a superpower for the average male fruit fly -- but there's a catch. Scientists have found that the single genetic change which protects the flies from the pesticide DDT also makes males smaller, less aggressive and 'rubbish' at courting females.
May 8, 2017
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Integrating two types of crop models to predict the effect of climate change on crop yields
Scientists now have a new tool to predict the future effects of climate change on crop yields. Researchers are attempting to bridge two types of computational crop models to become more reliable predictors of crop production in the U.S. Corn Belt.
January 3, 2018
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Intensive agriculture influences US regional summer climate, study finds
An increase in corn and soybean production in the Midwest may have led to cooler, wetter summers there
February 13, 2018
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Interconnected benefits of urban agriculture
Researchers have assessed the value of urban agriculture and quantified its benefits at global scale.
January 10, 2018
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Into the wild for plant genetics
Scientists sequence a whole genome on a Welsh mountainside to identify a plant species within hours
August 21, 2017
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IRB Barcelona scientists reveal role of Dpp gene in wing growth of fruit flies
Researchers working in the Development and Growth Control Lab at IRB Barcelona reveal that the Dpp gene (BMP in humans) plays a double role in the structural organization and growth of the wings of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. This study, which has been published in the journal eLife, demonstrates that Dpp is necessary for tissue growth but that "its gradient does not direct wing growth," explains Marco Milán, ICREA research professor and head of the study.
July 4, 2017
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iUNU aims to build cameras on rails for growers to keep track of their crop health
You've probably spent a lot of time keeping track of your plants and all the minor details, like the coloration of the leaves, in order to make sure they're healthy -- but for professional growers in greenhouses, this means keeping track of thousands of plants all at once.
November 14, 2017
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Misc. - K

Key to better asparagus identified in evolution of sex chromosomes
Working with an international team of breeders and genome scientists, plant biologists have sequenced the genome of garden asparagus as a model for sex chromosome evolution.
November 2, 2017
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Misc. - L

Larger swaths of tropical forest being lost to commercial agriculture
Satellite images show half of all forest loss from 2000-12 was industrial expansion
May 9, 2017
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Lightweight robots harvest cucumbers
Automation-intensive sectors such as the automotive industry are not the only ones to rely on robots. In more and more agricultural settings, automation systems are superseding strenuous manual labor. Scientists are now developing and testing a dual-arm robot for the automated harvesting of cucumbers.
February 2, 2018
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'Lost city' used 500 years of soil erosion to benefit crop farming
Researchers working on a 700-year-old abandoned agricultural site in Tanzania have shown that soil erosion benefited farming practices for some 500 years.
August 21, 2017
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Lost genes that boost tomatoes' flavor identified
Domestication has not retained the genes that give tomatoes their deliciousness.
January 26, 2017
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Misc. - M

Man Charged With Stealing Nearly $1 Million Worth Of Bees
Maybe you weren't aware, but bees are big business: With bee colonies mysteriously vanishing, hive owners can make a good income renting out their insects to farmers who need extra help with pollination. Those beekeepers will be happy to hear that authorities in California have busted a man suspected of stealing almost $1 million worth of bees and equipment.
May 17, 2017
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Mapping functional diversity of forests with remote sensing
Productivity and stability of forest ecosystems strongly depend on the functional diversity of plant communities. Researchers have developed a new method to measure and map functional diversity of forests at different scales -- from individual trees to whole communities -- using remote sensing by aircraft. Their work paves the way for future airborne and satellite missions to monitor global plant functional diversity.
November 13, 2017
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Mason, Bruce & Girard, Inc. Consulting Foresters.
specializing in timberland management, forest inventories, timber harvest planning, appraisals, forest economics and policy analysis, and special studies.
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Micro delivery service for fertilizers
Plants can absorb nutrients through their leaves as well as their roots. However, foliar fertilization over an extended period is difficult. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, German researchers have now introduced an efficient delivery system for micronutrients based on biohybrid microgels. Special peptides anchor the "microcontainers' onto the leaf surface while binding sites inside ensure gradual release of the "cargo'.
May 22, 2017
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Middle East Breeders and Technologies Ltd
offers livestock breeding consultancy services to government organisations, private sector, and individual breeders.
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Millions may face protein deficiency as a result of human-caused carbon dioxide emissions
If CO2 levels keep rising as projected, the populations of 47 countries may lose more than 5 percent of their dietary protein by 2050 due to a decline in the nutritional value of rice, wheat, and other staple crops, according to Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health researchers. They estimate an additional 250 million people may be at risk of protein deficiency because of elevated CO2 levels. This is the first study to quantify this risk.
August 2, 2017
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mRelief launches end-to-end food stamp enrollment service
Signing up for food stamps can be cumbersome, especially for those with limited access to transportation and internet. In San Francisco, about one in four people struggle with hunger, according to the SF-Marin Food Bank.
January 8, 2018
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More to the bunch: Study finds large chromosomal swaps key to banana domestication
A banana reference genome was completed in 2012. Now, researchers wanted to more finely explore the banana genome with an ultimate goal of helping breeding programs produce hardier, more disease resistant bananas. The significance of their findings are important for agriculture, highlighting a substantial contribution of a new chromosome structure in half the world's banana crops.
May 31, 2017
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Misc. - N

Nanoparticle drug-delivery method holds promise for controlling crop parasites
Researchers at Case Western Reserve University are applying drug-delivery technology to agriculture to control parasitic roundworms more effectively and safely.
May 31, 2017
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Nanoparticle fertilizer could contribute to new 'green revolution'
The 'Green Revolution' of the '60s and '70s has been credited with helping to feed billions around the world, with fertilizers being one of the key drivers spurring the agricultural boom. But in developing countries, the cost of fertilizer remains relatively high and can limit food production. now researchers report a simple way to make a benign, more efficient fertilizer that could contribute to a second food revolution.
January 25, 2017
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Nanoparticle fertilizer could contribute to new 'green revolution'
The "Green Revolution" of the '60s and '70s has been credited with helping to feed billions around the world, with fertilizers being one of the key drivers spurring the agricultural boom. But in developing countries, the cost of fertilizer remains relatively high and can limit food production.
January 25, 2017
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Nanosensors applied to plant leaves warn of water shortage
Forgot to water that plant on your desk again? It may soon be able to send out an SOS.
November 8, 2017
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Nanotechnology tool enables food authentication with the naked eye
Is the food on the shelf really that what is written on the label? Its DNA would give it away, but the DNA barcoding technology, which can be used for this purpose, is labor-intensive. Now, in the journal Angewandte Chemie, Italian scientists have introduced a simplified assay coined NanoTracer.
June 14, 2017
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Natural enemies reduce pesticide use
Crop variety in agriculture has a positive impact on the natural enemies of aphids. Farmers can use this insight to keep aphids at bay and cut down on pesticides.
March 20, 2018
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Nature plants a seed of engineering inspiration
Humidity-responsive burrowing of seeds inspires scientists to model the mechanism and find more efficient ways to penetrate soil for agricultural applications
April 25, 2017
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New approach to improve nitrogen use, enhance yield, and promote flowering in rice
Expression of the nitrate transporter gene OsNRT1.1A improves yield and accelerates maturation
February 23, 2018
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New lettuce genome assembly offers clues to success of huge plant family
A treasure-trove of genetic information has been unlocked about lettuce and related plants, completing the first reported comprehensive genome assembly for lettuce and the massive Compositae plant family.
April 12, 2017
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New light shed on how plants get their nitrogen fix
Researchers centered at Japan's University of Tsukuba untangle the genetics that allow legumes to respond to soil nitrogen
February 16, 2018
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New method makes bioethanol from waste -- in existing plants
It is possible to produce bioethanol from agricultural and industrial waste in existing plants in a socioeconomically sustainable way, according to new research from Sweden.
October 30, 2017
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New study shows early signs of resistance among bed bugs to two commonly used insecticides
Pest management professionals battling the ongoing resurgence of bed bugs are wise to employ a well-rounded set of measures that reduces reliance on chemical control, as new research shows the early signs of resistance developing among bed bugs to two commonly used insecticides.
April 10, 2017
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New system could remove two water pollutants from agricultural fields
Algae blooms in the Gulf of Mexico use up the majority of the oxygen in the water, leading to massive "dead zones" that cannot support fish or other wildlife. The culprit? Nitrate, running off agricultural fields through tile drainage systems. But nitrate is only part of the problem. Algae in freshwater lakes and ponds flourishes when exposed to a different pollutant, phosphorus, and the tiniest amount is enough to trigger a bloom.
July 31, 2017
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New tipping point prediction model offers insights to diminishing bee colonies
A new method to predict tipping points -- the moment at which sudden change occurs in complex networked systems -- may offer insights that prevent colony collapse disorder (CCD), a phenomenon in which the majority of worker bees in a colony disappear, threatening the agricultural economy at a global level.
January 10, 2018
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Northern European population history revealed by ancient human genomes
Analysis of ancient DNA found that Scandinavia was settled by hunter-gatherers via a southern and a northern route, and reveals that agriculture was likely introduced by migrating agriculturalists.
January 30, 2018
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Novel transdisciplinary study uncovers microbes that may one day deter major grape disease
Researchers have conducted a novel transdisciplinary study to characterize the microbial communities within the vascular system of grapevines and their connections with Pierce's disease, an economically significant disease of the California grape industry. Through the study, the researchers found potentially beneficial microbes that could one day be used as a deterrent to Xylella fastidiosa, the pathogen that causes Pierce's disease.
October 23, 2017
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Misc. - O

On-the-range detection technology could corral bovine TB
A research breakthrough allowing the first direct, empirical, blood-based, cow-side test for diagnosing bovine tuberculosis (TB) could spare ranchers and the agriculture industry from costly quarantines and the mass slaughter of animals infected with this easily spread disease.
April 12, 2017
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Optimizing feeding is necessary to maintain milk production in organic herds
Decisions on pasture use and feed management affect greenhouse gas emission, according to a new study
June 15, 2017
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Organic food provides significant environmental benefits to plant-rich diets
The study of more than 34,000 people is the first to investigate the environmental impacts of both food choices and farm production systems
February 9, 2018
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Misc. - P

Parasitic nematodes that cause greatest agricultural damage abandoned sex
The plant pests owe their success to large, hybridized genomes that help them adapt
June 9, 2017
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Parrot develops drones for firefighting and farming
Parrots latest drones are different to its previous fly for fun orientated products, as it has decided it now wants to start helping professionals like firefighters, building inspectors, and farmers.
October 25, 2017
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Pesticides may cause bumblebees to lose their buzz, study finds
Pesticides significantly reduce the number of pollen grains a bumblebee is able to collect, a new study has found.
November 14, 2017
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Planting GMOs kills so many bugs that it helps non-GMO crops
Bt corn protects neighboring peppers and green beans, cuts pesticide use.
March 15, 2018
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Plants sacrifice 'daughters' to survive chilly weather
Plants adopt different strategies to survive the changing temperatures of their natural environments. This is most evident in temperate regions where forest trees shed their leaves to conserve energy during the cold season. In a new study, a team of plant biologists found that some plants may selectively kill part of their roots to survive under cold weather conditions.
June 23, 2017
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Pre-Columbian people spread fruit species across Latin America
Humans played an important role in spreading fruit species around Latin America.
March 13, 2018
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Probiotics could improve survival rates in honey bees exposed to pesticide, study finds
Probiotics can potentially protect honey bees from the toxic effects of pesticides, new research indicates.
June 19, 2017
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Promising peas' potential in big sky country
Researchers identify peas good for consumers, bottom line
June 14, 2017
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Protein produced with electricity and carbon dioxide
A batch of single-cell protein has been produced by using electricity and carbon dioxide in a joint study by the Lappeenranta University of Technology (LUT) and VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland. Protein produced in this way can be further developed for use as food and animal feed. The method releases food production from restrictions related to the environment. The protein can be produced anywhere renewable energy, such as solar energy, is available.
July 19, 2017
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Purdue Uses IoT to Reinvent Farming, Boost Output
Digital agriculture harnesses the Internet of Things and wireless to revolutionize farming and increase food production for exploding population.
December 6, 2017
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Misc. - R

Refining pesticides to kill pests, not bees
Scientists have unlocked a key to maintain the insecticide's effectiveness in eliminating pests without killing beneficial bugs, such as bees. The study shows that molecular tweaks can make the difference.
November 21, 2017
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Report: Monsanto Skipped Important Testing On Weed Killer That's Now Killing Cropsc
There's a problem in farm country this year: Acres of crops are unexpectedly withering away, but it's not due to drought or natural blight. Instead, the crisis seems to be related to a new herbicide from Monsanto. Users of the recently released plant-killer didn't realize it would spread beyond their fields, because -- according to a new report -- Monsanto skipped over tests that would have highlighted this problem.
August 9, 2017
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Research could improve management of conflict between wildlife and farmers across the globe
A new study highlights improvements in the way conflicts between wildlife conservation and farming are managed worldwide.
March 12, 2018
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Research for an oil (palm) change
New research equips oil palm growers to better manage land and crop
June 8, 2017
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Rethinking how the US grows beef
We could free up an area the size of France.
December 26, 2017
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Robotic weeders: to a farm near you?
The future of weeding is here, and it comes in the form of a robot.
January 10, 2018
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Misc. - S

Scientists are speed breeding plants in a race to beat climate change
Nutritious, resilient crops in just eight week's time.
January 9, 2018
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Scientists developed 'smart fertilizer'
According to the head of the works Tatiana Volova, Professor of SibFU and the Head of Laboratory in the Institute of Biophysics KSC of SB RAS, development of a new generation of drugs with the use of bio-decomposable materials which decompose under the influence of the microflora to innocuous products and provide a gradual release of the active principle into the soil, is the newest area of research in the field of agriculture.
September 5, 2017
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Scientists discover more effective, and potentially safer, crystallized form of DDT
A new crystal form of DDT that is more effective against insects than the existing one has been discovered by a team of scientists. Its research points to the possibility of developing a new version of solid DDT -- a pesticide that has historically been linked to human-health afflictions and environmental degradation -- that can be administered in smaller amounts while reducing environmental impact.
June 13, 2017
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Scientists engineer light-emitting plant
MIT researchers investigating plant nanobionics have succeeded in engineering a plant that can emit light. By embedding nanoparticles into the leaves of a watercress plant, they managed to get the plant to emit a low level of light for almost four hours. With further development, the scientists believe they can create plants that will provide enough light to illuminate a workspace.
December 14, 2017
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Scientists identify factors which drive the evolution of herbicide resistance
Scientists have identified factors which are driving the evolution of herbicide resistance in crops -- something which could also have an impact on medicine as well as agriculture.
February 13, 2018
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Scientists identify optimal areas for conservation and agriculture in the tropics
Converting forests to agriculture not economically viable in most regions except the Atlantic Forest, areas around the Gulf of Guinea, and Thailand
July 27, 2017
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Scientists Reinstalling "Tasty" Genes In Supermarket Tomatoes
Researchers recently confirmed what food storage experts had long believed: Refrigerating tomatoes causes them to lose flavor. now scientists are hoping that some genetic tinkering will turn blah supermarket tomatoes into flavorful rivals to their farm-fresh cousins.
January 27, 2017
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Scientists work to develop heat-resistant 'cow of the future'
More than half the cattle in the world live in hot and humid environments, including about 40 percent of beef cows in the United States. By using genomic tools, researchers aim to produce an animal with superior ability to adapt to hot living conditions and produce top-quality beef.
June 23, 2017
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Solving Darwin's 'abominable mystery': How flowering plants conquered the world
Researchers have found that flowering plants have small cells relative to other major plant groups, made possible by a greatly reduced genome size, and this may explain how they became dominant so rapidly in ecosystems across the world.
January 11, 2018
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Stink bugs: Free guide for agricultural integrated pest management
Insights for midwestern corn, soybean growers on managing various stink bug species
May 4, 2017
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Study paints a confused picture of how insecticides are affecting bees
Despite one weak study, there's more evidence that it's not good for bees.
June 30, 2017
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Study tracks 'memory' of soil moisture
First year of data from SMAP satellite provides new insights for weather, agriculture, and climate
January 16, 2017
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Sweet route to greater yields
Three years ago, biotechnologists demonstrated in field trials that they could increase the productivity of maize by introducing a rice gene into the plant that regulated the accumulation of sucrose in kernels and led to more kernels per maize plant.
February 8, 2018
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Misc. - T

The absence of ants: Entomologist confirms first Saharan farming 10,000 years ago
By analysing a prehistoric site in the Libyan desert, a team of researchers has been able to establish that people in Saharan Africa were cultivating and storing wild cereals 10,000 years ago. In addition to revelations about early agricultural practices, there could be a lesson for the future, if global warming leads to a necessity for alternative crops.
March 16, 2018
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The advent of 'green' cattle
Implications of livestock farming on climate change should not be drawn from aggregate statistics, reveals a study based on a new method of carbon footprinting for pasture-based cattle production systems that can assess the impacts of individual animals.
October 30, 2017
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The complex interplay of nanosilver and wheat roots
Scientists have hypothesized that silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) may act as "Trojan horses' entering living organisms and then releasing Ag+ over time, causing toxicity. this has been recently proposed as the mechanism by which Ag2S-NPs could be toxic to wheat and cowpea.
May 8, 2017
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The evolutionary story of the birch tree, told through 80 genomes
A study of the iconic tree uncovers genetic secrets of value to wood, paper industries
May 8, 2017
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The Fantastic Geometry Of Greece's Fish Farms 2000 Feet Up
MOst People Visit Greece to see its ancient ruins, idyllic beaches, and sweeping cliffs. Not Bernhard Lang. He goes for the fish farms.
July 27, 2017
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The Facilities Where Scientists Breed Plants To Survive The Future
Imagine a world without grapes. Someday greenhouses like the one above may be our last defense against such a fate. Beneath the glow of high-voltage lamps, dozens of crop samples grow at the Agricultural Experiment Station in Geneva, New York. Here, Cornell University scientists crossbreed domesticated crops with their wild ancestors to propagate superhardy strains that better withstand droughts, heat waves, and freezes.
November 28, 2017
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The Internet of Cows herds hackers to support the global cattle industry
Cows are generally not top of mind among those who call the animal pen, South of Market, San Francisco, home. But BovControl, a Brazilian startup building data analytics tools to support livestock operations, is working to close the gap between technologists and ranchers. Host of the Internet of Cows hackathon, in partnership with Google Launchpad and the Silicon Valley Forum, the startup put groups to work brainstorming solutions for monitoring herds, exporting goods and securing loans.
April 25, 2017
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The secret lives of ancient land plants
Cracking of the liverwort genome sheds light on land plant evolution
November 2, 2017
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There's a better way to wash pesticides off your apples
A common kitchen ingredient can be a big helper when it comes to ridding your apples of pesticides, scientists discover.
October 26, 2017
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These drones plant trees by firing seed pods at the ground
Startups are tapping into the business potential of ecosystem restoration.
January 22, 2018
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Think of honeybees as 'livestock,' not wildlife, argue experts
Contrary to public perception, die-offs in honeybee colonies are an agricultural not a conservation issue, argue researchers, who say that manged honeybees may contribute to the genuine biodiversity crisis of Europe's declining wild pollinators.
January 24, 2018
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These pink greenhouses generate electricity and improve plant growth
Each year, greenhouses use a monstrous 18,000,000 kWh of electricity just to grow our food. To put that in perspective, that's equivalent to the amount of carbon emitted from driving around the world 391 times. Thankfully, researchers have developed new electricity-generating greenhouses that could solve this growing problem -- and better yet, they're pink.
November 8, 2017
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This Robot Tractor Is Ready To Disrupt Construction
Zipping around like a bumblebee, the little black-and-yellow tractor claws its bucket into one of San Francisco's few vacant lots, kicking up a puff of dust. Payload secured, it backs up--beep, beep, beep--whips around, and speeds to its dirt pile, stopping so quickly that it tips forward on two wheels. It drops its quarry and backs up--beep, beep, beep--then speeds back to its excavation for another bucketful.
October 19, 2017
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Turning pollen into a low-cost fertilizer
As the world population continues to balloon, agricultural experts puzzle over how farms will produce enough food to keep up with demand. One tactic involves boosting crop yields. Toward that end, scientists have developed a method to make a low-cost, biocompatible fertilizer with carbon dots derived from rapeseed pollen. The study found that applying the carbon dots to hydroponically cultivated lettuce promoted its growth by 50 percent.
August 16, 2017
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Misc. - U

Urban farming incubator Square Roots raises $5.4M
Square Roots isn't your normal startup incubator. Sure, the people who participate are entrepreneurs -- but instead of sitting at desks building new gadgets or smartphone apps, they're growing food in hydroponic farms housed inside long, metal containers.
August 23, 2017
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Using drones to estimate crop damage by wild boar
Growing populations of wild boar (Sus scrofa L.) are causing more and more damage to agricultural land in Europe, requiring hundreds of thousands of Euros in compensation. A new drone-based method allows estimating crop damage in a fast, standardized and objective manner.
December 12, 2017
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Misc. - W

Weeds out of control
Spraying weeds with chemicals has always been costly. Now it is costly and ineffective, with resistance to herbicides pervasive and demanding a new strategy to protect crops.
February 12, 2018
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What are the symptoms of organophosphate poisoning?

Worries grow that climate change will quietly steal nutrients from major food crops
Increasing carbon dioxide tinkers with plant chemistry in ways not well understood
December 13, 2017
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December 19, 2017
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What silver fir aDNA can tell us about Neolithic forests
A new technique makes it possible to cost-effectively analyse genetic material from fossil plant and animal remains. Researchers have used this technique to examine the DNA of silver fir needles found in lake sediment in Ticino. they found clues as to how forests reacted to the emergence of agriculture.
May 8, 2017
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What's in your wheat? Scientists piece together genome of most common bread wheat
Scientists have successfully used two separate gene technologies to assemble the most complete genome sequence to date of Triticum aestivum, the most common cultivated species of wheat used to make bread.
November 20, 2017
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Wheat gets boost from purified nanotubes
The introduction of purified carbon nanotubes appears to have a beneficial effect on the early growth of wheatgrass, according to Rice University scientists. But in the presence of contaminants, those same nanotubes could do great harm.
December 6, 2017
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When every drop counts: Schneider Electric transforms agriculture with the Internet of Things for sustainable farming
On the grassy Canterbury Plains of New Zealand, Craig Blackburn raises cattle and sheep in a line of work with a long tradition, in which he keeps a close eye on crops, land, weather and water.
July 10, 2017
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Why did hunter-gatherers first begin farming?
The beginnings of agriculture changed human history and has fascinated scientists for centuries. Researchers have now shed light on how hunter-gatherers first began farming and how crops were domesticated to depend on humans.
May 16, 2017
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Will we be able to use zinc oxide nanoparticles as fertilizers?
Researchers from Universidad Politecnica de Madrid (UPM) and National Institute for Agricultural Research and Experimentation (INIA) have studied the effects of using zinc oxide nanoparticles on agriculture.
October 11, 2017
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Will we be able to use zinc oxide nanoparticles as fertilizers?
Researchers from Universidad Politecnica de Madrid (UPM) and National Institute for Agricultural Research and Experimentation (INIA) have studied the effects of using zinc oxide nanoparticles on agriculture.
October 11, 2017
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Win-win strategies for climate and food security
Efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from the agriculture and forestry sectors could lead to increased food prices -- but new research identifies strategies that could help mitigate climate change while avoiding steep hikes in food prices.
October 2, 2017
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Wireless energy harvester for implants
Researchers in Korea demonstrate the self-powered wireless data transmission enabled by harvesting in vivo biomechanical energy with a high-performance piezoelectric energy harvester in a large animal model.
July 4, 2017
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Misc. - Y

You Want Better Beer? Good. Here's a Better Barley Genome
The genome of barley--the grain that's the soul of beer and whiskey--is weird. the commodity crop has just seven pairs of chromosomes (compared to your 23, assuming you are a human being) but twice the size of your genome overall, with the vast majority of the sequences repeating themselves.
April 26, 2017
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Misc. - Z

Zwicker Consulting
source of information on Illinois agriculture featuring sections on commodities, crop conditions and weather reports.
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